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 Title Page
 County map of state of Florida
 Peanut growing, hog cholera control,...
 Crop and live stock conditions
 Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00024
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Peanut growing, hog cholera control, additional rules and regulations by state nursery inspector and board of control
        Page 3
        Page 4
        The peanut: its culture and uses
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
        Hog cholera
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Additional rules, regulations, and modifications
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
    Crop and live stock conditions
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
    Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Caution to owners of live stock
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Circular no. 4
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
        Circular no. 5
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        Circular no. 6
            Page 83
            Page 84
        Special samples
            Page 85
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 86
            Page 87
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 88
            Page 89
        New York wholesale prices
            Page 90
            Page 91
        State valuations
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Average composition of commercial feed stuffs
            Page 96
            Page 97
        Commercial state values of feed stuffs for 1912
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Special fertilizer analyses
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Official fertilizer analyses
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
        Special feeding stuff analyses
            Page 108
        Official feeding stuff analyses
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
        Special food analyses
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
        Official food analyses
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
Full Text






VOLUME 22 NUMBER




FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


AGRICT,." ._AL DEPARTMENT

JULY 1, 1912

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part 1-Peanut Growing, Hog Cholera Control, Additional Rules
and Regulations by State Nursery Inspector and Board of
Control.
Part 2-Crop Conditions.
Part 3-Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs and Foods and Drugs.

Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter unler Act of Congress of June, 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FREE T TTHOSE REQUESTING THEM

T. J. APPLEYARD, State Printer,
Tallahassee, Florida
-.. j











COUNTY MAP OF STATE OF FLORIDA




















PART I.

Peanut Growing, Hog Cholera Control, Addi-
tional Rules and Regulations by State
Nursery Inspector and Board
of Control.

















THE PEANUT:

ITS CULTURE AND USES.


BY W. R. BEATTIE,
Assistant Horticulturist, Bureau of Plant Industry,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.


INTRODUCTION.

Very little is known regarding the early history of the
peanut in the United States except that it was brought
into the country during the period of slave importation
and became established along the James River in Vir-
ginia. It is not until after the Civil War that we find
any record of peanuts becoming a commercial crop, and
then only on a small scale. Prior to this time peanuts
were grown in gardens for home use, and the nuts when
parched were considered a great treat by the children.
Soon the value of peanuts as a money crop was recognized
and farmers began growing an acre or two for the mar-
ket, and upon this beginning has been built an industry
that represents ten or twelve millions of dollars annually.
During the early days of the peanut industry only one
or two varieties were recognized, those having the largest
pals being known as "Virginians" and the smaller pod-
ded( sorts as "Africans." Soon the farmers observed that
among the large-pod variety there were certain plants
Ihat were of a more compact or bunch habit than the gen-
eral crop, which spread or ran upon the ground; also
that these bunch plants produced larger pods than the
runner type. Accordingly the two sorts were separated,
and the names of "Virginia Bunch" and "Virginia Run-
ner" given them.












The habits of the peanut render it especially adapted
to cultivation on the sandy soils throughout the Southern
States, and the wide ranges of uses to which it may be put
makes it a desirable addition to our farm crops. During
past years the greater part of the commercial peanut crop
has been produced in Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. With the boll weevil
injuring the cotton crop of the Southwestern States the
peanut promises to become an important money crop and
a part of the regular farm rotation of this section. In
many cases the peanut has proven fully as profitable as
any other farm crop. The production of peanuts has
not kept pace with the increased demand, and there is
little danger, for the present at least, of overstocking the
market. Spanish peanuts can be grown for 2! cents a
pound, and when the general market becomes supplied the
oil mills can handle the surplus, making therefrom one of
the finest cooking oils that can be produced. The cake
resulting from the manufacture of oil is valuable for stock
feeding and fertilizer. There is always the opportunity
to convert peanuts into pork that will bring fancy prices.
The famous Smithfield hanis and bacon, which sell at
from 30 to 40 cents a pound, are made from hogs that
are partly fed on peanuts. All kinds of live stock will eat
and thrive on peanuts and peanut ihy.
The peanut belongs to the same family of plants as do
the clovers, alfalfa, beans, and peas, but has the peculiar
habit of developing its seeds underground instead of on
top, as do most of the legumes. During the early days
when peanuts were first cultivated it was thought necess-
sary to cover the blossoms with soil in order to secure
well-filled pods. It is only necessary, however, that there
should be a bed of loose soil surrounding the plants and
they will then care for themselves. The blossoms of the
peanut appear above ground, shooting out from where the
leaf joins the stem, and after fertilization takes place the
flower withers and the little stem or peg elongates and












pushes down into the earth, where the pod develops.
This habit of the peanut has an important bearing upon
the production of the crop in that peanuts should be
planted only upon loose, sandy soils, and the soil must be
well cultivated and loose in order that the pegs may enter
the soil and form pods.
In common with other legumes the peanut has the
power, through the agency of bacteria upon its roots, to
draw the nitrogen from the air and not only use it for
its own growth but to store it for the use of other plants
as well. An illustration of this may be had by pulling up
a peanut plant and noting the immense number of nitro-
gen-gathering nodules upon its roots.

THE SOIL AND ITS PREPARATION.

Peanuts thrive best on a rather loose, sandy loam soil,
such as is found in abundance throughout the Southern
States. The soil should be well drained, or what is or-
dinarily termed a "n~arm" soil. Peanuts can be grown
on the heavier alluvial soils, but are easier to cultivate
and mature better on the light, sandy loam soils. It will
pay to prepare the land for peanuts in a most thorough
manner, and much of the difficulty in keeping the crop
clean will be avoided by harrowing or disking the land
two or three times before planting. The Spanish variety
may be grown on much heavier land than the Virginia
Punch or Runner.

CROP ROTATION IN PEANUT CULTURE.

Peanuts should not be grown exclusively on any farm,
but in rotation with other crops. Peanuts are adapted
to growing in a system with corn, cowpeas, oats, cotton,
and Irish potatoes, the cropping arrangement being made
to conform to local requirements. The crop of peanuts
should invariably follow some crop that has been kept












cultivated and reasonably clean, as this decreases the
labor required to keep the weeds under control.
When fitting land for peanuts it should be plowed
about the same depth as for corn, broadcast plowing be-
ing preferable to bedding. If the land has been in corn
the previous season it should be plowed in ample time to
allow the materials that are turned under to thoroughly
decay before planting time. Some growers prefer to bed
the land and then drag down almost level before plant-
ing, but on the whole it is better to keep the surface
smooth and then work the soil toward the rows in culti-
vating.

