• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 County map of state of Florida
 Celery growing, lettuce growing,...
 Condition and prospective yield...
 Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00030
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Celery growing, lettuce growing, and planting dates
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Celery growing in Florida
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
        Commercial lettuce growing in Florida
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Seasons and dates for planting vegetables and other crops in Florida
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
    Condition and prospective yield of crops
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 23
            Page 24
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
    Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 55
        Commercial state values of feed stuffs
            Page 56
        Average composition of commercial feed stuffs
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Special fertilizer analyses
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Official fertilizer analyses
            Page 62
            Page 63
        Official feeding stuff analyses
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Special food analyses
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Official food analyses
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
Full Text






NUMBER 4


FLORIDA

QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


OCT. 1 1913


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part 1-Celery and Lettuce Growing; Planting Dates.
Part 2-Crop Conditions and Prospective Yields.
Part 3-Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs and Foods and Drugs.

Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARI ISSUED ~REE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM


T. J. APPLEYARD, State Printer,
Tallahassee, Florida
-E0


I~ i- '


i


U"L. ~~i*5i.ir_


'i .u h
"`









COUNTY MAP OF STATE OF FLORIDA




















PART I.

CELERY GROWING, LETTUCE GROWING,
AND PLANTING DATES.

















CELERY GROWING IN FLORIDA.


Celery has for many years beei recognized as one of
the greatest luxuries of the garden, and while there are
no special difficulties in the way of cultivation, it is
grown by comparatively very few. The plant is a native
of England, where it grows in a wild state in favorable
localities. It is also a native of and occurs in several lo-
calities in Florida in its wild state, though in this con-
dition it is not fit to eat except by wild water fowl, as it
contains a poisonous principle making it dangerous as
human food.
Although it has been grown for market in various sec-
tions of the country in a comparatively small way for
many years, it is really little more than ten years since
it became one of the niost important commercial vegetable
crops. The first experiments in its cultivation were not
without failures by any means, for they were many, but
gradually success was generally the rule, and with well
defined methods, the growing of celery became a commer-
cial success.
Celery requires in both its early and late stages of
growth a cool, moist atmosphere, and consequently does
not do well under extremes of heat or drought. In Flor-
ida the seeds are sown in the open generally, protection
being rarely necessary. The soil must be a rich loam, or
other soil and means added to obtain the same character
as nearly as possible, but it should be loose and rich, soil
that has been previously cultivated and manured heavily
being considered the very best. The seed bed may be
any length desired, but from three to five feet is the best
width, most growers use three feet widths.
Such beds are prepared generally in August and Sep-
tember. The most successful celery growers in Florida











prepare their seed beds some two to three weeks before
time for planting the seed, the bed having previously been
Well manured, thus time enough is allowed to elapse for
the manure to become thoroughly assimilated. The seed
being very small must not be too deeply covered. Germi-
nation of the seed may be hastened by packing the soil
over the seed immediately after sowing by means of a
smooth board six or eight inches wide and three or more
feet long, as may be necessary. Mark off the rows for
planting the seed across the beds in the following man-
ner. "Take a five-inch plank, three feet long; nail a lath
on each edge, projecting one-fourth of an inch on one
side. With this make marks across the beds by pressing
it down on the beds. Scatter or sprinkle in the seeds
thinly and cover by sprinkling or sifting light soil or sand
over the rows. A good idea is to cover the beds with old
gunny sacks, Spanish moss or by laying a corn stalk
along each side of the drill, but not directly over it and
keep fairly wet till the seeds sprout, which, under favor-
able conditions, will be in from eight to twelve days. As
soon as the seed are well sprouted and show that they
are coming up it is best to cover them as a protection
against both hot sun and heavy rains, removing the cover
in the evening till next morning. Each day as the plants
grow stronger, a little more sunlight can be given them
till in a few days they will, under ordinary circumstances,
be able to remain uncovered all day. Keep the beds moist,
not letting them become dry at any time. When the
plants are well above ground, say about an inch high, it
is a good plan to put a little fertilizer between the rows
and either stir into the surface gently or let it be dis-
tributed by a gentle sprinkling of water, either or both
is good. Good working of the surface to keep down the
weeds should be given once every few days. When plants
are two or three inches high they are about ready to
transplant to other beds, though some growers prefer to
wait till the plants are larger, and some do not trans-











plant but once and that direct from the originalbeds to
the fields. None but the best stocky plants should: be
used, as, spindling plants rarely develop into :profitable
growth. Celery has been and can be grown on almost
all of the soils of Florida, the best soil, however, being the:
low hammock lands when well drained, but any soil loose
in texture and containing a good supply of humus will,
under proper management produce fine crops. As before
stated, a soil of a cool nature should be selected if obtain-
able, as the plant develops better, and is less liable to
attacks of injurious diseases. Following in concise form
are the methods used in South Florida in connection
with the system of irrigation practiced in Orange County.

"The plot to be planted should be well supplied with
water either from artesian wells, steam pumps or natural
sources. Many of the most successful growers are tile
draining their lands, the tiles being placed from a foot
and a half to two feet under ground. The joints are
covered with cinders, sawdust or even moss, to keep the
sand out and let the water pass in or out as necessary.
These drains are placed about twenty-five feet apart, and
are so arranged, that they can be used to drain the land
during heavy rains or to irrigate it when it is dry. After
the draining and irrigating system is completed, no pains
should be spared, or labor omitted to reduce -the soil to
perfect tilth so that the innumerable fine feeding roots of
the plant can penetrate the soil in every direction."

In sections where overhead or sprinkling and surface
systems of irrigation are practiced the same principles
will apply, and can be adapted to suit conditions, but one
thing must be remembered, the plants whether in bed or
field must not be permitted to suffer from lack of water
any more'than they must be over-watered. All manures
applied to the soil should be in the most perfect condition
--soluble and available-whether it be in the form of comic
mercial or barnyard manure; the latter should be, tho:











oughly decomposed, evenly distributed broadcast and
harrowed in well. At this stage, the general custom is
to also apply about a ton of first-class commercial fertil-
izer to the land and harrow till thoroughly incorporated
into the soil.

A well-known authority on this subject says: "When
plants are ready for transplanting take great care to
have these in each row of uniform size. To accomplish
this, put the large and small plants in alternate rows, as
the larger ones will often be ready for market from ten
days to two weeks prior to the smaller ones. There is no
use setting celery plants in dry soil. If there has been
lack of rain as is often the case in October and November
in Florida, then turn on the irrigating plant till the land
is thoroughly moist, and then water the plants, freely. In
setting the plants remember the rows must be absolutely
straight. Use a line as a guide and run a cleated roller
over the ground to mark the place for each plant. Set-
ting in double rows is seldom practiced, and the rule now
is to set plants four inches apart in single rows twenty-
eight to thirty inches in width, giving about 60,000 plants
to the acre. Droppers immediately preceding the plant
setter, place the plants at the marks along the line. The
plants are quickly placed in the holes made by a round
dibble or garden trowel the depth of the center or heart
leaf and the soil placed firmly alongside of the plant over
the roots by pushing the dibble to the depth of the root
and bearing towards the plant, afterwards closing up the
depression made by the dibble to prevent drying out of
the soil near the roots; thus firm the soil. When the soil
is wet, celery plants will usually live even though care-
lessly set."

Either of the following formulas for commercial fertil-
izer are good for celery, and the one which seems best
adapted to the soil and conditions can be used, or any
other approximately similar:











1 300 lbs Nitrate of Soda.....
800 lbs Fish Scrap ......... 6.9% Ammonia
600 lbsAcid Phos., 13%..... yields 5.5% Avail. Phos. Acid
300 lbs Muriate Potash...... 7.2% Potash
2000 lbs

2 250lbsNitrate of Soda.....
600 lbs Dried Blood ........ 7.2% Ammonia
850 lbs Acid Phos. 13% ..... yields 5.5% Avail. Phos. Acid
300 lbs Muriate Potash .... 7.8% Potash



During the growth of the crop from one to two tons
per acre of the above may be applied between the rows,
and from two to four hundred pounds of nitrate of soda
per acre as a top-dressing in four equal applications at
about four different times.
To make the cultivation of celery a success it must be
worked often; in fact, it is not too much to say that the
oftener it is worked the better, just so it is not disturbed
or handled while the plant is wet with dew or rain, or
while the soil is wet, or it will cause rust to the plant and
pack the soil. The best implements for use near the
plants when small are the hand cultivators with wheel
hoes and small blades, while the middles can be worked
out well with horse hoes on similar, or larger imple-
ments.
When the weather is cool during the winter months, be
very careful not to apply too much water, as it may make
your soil soggy and check the growth of the plants.
Blanching is done almost entirely with twelve-inch
boards placed close alongside the rows of plants. It is
found to be much better, takes much less time to blanche,
and avoids the danger of the loose soil falling into the
crown of the plants, as was the case when blanching was
done by drawing the earth up against the plant. It re-
quires only from twelve to fifteen days to blanche the
plants to the creamy yellow color so desired in celery
where boards are used. The above.suggestions are appli-









10

cable to celery growing in all sections of the State by
simply observing and adapting them to the prevailing cli-
matic conditions and seasons.
Four ounces of seed is, sufficient to plant an acre.
Crates of standard size can readily be obtained from
any one of the numerous crate manufacturers throughout
the State.











COMMERCIAL LETTUCE GROWING
IN FLORIDA.


This plant has been cultivated for more than twenty
centuries, and apparently continues to increase in popu-
larity every year with all classes of people. Few plants
are more easily grown, and yet with the enormous demand
for it it is still a luxury on most tables, merely because so
comparatively few gardeners take the trouble to grow it at
the. season of the year when it is appreciated. The
best varieties are to a great degree intolerant of hot sun-
shine, but thrive well with but very little protection from
either hot sun or cold snaps, from October to the first of
June.
The quality of the lettuce crop is more or less influenced
by the kind of soil upon which it is grown, and while
some soils are inferior for the work, their character may
be changed to such a degree, by careful management, as
to give satisfactory results.
The soils may be divided into three classes-light soils,
heavy'soils (those containing a good deal of clay), and
medium soils, as the various grades of loamy soils-clay
loam, fine sandy loam and sandy loam. All things con-
sidered, the ideal soils for the development of this crop
are those of the best sandy loam, resting on a clay subsoil
twelve to fifteen inches below the surface and well drain-
ed. A soil retentative of moisture and plant-food must
have a more or less impervious clay subsoil, for, no mat-
ter how suitable the surface soil may be, unless there is
clay beneath it the plant-food on becoming soluble will
quickly leach out and be lost if it is not taken up by the
crop. Deep sandy soils, though quicker in their action
than heavier soils, if constantly irrigated and fed, are
nevertheless expensive in both fertilizer and irrigation.
In selecting a soil for lettuce growing, in fact, for any











truck crop, it is best to look carefully into the character
and position of the subsoil.

Lettuce thrive best on a very rich, loamy, moist soil,
well drained so there will be no .water-sogging after rains,
and in common with all quick-growing crops, requires a
large amount of humus in the soil. Barnyard manure is
one of the best and surest means of adding humus to the
soil, but because of its scarcity it is not always available,
so the next best and cheapest source of organic matter
is by the use of cover crops of the legume order. Lettuce
growers should see to it that whenever their lettuce soils
are not under crop they should be storing humus and
nitrogen from a crop of some legume; cowpeas or velvet
beans are best. To make lettuce growing a success,
humus must be supplied, and it may as well be set down
as an incontrovertible fact, that where there is no humus
in the soil there will be no lettuce. A rich soil is
absolutely necessary. If you haven't got it, and are not
willing to bear the expense of making it, don't plant
lettuce.

Prepare the land by plowing deeply; scatter broadcast
stable manure or well-rotted compost, and harrow in well
till the soil is in finest tilth and the manure thoroughly
incorporated with the soil seven days, or even two weeks,
before the time for setting ou the plants; it is also a good.
plan to apply before harrowing from one thousand to one
thousand five hundred pounds per acre of a high-grade
commercial fertilizer, as an adjunct to the stable manure,
etc., and that it may be well assimilated by the soil before
time for setting.

Plants are ready for setting at from four to six weeks
after sowing the seed, at which time they should be from
three to five inches high. Set only vigorous plants, or
they will likely be stunted and run to seed instead of
heading. The varieties most preferred and apparently











most in demand by consumers are the Big Boston and the
California Cream Butter.
Preparation of the seed-bed does not materially differ
from that of the celery, and the same methods are applica-
ble to a great degree.
Select for this purpose a piece of new, rich land, prefer-
ably hammock, for new land is not subject to the root
knot plague which sometimes troubles roots. Clear the
soil of all trash, plow or spade it deep and rake very fine
and mellow, scattering on.hardwood ashes or air-slaked
lime two weeks beforehand to neutralize the sourness.
Sow in drills as you would turnip seed, very shallow,
and rake in. Firm the soil. Beat down the earth with
the back of the hoe or lay down boards and walk along
them. If planted before October, it is well to shade the
beds lightly for seven or eight hours during the middle of
the day. Sprinkle night and morning with a fine spray,
so as not to pack the land.
Watch sharply for ants; they may carry off every seed
in forty-eight hours. Apply tobacco dust liberally; if
they still persist, give them a tobacco solution, strong;
also, as a further preventative, sow grits over the bed.
The ants will take this in preference to the seeds, and
while they are carrying it away the lettuce will have
sprouted and be out of danger.
When the plants are to be transplanted, weed out rigid-
ly and throw away the diseased and feeble plants. A
small strawberry plant, by diligent care, can be fed up to
be'nearly as good as a large one; but not so with a let-
tuce plant. With a lettuce, it is a head or it is nothing;
unless it heads it is valueless.
We repeat, it is not worth while to attempt to grow
lettuce commercially for profit unless you have made up
your mind to fertilize liberally, unstintedly. Lettuce
is largely a luxury of the rich, used for garnishing meats
in splendid dinner services, and small leaves, though they
may be just as crisp and high-flavored, are not wanted,











because they lack in spectacular qualities. A single
large, rich, creamy-white leaf or head is worth a dozen
smaller ones.
Fully four-fifths of the failures in lettuce culture in
Florida are chargeable to the stinting habit in the appli-
cation of fertilizer. In some localities hundreds of dol-
lars worth of fertilizer per acre is applied, with larger
profits as a result. One to two tons of ashes per acre,
specially on medium to heavy soils, while preparing the
land will be worth many times their cost. It will make
the. soil loose, friable and sweet.
The truckers of Central Florida begin to plant seed the
latter part of August and continue to plant until the first
of January.. Those who plant prior to the middle of Sep-
tember seldom succeed in securing a satisfactory stand of
plants. Lettuce is a cool weather plant; it germinates
poorly in hot weather. The few, however, who do succeed
by shading and watering in securing a good stand of
these extra early plants, and who bring them on to a
handsome and solid maturity, generally reap a rich re-
ward, as this early lettuce commands a fine price. It is
a good plan to make repeated sowings, from August 25th
to January 1st.
It is an advantage to select a field on the south side
of a forest, as a screen against wind. A covering of cot-
ton cloth often pays heavy dividends on the investment.
Lettuce, when in heading, is greatly injured by a: tem-
perature of 25 degrees; but when not heading it will often
withstand 20 degrees without serious injury. The cloth
is carried on short stakes, care being exercised to bring
the edges well down to prevent the wind from getting
under. If the field is not protected by a cloth cover, cut
all the heads that will do to ship, when you see that
there will be a killing frost; and ship them to market
next day.
Following are two good formulas for fertilizing let-
tuce. Use the one which seems to suit your soil and











general conditions best; or if preferred, use some other
approximating them:

1. Ammonia, 5 to 6 per cent.
Available phosphoric acid, 7 to 9 per cent.
Potash, 8 to 10 per cent.

2. Ammonia, 6 to 7 per cent.
Available phosphoric acid, 6 to 7 per cent.
Potash, 6 to 7 per cent.

Apply from 1,500 to 2,000 pounds per acre, and while
the crop is growing top-dress with about 150 to 200
pounds of nitrate of soda per acre. It requires about
three pounds of seed to sow an acre, or one ounce to
every 250 feet of drill.
Baskets for shipping can be obtained from the vege-
table crate manufacturers in any section of the State.











SEASONS AND DATES FOR PLANTING
VEGETABLES AND OTHER CROPS
IN FLORIDA.


The following lists include what experience demon-
strates can be successfully grown each month as the
season*most suitable for each variety comes around in the
several sections of the State.

NORTH AND WEST FLORIDA.

January-Asparagus, seed, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage
Seed and Plants, Cauliflower seed, Collards, Leeks, Let-
tuce, Mustard, Onion sets, Radishes, Rape, Spanish Onion
seed, Tomato seed, Turnips.
February-Asparagus seed, Early corn, Brussels
Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Collards, Eggplant seed,
English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce,
Onions, Parsley, Parsnip, Pepper seed, Rutabages, Sal-
sify, Spinach, Beets.
March-Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cantaloupes,
Carrots, Collards, Cowpeas, Cucumbers, Early Corn,
Eggplant, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Kohlrabi,
Leek, Okra, Parsley, Parsnip, Pepper, Pumpkin, Radish,
Rape, Rutabagas, Salsify, Squash, Sugar Corn, Water-
melons, Tomato, Turnip.
April-Beans, Cantaloupes, Cow Peas, Cucumber, Egg-
plant, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kohlrabi, Lettuce,
Okra, Parsley, Parsnip, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radishes,
Rutabagas, Squash, Sugar Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Toma-
toes, Turnips, Watermelons.
May-Beans, Butter Beans, Cantaloupes, Cowpeas,
Cucumbers, Eggplant, Okra, Peppers, Pumpkins, Squash,
Sugar Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tomato Plants and seed,
Watermelons.











June-Butter Beans, Cowpeas, Eggplant, Peppers,
Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Tomatoes, Watermelons.
July-Cowpeas, Eggplant, Parsley, Peppers, Pumpkin,
Rutabagas, Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Tomato Plants and
seed, Watermelons.
August-Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Cauliflower seed, Car-
rots, Cowpeas, Cucumbers, Collards, Eggplants, Irish
Potatoes, Kale, Kohlrabi, Okra, Onions, Rape, Rutabagas,
Salsify, Spinach, Squash, Tomatoes, Turnips, Celery seed.
September-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots,
Cauliflower plants, Celery plants, Collards, Cowpeas,
English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce, Mus-
tard, Onion sets, Parsnip, Radishes, Rape, Rutabagas,
Salsify, Spinach, Turnips.
October-Beets, Bermuda Onion seed, Brussels
Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower plants, Celery
plants, Collards, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce seeds and plants,
Mustard, Onion sets, Parsnips, Radishes, Rape, Spinach,
Turnips.
November-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage seeds and
plants, Carrots, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion
sets, Parsnip, Radishes, Rape, Spinach, Turnips.
December-Cabbage plants and seed, Collards, Leeks,
Lettuce plants and seed, Mustard, Onions, Radishes,
Rape.



The following list includes what experience demon-
strates can be successfully grown each month as the sea-
son most suitable for each variety comes around in the
section of the State mentioned below.

CENTRAL FLORIDA.

January-Asparagus seed, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage
seed and plants, Cauliflower seed, Collards, Leeks, Let-
2-Bull.











tuce, Mustard, Onion sets, Radishes, Rape, Spanish Onion
seed, Tomato seed, Turnips, Eggplant seed.
February-Asparagus seed, Early corn, Beans, Brus-
sels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Collards,
Cucumbers, Eggplant seed, English Peas, Irish Potatoes,
Kale, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Parsley, Parsnip, Pepper
seed, Rutabagas, Salsify, Spinach, Windsor Beans, Beets.
March-Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cantaloupes,
Carrots, Cauliflower, Collards, Cowpeas, Cucumbers,
Early Corn, Eggplant, English, Peas, Irish Potatoes,
Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Okra, Onion, Parsley, Parsnip,
Pepper, Pumpkin, Radish, Rape, Rutabagas, Salsify,
Squash, Sugar Corn, Watermelons, Tomatoes, Turnips.
April-Beans, Cantaloupes, Collards, Cowpeas, Cucum-
bers, Eggplant, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kohlrabi,
Lettuce, Okra, Onion Plants, Parsley, Parsnip, Peppers,
Pumpkin, Radishes, Rutabagas, Squash, Sugar Corn,
Sweet Potatoes, Tomatoes, Turnips, Watermelons.
May-Beans, Butter Beans, Cantaloupes, Collards,
Cowpeas, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Okra, Peppers, Pump-
kins, Squash, Sugar Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tomato plants
and seed, Watermelons.
June-Butter Beans, Cabbage seed, Cauliflower seed,
Celery seed, Cowpeas, Eggplant, Peppers, Squash, Sweet
Potatoes, Tomatoes, Watermelons.
July-Cabbage seed, Cantaloupes, Cauliflower seed,
Celery seed, Cowpeas, Eggplant, Parsley, Peppers, Pump-
kin, Rutabagas, Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Tomato plants
and seed, Watermelons.
August-Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Cauliflower seed,
Carrots, Cowpeas, Cress, Cucumbers, Collards, Eggplant,
Irish Potatoes, Kale, Kohrabi, Okra, Onions, Rape, Ruta-
bagas, Salsify, Spinach, Squash, Tomatoes, Turnips,
Windsor Beans, Celery seed.
September-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots,
Cauliflower plants, Celery plants, Collards, Cowpeas,
Cucumbers, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Leeks,











Lettuce, Mustard, Onion sets, Parsnip, Radishes, Rape,
Rutabagas, Salsify, Spinach, Squash, Turnips.
October-Beets, Bermuda Onion seed, Brussels
Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower plants, Celery
plants, Collards, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce seed and plants,
Mustard, Onion sets, Parsnip, Radishes, Rape, Spinach,
Turnips.
November-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage seed and
plants, Carrots, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion
sets, Parsnip, Radishes, Rape, Spinach, Turnips.
December-Cabbage plants and seed, Collards, Leeks,
Lettuce plants and seed, Mustard, Onions, Radishes,
Rape.



The following list includes what experience demon-
strates can be successfully grown each month as the esa-
son most suitable for each variety comes around in the
section of the State mentioned below.

TAMPA, ORLANDO, TITUSVILLE AND SOUTHWARD.

January-Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage
plants and seed, Carrots, Cauliflower seed, Collards, Egg-
plant seed, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mus-
tard, Radishes, Rape, Spanish Onion seed, Spinach.
Tomato seed, Turnips.
February-Adams Early Corn, Beans, Beets, Brussels
Sprouts, Cabbage, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Cucumbers, Egg-
plant seed, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Lettuce, Okra, Onions,
Pepper seed, Spinach, Squash, Windsor Beans.
March-Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cantaloupes,
Cauliflower, Cowpeas, Cucumbers, Early Corn, Eggplant,
Irish Potatoes, Lettuce, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Pepper,
Pumpkin, Radish, Squash, Sugar Corn, Tomatoes, Water-
melons.











April-Beans, Collards, Cowpeas, Cucumbers, Egg-
plant, Kohlrabi, Okra, Radishes, Squash, Sugar Corn,
Sweet Potatoes, Tomatoes, Onion plants, Pepper, Pump-
kins.
May-Beans, Butter Beans, Cowpeas, Eggplant, Okra,
Peppers, Pumpkins, Squash, Sugar Corn, Sweet Potatoes,
Tomatoes.
June-Butter Beans, Cabbage seed, Celery seed, Cow-
peas, Eggplant seed, Peppers, Squash, Sweet Potatoes,
Tomato plants and seed, Watermelons.
July-Cabbage seed, Cantaloupes, Celery seed, Cow-
peas, Eggplants and seed, Peppers, Pumpkins, Squash,
Sweet Potatoes, Tomato plants and seed, Watermelons.
August-Beans (snap), Cabbage seed, Cantaloupes,
Carrots, Cauliflower seed, Collards, Cowpeas, Cucumbers,
Eggplant, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale, Kohlrabi,
Lettuce, Mustard, Onions, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radishes,
Rape, Rutabagas, Spinach, Squash, Swiss Chard, Toma-
toes, Turnips, Windsor Beans.
September-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage plants
and seed, Carrots, Celery seed and plants, Collards, Cow-
peas, Cucumbers, English Peas, Irish Potatoes, Kale,
Lettuce, Mustard, Onion sets, Radishes, Rape, Rutabagas.
Spinach, Squash, Swiss Chard, Turnips.
October-Beets, Bermuda Onion seed, Brussels
Sprouts, Cabbage plants and seed, Carrots, Celery seed,
Collards, Kale, Lettuce plants and seed, Mustard, Onion
sets, Radishes, Rape, Rutabagas, Spinach, Swiss Chard.
Turnips.
November-Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage plants
and seed, Carrots, Celery seed and plants, Collards, Kale,
Lettuce, Mustard, Onion sets, Radishes, Rape, Rutabagas,
Spinach, Swiss Chard, Turnips.
December-Cabbage plants and seed, Celery plants,
Collards, Lettuce plants and seed, Mustard, Onion sets
and plants, Radishes, Rape, Spanish Onion seed, Swiss
Chard.


