FERTILIZERS REQUIRED BY PEANUTS.

Commercial fertilizers, if any are used, should be ap-
plied about the time the land is given its last harrowing
before planting. A crop of 60 bushels of peanuts will
require about 85 pounds of nitrogen, 15 pounds of phos-
phoric acid, 32 pounds of potash, and 48 pounds of lime.
It would be difficult to secure a fertilizer that would sup-
ply these elements in the above proportions; in fact, it
would not be profitable to return all of these elements,
especially the nitrogen, to the soil by means of commercial
fertilizers. A fertilizer containing about 2 per cent nitro-
gen, per cent horicid, and S pe et los ic r cent potash is
recommended for peanuts, and this miay profitably be ap-
plied at the rate of 200 to 400 pounds to the acre. This
will add the necessary phosphoric acid and potash to
grow a crop, but only a small part of the nitrogen; the
remaining nitrogen can be secured more cheaply through
the agency of cowpeas, crimson clover, and the peanuts
themselves if they are properly handled.
Stable manure is not a desirable fertilizer for peanuts
unless applied about a year in advance. The objections
to manure are that it carries with it too many weed seeds
and also produces a rank growth of peanut vine at the
expense of the peanuts.











Lime is essential to the proper ripening of the pea-
nuts, and where not already abundantly present should be
applied to the soil. Marl is often used as a substitute for
lime, being hauled and spread upon the land during the
winter months. Ordinary lime may be used at the rate of
300 to 600 pounds to the acre on land being planted to
peanuts. In many cases the soils of the Southern States
are pretty well supplied with lime. Where there is any
doubt about the matter lime should be applied to a por-
tion of the field at least and its influence upon the yield
and ripening of the peanuts observed. The lime should
be applied to the surface after plowing and while fitting
the land for planting.
Wood ashes are an excellent fertilizer for peanuts, as
they contain both potash and lime. Unfortunately, the
supply of wood ashes is quite limited and only small quan-
tities may be secured. Where obtainable, unleached wood
ashes may be applied to peanut land at a rate not exceed-
ing 1,200 pounds to the acre.
Several methods are followed in distributing the ferti-
lizers for peanuts, and while some growers employ a one-
horse distributor and sow the fertilizer where the row
is to be, others scatter it broadcast and harrow it into
the soil. The roots of peanuts do not spread like those.
o! corn, and it imay be more economical to apply the fer-
Illizers to, he row rather than broadcast.

PLANTING PEANUTS.

SELECTION OF SEED.

Careful selection of seed is just as important with pea-
u. l s with any other farm or garden crop. Our best
varieties have originated by selection, and it stands to
reason that they may be still further improved by the
same process. The best of the crop should always be
saved for seed, and wherever a particularly fine plant
is found it should be saved separately and the peas plant-











ed in a row to themselves, or in a small patch where they
can be closely observed. If several extra fine plants
were selected and the peanuts from each saved separately,
this seed might be planted in a special seed plat, a row be-
ing devoted to the product of each plant; in this way
comparisons may be made from time to time and the best
saved for further selection. The ideal plant should not
only produce a large number of pods, but the pods should
be well filled, uniform in size, smooth, and of bright color.
The peas themselves should be plump, bright, uniform in
shape, and well filled. If a grower does not have a good
strain of seed, lie should purchase from someone who has
given the matter attention; then in future years give
especial care to the matter of saving good seed.

PLANTING SHELLED OR UNSHELLED PEANUTS.

The seed of the large varieties of peanuts are practically
all shelled by hand for planting. In the case of the Span-
ish the peas practically fill the pods, making it difficult
to remove the shell by hand. The machines used in the
factories for shelling peanuts break the peas more or less,
and even when the peas are not broken the germination
,is often injured by the rough usage in shelling. For this
reason it has been found safer to plant the Spanish peas
in the shell almost exclusively. The shelled peas will
sprout a little more quickly than those in the shells,
but a few days' time will not make any material differ-
ence. If desirable, tle pods may be soaked in water
for a few hours before planting, in order to hasten ger-
mination.

PLANTING MACHINERY.

The machines now upon the market for planting pea-
nuts are constructed somewhat upon the plan of the one-
horse cotton planter. These machines are well adapted
to planting the shelled peas, both of the large and small











varieties, and, if the peas are clean and free from stems,
are quite satisfactory for planting the Spanish nuts in
the shells.
Jn using the one-horse machines the land is first laid
off in rows one way by means of a marker similar to
that used in laying off corn rows. The planter is then
run in this mark and it drops, covers, and rolls at one
operation. The different distances of planting are re-
gulated by changing a gear wheel on the machine.

PLANTING BY IHANI).

For hand dropping, furrows or marks are made with a
sweep-stock or single shovel just at little in advance of the
droppers to prevent drying out. The seed peanuts are
hauled to the field in bags, and close-woven baskets of
about half-bushel size have been found desirable to drop
from. The drolppers simply take a small handful and
work them between the thumb and first finger,at the same
time stooping slightly in order to drop tile pods at regular
distances. Behind the droppers the seed is covered by
means of a cultivator having the center teeth removed
and a notched board placed across the rear portion, the
notch coming directly over the row. The horse that
draws the covering cultivator or harrow should be hitch-
ed with a side draft so that it will not walk directly upon
lthe row.

DISTANCES TO PLANT.

The planting distances will depend upon the variety
being grown; also upon the strength of the land. For
the Virginia Bunch variety the usual distances are 30 to
36 inches between the rows and 10 to 12 inches in the row;
for Virginia Runners the rows are placed 36 to 40 inches
apart and the plants 12 to 16 inches apart in the rows.
For Spanish and other similar varieties the rows are











placed from 32 to 38 inches apart and the plants 8 to 12
inches apart in the rows.

DEPTH TO COVER THE SEED.

The depth to cover the seed will depend somewhat
upon the compactness of the soil. If the soil is of a light
sandy nature and in good condition the seed should be
covered about an inch deep. Should the soil at planting
time be quite dry it will be desirable to cover the seed
at least 1l or 2 inches to insure germination.

PROTECTION OF SEED FROM ENEMIES.