PART II.


CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD
OF CROPS.














DIVISION Of THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are the divisions of
ties contained in each:

Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla-11.

Western Division.
Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-8.


the State, and the coun-


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-10.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Lade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,
Manatee,


Monroe,
Osceola,
Palm Beach,
Pinellas,
Polk,
St. Lucie-12.
















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. A. McRAE, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIVISION.-From well digested reports by
our correspondents throughout the above district, the
conclusion is readily arrived at that the crops generally
are far better than at this time last year. In fact, the
corn crop is nearly one third greater than last year, al-
though the difficulties in the way of uniform planting
in the early season retarded the crop to a great degree.
The present crop of corn in this district will be probably
between 25 and 35 per cent greater than last year. Cot-
ton although affected by unfavorable seasons in the be-
ginning is also yielding much better than was first an-
ticipated. The area planted to cotton is possibly not
quite equal to that of 1912, but those planters who suc-
ceeded in getting their crops in at the proper time and
a good stand have more than made up for the loss by
poor stands. Generally the season since planting time
has been very favorable to general crop growing through-
out this section. It has also been favorable to live stock,
which we note are in much better condition than at the
same time last season. Hogs are certainly in better
condition. We have had practically no complaints of
cholera or other dangerous diseases. Only once or twice
have we had anything on the subject. All crops are in
good condition and all of them promise unusually large
yields. The hay crops and forage crops generally are the
finest this district has produced for a number of years.
Pastures are in fine condition.











WESTERN DIVISION.-In this division conditions are
practically the same as.just reported above for the north-
ern district. Crops of all kinds are good, live stock is in
fine condition and pastures, of course, are above the
average. Indications are that the corn crop is even a
little better in the western division than in the north-
ern, and the same may be said of one or two other crops.
By reference to the statistical tables these facts will ap-
pear to anyone who wishes to examine closely into these
conditions. In this district also it will be noticed that
forage crops are in most excellent condition and promise
unusually large yields. Also in this connection, alfalfa
is reported as doing remarkably well and is growing
with fine success in one or two counties of this district.
This is a fact worth noting as an example of the ability
of the soils of Florida to produce this universally extolled
forage plant. Seasonable conditions have, of course,
been favorable to produce these results. No fatal dis-
eases of live stock are reported so far from this district.
Every indication is for a prosperous condition.
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this division, if any-
thing, there is still an increase over the two former ones.
All crops seem to have produced remarkably well and
indicate full yields in return. The cotton of this district,
which is mostly Sea Island, will, apparently yield a full
average crop and the quality is said to be above the average
in some localities. It is said to be the finest cotton crop
for a number of years, both as to quality and quantity.
The corn crop certainly is equal to anything heretofore
produced for many years, if not possibly*the greatest
yield within the past fifteen years. All crops promise
full yields. Live stock is in good condition and no re.
ports of unhealthfulness are made.
CENTRAL DIVISION.--Reports from this division show
equally as well as those mentioned above. In this divi-
sion the citrus fruit crops begin to show up and, accord-
ing to our correspondents, conditions are exceedingly











favorable for a fine crop of citrus fruits generally.
Oranges do not appear to be quite up to the large crop
of last year, nor do grape fruit, but it is said that the
quality will be possibly superior. In general, crops,.of
all kinds in this section are fine. The results of the
vegetable crops were favorable and live stock in this
section, as in the others, is in fine condition.
SOUTHERN DIVISION.-In this division the climatic con-
ditions have been, taken as a whole, probably as favor-
able as it is possible to be for the products which are
grown on a commercial scale and for profit. All of the
products of this district of importance are showing re-
markable returns. The principal products of this sec-
tion are commercial vegetable growing and fruit grow-
ing. The first has been favorable in the extreme accord-
ing to reports and the fruits promise to equal last year
if not exceed it in profitableness. All of the fruit crops
have produced remarkably well. The orange crop in
this district is almost equal, possibly quite, to that of
last year, with the exception of grape fruit which ap-
pears to be short throughout the district about 30 per
cent. In some localities this decrease is more, in some
others not so much.
Considered as a whole, the prospects for the yield of
products of Florida this year are brighter than for many
years, in fact it is doubtful whether ever before more
favorable conditions existed in any of the branches of
agriculture than do exist in all of them today. The in-
crease in the corn out-put in the State is most remark-
able. Indications are that it will run close to one and
a quarter million bushels over the yield of 1912. The
oat crop is the largest ever known and the possibilities
are that the increase will reach near to 125 per cent
over last year.
The sweet potato crop which is one of the most valua-
ble grown in the State, is also a record breaker this year.
It is quite possible that the increase in this crop will











exceed 1,000,000 bushels over last year. Other crops are
showing the same ratio of increase, practically, and to
those who would inform themselves thoroughly on this
subject, we suggest a close study of the statistical tables
which follow.
From the best information obtainable through our
correspondents who have made a most careful report in
this case, it is apparent that the orange crop will come
within about 150,000 crates of last year's crop. Two
to two and a half per cent decrease is about the figures
indicated for the orange crop as compared with last year.
The same careful estimates indicate that the grape fruit
crop of this year is about 30 to 31 per cent short of that
of 1912.
We do not believe that anything will cause any
material change in these figures. These conditions war-
rant the prophesy that the present citrus crop with
proper handling, will be the most profitable ever grown
in the State.












29


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES, FOR QUARTER ENDING SEP-
TEMBER, 30, 1913, AS COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD LAST
YEAR.

COUNTIES. Upland Cotton.. Sea Island Cotton.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
I I Yield. Yield.
Gadsden .............. 110 50 110 60
Hamilton ............. 70 80
Jefferson ............. 85 70 70 75
Leon ................. 85 65 .
Liberty .............. 80 65
Madison ............. 60 75 5 60
Suwannee ........... 80 80 75 70
Taylor ......1.. 00 95
Wakulla ............. *560
Div. Av. per cent.... 81 i 71 ) 79 73
Western Division.


Calhoun ..............
Escambia ............
Holmes .............
Jackson ...........
Santa Rosa ........
W alton ...............
Div. Av. per cent....r


WiF 1 80 105 105


Northeastern Division.
Alachua 90
Baker ............ 100 100 1 110
Bradford ............. 100 90
Clay .................. ... 100 100
Columbia ............ 0 90 80 75
Duval ................
Nassau ............ 100 9095 90
St. Johns ............
Div. Av. per cent.... 97 1 93 94 93
Central Division.
Citrus ................
Hernando ............
Lake ........ .......... .. o
Levy ................. 60 60 50 50
Marion ............... 100 95
Orange ............... *...*. .. '
Pasco ................ I, ...
Volusia ............. ... .
Div. Av. per cent.... 60 60 75 72
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. ...
Dade ...............
DeSoto ..............
Hillsborough .......
Lee ....... ..
Osceola .............
Pinellas .............
St. Lucie .............
Div. Av. per cent.......
State Av. per cent.... 80 76 88 86


83 i go 1 0 0















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Corn. Sugar Cane.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
I Yield. Yield.
(Uadsden ............. 100 120 80 80
Hamilton ............ 100 105 90 95,
Jefferson ............ 100 110 90 90
Leon .... ......... 100 125 95 95
Liberty .............. 100 100 90 85
Madison ............ 100 125 110 110
Suwannee ............. 110 100 100 100
Taylor ............... 100 100 100 100
"Wakulla ............. .- 100 | 100 100 90
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 109 95 -94
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 150 100 100
Escambia ...........1 100 100 100 100
Holmes .............. I 100 110 100 105
Jackson .............. 100 115 100 105
Santa Rosa .......... 100 100 100 100
Walton ................ 100 105 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 113 100 102
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 110 105 90 85
Baker ................ 100 155 100 100
Bradford ............. 100 100 60 60
Clay ................ 100 125 100 100
Columbia ............. 100 100 85 83
Duval ................ 100 100 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 100 100 100
St. Johns ............ 100 110 75 75
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 112 89 988
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 85 95 100 100
Hernando ............ 100 100 100 100
Lake ................. 80 85 100 100
Levy ................. 90 90 60 60
Marion ............... 110 110 98 105
Orange ............... 90 90
Pasco ................ 100 100 90 90
Volusia ............... 80 70 80 80
Div. Av. per cent.... 92 92 90 91
Southern Division.
Brevard ............ .. ... ... 75 75
Dade ................. 100 100 100 100
DeSoto ............... 80 75 90 100
Hillsborough ......... 90 ,90 90 85
Lee .................. ... ... 100 120
Osceola .............. 100 100 100 100
Pinellas .............. ... ... 85 85
St. Lucie ............ 95 95
Div. Av. per cent.... 92 91 92 95
State Av. per cent.... 97 115 94


U












31


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTIES.


Field Peas.


Rice.


Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
_Yield. __ Yield.
Gadsden ............. 110 120 .
Hamilton ............. 60 50
Jefferson ............. 75 75
Leon .............. 100 105
Liberty ............... 100 100
Madison .............. 90 100
Suwannee ............ 50 40
Taylor ............... 100 100
Wakulla ............. 100 90 ..
Div. Av. per cent....I 87 | 87 __
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 | 100
Escambia ............ 75 ] 5 100 100
Holmes .............. 100 100 ...
Jackson .............. 100 100
Santa Rosa .......... 90 90 100 100
Walton ............... 50 60 75 75
Div. Av. per cent....I 86 88 I 92 I 92
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 70 75
Baker ................ 90 85 100 100
Bradford ............. 75 80
Clay ................. 100 100
Columbia ............ 60 65 60 65
Duval ................ 90 90
Nassau .............. 100 100 100 100
St. Johns ............ 80 90 80 85
Div. Av. per cent.... 83 | 86 85 87
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 100 100
Hernando ............ 100 100 100 100
Lake ................. 95 90 ...
Levy ................. 50 50 ...
Marion ............... 100 100
Orange ....... .....
Pasco ................ 95 100 75
Volusia .............. 90 90 ....
Div. Av. per cent .... 0 90 87 "87
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. 50 60 .....
Dade ................ 100 100
DeSoto ................ 85 90 75 60
Hillsborough ......... 95 95 90 90
Lee .................. 90 90 100 100
Osceola .............. 100 100
Pinellas .............. 90 90 85 85
St. Lucie ............ ... ...
Div. Av. per cent..... 87 89 87 84
State Av. per cent.... S7 88 88 I 87












32


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Sweet Potatoes. Cassava.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
I I Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ............. 90 | 90
Hamilton ............ 45 50
Jefferson ............. 60 65
Leon ................. 100 110
Liberty .............. 100 80
Madison ............. 100 100
Suwannee ............ 75 80
Taylor ............... 90 90
W akulla ............. 90 85 ...
Div. Av. per cent.... 83 83 ...
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 100
Escambia ............ 100 110 100 100
Holmes .............. 100 100 ...
Jackson .............. 100 110 ...
Santa Rosa .......... 100 105
Walton ............... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 104 | 100 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 90 85
Baker ................ 100 125
Bradford ............. 100 100
Clay .................. 100 100
Columbia ........... 80 80
Duval ................ 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 100
St. Johns ............ 100 100 .
Div. Av. per cent.... 96 1 99 .
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 105 100 ...
Hernando ............ 105 115
Lake ................. 100 107
Levy ............... 80 80 60 60
M arion .............. 9 95 ...
Orange ............... 80 95
Pasco ........ .... 90 0 0 75 75
Volusia ............... 75 75 SO 80
Div. Av. per cent.... 91 95 72 7
Southern Division.
Brevard ..............1 65 70 ...
Dade ................. 100 100 ..
DeSoto ............... 75 75
Hillsborough ......... 95 90 85 90
Lee .................. 100 120
Osoeola .............. 80 80 90 90
Pinellas .............. 90 90 .....
St. Lucle ............ 95 95 ..
Div. Av. per cent....| 88 90 87 90
State Av. per cent....| 92 ] 94 1 88 88















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Peanuts. Broom Corn.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
_Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ............. 100 100
Hamilton ............ 100 100
Jefferson ............. 100 95
Leon ................. 100 110
Liberty .............. 100 100
Madison ............. 100 100
Suwannee ............ 100 100
Taylor ............... 100 100
Wakulla .............. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 101 ... ___ ...
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 105 ... ..
Escambia ........... 100 125 100 100
Holmes .............. 100 100 ...
Jackson .............. 100 100 ...
Santa Rosa .......... 100 100 ...
Walton .............. 100 100 .....
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 105 100 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 100 100 ..
Baker ................ 100 100
Bradford ............ 60 60 ...
Clay .................. 100 100 ...
Columbia ............ 90 90 ...
Duval ................. 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 100 100 100
St. Johns ............ 85 85 ...
Div. Av. per cent.... 92 92 100 100
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 105 100 ...
Hernando ............ 100 100
Lake ................ 100 100 100 100
Levy ................. 85 85, ...
Marion ............... 100 100 ...
Orange .................
Pasco ................ 80 90
Volusia .............. 90 90 .....
Div. Av. per cent.... 94 I 95 100 100
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. ... ...
Dade ................ .....
DeSoto ...............
Hillsborough ......... 90 90...
Lee .................. .. ...
Osceola .............. ........
Pinellas .............. ... ........
St. Lucie ............. ... .....
Div. Av. per cent.... 90 90
State Av. per cent.... 9597 100 100


3-Bull.














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Hay-Native Grasses. Alfalfa.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ............ 100 100 ...
Hamilton ............ 100 110
Jefferson ............. 100 110 ...
Leon ................. 100 115 ...
Liberty .............
Madison ............. 100 100 .
Suwannee ............ 100 100..
Taylor ............... 100 100..
Wakulla .............. 100 100 ..
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 104 ... .
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 100 100 100
Escambia ............ 85 100
Holmes .............. 100 100
Jackson ............ 100 100 100 125
Santa Rosa .......... 100 100 ...
Walton ............... 100 100 ...100
Div. Av. per cent.... 98 100 100 I 112
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 100 100...
Baker ................ 100 200 ...
Bradford ............. 50 50
Clay .................. 100 110 ...
Columbia ............. 90 90 ...
Duval ................ 100 100 ...
Nassau ............... 100 100 100 50
St. Johns ............ 90 95 .....
Div. Av. per cent.... 91 106 100 50
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 100 100
Hernando ............ 100 100
Lake ................. 100 115
Levy ................. 95 95
Marion ............... 100 115
Orange ............... 75 75
Pasco ............... 85 90
Volusia .............. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 94 99
Southern Division.
Brevard ..............
Dade ................. 100 100
DeSoto ............... 100 100
Hillsborough ......... 100 100
Lee .................. 110 100
Osceola ............... 100 100 ...
Pinellas .............. 100 100 ...
St. Lucie ............ 1000 100 .
Div. Av. per cent.... 101 101 ..
State Av. per cent.... 97 102 10081














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Velvet Beans. Pastures.

Northern Division. Prospective
S_______________Condition. Yield. Condition.
Gadsden ...................... 110 100 100
Hamilton ......................... 100 100 100
Jefferson .......................... 100 100 100
Leon .............................. 100 110 115
Liberty ........................ .. 100 100 100
M adison .......................... 50 60 100
Suwannee ......................... 80 80 100
Taylor ............ I ............... 100 100 100
Wakulla ...................... .. 100 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ................. 93 93 I_ 102
Western Division.
Calhoun ........................... 100 115 100
Escambia ......................... 100 125 90
Holmes ........................... 100 100 100
Jackson .......................... 100 100 100
Santa Rosa ...................... 100 100 100
Walton ........................... 100 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.................. 100 107 98
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .......................... 75 70 100
Baker ............................ 100 100 100
Bradford .......................... 60 60 80
Clay ........................... 100 100 100
Columbia ................ .......... 75 80 100
Duval ............................ 100 100 100
Nassau ........................... 100 100 100
St. Johns ........................ .. 100 100 100
Div. Av. per cent................. 89 89 97
Central Division.
Citrus ............................. 90 100 100
Hernando ......................... 100 100 100
Lake .............................. 90 100 100
Levy ............................. 65 65 90
Marion ........................... 100 100 100
Orange .......................... 100 100 100
Pasco ............................. 90 95 90
Volusia ........................... 90 90 90
Div. Av. per cent................. 91 94 96
Southern Division.
Brevard ........... .........
ade .............................. i100 10
DeSoto ........................... 100 100 100
Hillsborough ...................... 100 100 100
Lee ................... ............ 100 100 100
Osceola ........................... 100 100 100
Pinellas ........................... 85 90 100
St. Lucie ........................ 100 100 105
Div Av. per cent................... 98 99 101
State Av. per cent................ 94 96 99















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Bananas. Mangoes.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
Yield. Yield.
Gadsden .............. ....* *** *
Hamilton ............. ... ..
Jefferson ............ ...
Leon .................. ........
Liberty ............... ...
Madison ............. ... .
Suwannee ............ ....
Taylor .............
Wakulla ............. .... _______
Div. Av. per cent.... ... .. .
Western Division.
Calhoun ..............
Escambia ............ ...
Holmes..............
Jackson..............
Santa Rosa .......... ..
W alton .............. ...
Div. Av. per cent.... ... ....
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 100 100
Baker ................ ..
Bradford ........... .. ...
Clay ..................
Columbia ..........
Duval ................ 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 50
St. Johns ............ ..
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 83
Central Division.
Citrus .............. ..... ...
Hernando ...........
Lake ................. 100 100 .
Levy ................. 20 20
M arion ............... .....
Orange ..............
Pasco ............... 100 100
Volusia ...............
Div. Av. per cent..... 73 73
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. 85 75 75 60
Dade ................. 100 100 95 85
DeSoto ............... 75 60 ...
Hillsborough ......... 90 90 .
Lee .................. 110 110 90 75
Osceola .............. 100 300 100 300
Pinellas ............
St. Lucie ........... 88 90 95 60
Div. Av. per cent.... 93 105 91 112
State Av. per cent.... 53 52 I 9112













37


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Avocado Pears. Guavas.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ..............
Hamilton ............
Jefferson ............ ..
Leon ................
Liberty ..........
Madison .........
Suwannee ..........
Taylor ..............
Wakulla ...............
Div. Av. per oent....| .. ...... __ "'"
Western Division.
Calhoun .............
Escambia ...........
Holmes ..............
Jackson ........... ........
Santa Rosa .......... ....
W alton ........... ...
Div. Av. per cent.... ......
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ..................
Baker .................. .
Bradford ......... ... .
Clay ............ ........
Columbia ........ ...
Duval ............... .. .. .. ...
Nassau ............... ..
St. Johns ............ ...... 100 10
Div. Av. per cent.... ... ... 100 100
Central Division.
Citrus ............... .....
Hernando ......... ... ...
Lake ...... ......... ... ... 100 100
Levy ............... ... ... .
Marion ........ ......
Orange .............. ... ... 100 100
Pasco ............... ..... 100 100
Volusia ................ .... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... ... | ... 100 100
Southern Division.
Brevard .......... ... 90 90
Dade ................. 100 100 100 100
DeSoto .............. ... ... 100 100
Hillsborough ..... ... ... 95 100
Lee .................. 90 110 100 90
Osceola ............ ... ... 100 300
Pinellas .............. ... ... 100 100
St. Lucie ......... .100 150 100 100
Div. Av. per cent... 97 120 98 12
State Av. per cent.... 97 120 99 107













38


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Orange Trees. Lemon Trees.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ................
Hamilton ............ ...:
Jefferson .. ........
Leon ................ 100 90
Liberty ............... ... ...
Madison ...... .... ............
Suwannee ............ 60 60 .....
Taylor ....................
Wakulla ............
Div. Av. per cent.... 4 80 75 ... ...
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 90 100 85
Escambia ... ........ ...
Holmes ............... ...
Jackson ..... ..... ............
Santa Rosa ..........
Walton ............... 100 50 .
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 0 100 85
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 80 80.
Baker ............... 100 150 100 100
Bradford ...............
Clay ................ 100 90
Columbia ............
Duval ................ 100 100
Nassau ............... 90 100 90 100
St. Johns .......... 10 100 ...
Div. Av. per cent.... I 95 103 95 | 100
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 105 85 100 95
Hernando ............ 90 75
Lake ................. 95 100 90 90
Levy ................. 60 80
Marion ............... 100 85 100 90
Orange .............. 95 100 ...
Pasco ................ 80 85
Volusia ............... 80 75 .
Div. Av. per cent.... 88 86 97 92
Southern Division.
Brevard ............. 80 80 80 55
Dade ................. 100 85 85 75.
DeSoto ............... 100 85 85 70
Hillsborough ......... 95 95 90 90
Lee ................... 100 100 100 75
Osoeola ............... 100 70 100 70
Pinellas .............. 95 90 90 85
St. Lucie ............ 100 118 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 96 90 91 66
State Av. per cent.... 92 85 1 95 86
















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTIES. Lime Trees. Grapefruit Trees.

Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ............. ...
Hamilton ............ ...
Jefferson ............ ...
Leon ................ ... ... 100 8
Liberty .............. .... 2
Madison ............. ...... 20 20
Suwannee ............ ... ... 40 20
Taylor ............... ...
Wakulla ..........
Div. Av. per cent.... I ...... 53 42
Western Division.
Calhoun .......... ... ... 100 90
Escambia -. ...
Holmes ............. ...
Jackson .............. .
Santa Rosa ..........
Walton ...... .
Div. Av. per cent....| ... ... 100 90
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............ I .. .. 90 90
Baker ................ ... ... 100 150
Bradford ............. ....
Clay .......... ...... ... ... 100 100
Columbia ......... .... .
Duval ................ ... ... 100 100
Nassau ............... ... ... 100 100
St. Johns ............ ... ... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... ...... 98 107
Central Division.
Citrus ............... 100 100 105 75
Hernando ............ ... ... 90 40
Lake ................. ... ... 90 45
Levy ................. ... ... 60 60
Marion .............. 100 80 100 125
Orange ............... ... 90 60
Pasco ................ 100 100 80 80
Volusia ............... ... ... 80 60
Div. Av. per cent.... 100 93 87 68
Southern Division.
Brevard ............. ... ... 80 7
Dade ................. 100 100 90
DeSoto ............... 90 90 90 80
Hillsborough ......... 95 85 92 50
Lee .................. 100 90 100 80
Osceola .............. 100 60 100 50
Pinellas ............. .. ... 95 60
St. Lucie ............ 10 100 100 86
Div. Av. per cent.... "5 89 95 71
State Av. Der cent... 91 87 776























PART III.
Fertilizers,
Feed Stuffs, and
Foods and Drugs.

















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE COM-
MISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.



SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and
A FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A TIN CAN
OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE
ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSES. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary de-
termination and to allow the preservation of a dupli-
cate sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate
sample will be preserved for two months from the date
of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce); fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.











I would call the attention to those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter, strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The samples must not be less than one-
half pound, in a tin can or bottle, sealed and addressed to
the Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and
address must also be on the package, this rule applying
to special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding
stuff.
A one-pound baking powder tin can, properly cleaned,
filled with a fairly drawn, well mixed sample taken from
several sacks, is a proper sample. It should be sealed and
addressed to the Commissioner of Agriculture at Talla-
hassee. The sender's name and address should also be
placed on the package. If more than one sample is sent,
the samples should be numbered so as to identify them.
All this should be done in the presence of the witnesses
and the package mailed or expressed by one of the
witnesses.
The tags off the sack should be retained by the sender
to compare with the certificate of analysis when received,
and not sent to this office. The date of the drawing and
sending the sample, and names of the witnesses, should
also be retained by the sender; not sent to this office.



INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This Department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient.
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides for
the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or purchaser,
under proper rules and regulations fixed by law-to be
sent to the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost.
Any citizen in the State who has purchased fertilizers or
feeds for their own use may draw a sample of the same,
according to law, and have the same analyzed by the State
Chemist free of cost. And in case of adulteration or de-
ficiency he can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost of price demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."
This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.
Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.
"THE SPECIAL SAMPLES FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS MA-
TERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE OF
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FERTIL-
IZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."












FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for formulas for various
crops, and there are hundreds of such formulas published;
and, while there are hundreds of "brands," the variations
in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of "brands"
put up by the same manufacturer are identical goods, the
only difference being in the name printed on the tag or
sack. A good general formula for field or garden might
be called a "vegetable formula," and would have the fol-
lowing: Ammonia, 31%; available phosphoric acid,
6%; and potash, 71%. The following formulas will
furnish the necessary plant food in about the above pro-
portion. havIe purposely avoided the use of any fraction
of 100 pounds in these formulas to simplify them. Values
are taken from price lists furnished by the trade, January
1, 1912.