After planting, seed peanuts are often molested by
moles, crows, and pigeons; blackbirds are also accused
of destroying the young plants just as they come through
the ground. For the protection of thelseed in the shell
from moles it is permissible to coat the shells very lightly
with pine tar thinned with kerosene. It would hardly
be permissible to coat the shelled seed with tar, although
a few peas might be tarred and mixed in with the regular
seed. For protection against crows stretch lines of white
string across the field; also scatter a few tarred peas
over the surface of the ground. Pigeons are peri;aps the
most difficult to either frighten or repel, and the use
ol a shotgun is the most certain remedy. If the seed are
all securely covered in planting there will not be so great
danger of crows or other birds getting a start upon them.

CULTIVATION.

TOOLS REQUIRED.

The tools adapted for the cultivation of peanuts are
practically the same as those required for corn. Shortly
after planting the peanut field may be gone over once












or twice with a weeder of the King or Hallock type, or
with a light harrow; to loosen the surface and destroy
weeds that are starting.' In using these tools very little
attention need be paid to the rows; in fact, many growers
prefer to go directly across the rows. Later, after the
plants appear and the rows can be followed, one or two
teeth can be removed from the weeder, and this type of
cultivation continued until the plants are large enough
for working with regular corn cultivators. A two-horse
spring-tooth riding cultivator is one of the best imple-
ments for handling the peanut crop, and after the plants
attain considerable size the spring teeth can be changed
for the regular shovel teeth. A one-horse cultivator hav-
ing five teeth is also an excellent implement, as the size
of the shovels can be increased as the crop becomes larger,
or hillers can be attached for working the soil toward
the rows of plants.

METHOD OF HANDLING THE CROP.

Throughout the growing of a crop of peanuts it should
be the aim to keep the entire surface of the soil fine
and loose, and a bed of loose soil near the plants in which
the pods may form. It is scarcely necessary to add that
the crop should be kept free from weeds. At the final
cultivation it is considered a good practice to throw the
soil well toward the plants, forming a bed, at the same
time leaving a small furrow in the center of the alley
to provide drainage in case of heavy rains. It is not
necessary to cover the blossoms or to throw soil over the
vines. Some growers follow the practice of rolling the
peanuts to make the pegs go into the ground and form
pods. The best method is to provide an abundance of
loose earth near the plants and they will have no difficulty
in plants setting pods. Care should be taken, however,
that the pegs that are already rooted be not disturbed by
the final cultivation. Hand hoeing may be necessary;












especially during a rainy season, when the grass grows
rapidly.

HARVESTING.

Peanuts are harvested by lifting the vines from the
ground with the pods attached and then stacking them
around small poles to cure. Proper harvesting and curing
is the most important part of the handling of the peanut
crop. Many persons who are growing peanuts for the
first time have an idea that the crop may be handled in
some easier and cheaper way than by stacking, but many
years of practice has shown that stacking around poles
is the simplest and best method. By placing the vines
and peas in the small stacks they are permitted to dry
slowly and at the same time are in so small quantity that
they will not become musty.
The proper time for harvesting the peanut crop is in-
dicated by a ripening appearance of the vines. This con-
sists of a slight yellowing of the foliage and a drooping
of the stems. A few days later some of the lower leaves
will begin to fall, especially if the weather is dry. To the
northern limits of the peanut territory the harvesting
should be done just before frost. Many beginners insist
upon digging their peanut crop too early and before the
peas have fully matured. It is true that there may be a
pod now and then which bursts and sends forth a sprout,
but the number of these are few as compared with those of
later formation which are rapidly filling. Where good
peanut hay is especially desirable the crop should be
harvested in time to secure the best quality of vine and
leaf.

LIFTING THE PEANUTS FROM THE SOIL.

The usual custom in the older peanut sections has been
to simply run a plow under the roots and lift them from
the ground. Sometimes a specially designed plow is used












having a share or point with a broad wing to extend be-
neath the plants; in other cases an ordinary plow is used,
but the turning or moldboard is removed to prevent the
furrow being turned, the idea being to simply loosen the
plants. This practice of plowing out the crop has been
responsible in a great measure for the general depletion
of soil fertility throughout the peanut belt. To maintain
soil fertility these roots must be left in the soil. By the
old method of plowing out the crop almost all of the roots
are removed, and as they have not subsequently been re-
turned to the soil, depletion of fertility has been the
result. The proper method is to employ a tool which will
cut off the greater portion of the root and leave it in the
soil. In several sections the farmers have had special
tools made for running under the peanut vines, and
some of these are worthy of more general use.

MACHINES FOR DIGGING PEANUTS.

Some of the regular machine potato diggers have been
found quite satisfactory for harvesting peanuts, but as a
rule these implements have not sufficient clearance to
allow a heavy growth of peanut vines to pass through.
Atl present very much larger machines are being perfected
and especially adapted to the work in the peanut fields.
The machine or elevator potato diggers require about
four strong mules to pull them, but may be so regulated
lhat the sharp point of the digger will cut off the roots
just below where the peanuts are formed, carry the vines
with the peas attached up and over the elevator device,
and deliver them on the ground behind the machine with
practically all of the soil shaken from them. An outfit
of this kind will dig from 8 to 12 acres daily and require
about 20 hands to stack the vines behind it. In land that
is weedy there is always difficulty in harvesting the crop,
regardless of the kind of implement used for digging.












METHOD OF STACKING PEANUTS TO CURE.

As already mentioned, the proper method of curing
peanuts is to stack them, vines and all, around stakes set
in the field where the crop is grown. Before starting
to harvest the crop provide the small poles to be used as
stakes around which to stack the peanuts. These stakes
should be 7 feet in length by about 3 or 4 inches in diam-
eter, and may be either split out of large logs or simply
small saplings with the bark upon them. From 12 to
35 of these poles will be required for each acre, accord-
ing to the stand and growth of vine; the rule, however,
is about 22 stacks to the acre. Have the poles hauled
and piled where they can be conveniently distributed
through the peanut field when the rush of harvesting
comes on.
As a rule 11, 13, or 15 rows of peanuts are placed in a
single row of stacks. The digging machine is started in
the center, on the row where the stacks are to stand, and
is worked outward until the necessary number of rows are
lifted. After the machine has gained sufficient headway
the poles are distributed at distances varying from 12
to 20 paces and set in the ground by means of a pointed
bar, a peg and a maul, or by a post-hole digger, and
tamped in place. The stake should be set into the soil
sufficiently deep to prevent the stack blowing over. On
the other hand, they should not be set so deeply as to
prevent their being easily lifted with the stack at thrash-
ing time.
Peanuts should not be handled when there is dew or
rain upon the foliage, but, aside from this, they may be
stacked within an hour or two after digging. Before
starting to build the stack nail a couple of short pieces of
lath at right angles across the stake about 8 inches from
the ground, then simply build the stack upon these, keep-
ing the peas or roots close around the pole and giving
the outer part of the stack a downward slope to carry
off the water during rains. As the stack is nearing com-












pletion it should be kept higher in the center and drawn
in to a point. If convenient, the top of the stack may be
finished with a bundle of dry grass, or a few peanut vines
may simply be rolled together and pressed down over the
top of the pole. Wet or green hay should never be placed
on top of the stack. When completed, the stack should
be about 6 feet in height and 30 inches in diameter.

LENGTH OF TIME THAT PEANUTS SHOULD REMAIN IN THE
STACKS.

Once the peanut vines are in the stacks they will be
comparatively safe for 5 or 6 weeks, or until they are dry
enough to pick from the vines. As a rule the curing
period will require at least 4 weeks, and if the peas are
not molested by birds, field mice, rats, or thieves they may
remain in the stacks for 3 or 4 months without injury.
The crop will not be ready to pick from the vines until
the stems have become brittle and the peas have attained
a nutty flavor.

PICKING PEANUTS FROM THE VINES.

Formerly peanuts were all picked from the vines by
hand, the work being done largely by negro women and
children. Recently there have been developed several
machines for doing this work. These peanut-picking
machines are of two types, one having a cylinder like
the ordinary grain thrasher, and in the other a picking
mesh of diagonally woven wire is employed.

PEANUT-PICKING MACHINERY.

The essentials of a satisfactory peanut-picking machine
are, first, that the pods should be picked clean from the
vines without breaking or cracking the shells, and, second,
that the peanuts be cleaned of all the coarser dirt and
2-Bull.












separated from the pieces of stems. There is always a
small quantity of very fine dirt adhering to the hulls
of the peanut which must be separated from them in the
cleaning factory. The greatest objection to the work of
peanut thrashers in the past is that they broke too many
of the shells, in many cases breaking the kernels as well
and rendering them unsalable. This breaking of the
shells is a more serious damage than might appear at
first thought, as the keeping qualities of the nuts depend
upon their not becoming broken. There are a number of
insects which attack peanuts while in storage, especially
during the summer months, and these cannot injure the
kernels unless the shell is cracked or broken.
The picking of peanuts is paid for at so much per bag
of about 4 bushels; 35 cents a bag being the ruling price.
In some sections the owners of the picking machines do
the work for every tenth bag, or where they provide a
baling machine and press the peanut hay into bales they
take every eighth bag, but none of the hay. Hand picking
is paid for at the rate of from 40 to 50 cents a hundred
pounds.

SACKING AND HANDLING PEANUTS AFTER PICKING.

As the peanuts come from the picker they are placed
in sacks and either hauled direct to the cars or stored
for later delivery. The standard peanut bag is about
4 bushels, 00 or 92 pounds of Virginias and 110 to 120
of Spanish. As the bags are filled they are sewed and
tied at the corners to facilitate handling. If tile peanuts
are not to be sold immediately, they are often taken from
the bags and stored in bins or in slatted cribs where they
will get air. The storage room should be proof against
rats and mice.
The peanut vines, if properly cared for after the re-
moval of the peas, make an excellent hay. The best plan
is to have a baling press working while the thrashing or












picking is being done and press the vines into moderate-
size bales.
The peanut-picking machines break the hay considera-
bly, but by careful handling in baling the leaves and
stems can be worked into the bales together in the proper
proportions. The feeding value of peanut hay renders
it worth while to take special precautions in curing and
handling it. One important point in curing peanut hay
is to get the vines into the small stacks soon after digging
them; also to avoid having the hay become wet by rains.

VARIETIES OF 1'EANUTS.

At present about five varieties of peanuts are grown in
the United States, these being known as Virginia Runner,
Virginia Bunch, African (or North C(arolina), Spanish,
and Valencia, commonly known as Tennessee Red. The
Virginia Runner and Bunch produce peas that are prac-
tically alike, these being the Jumbo or parching peanuts
of our markets. The African, or North Carolina, as it has
come to ble called in this country, has a spreading vine
and produces a medium-size pea, which is used for shell-
ing purposes and for the smaller grades of parching slock.
Tlie Spanish variety is the small peanut, with only two
peas in a pod, which is used so extensively for the manu-
facture of salted peanuts, peanut butter, etc. The Span-
ish has an upright or bunch habit of growth, with the
peanuts clustered about the base of the plant. The
Valencia, or Tennessee Red variety, has rallher large and
sometimes very long pods, with anywhere from two to
seven small red peas crowded together in the podls. The
Valencia is in demand for use in the manufacture of salt-
ed peanuts and peanut butter. A form of the Valencia
known as (;eorgia Red or Red Spanish is extensively
grown for hog and cattle feeding in parts of the Southern
States. However, this variety is not desirable for the
market. For the present, the true Spanish, or white












Spanish as it is sometimes called, is the proper variety
to grow throughout the Southwestern States, as it is
easy of cultivation and contains a high percentage of
oil.

MARKETING OF PEANUTS.

The peanut s as hey come from tlhe picking machine
on the farm are generally bagged, and either hauled direct
to lie cars or stored for a short time in barns or sheds
until they c.1n be shipped. It should be the aim or every
grower to have his crop go into the bags in just as clean
a condition as possible, free from stones, sticks, (irt, and
pieces of stems. Where the peanuts are not properly
cleaned tile buyers are compelled to dock lhe weights,
and this always results in dissatisfaction to olth parties.
If the peas are not clean as they come from tle thrasher
they should be run through a fanning mill to blow out
the diri, and afterwards picked over by hand if necessary.
Peanuts are comparatively light lo handle anid can be
transported considerable distances, and it is not neces-
sary to have a factory in every section where peanuts
are grown. As a rule the buyers from the factories come
to the various shilling points to inspect, purchase, and
load the peanuts into cars as they are hauled in by tlhe
farmers. Another method is where tile factory is repre-
senied in a town by a merchant who buys the peanuts
from the farmers and stores them until wanted for ship-
ment to the factory.

WEIGHT OF PEANUTS.

The unit in handling peanuts is the pound rather than
the bushel or bag. The large Virginia peanuts weigh
about 22 pounds to the measured bushel, while the Span-
ish weight about 30 pounds to the bushel. Two and one-
half cents a pound for farmers' stock would mean about












75 cents a bushel for Spanish, while 3. cents a pound,
or 77 cents a bushel, would be the ruling price for Vir-
ginias. By using the pound as the unit in buying and
selling peanuts the troublesome question of weight per
bushel will be avoided. Peanuts grown in one section
may weigh more to 1he bushel than those grown in an-
other or even an adjoining territory.