For cotton, corn, sweet potatoes and vegetables: Am-
monia, 3S%; available phosphoric acid, 61%; potash,
7%.

(A) "VEGETABLE."

No. 1.
Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (7i-2-11) ..... 3.25 Ammoaia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 6.46 Available
300 pounds of Muriate or (Sulphate) (50 per cent) 7.50 Potash
2,000
State value mixed and bagged.............. $27.52
Plant Food per ton......................... 343 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
1,000 lbs. of Blood and Bone (61-8)............ 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)....... 7.00 Available
600 lbs. of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent) 7.80 Potash
State value mixed and bagged.............. $28.45
Plant Food per ton ....................... 360 pounds












No. 3.
Per Cent.
300 lbs. of Dried Blood (16 per cent)........... 3.25 Ammonia
100 lbs. of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)...... 8.00 Available
1,000 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)...... J 7.80 Potash
600 lbs. of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent)

2,000
State value mixed and bagged...........$29.45
Plant Food per ton......................... 381 pounds


(B) "FRUIT AND WINE."

No. 1.

'Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes. Ammonia, 4 per
cent., Available Phosphoric Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.

Per Cent.
1,000 Ibs of Blood and Bone (6-8) .............
400 Ibs. of Muriate of Potash (50 per cent).... 8 Available
500 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent) ...... 4 Ammonia
100 lbs. of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)......J 10 Potash

2,000
State value mixed and bagged..............$34.50
Plant Food per ton......................... 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
500 lbs. of Castor Pomace (6-2 per cent)......1 4.00 Ammonia
200 lbs. of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent)........ 7.70 Available
900 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)...... 9.60 Potash
400 lbs. of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent)........

2,000
State value mixed and bagged..............$33.76
Plant Food per ton........... ......... 426 pounds

No. 3.
Per Cent.
500 lbs. of Cotton Seed Meal (71-21 1) ........
100 lbs. of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)...... 3.97 Ammonia
100 lbs. of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent)........ 8.30 Available
900 lbs.of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)...... 8.97 Potash
400 lbs. of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent).... J

2,000
State value mixed arid bagged............. $33.56
Plant Food per ton....................... 425 pounds










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Muriate of potash into actual, potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1,583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.41
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent, carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).



COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER, STOCK FEED AND
PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAWS.

Copies of the Laws, Regulations and Standards will be
furnished by the Commissioner of Agriculture on appli-
cation.











COMMERCIAL "STATE VALUES" OF FERTILIZERS
FOR 1913.

Available Phosphoric Acid .............. 5c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. Ic a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)..17. c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, KO) ......... 5c a pound

If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ............ .1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20c per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). 3.50 per unit
Potash ............................... 1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easist and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, tnke
for example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per cent.x$1.00-- 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid... 1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................3.42 per cent.x 3.50- 11.97
Potash ....................7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Baging .............. .......... 1.50

Commercial value at Florida sea ports......... $27.94

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.....8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ..................2 per cent.x 3.50- 7.00
Potash .....................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging ........................- 1.50

Commercial value at Florida sea ports.......... $18.70

The State valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one-
4-Bull.










ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought. at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.'


STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are, made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton, of boods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists are published in this report, with the
"State values" for 1913 deducted therefrom.










MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA
PORTS, OCTOBER 1, 1913.

AMiMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% Ammonia...............$ 60.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 20% Ammonia........... 74.00
Dried Blood, 16% Ammonia ................... 60.00
Cynanamid, 17.5% Ammonia ................. 54.00
Dry Fish Scrap, 11% Ammonia................ 55.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% Sulphate,
48% KO ................................ $ 50.00
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% Sulphate,
26% K,O ................................. 30.00
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% K20............ 46.00
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 16% Ammonia,
46% Potash KO .......................... 120.00
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Ammonia,
42% Potash K2O .......................... 100.00
Kainit, Potash, 12% K0 .................... 13.00
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% K20 Pot-
ash ........................... .. .......... 19.00

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Water Soluable Tankage, 15% Ammonia ....... $ 52.00
High Grade Tankage, 10% Ammonia, 3% Phos-
phoric Acid ...... .............. ...... 43.00
Tankage, 8% Ammoria, 10% Phosphoric Acid.. 37.00
Low Grade Tankage, (i6 Ammonia, 12% Phos-
phoric Acid ............................... 33.00
Totel Tankage, 67% Ammionia, 7% ,Phosphoric
Acid .......... ........ ........ .....
Sheep Manure, ground, 2% Ammonia ....... .. 24.00











Imported Fish Guano, 12% Ammonia, 12% Phos-
phoric Acid ............................... 52.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Ammonia,
22% Phosphoric Acid ...................... 31.00
Raw Bone, 4% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric Acid. 35.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51% Ammonia, 2% Phos-
phoric Acid ............................... 26.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7% Ammonia...... Market
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 4j% Ammonia........ Market


PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ................. ........$ 15.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid 14.00
Bone Black, 17% Available Phosphoric Acid... 25.00


MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2% Ammo-
nia, 8% Potash .........................$ 24.00
High Grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
2% Ammonia, 10% Potash ................ 28.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash.. 25.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash ............................ ....... 20.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash ......................... ... ..... .. 19.00
Land Plaster, in sacks ....................... 12.00


The charges by reputable manufactures for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.









53

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
OCTOBER 1, 1913-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES.
Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, prompt... 3.10 @ -
futures ....................... 3.10 @ -
Ammonia, sulph. domestic, spot ....... @ -
futures ....................... 3.00 @ -
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and
14 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. fish
works, per unit .................... 3.10 @ -
wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia,
3 p. c. phosphoric acid delivered @
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11
p. c. ammonia and 15-17 p. c. bone
phosphate, c. i. f. N. Y., Balto. or
Phila. ............................ 3.00 & 10
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. f. o. b.
Chicago ......................... 2.70 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago
ground ......................... 2.371/2 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago
ground .......................... 2.37% & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 per cent, f. o. b. Chicago.... 2.45 & 10
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago...... 9.00 @ -
Sheep manure, concentrated, f. o. b.
Chicago, per ton ................... 13.00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit.... 2.00 @ 2.70
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York ........................ 2.95 @ -
Chicago ........................ 2.80 @ -
Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c. spot, per 100 lbs. 2.35 @ -
futures, 95 p. c. ................. 2.40 @ -

PHOSPHATES.
Acid phosphate, per unit.............. 45 @ '50












Bones, rough, hard, per ton ......... 22.50 @24.00
soft steamed unground........... 21.50 @22.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. am-
monia and 60 p. c. bone phos-
phate ..................... 20.00 @21.00
ditto, 3 and 50 p. c. ........... 23.50 @24.00
raw ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and
50 p. c. bone phosphate...... 28.50 @30.00
South Carolina phosphate rock, kiln
dried, f. o. b. Ashley River.......... 3.50 @ 3.75
Florida land pebble phosphate rock 68
per cen., f. o. b. Port Tampa, Fla.. 3.00 @ 3.25
Florida high grade phosphate rock 77
per cent., f. o. b. Florida ports...... 5.75 @ 6.25
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c., per
ton ............................... 5.00 @ 5.50
75 p. c. guaranteed ............... 4.75 @ 5.00
68@72 p. c. .................... 4.25 @ 4.50


POTASHES.


Muriate of potash, 80-85 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ............... 38.55 @
Muriate of potash, min. 95 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ............... 40.15 @
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ............... 41.00 @
Sulphate of potash, 90-95 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags .............. 46.80 @
Double manure salt, 48-53 per cent., basis
48 per cent., in bags ............... 24.95 @
Manure salt, min. 20 per cent., K(O, in
bulk ................... ........... 13.50 @
Hardsalt, min. 16 per cent;, K,O, in
bulk ..................... ....... 10.85 @
Kainit, min. 12.4 per cent., KO, in
bulk ............................. 8.45 @














COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Ammonia Phosphoric Potash
Acid

Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19......... ............
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 24 ...... ..............
Dried Blood ............. 12 to 17 ............ .........
Concentrated Tankage.... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
Bone Tankage ........... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 8 to 11 6 to 8 ..........
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 101 2 to 3 li to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 171 I to 2 ............
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Insoluble
Ammonia Available Phosphoric
Phos. Acid Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate........................ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate. ....................... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 35
Ground Bone ......... ... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... .3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Actual
Potash Ammonia Phosphoric Lime
Acid

Muriate of Potash...... 50 ......... ......... .........
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ...... ......... .........
Carbonate of Potash... 55 to 60 ...... ......... .........
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ...... .........
Double Sul. of Pot.&Mag. 26 to 30 ........ ......... .........
Kainit ................. 12 to 12J ........ .... ... ........
Sylvlnit ............... 16 to 20 ......... ......... .........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleashed. 2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2 ........
Wood Ashes, leached... 1 to 2 ......... 1 to 1 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 5 to 8 2to 4 ....... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.40 0to 0.41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.53 0to0.60 0.28 0.31
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.67 1.00 0.19 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) ...... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure.. 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFFS
FOR 1913.

For the season of 1913 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEED STUFFS FOR 1913.

Protein, 3.4c. per pound ................68c. per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1.1c. per pound ........22c. per unit
Fats, 2.5c. per pound ................... 50c. per unit

A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @$25.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE No. 1.

CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-
Protein ......................11.15 x 68c, $ 7.58
Starch and Sugar ................ 64.65 x 22c, 14.22
Fat ........................... ..... 5.20 x 50c, 2.70

State value per ton .......................$24.50

EXAMPLE No. 2.

Protein ......................10.50 x 68c, $ 7.14
Starch and Sugar ............... 69.60 x 22c, 15.31
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 50c, 2.70

State value per ton ............... ..... .$25.15









57
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS.


e Ea
NAME OF FEED.
4 .
5 a ca 4
g 2 Si
4 P4 2-


Bright Cot'n Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meal
Linseed Meal, old pro-
cess .... ...........--
Linseed Meal, new pro-
cess .....................................

Wheat Bran ...........................

Wheat Middlings .............

Mixed Feed (Wheat)......

Ship Stuff (Wheat).......

Corn (grain) ......................

Corn Meal ..............................

Corn Cobs ................................

Corn and Cob Meal.........

Hominy Feed ........................

Corn and Oats, equal
parts ......................

Corn and Oats Feeds......

Barley (grain) .......... ......
Barley and Oats, equal
parts ......................... ....


9.35

20.00


39.70

22.90


7.50 35.70


8.40

9.00

5.40

7.80

5.60

2.10

1.90


36.10

15.40

15.40

16.90

14.60

10.50

9.70


30.10 2.40

6.60 8.50

4.05 10.50


5.80 11.15

12.10 8.70

2.701 12.40

6.101 12.101


28.60

37.10

36.00

36.70

53.90

59.40

54.40

59.80

69.60

68.70

54.90

64.80

65.30


64.65 5.20

61.70 3.70

69.80 1.80

64.75 3.401


-------


5.80

5.00

5.30

5.20

5.80

3.20

5.30

3.70

1.50

1.40

1.40

1.50

2.55


2.25

3.20

2.40

2.70










58

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS- (Continued.)


NAME OF FEED.
I I


Oats (grain) 9.50 11.80

Rice (grain) ........................... 0.20 7.40

Rice Bran ............................ 9.50 12.10

Rice Hulls ................................ 35.70 3.60

Wheat (grain) .................... 1.80 11.90

Dry Jap Sugar Cane...... 26.22 2.28

Cow Pea ................................... 4.10 20.80

Cow Pea Hay ................. 20.10 16.60

Velvet Bean Hulls............... 27.02 7.46

Velvet Beans and Hulls 9.20 19.70

Velvet Bean Hay............... 29.70 14.70

Beggarweed Hay ............... 24.70) 21.70j

Japanese Kudzu Hay...... 32.14 17.43

Cotton Seed (whole) ......23.20 18.40

Cotton Seed Hulls ............ 44.40 4.00

Gluten Feed ................... 5.301 24.00

B eef Scrap .......................... ............. 44.70


Ca


m 4j4
V

^U
sr I I


59.70

79.20

49.90

38.60

71.90

62.55

55.70

42.20

44.56

51.30

41.00

30.201

30.20

24.70

36.60

51.20

3.28


5.00

0.40

8.80

0.70

2.10

1.55

1.40

2.20

1.57

4.50

1.70

2.30

1.67

19.90

2.00

10.60

14.75


3.00

0.40

10.00

13.20

1.80

2.77

3.20

7.50

4.32

3.30

5.70

10.90

6.87

3.50

2.60

1.10

29.20










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1913. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. 3 0 BY WHOM SENT.