THE CLEANING FACTORY I'ROCE(L

In the factory the peanuts are fanned and polished to
remove the dirt, and are separated into a number of dif-
ferent grades. During the process they are all carefully
picked over by hand and cleaned until the finished pro-
ducts would scarcely be recognized as coming from the
rough stock that was shipped in by the farmer. All of
the shelled or broken peas must be separated from the
whole ones and worked into shelled stock of various
grades.
in the factories where the Spanish are handled the
process is not so complicated, yet even here there is the
same careful hand picking to remove inferior peas and
refuse not taken out by the cleaning machinery. The
peas are passed over a fan, then are shelled and the hulls
own out. Next the peas are run through a machine
which separates the split or broken peas from the whole
ones. The different grades are then run on what are
termed picking belts beside which a large number of
women are seated and pick out every inferior pea or par-
title of foreign matter. The refuse from a peanut factory
often contains practically every waste or cast-off article
that may be found on the farm. After the cleaning pro-
cess is completed the peanuts are bagged in clean, new
burlap bags and marked with a stencil showing the brand,
grade, and name of the cleaner.











USES OF PEANUTS.

USES OF I'EANUTS AS FOOD.

Peanuts now find uses in a great many ways aside from
being roasted and sold in packages. There is a great
and ever-increasing demand for peanuts to be used in
the preparation of salted peanuts, peanut butter, peanut
candies, peanut lour, and vegetarian meat substitutes.
Owing to the high nutritive properties of peanuts they
are rapidly assuming an important place as a standard
human food, ranking in this respect with olher legumes
which they resemble in composition. The consumption of
peanut butter alone amounts to hundreds of carloads of
the product annually.

PRODUCTION OF OIr FROM 'PEANUTS.

In France and G(ermanyI millions of bushels of peanuts
are annually crushed for oil, the oil being used for cook-
ing, for salad making, and in the place of butter, while
the cake resulting from the manufacture of the oil is used
as stock food. In this country we have many oil mills
that are either idle or running on short time on account
of the shortage of cottonseed, and it is only a matter of
a little time until our production of peanuts will enable
us to build lup a great industry in the manufacture of
peanut oil. In general the oil front the peanut has the
same culinary and table uses as olive oil, cottonseed oil,
and some other vegetable oils, and, like them, is consider-
ed a wholesome and valuable food product. Thirty
pounds, or a bushel, of Spanish peanuts will yield 1 gal-
lon of oil and about 20 pounds of cake. A gallon of this
oil is worth 75 cents wholesale and the cake is worth 1}
cents a pound, or 25 cents, making a total of $1 from a
bushel, from which the working cost must be taken. As-
suming that an average of 40 bushels of Spanish pea-
nuts can be grown to an acre, we have a very promising











proposition in the manufacture of peanut oil, especially
when the peanut hay will almost pay the cost of growing
the crop.

VALUE OF PEANUTS AS STOCK FEED.

All of the inferior or refuse peanuts can be used to
advantage on the farm for feeding to hogs and also to the
general farm animals. There is not a pound of the entire
peanut crop, including roots, stems, leaves, and peas, but
that has sonic value, and not an ounce should be wasted.
The lops when used as hay have a feeding value equal
to the best clover, alfalfa, and cowpea hays; in fact, pea-
nut hay is one of the best dairy feeds for milk produc-
tion. As a result of the handling of peanuts in the clean-
ing factories there are quantities of finely broken and
shriveled peas that are sold for hog feed, and sometimes
ground into meal and sold for feeding to cows. The
cake resulting from the manufacture of peanut oil is
equal to the best cottonseed meal for feeding purposes.

COST OF GROWING PEANUTS AND RETURNS.

The total average cost of growing an acre of peanuts
in the Southern States is about S!12 where no commercial
fertilizers are used. Add to this the cost of 200 to 300
pounds of fertilizer and the total will not exceed 816 an
acre. On a block of land consisting of 54 acres in north-
ern Louisiana during the season of 1910 the itemized cost
per acre of production was as follows: Plowing and fit-
ting the land, seed, and planting, .'.:'. ; cultivation, $2.80;
harvesting and stacking, including the cutting and haul-
ing of poles, $3.87; thrashing and hauling to car, $4.80;
bags and twine, $1.05; total cost, $17.87. This land pro-
duced and average yield of 60 bushels to an acre and
1 ton of hay. The peanuts sold for $1 a bushel of 30
pounds and the hay for >~12 a ton, making a total return
of $72 an acre. Deducting the cost of growing, which in-








24

cluded the foreman's time, the grower received a net re-
turn of about $54 an acre, or $2,916 from the 54 acres.
Doubtless a great many more peanuts will be grown in
the future than in the past; but the demand is also in-
creasing and there is money to be made so long as the
price for Spanish peanuts remains above 2 cents a pound
for farmer's stock. There is great interest in hog raising
throughout the Southern States, and peanuts are a valua-
ble adjunct to corn for the production of high-grade
hams and bacon.














HOG CHOLERA.

BY A. P. SPENCER,
A.ssi.sttant in E:iicnsion, Unircrsity of Florida.
G aincsville.

Perhaps the greatest obstacle that hog raisers in Flor-
ida have to contend with, is the disease known as hog
cholera. A conservative estimate places the direct loss
from hog cholera throughout Florida for 1910 at a quar-
ter of a million dollars. Furthermore, this disease is
responsible to a large extent for the inferior hogs that are
found too generally in tile State. Many farmers who
would otherwise have purchased improved stock lo build
up their herds, have hesitated and in most cases chosen
not to do so because of the danger of loss from hog
cholera. Since the greater part of Florida is without
a well-defined stock law, the average farmer is power-
less to keep his herd free from such an infectious dis-
cIeases l ho c(holelra.

SYMPTOMS OF HOG CHOLEIA.

All the animals may not show similar symptoms when
affected with hog cholera, but generally speaking the fol-
lowing are typical symptoms.
The hog is sluggish; has little appetite; a desire to
drink much water; some diarrhoea; inflamed eyes, with a
sticky discharge ofien gluing the eye-lids together;
usually a hacking cough; a weak uncertain walk; and
red blotches, which afterwards turn purple, over the
body. Usually the hogs live only from 3 to 10 days after
the first sign of disease. Few recover, and the recovery
in such cases is slow, while frequently the hair comes
off and ulcers appear on the body.











TREATMENT.