0 o .3 C o
S.0
E P4


Fertilizer ................... 3082
Fertilizer ...,.............. 3083
Sea Fowl Guano............ 3084
Ground Castor Pomace...... 3085
Fertilizer No. 1............. 3086
Fertilizer No. 2............ 3087
Ashes ...................... 3088
Fertilizer ................... 3089
Guano ...................... 3090
Fertilizer ................... 3091
Complete Fertilizer .......... 3092
Fertilizer ................... 3093
Fertilizer ................... 3094
Treated Muck or Peat (Potash 3095
Salts added.)


4 54!
9.f0(


7.45
S7.68

9.23

5.39
-15.34

...... 7


5.94 0.96 6.90
9.78 1.02 10.80
..... ..... ......

7.83 4.02 11.85
(.25 2.40 8.65

7.14 0.78 7.92
10.50 1.90 12.40
5.851 0.50 6.35
9.511 3.80 13.411
63.(51 1.85 5.501
6.401 2.55 8.951
.....I...... .I
I I


4.90
3.22
4.80
5.35
5.13
4.93

5.01
2.39
3.20
4.731
6.15
5.45
2.171


8.91 Green & Robertson, Rideout.
6.35 Jno. A. Bailey, Chumuckla.
...... B. E. Chapman, Tampa.
...... Osceola Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.
5.24 Henry W. Smith, Wauchula.
10.52 Henry W. Smith, Wauchula.
0.34 W. S. Tallant, Manatee.
8.15 F. E. Williams, Inverness.
1.86 R. H. Ellison, Baker.
7.17 D. H. Spencer, Sorrento.
6.17 J. Ed Raulerson, Lily.
4.531C. T. Brown, Delray.
10.661H. W. Smith, Wauchula.
6.651Robert Ranson, Pablo Beach.
-, I I ... .. ... .










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES. 1913.-(Continued.)


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer No. 3.............
Fertilizer ...................
Castor Pomace ............
Fertilizer ...................
Hardwood and Hickory Ashes
Fertilizer No. 1 (C.S.M.)..
Fertilizer No. 2 (complete)..
Fertilizer No. 3 (Kainit)....
Guano ....................
Fertilizer ........ ........
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Ashes .....................
No. 1 Guano.................
No. 2 Phosphate.............
No. 1 Fertilizer.............
Guano ....................
Fertilizer ..................


On

Bz


8.52
6.31
1.74

7.67


8.03


4.26
4.24
5.43
8.38

10.45

11.80

9.02


Phosphoric Acid.


.

s S c
*rt H


7.25
11.40
5.79

8.00


12.02

9.25
8.90
8.72
8.20
6.21

10.00
16.25
9.20
9.23
6.95


0.85
0.10
4.95

2.80


0.43

0.35
2.25
2.48
3.20
1.14

0.60
1.15
1.60
1.27
0.95


8.10
11.50
10.74

10.80


12.45

9.60
11.15
11.20
11.40
7.35

10.60
17.40
10.80
10.50
7.90


5.31
3.44

5.62
4.43

8.00
2.63

2.35
4.54
4.49
5.03
2.38

3.45

2.78
2.43
3.98


BY WHOM SENT.


7.94 F. E. Williams, Inverness.
11.88 Henry W. Smith, Wauchula.
..... H. G. Gacio, Venice.
...... Osceola Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.
8.09 J. T. Rousseau, Largo.
1.45 J. R. Williams, Citra.
...... J. M. Nobles. Berrydale.
2.36 J. M. Nobles, Berrydale.
11.32 J. M. Nobles, Berrydale.
1.88 J. C. Stewart, Bascom.
7.91 T. E. Mobley, Hastings.
7.46 J. A. Gladney, Hastings.
6.92 J. J. Brown, Hastings.
9.77 L. J. Hartley, Jr., Longwood.
3.34 B. F. Blackburn, Osprey.
3.08 E. M. Pitts, Red Rock.
...... E. M. Pitts, Red Rock.
1.75 J. W. Kelly, Otahite.
3.46 J. M. Deshazo, Mossy Head.
6.54 M. Merrett, West Apopka.


"










Fertilizer .................
Acid Phosphate ............
Fertilizer ............... ..
Ashes ......................
Fertilizer No. 1.............
Fertilizer No. 2............
Fertilizer No. 3.............
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ..................
Ashes No. 1...............
Ashes No. 2................
Hardwood Ashes ............
Phosphatic Clay (Sea Mud)..
Fertilizer (Basic Slag &
Nitrogen.)
Fertilizer No. 1.............
Fertilizer No. 2.............


8.44
6.71
12.04
11.(65

5.88
3.53
6.58
4.88
5.25






13.69
12.87


12.62 0.38
18.55 1.05
10.65 0.45
..... ......
7.37 1.55
9.30 0.20
10.15 0.65
6.60 0.80
9.28 1.70
6.86 0.74
5.50 0.50
7.90 0.90
5.83 0.82
6.90 0.90
7.88 2.20
. ... ......
..... ......


4.73 6.87

9.00 1.80
10.481 1.62


13.00
19.60
11.10

8.92
9.50
10.80
7.40
10.98
7.60
6.00
8.80
6.65
7.80
10.08



1.20
11.60

10.80
12.10


3.95

3.23
3.68
3.80
3.65
1.96
3.10
3.35
4.45
5.28
5.55
3.68




3.21


3.71

3.88
3.14
9.97
7.21
5.06
8.28
1.201
10.16
8.29
6.12
5.13
8.34
11.68
0.37
0.27
2.05


J. W. Peddle, Bristol.
J. B. Huggins, Bluff Springs.
B. D. Mayo, Pollard.
R. F. Blackburn, Osprey.
C. F. Kistner, Crystal River.
0. F. Kistner, Crystal River.
C. F. Kistner, Crystal River.
R. P. Johnson, Orlando.
C. B. Franklin, Galliver.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville.
Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.
Walter S. Tallant, Manatee.
Walter S. Tallant, Manatee.
R. P. Johnson, Orlando.
J. Raford Carter, Merritt.
Jno. W. Jourdan, Jacksonville.


2.00 1.20 Chas. B. Franklin, Galliver.
2.35 2.06IChas. B. Franklin, Galliver.


__~_____ _I











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1913. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Armour Fruit & Vin


Bean Fertilizer ....


Tomato Special ....


Goulding's Bone Com
pound.

New Mineral Fertili
zer.


e11914 Guaranteed
Found .....

.1915 Guaranteed
Found.....

. 1916 Guaranteed
Found.....

-1917 Guaranteed
IFound.....

- 1918 Guaranteed
I Found.....


10.00
3.02

10.00
(. (4

10.00
7.(60

1 00
12.13


0.12


Phosphoric Acid.





A
3 I aH


1.00
0.43

1.00
0.82

1.00
0.90

1.00
2.90

.,,.,,.


6.92


7.58


7.38


11.02

0.23
0.06


2.50
2.69

5.00
4.97

5.00
4.76

2.00
2.35


BY WHOM and WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


11.00 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jackson- t
11.29 ville, Fla.

5.00 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jackson-
5.94 ville, Fla.

8.00 Armour Fertilizer Works; Jackson-
8.96 ville, Fla.

2.00 American Agricultural Chemical Co.,
1.90 Pensacola, Fla.

2.09 New Mineral Fertilizer Co., Boston,
...... Mass.


.


J









Mapes Orange Tree
Manure.

Mapes Fruit & Vine
Manure.

Mapes Vegetable Ma-
nure.

Ideal Corn Fertilizer


Dekle's Trucker Gu-
ano.

V. C. Special No. 5..


Number 3 ..........


Ideal Fruit & Vine
Manure.

Mineral Plant Food.


1019 Guaranteed
Found.....

1920 Guaranteed
Found.....

1921 Guaranteed
Found.....

1922 Guaranteed
Found.....

1923 Guaranteed
Found.....

1924 Guaranteed
Found.....

1925 Guaranteed
Found.....

1926 Guaranteed
Found.....

1927 Guaranteed
Found.....


12.00
9.92

10.001
9.03

12.00
5.46

10.00
8.11

10.00
6.27

8.00
8.18

8.00
5.53

8.001
9.98


6.00 2.00
0.90 3.95

5.00 2.00
6.13 1.97

6.00 2.00
6.80 3.20

8.00 2.00
7.36 1.84

7.00 2.00
4.75 2.45

5.00 1.00
5.93 1.07

6.00 2.00
6.25 0.15

6.00 2.00
6.85 1.00


.... ......


10.85


8.10


10.00


9.20


7.20


7.00


6.45


7.85

0.23


4.00 3.00 Mapes F. & P. Guano Co., New
4.55 6.90 York, N. Y.

2.00 10.00 Manes F. & I'. Guano Co., New
2.75 10.86 York, N. Y.

5.00 2.00 Mapes F. & P. Guano Co., New
5.94 5.12 York, N. Y.

2.00 6.00 Gulf Chemical Company, Marianna,
2.05 7.05 Fla.

3.00 8.00oGulf Chemical Company, Marianna,
3.45 9.69 Fla.

5.00 5.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical Com-
5.00 4.27 pany, Sanford, Fla.

4.00 10.00 Southern Fertilizer Company, Or-
3.85 10.42 lando, Fla.

3.00 .10.00Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Com-
3.55 8.851 pany, Jacksonville, Fla.

2.09 New Mineral Fertilizer Company,
............ Boston, Mass.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1913. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspector Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND. | NAME AND ADDRESS
0 ;4 E. I OF, MANUFACTURER.
LdZ. .ig
----~ e %rlIIri


Prime Cotton Seed Meal.......


Magnolia Brand Cot. Seed Meal


Standard Grade Cot. Seed Meal


Standard Grade Cot. Seed Meal


Faultless Hen Feed..........


Larro-Feed .. . . .


1546 Guaranteed
Found.....

1547 Guaranteed
Found.....

1548 Guaranteed
Found.....

1549 Guaranteed
Found.....

1550 Guaranteed
Found.....

1551 Guaranteed
Found.....


....... 38.62
...... 38.70

...... 38.62
...... 38.26

...... 38.62
...... 40.63

...... 38.62
...... 38.52

4.00 10.00
3.131 1.14

14.00[ 19.00
11.50 20.71


65.00
69.02

50.00
51.12


3.00
3.65

3.00
3.62


...... The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
...... Cincinnati, Ohio.

...... Union Brokerage and Coin.
...... Co., New Orleans, La.

. ...... Georgia Cotton Oil Co..
...... Columbus, Ga.

...... W. C. Bradley Co., Colum-
...... bus, Ga.

...... |Consolidated Grocery Co..
1.541 Jacksonville, Fla.

...... The Larrowe Milling Co.,
4.201 Detroit, Mich.


' '











Feed (?) .................... 1552 GuaranteedI ..... ...... ]......
Found..... 4.17 12.90 65.791 3.32

Vq Corno Horse and Mule Feed.. 115531 guaranteed 12.00 10.00 58.50 3.50
Fou ind..... 13.211 11.06 53.67 3.61

SSchumacher Special Horse Feed 1554 Guaranteed 8.00 9.25 64.50 3.25
Found..... 4.50 9.92 C6.56 4.50

Gano Feed ................... 1555 Guaranteed ...... 7.50 59.00 3.50
Found..... 3.70 11.14 66.90 4.22

Carolina Horse and Mule Feed 1556 Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 55.00 3.00
Found..... 10.75 10.92 61.63 2.78

Bell Horse and Mule Feed.... 1557 Guaranteed 17.00 10.00 47.00 2.40
Found..... 15.95, 9.74 51.06 .3.81

Rex Stock Feed ............. 1558iGuaranteed 9.00o 11.45 59.00 4.45
Found..... 10.16 12.21 58.00 4.27

Kornfalfa Kandy Feed........ 1509 Guaranteed 12.00 9.00, 55.00 2.50
Found..... 8.67 8.42 61.10 2.55

Hammond Dairy Feed........ 115O Guaranteed 11.00 16.50 48.00 3.50
| Found;.... 10.78 16.51 46.85 6.02-

Permenter's Stud Feed........ 1561 Guaranteed 12.00 10.50 55.00 2.50
Found,.... 11.44 11.88 54.69 3.00

Perfection Horse Feed ........ 1562 Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 55.00 2.00
Found ..... 9.68 11.27 59.79 2.04


..... J. Bolgiano & Son, Balti-
2;87 more, Md.

..... The Corno Mills Co., St.
4.25 Louis, Mo.

...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
2.42 cago, Ill.

...... Valley Milling Co., St.
4.67 Louis, Mo.