It is the general opinion among those who have had
most experience with this disease, that ordinary medi-
cines are of little or no value in curing it, and that the
only treatment that has been effectual is the serum treat-
ment prescribed by the Bureau of Animal Industry,
Washington, D. C. To describe in detail the method of
obtaining the serum and the precautions that must be
observed in its manufacture, would require too much
space. It is, however, sufficient to state that the manu-
facture of this serum must be under the control of a
competenI Veterinarian. It must, he produced under
sanitary conditions, and then judiciously distributed.



HOG CHOLERA SERUM.
From Florida Health Notes.
(Official Bulletin State Board of Health.)

METHOD OF DISTRIBUTION.

In accordance with Chapter 6167, Laws of Florida.
1911, the State Board of Hlealth last August commenced
the administration of hog cholera serum, sending its
Veterinarians to such points as requests came from; but
the number of calls for this service increased so rapidly
that it was found impracticable to attempt to detail men
oftentimes a long distance to perform this work, and in
many cases the Veterinarians were so busy that com-
pliance with requests was delayed and the owners dis-
satisfied because of the loss of hogs from cholera.
At the 1912 annual meeting of, the State Board of
Health the compliance with this statute and methods
to be followed were thoroughly gone into, and the work
has been placed upon an entirely new basis. The Board
now furnishes the serum free to hog cholera agents of











the Board. These agents, one or more to the county,
administer the serum at a specified cost to the owner,
and make reports of their work to this office. The Board
also retains its present staff of field Veterinarians who
attend to inquiries from those counties in which there
is no cholera agent and who are always seeking to find
men in such counties to recommend for this appoint-
ment.

Q[ ALIFICATIONS AND DUTIES OF IIOG CHOLERA AGENTS.

The dutties of these agents consist in the administration
of the scrum to hogs for the prevention of hog cholera.
In making such appointinents the Board requires that
prompt indl reliable reports of work done shall be made
to this office upon forms to be furnished for the purpose,
and that the work will be done in strict accordance with
the rules to be issued by the State Health Officer and the
State Veterinarian.
It should be distinctly understood that the administra-
tion of scrum to well hogs does not prreent the disease,
and to sick ons es os not cure it. What it does do is this:
lWhen administered to hogs soon after they are exposed
to hog cholera and before they have developed the dis-
case it so modifies the course of the disease that few cases
(lie, after which these hogs are permanently imnmltne.
But to administer it in the absence of the disease, or to
administer it to the sick wIith the hope of curing is that
nmuch waste of energy.
The Board furnishes to these agents, free of charge,
such quantities of scrum, as are necessary for the work
of each such agent, but it is required that the disposition
of one lot of serIum shall be reported upon before another
is furnished. The agent is expected to furnish his own
hypodermic syringe for the work. and where proper
v,,m intEs can not be had conveniently or otherwise, the
Board assists in procuring these.












CHARGES.

The following scale of charges for administering hog
cholera serum when the work is done at a reasonable dis-
tance from the residence of the agent, is suggested by the
Board, and any radical departure therefrom is to be con-
sidered an imposition upon the owner of the hogs and
will be sufficient reason for withdrawing the agent's ap-
pointment.

10 hogs, $1.50; 15 hogs, $1.75; 20 hogs, $2.00; 25 hogs, $2.25;
30 hogs, $2.50; 35 hogs, $2.75; 40 hogs, $3.00 45 hogs, $3.25; 50
hogs, $3.50; 55 hogs, $3.75; (O hogs, $4.00; 05 hogs, $4.25; 70
hogs, $4.50; 75 to 85 hogs, $5.00: 00 to 100 hogs, $6.00; or over
100 head, add the stated charge for each number.

In cases where the distance is great, special arrange-
ntents as to charges may le made between the owner and
the agent for doing the work.

INSTRUCTIONS.

The hypodermic syringe lori admiii;Jstering hog cholera
serum should be of about 20 to 30 cubic cen:timou'ters capa-
city andl should have rubber fittings so lhat it can be
thorou ,ghly di sin'ected by boiling.
It is suggested in all cases where the ;ag.u:t is preparing
to comply with an owner's request for the administration
of serum, that arrangements be made beforehand so that
the work may proceed with the greatest dispatch. The
owner should be requested to have his hogs penned pre-
vious to the arrival of the agent and should furnish at
least two men to catch and hold the hogs, as the operator
must keep his hands and syringe clean and free of dirt.
This he can not do if he handles the hogs.
The serum is to be injected according to the following
dosage:












Dose to Dose to
Weight of pigs. be given. Weight of pigs. be given.
Small pigs ....................10-15c.c. 225-275 pounds ........... 45c.c.
30- 50 pounds ........... 20c.c. 275-325 pounds ............ 50c.c.
50- 75 pounds .............. 25c.c. 325-375 pounds .............. 55c.c.
75-125 pounds .......... 30c.c. 375-425 pounds .............. CO.c.
125-175 pounds .............. 35c.c. 425-475 pounds ............ (;5c..
175-225 pounds .......... 40c.c. 475-525 pounds .............. 70c.'.
For sick hogs double the dose. In all cases of large doses,
small quantities in several places.

The injection is made under the skin on the inside of
thie thigh where the skin is loose and where there is least
fat. The serum should be poured into a cup which has
been previously sterilized wilhi boiling water. This cup
should be covered to keep out dirt and flies. Before each
puncture with the needle the same should be dipped into
a solution of formalin, one to four parts of water, so as
to disinfect the wound made by the needle and thus pre-
vent abscesses. When the day's work is done, the syringe
and needles should be thoroughly washed free of all blood
and then boiled for a minute or two. The syringe, how-
ever, should not be suddenly immersed in hot or boiling
water. After this boiling, it should be taken apart, the
rubber plunger and needles dried and greased with car-
holized vaseline. By careful attention to these details a
syringe wil last inedfinitely.

RItO.id )I R]E.

When an owner finds or suspects that any of his hogs
have hog cholera, lie should communicate at once with
the State Board of Iealth at Jacksonville, or with the
hog cholera agent in his county, furnishing information
as to the number of hogs, status of the disease, location
of animals, etc., as prescribed by the application form
issued by the Board.
Where there is a hog cholera agent in the county ar-
rangements can be made at once for the work. In other
cases the Board will detail one of its Veterinarians to
the point and the work expedited as much as possible.












In applying for serum or its administration, or in re-
porting outbreaks of cholera, if the telegraph is used,
the message should not be sent collect. This expense is
to be borne by the owner or agent.