...... Virginia-Carolina Feed Co.,
6,35 :East St. Louis, Ill.

...... Commonwealth Feed Mill
5.09 Co., St. Louis, Mo.

...... Milan-Morgan Co., New Or-
4.22 leans, La.

...... Kornfalfa Feed Milling Co.,
4.30 Kansas City, Mo.

...... Western Grain Products Co.,
9.76 Hammond, Ind.

...... Cairo Milling Co., Cairo
5.83 Ill.

...... Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co.,
4.87 Omaha, Neb.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1913.--Continued


I-
NAME, OR BRAND. 'S

I z

Straight Alfalfa Molasses Feed 1563


Reliable Horse Feed .......... 1564


Best Yet Molasses Feed...... 1565


Crown Horse Feed........... 1566


Big Four Feed................ 1567

Just Horse and Mule Feed.... 1568


Molac Horse Feed............. 1569


Royal Horse and Mule Feed.. 1570


Fn .4 5 .5
S^ i | d
I A'


Guaranteed 25.00 9.00 45.00
Found.... 12.9011.14 53.
Guaranteed 25.00 9.00 45.00
Found..... 12.901 11.141 53.58

Guaranteed 15.00 10.00 52.00
Found..... 12.82 9.81 54.99

Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 58.00
Found..... 12.22 8.67 58.68

Guaranteed 12.00 9.001 59.00
Found..... 15.88 8.34 55.24

Guaranteed 12.00 10.50 55.00
Found..... 10.14 11.49 59.39

Guaranteed 12.001 10.00 58.00
Found..... 9.62 10.07 59.20

Guaranteed 10.501 10.00 62.00
Found..... 9.69[10.11 53.09

Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 55.00
Found..... 10.95 8.78 62.45


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
. ~- MAN A "TTT' A TflMTTX'


ifn AU.TEA urr avr J. UA.
S, .U R

1.00 ...... Kornfalfa Feed Milling Co.,
1.98 8.20 Kansas City, Mo.

3.50 ...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
3.23 6.92 St. Joseph, Mo.

3.75 ...... National Milling Co., Ma-
2.95 5.41 con, Ga.

2.00 ...... G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
2.16 6.34 phis, Tenn.

2.50 ...... Cairo Milling Co., Cairo,
2.11 6.24 Ill.

3.25 ...... Just Milling Co., Nashville,
2.91 5.09 Tenn.

3.00 ...... The Quaker Oats, Co., Chi-
2.75 4.65 cago, Ill.

2.50 ...... Standard Feed Co., Memphis,
3.28 5.551 Tenn.











Nutriline "Momylk" Dairy Feed 1571


Steer Head Molasses Feed..... 1572


Mak-Fat Molasses Feed........ 1573


Mixed Chicken Feed.......... 1574


Special Horse and Mule Feed.. 1575


Purina Feed ................. 1576


Acme Feed .................. 1577


Choice Feed ................. 1578


O. K. Horse Feed.............. 1579


Midland Poultry Feed......... 1580


Ballard's Brand .............. 1581


Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found .....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....


12.00
12.64

12.50
5.36

12.00
12.00


5.10

12.00
9.21

9.80
9.00

10.00
2.45

9.00
8.62

12.00
11.09

2.50
4.61


15.00
14.99

9.00
9.62

10.00
9.34


11.41

10.00
11.23

12.00
16.23

10.00
10.00

11.00
12.24

10.00
12.20

17.50
16.50


8.04 15.781
9.001 14.931


48.00 4.50 ......
45.24 7.22 8.08

56.51 3.00 ......
63.33 3.14 4.04

55.00 3.50 ......
59.23 2.30 5.46


65.16 2.23 5.10

58.00 3.25 ......
54.54 3.92 3.60

58.00 4.00 ......
55.78 4.75 2.70

70.00 3.00 ......
69.10 3.45 2.70

58.00 2.50 ......
61.12 3.35 3.72

55.00 2.00 ......
58.29 3.51 3.76

50.50 2.50 ......
53.59 4.61 10.11

53.00 4.42 ......
55.27 4.60 6.50


Nutrillne Milling Co., Crow-
ley, La.

Drago Grain Co., Mobile,
Ala.

National Milling Co., Ma-
con, Ga.

Excello Feed Milling Co.,
St. Joseph, Mo.

Stringfellow & Doty Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Ralston Purina Co., St.
Louis, Mo.

Valley Milling Co., St. Louis,
Mo.

City Mills Co., Columbus,
Ga.

Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co.,
Omaha, Neb.

Midland Mixed Food Co.,
Kansas City, Mo.

Ballard & Ballard Co.,
Louisville, Ky.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALY SES, 1913.-(Continued.)


NAME, OR BRAND.


Omega Stock Feed........... 1582 Guaranteed 12.001
lFound..... 13.421
M. Middlings ................ 1583 Guaranteed 5.70
Found..... 7.20
Pure Wheat Middlings....... 1584 Guaranteed .00
ound..... 5.70
Southern Dairy Feed.......... 1585 Guaranteedl 9.00
I Found..... 10.15
Steinmesch Mixed Feed....... 11586 Guaranteed 6.0
Found..... 4.881
Camp's Flaked Corn and Oats.. 1587 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 4.17

Pure Dustless Alfalfa..........1588 Guaranteed 30.001
Found...:. 29. 67
Pawnee Feed ................ 11589 Guaranteed 12.00
S IFound..... 16.17


cd
cdm"
M -


12.00[ 50.00 1
11.931 49.41

17.81 54.44
17.29 53.48

15.00 CO. 00
17.02 56.72

0.00 55.00
8.95 01.77

10.00 65.00
10.97 66.80

10.00 65.00
10.09 67.85

14.00 ...
13.00 37.36

8.251 65.00
8.691 58.89


NAME AND. ADDRESS
OF MANUFACTURER.


5.00 ...... Webb & Maury, Memphis,
6.87 8.57 Tenn.

6.40 4.55 Hecker-Jones-Jewell Milling
6.00 5.451 Co., New York, N. Y.

4.00 ...... Igleheart Bros., Evansville,
5.29 5.45 Ind.

7.50 ...... Western Grain Co., Birminig-
4.83 2.97 ham, Ala.

3.50 ...... Steinmesch Feed Co., St.
4.58 2.15 Louis, Mo.

4.00 ...... The Toledo Grain & Milling
4.271 3.60 Co., Toledo, Ohio.

1.50 ...... The Otto Weiss Alfalfa Co..
2:77 7.37 Wichita, Kan.

3.O5 .:... INational Oats Co., St. Louis.
4.35 3.92 Mo.


* >. "3



11 ^
0 -T!= 3
53


-------


7~








Carolina Horse and Mule Feed. 1590 Guaranteed 12.00 10.50
Found..... 11.77 11.93

Kentucky Farm Feed......... 1591 Guaranteed 6.42 16.45
Found..... 4.20 19.131

Snow's Horse and Mule Feed.. 1592 Guaranteed ...... 10.50
Found..... 11.50 10.73

Circle C. Molasses Feed...... 1593 Gauranteed 12.00 10.50
Found..... 11.79 10.30

Old Beck Sweet Feed......... 1594 Guaranteed 12.00 8.50
Found..... 11.49 9.08

Reliable Horse Feed.......... 1595 Guaranteed 15.00 10.00
Found..... 14.36 11.71

Feed Meal ................... 1590 Guaranteed 8.00 12.50
Found..... 8.32 12.72

Camp's Flaked Corn and Oats. 1597 Guaranteed 8.00 10.00
Found..... 7.31 9.96

Atlas Feed ................... 1598 Guaranteed ...... 11.85
Found..... 11.65 12.35

Homco Feed ................. 1599 Guaranteed 7.00 9.50
Found..... 4.25 10.97

Red Seal Mixed Feed.......... 1C00 Guaranteed 7.00 9.50
I Found..... 4.25 10.97


53.00
56.01

58.00
58.26

55.00
55.00

55.00
56.29

55.00
60.40

52.00
50.26

60.00
59.22

65.00
65.43

57.18
57.10

67.89
64.10
67.89
64.10


3.50 ...... Allneed Mills Co., East St.
3.77 6.47 Louis, Ill.

4.60 ...... Ballard & Ballard Co.,
4.20 4.64 Louisville, Ky.

2.75 ... G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
3.08 5.45 phis, Tenn.

2.50 ...... Cairo Milling Co., Cairo,
2.59 6.90 ll.

2.00 ...... Edgar-Morgai Co., Memphis,
2.34 3.23 Tenn.

3.50 ...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
3.60 6.74 St. Joseph, Mo.

5.50 ...... Mountain City Mills Co..
5.62 3.42 Chattanooga, Tenn.

4.00 ......The Toledo Grain and Mill-
4.27 2.13 ing Co., Toledo, Ohio.

3.35 ...... Bnanard & Hester, Tampa,
3.65 4.14 Fla.

7.00 ...... American Iominy Co., In-
4.25 3.68 dianipolis, Ind.

7.00 ...... IJocknsch, Davison & Co.,
9.03 3.68f Galveston, Texas.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1913.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


___________| III
Brown Mule Feed............. 1601 Guaranteed
Found.....

Star Feed ................... 1602 Guaranteed
Found.....

Protena Feed ................ 1603 Guaranteed
Found.....

Besto Molasses Feed.. ....... 1604 Guaranteed
Found.....

Sucrene Alfalfa Horse & Mule 1C05 Guaranteed
Feed ....................... Found.....

Sho-Me Horse Feed ........... 1606 Guaranteed
Found.....

Kawmo Molasses Feed........ 16071Guaranteed
Found.....

Standard Feed ................ 11608 Guaranteedj
S [Found.....


0 a I NAME AND ADDRESS OF
0,d MANUFACTURER.


12.00
12.62

10.00
10.46

10.00
8.95

12.00
8.461

12.001
11.091

15.00
10.04

12.00
11.87

12.00
11.04


10.00 50.001
9.92 55.74

11.70 57.00
13,081 58.70

11.70 57.00
14.30 57.90

10.00 57.00
9.63 59.36

11.00 50.00
12.89 55.58

10.00 52.00
11.42 57.77

9.00 55.00
10.50 57.09

10.00 55.00
10.28 58.60


8.40


5.11i

4.13


5.13


Good Luck Mills, St. Louis,
Mo.

Illinois Feed Mills, St. Louis,
Mo.

Ralston Purina Co., St.
Louis, Mo.

J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
La.


...... American Milling Co., Chi-
5.08 cago, Ill.

...... Excello Feed Milling Co..
4.29 St. Joseph, Mo.

...... Kornfalfa Feed Milling Co.,
5.18 Kansas City, Mo.

...... Standard Feed Co., Mem-
4.42 phis, Tenn.











Infermary Feed .............. 1609 Guaranteed
Found.....

Ideal Horse & Mule Feed...... 1610 Guaranteed
Found ....

International Poultry Feed.... 1611 Guaranteed
Found.....

Larro Feed ................. 1612 Guaranteed
Found ....

Cerolfa Stock Feed............ 1613 Guaranteed
Found.....

M. Middlings ................ 1614 Guaranteed
SFound.....

Shipstuff ................... 1615 Guaranteed
I Found.....


7.50 0.78 62.95
3.38 9.74 64.57

12.00 10.50 56.00
9.45 10.97 61.45

5.00 10.00 70.00
2.41 10.53 71.37

14.00 19.00 50.00
12.12 19.13 51.60

11.50 13.00 55.00
4.87 14.22 61.86

6.27 17.59 53.65
10.90 17.36 54.51

7.00 14.50 54.00
5.15 .71 59.45


6.05 ...... Barnard & Hester, Tampa.
6.05 5.26 Fla.

3.50 ...... Just Milling & Feed Co.,
3.40 2.80 Nashville, Tenn.

3.50 ......International Sugar Feed Co.,
3.42 1.82 Memphis, Tenn.

3.00 3.50 The Larrowe Milling Co.,
3.86 4.36 Detroit, Mich.

3.50 ...... Edgar-Morgan Co., Memphis,
4.13 4.80 Tenn.

5.78 ...... Hecker-Jones-Jewell Milling
4.60 3.96 Co., New York, N. Y.

4.00 ...... The Dunlop Mills, Rich-
4.60 4.07 mond, Va.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1913. L. HEIMBURGER, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911.
ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.


LABEL. MANUFACTURER. C



Wurtzburger Style Malt Tonic.. Wurtzburger Malt Extract Co., At- 3.88
S' lanta, Ga.