AGENTS.

Names and Post Office addresses of Agents of State
Board of Health and who are authorized to supply and
administer Hog Cholera Serum.

County. Name. Postoftice.
Alachna ...................... G. A. IBvles, W indsor.
Alachua ................... . ). Frederick, Alachua.
Alachua ........ MI. F. Studs!ill, R. F. 1). no. 3, Alachuna.
Alachua .................. Dr. E. R. Flint, Gainesville.
Alachua ...................... B. B Smith, Newberry.
Baker ....................... R. C. Crews, Macclenny.
Baker ..................... W E. Schoch, Macclenny.
Bradford ..................... J. Wynn, Hampton.
Bradford ........................ .Theo Tison, Starke.
Calhoun .................. .. Griflin, Blountstown.
Columbia ............... D. Dr 1. Jordan, Lake City.
Citrus .................... r. PIuterbaughl, Hernando.
)eSoto ................... A. K. Albritton, Limestone.
DeSoto .................. .. as. Goft, Punta Gorda.
1 eot(. .................. Dr. C. A. Gavin, Fort Green.
1)eSoto ................... .. II. II. Rainey, W auchula.
Escambia .......... Walter II. Johnston, Pine Barren.
Escambia ... J L. Godwin, R. F. I). No. 1, Atmore, Ala.
Gadsden ..................... D. D. Edwards, Gretna.
Gadsden .......................... J. B. Ball, Quincy.
Gadsden..W. 1). Richards, Express Greensboro, Juniper.
Gadsden ............... M. E. McCorquodale, Havana.
Gadsden .................. J. L. Shepard, Greensboro.
Holmes ................ H. D. & J. K. Brock, Bonifay.












County. Name. Postoffice.
Holmes .................. Dr. D. G. Milton, Westville.
Hamilton .................. Dr. J. H. Corbett, Jasper.
Jackson ................ Dr. J. G. Phillips, Marianna.
Jackson ...................... W W ester, Inwood.
Jackson ...................... A. J. Brunson, Sneads.
Jackson .............. A. M. Singeltary, Grand Ridge.
Jefferson... Dr. W. H. Walker, Express Aucilla, Lamont.
Jefferson ..................... S. V. Coxetter, Lloyd.
Jefferson .................. G. C. McCall, Monticello.
Jefferson ................D. Dr. W. N. McLeod, Aucilla.
Lafayette ........................ M. J. Fowler, Day.
Lafayette ................ J. I. .Johnson, Steinhatchee.
Lafayette........................... ... (lornto, Mayo.
Lake ...................... J. M. W alton, Lady Lake.
Lee ...................... W. H. Towles, Fort Myers.
Leon ................... .T M. Atkinson, Tallahassee.
Levy ......................... .. E. Brown, Raleigh.
Madison ................ B. Sever, Ebb or Sirmana.
Marion ................... .S. H. Gaitskill, McIntosh.
Marion... C. R. Tydings, Dist. Agt. for Emergency, Ocala.
Marion .................... Dr. WV. H. Counts, Ocala.
Marion ........................ W. L. Martin, Sparr.
Marion ........................ R. F. Rogers, Conner.
Marion ................... Dr. S. II. Blitch, Blitchton.
Orange ............... Dr. B. D. Wienenga, Orlando.
Pinellas ............ Dr. W. T. Tanner, St. Petersbnrg.
Polk ........................ A. 0. Graddey, Bartow.
Polk ........................ R. L. Young, Mulberry.
Pulnam ..................... J. P. Newbeck, Palatka.
St. Johns ...................... Dr. Dolan, Hastings.
St. Johns .................. H. B. Paris, St. Augustine.
St. Johns .................. Dr. F. S. Whitney, Elkton.
Santa Rosa ................ J.W. Urquahart, Milton.
Santa Rosa .................... J. R. Miller, Milligan.
Suwannee ..................... M. A. Best, Branford.
Suwannee .................... C. P. Odom, Branford.












County. Name. Postoffice.
Suwannee .................... A. S. Hogan, Wellborn.
Suwannee ................ D)r. J. H. Reynolds, O'Brien.
Taylor ....................... Barney O'Quinn, Perry.
Walton .................... Alex McRae, Florala, Ala.
Walton ......... P'rof. H. J. Rogers, DeFuniak Springs.
W aukulla .................... C. K. Allen, Sopchoppy.














ADDITIONAL

Rules, Regulations, and Modifications Adopted by the lBolnd of
Control in Accordance with Chapter 6156, Laws of Florida,
at a Meeting Held in Jacksonville on April 8, 1912. In
Force After June 1, 1912.

MEXICAN COTTON BOLL WEEVIL.
MANGO WEEVIL.
IRISH POTATOES.
FRUIT FLIES.
EXCEPTIONS TO RULE 1 (NURSERY INSPECTION
CIRCULAR 1.)



RESOLUTION OF BOARD OF CONTROL.
Jacksonville, Fla., April 8, 1912.

Under the provisions of Chapter 6556, Laws of Florida,
1911, the Board of Control considered the Additional
Rules and Regulations and Modifications for Nursery
Stock hereinafter set forth. The said Additional Rules
and Regulations and Modifications were read section by
section and as a whole. On motion of Mr. Wartman,
seconded by Mr. King, and unanimously carried, the
Board of Control hereby makes, adopts and promulgates
the following' just and reasonable Additional Rules and
Regulations and Modifications for the government of the
inspection, certification, sale, exchange, transportation
and introduction of nursery stock, trees, shrubs, plants,
vines, cuttings, scions, grafts, buds, seeds, pits, bulbs,
roots, or parts thereof, infested or infected, or suspected
of being infested or infected, with injurious insects or
other plant pests, or injurious fungus, bacterial or other
plant diseases; and the Board of Control hereby declares
the said Additional Rules and Regulations and Modifi-
23-Bull.













cations necessary to prevent the introduction, increase
or dissemination of said insects, pests and diseases, and
that the same shall be in force after June 1, 1912.



MEXICAN COTTON BOLL WEEVIL.


Rules and Regulations Governing the Transportation, Impor-
tation and Exchange of Articles Infested or Suspected of
Being Infested with the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil.