Hop Ale ...................... .................................... 0,20

Florida Bud., 12 oz. Guaranteed The Florida Brewing Co., Tampa, 3.27
less than 2% Alcohol. Fla.

Florida Bud., 12 oz. Guaranteed The Florida Brewing Co., Tampa, 2.95
less than 2% Alcohol. Fla.

Extract Jamaica Ginger........ New Smyrna Pharmacy, New Smyrna, 91.04
Fla.

Sc
Gider ............................. ....................... ........ 7:39


FROM


Nat R. Walker, Crawfordville. ,


T. C. Smyth, Tavares.
T. C. Smyth, Tavares.


T. C. Smyth, Tavares.

W. H. Newell, New Smyrna.


Tiampa Bottling Works, Tampa

E. D. Wester, DeFuniak Sp'gs.


F.










SOFT DRINKS.
(These Drinks Contain No Alcohol.)


No. LABEL., MANUFACTURER. FROM.
__ .' '* ___ ___ j___________


Poinsetta. Contains no alcohol,
- etc;

Golden Ribbon. Non-intoxicating,
etc., 12 ozs.

Mezzo No. 1. Elberta Flavor..


Golden Ribbon. Non-intoxicating,
etc.. 12 ozs.

Schooner Brew. Preserved with
: 1/10 of % 'Benzoate of Soda,
National Beverage Co., Chatta-
etc. Bottled under authority of
National Beverage Co., Chatta-
nooga, Tenn.


The Purity Extract & Tonic Co., Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.

Council Bluffs Soda Water Co., Coun-
cil Bluffs, Iowa.

Anderson & Co., Atlanta, Ga.........


Council Bluffs Soda Water Co., Coun-
cil Bluffs, Iowa.

Crown Bottling Works, Brooksville,
Fla.
I


H. Blaine Peacock, Tarpon Springs.


paul Carter, Mariatnd:


A. R. Denmark, Tallahassee.


Tallahassee Fruit & Grocery Co., Talla-
hassee.

Crown Bottling Works, Brooksville.










SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES--(Continued.)
CITRUS FRUIT.


I '


NAME. DATE. FROM.



1472 Pomelo (Sample No. 2)........ Aug. 27, 1913................ 2.23 IJ. R. Williams, Citra.

1473 Pomelo (Sample No. 1.......... Aug. 27, 1913................ 2.05 J. R. Williams, Citra.

1479 Oranges ........................ Sept. 18, 1913................ 1.49 Barney Dillard, Astor.

1480 Grapefruit ..................... Sept. 18, 1913 ............... 1.83 Barney Dillard, Astor.

MISCELLANEOUS.

No. LABEL. ANALYSIS. FROM.


1468 Blue Grass Belle Catsup. Put up Sodium Benzoate........None. IPeninsular Grocery Co., Tampa.
by The Castleman-Blakemore Net measure............ 16.6 fluid wzs.
Co., Louisville, Ky.; 16 fluid Microscopic Examination.
ozs. Mold (in 2% of fields) .... = 2
Yeasts & spores per 1/60 cc= 8
Bacteria (per cc) .........= 5,000.000












OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1913
MISCELLANEOUS.


No.


REMARKS.


LABEL. RESULTS.


Airio Brand Cane & Corn Syrup. Sulfur Dioxide ......... =None.
Packed by Dunbars, Lopez & Net Weight ............ =12, 2 /8 ozs.
Dukate Co., New Orleans, La.

Excelsior Brand Beets. Packed Salicylic Acid ........... =None.
by C. E. Sears & Co., Circleville, Benzoic Acid ...........=None.
Ohio. Net weight ........=2 lbs. 1, 3/8 ozs.

Crown Brand Little Neck Clams. Salicylic Acid............ None.
Packed by L. Pickert Fish Co., Benzoic Acid ............=None.
Boston, Mass. Net weight ............ =15, 7/8 ozs.

Monticello Special Reserve Rye Alcohol (ty volume)....=44.13%
Whiskey. The Monticello Dis-
tilling Co., Baltimore, Md.

Mild Holland Gin. Hanne Bros., Alcohol (by volume).....=34.32%
importers and bottlers, Jack-1
sonville, Fla.


Illegal. Misbranded. No. statement of
net weight or measure.


Illegal. Misbranded. No statement of
net weight or measure.


Illegal. Misbranded. No. statement of
net weight or measure.


Illegal. Misbranded. No statement of
net weight or measure or alcohol
percentage on label.


Illegal. Misbranded. No. statement of
net weight or measure or alcohol
percentage on label.


REMARKS.











OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1913
-- -- ..--..--. --... .... LARDS, LARD COMPOUNDS A.ND_ CQOKIN.G_.OILS-..


LABEL.


Armour's "Shield" Pure


Lard,


Armour &. Co. (on CO-l. tub).


I
rd2
uS




Sold in bulk .


1205 Wesson Snowdrift Oil. Choice Not stated..
Winter Pressed Cotton .Seed-
Oil. Good for salads and cook-
ing; etc. The, Southern Cotton"
SOil-Co., New York, Savannah,
SNew Orleans, Chicago.

1206 Advance Compound. Ingredients: Sold in bulk
Prime Oleo Stearine and Re-
fined Cotton Seed Oil. Sulg-
berger & Sons Co., of Oklaho-1
ma (on CO-lb. tub).


.... .. 62.5


13% ozs. 69.9


....".....] 83.2


a-:
CC


50.2*


59.8






56.60


C)
c)
C12.

C
C


Absent.


Present






Present


REMARKS.


Legal.


Illegal. No statement of net
weight or measure.





Legal.


----i--- I


I .









Scoco Shortening. Not less than 3 lb. 7 os.
1 lb. 7 ozs. net. Contains only
C. S. Oil, Stearine made from
C. S. Oil and Oleo Stearine.
Made at Savannah, Ga. The
Southern Cotton Oil Co.


Pearl-Choice Refined Cotton Seed
Oil, Prime Oleo Stearine-Beef
Fat. Tennessee Packing and
Stock Yards Co., Nashville,
Tenn. (on tierce).

Kneedit. Composed of C. Seed
Oil. Cotton Seed Stearine and


Oleo Stearine. Edible Products
Co. Made at Savannah, Ga.
(on 60-lb. tub).

1210 Fairbanks Brand Compound. r
Composed of C. S. Oil, Oleo
I Stearine and Stearine made
from C. S. Oil. The N. K. Fair-
banks Co., New Orleans. (on
50-lb. can).

1211 Indiana Brand Pure Lard.
Kingar & Co., Indianapolis,
Ind. (on 50-lb. can).


Sold in bulk


iold in bulk




told in'biulk


"o)Il in


1 Ib. 7 ozs.




I .. 1


88.6 58.00





63.8 55.30




03.2 56.40


bulk .......... 65.9


Present





Present




Present


55.2" iPresent Legal.


50.3 Absent.

I


Legal.





Legal.




Legal.


Legal.


I-- -


S










OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1918 -Continuead
LARDS, LARD COMPOUNDS AND COOKING OILS.




LABEL. REMARKS.
0 0

__ g |S ~ ,eg


Morris' White Seal. Made from
Cotton Seed Oil and Oleo
Stearine, Morris & Co., E. St.
Louis. |Sample from 45-lb.
can).

Invincible. For shortening, for
frying. The Proctor & Gamble
Co. Made at Ivorydale, 0., and
Macon, Ga. (on 60-lb. tub.)

Sea Foam Compound. Cotton
Seed Oil and Oleo Stearine.
Made for Kingar & Co., Indian-
ols. Ind. (on 60-lb. tub).


Sold in bulk]......... 84.2


Sold in bulk .......... 93.9



Sold in bulk ......... 86.7


55.9


Present Legal.


57.00 Present Legal.



55.2 Present Legal.










White Breast Brand Pure Lard,\Sold in bulk
401-54 gross. Morton Gregson|
Co., Nebraska City, Neb. (Label
taken from bottom of tierce).

Cream 'O'Cotton. Contains only Sold in bulk
sterilized C. S. Oil and Oleo
Stearine. Texas Refining Co.,"
Greenville, Texas. (on. 45-lb.
tin).


Eagle Brand Pure Lard with
Oleo Stearine. Jones & Lamb
Co., Baltimore, Md. (on 45-lb
tin).

Sunny South C. S. Oil and Oleo
Stearine.' Net weight of con-
tents 46 lbs. Street & Corkran
Co., Baltimore, Md. (on 45-lb.
tin can).

Polar Compound. Sterilized Cot-
ton Seed Oil and Oleo Stearine.
Net weight 45 lbs. 9 ozs. Man-
ufactured by the Merchants &
Planters' Oil Co., Houston, Tex.
(on 45-lb. can).

Tennessee Country Style Pure
Lard (on 45-lb. tin can).


I .. .


Sold in bulk ........


Sold in bulk ....


Sold in bulk .........





Sold in bulk ........


65.7



87.2




63.0



83.4




83.6





69.6
B9a


50.4 IAbsent. Legal.


56.5*




50.2*



56.2




55.2*





50.9*


Present




Absent.



Present




Present





Absent.


Legal.




Legal.



Legal.




Legal.





Legal.


I











OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1913-Continued.
LARDS, LARD COMPOUNDS AND COOKING OILS.


LABEL.


Crisco. Purely vegetable. Net
weight 11 lbs. The Proctor &
Gamble Co., Cincinnati, 0.

Cottolene. Cotton Seed Oil-
Oleo Stearine, 1 lb. 10 ozs. net
weight. Contaiils lio hog fat.
The N. K. Fairbank Co.

Snowdrift. Contains only C. S.
Oil and Oleo Stearine. Not less
than 23 ozs. net. The Southern
Cotton Oil Co., Gretna, La.


and 12lbs. !lb 8 ozs. 76.3


lb. 10 ozs. 1 lb.10 ozs.


23 ozs ....


87.1


251 ozs.j 81.9


to





53.20


02
;a

o
0. -
a0


REMARKS.


Absent. Legal.


55.20 (Present Legal.


55.90


Present


Illegal. Net weight not cor-
rectly stated in pounds and
ounces.















1417 Cream White. Choice C. S. Oil,
Prime Oleo Stearine-Beef Fat.
Tennessee Packing and Stock
S Yards Co., Nashville, Tenn. (on
barrel).

S1418 Swift's Jewel Shortening. Made
from refined Cotton Seed Oil
and Oleo Stearine (on barrel).

1419 Cudahy's White Ribbon Com-1
pound. Prepared from Cotton
Seed Oil, Oleo Stearine and
Beef Fat (on barrel).

1420 Cudahy's Milwaukee Snow Ball,
composed of C. S. Oil, Oleo
Stearine and Beef Fat. Cudahy
Bros. Co. plant, Cudahy, Wis.

1421 Pure Lard, Laurel Leaf Brand.
Sulzberger & Sons Co. (on 40-lb.
tin.

1422 Cudahy's Milwaukee White Cham-
pion Brand Pure Lard. Cudahy
Bros. Co., Cudahy, Wis. (on
1 40-lb. tub).


Sold in bulkj..........j 88.9 56.3 Present Legal


Sold in bulk .......... 85.5


Sold in



Sold in


bulk .....


bulk) .......... 69.9


bulk ..........


Sold in bulk ....


55.3



55.3*




50.2



50.0


Present Legal.



Present Legal.



Present Legal.



Absent. Legal.



Absent. Legal.
I
Asn.ILgl









OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1913-Continued.
LARDS, LARD COMPOUNDS AND COOKING OILS.





LABEL. a ; r REMARKS.
g i | .
|____ r
z


1423 Swift's Silver Leaf Brand, Guar-
anteed Pure Lard. Swift & Co.
(on 60-lb. tub).

14241Flake White for shortening, etc.
Proctor & Gamble Co.. Ivory-
Sdale, 0. (on 69-lb. tub).

1425 Snowhite. Composed of C. S. Oil.
The N. K. Fairbank Co., New
Orleans, La. (on tierce).

1426 Armour's White Cloud. Composed
of Cotton Seed Oil and Oleo
Stearine. Armour & Co. (oni
60-lb. tub).


Sold in bulk



Sold in bulk



Sold in bulk



Sold in bulk


51.1


59.7


55.4



55.30


Absent. Legal.



Present Legal.



PresentlLegal.



Present Legal.
I


..........






..........










1427 Armour's Simon Pure Leaf Lard. Sold in bulk .......... 58.5 48.8" Absent. Legal.
Armour & Co. *

1428 Cudahy's Rex Pure Lard (on side Sold in bulk .......... 60.9 50.1* Absent. Legal.
of tierce).









x




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