17. That in order to prevent the introduction of the
Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonoimus grandis) into
non-infested territory in the State of Florida, from any
region in Florida or from any other States and countries
where the same is known to exist, the articles listed in
Iule 18, during the period of prohibition applying to
each, shall not at any time be brought into non-infested
territory in the State of Florida from infested territory,
or from any point situated within 20 miles of the area
known to be infested by the boll weevil.
Provided that, between January 15th and July 15th of
any year, shipments of the hereinafter named articles,
whether by public or private conveyance, originating
within or ginned within a zone 20 miles in width imme-
diately :1,i..;i,;., but outside of the area of the weevil
infestation, may be made to points not more than 40
miles outside of the known line of infestation as last offi-
cially determined and announced.
18. "Articles prolibited.f
1. Seed Cotton;
*This list of items was unanimously recommended by the
Association of Cotton States Entomologists at a meeting held
at Atlanta, Go., December 6th, 1911. No 8 was added to list
by Florida.
T-Articles not prohibited.
In order to remove a 1 doubt upon a number of points, it is
particularly stated that there is no restriction upon any of the
following list of nine items at any season. Unanimously rec-












2. Cotton Seed;
3. Seed Cotton Sacks, cotton seed sacks and cot-
pickers' sacks, any of which have been used
within eight months for any of the purposes
indicated;
4. Cotton Seed Hulls between August 1st and
December 31st;
5. Spanish Moss and Corn in Shuck between
October 1st and June 30th;
G. Living Weevils or weevil stages or weevil work
in possession of any person outside of infested
territory except a qualified Entomologist;
7. Household goods containing any of the forego-
ing during the period of prohibition applying
to each;
8. Sugar Cane when not cut back and stript of
its leaves;
Where no time limit is specified, the restriction is con-
tinuous.
19. (a) That shipments of the articles prohibited in
Rule originating outside of territory infested by the
Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil and outside of the 20-mile
safety zone, may be made at any time, without certificate
or affidavit, to any part of Florida.
(b) That these Rules and Regulations shall not apply
to shipments into counties of Florida in whiich cotton is
being grown at the time the shipments are made. A list

ommended by the Association of Cotton States Entomologists.
1. Baled Cotton, flat or compressed;
2. Linters and loose cotton lint;
3. Cotton seed meal, cake or oil;
4. Corn shelled or in the ear with shuck removed, oats
or any other seed except cotton seed;
5. Cotton seed shown by affidavit to have been sacked
continuously for nine months or more;
6. Cotton seed for planting purposes after fumigation
with carbon di-sulphide by a competent entomologist;
7. Hay;
S. Empty freight cars;
6. Sugar cane when cut back and stript of its leaves
(Added to list by Florida).












of the counties in Florida in which cotton is grown is
herewith appended.f
20. That, in order to meet the requirements of ship-
pers of quarantined articles located in non-infested ter-
ritory, and outside the safety zone of 20 miles, but who
may find it necessary to have proper credentials to
accompany their shipments to other States and portions
of States not infested by the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil,
the system of allidavits and certificates recommended by
the Association of Colton States Entomologists in ses-
sion at Atlanta, (Ga., on December 5 and 6, 1!)11, and in
use by the State of Alabama, is hereby adopted. Appli-
cations for certificates and forms of the affidavits to be
employed should be made to the Inspector of Nursery
Stock, Gainesville, Fla.

Affid(a it Form A. No ...................

AFFIDAVIT AND AGREEMENT RELATING TO
THE MEXICAN BOLL WEEVIL.
(To lbe e:.ecuied by oil mill repre,'nctatives.)


State of Florida,
County of'......................
B before m ef ...... ........ .... _..................
a Nolary Piublic (Juslice of ihe
Peace) in aInd Io said State ai n
County,
personally :appeared this day..... .
who, after being by me (duly sworn. !i !poms;s nal says as
follows:

;:Counties in Florida growing colton. Compiled from the
Eleventh Biennial Rleport of the Co missioner of Agricuiture
of Florida, pp. 217-2-1S and 331; and other sources. This list
is subject to revision by ilih Inspector of Nursery Stock.
Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Calhoun, Clay, Columbia, Dural,
Escamibi, Gadsden, Hamilton, Holme. Jackson, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Lake, Leon, Levy, Liberty, Madison, Marion, Nas-
sau, Orange, Pasco, Putnam, Santa Rosa, St. Johns, Sumter,
Suwannee, Taylor, Volusia Wakulla, Walton, Washington.












That he is (title ... ....of (mills) ..
located at .... ........... .. .... .. .. C ounty,... ....... ................ F la.
and that to his certain knowledge said oil mill has used
to date during this oil mill season of 191.........., cotton
seed grown or ginned at or shipped from points or places
in the following counties only:



nu consideration of the issuance to said mill of a certili-
cate allowing shipments of seed and cotton seed hulls to
be made to points in territory not yet infested by the boll
weevil, this party hereby agrees to the following condi-
tions: 1. That upon request he will furnish the party
issuing this certificate with a full and complete list of all
localities from which seed has been secured this season.
2. That, during the life of said certificate, said oil mill'
will not draw seed from olher territory that may be near-
er to the area of weevil infestation than that mentioned
in the foregoing statement of counties without first in-
forming the party signing said certificate as to the pro-
posed action. At all times seed may lbe drawn from coun-
ties located north and east of that in which said oil mill
is located. 3. Ile will immediately surrender said certifi-
cate at the call of the party issuing same. (ritificatl wiill
expire inIly :31, 191..........

(Signed) ..........

(P position or title) ...............

Seal of Sworn to and subscribed to before me this
N ota ry ..............................d ay of................................................ 19 1.....
................. .......................... ....,, Notary Public.
My commission expires.............................., 191....
This form is used only by oil mills in application for a cer-
tificate.











OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE: BOLL WEEVIL NO.........


Issu ed to ...................................... .............. .. a te ................. ..........
L ocated at ................... ........................C county, .. .. ........... ....... F la.

To Wihom It May Concern:
This is to certify that
T h e ...............................................................................................................................................
located at .................................................... State of F lorida,
th ro u g h ................... ........ ..................... ............ ............................... h a s fi led
in this office an affidavit (File No. ................) stating that
since August 1, 191........., said oil mill has used only cotton
seed grown or ginned at or shipped from, points or places
located in the following counties :.........................................



The maker of this affidavit furthermore agrees that said
oil mill will at any time furnish upon request a complete
list of all localities from which seed has been secured and
that said mill will not draw seed from other territory
which may be nearer to the area of weevil infestation
than that mentioned above, without first informing the
Inspector of Nursery Stock regarding the proposed action.
To the best of our knowledge and belief the territory
from which ihis oil mill draws seed is safely outside of the
area where the boll weevil is known to occur or is likely
to occur this season.
In accordance with said affidavit, I hereby certify that
cotton seed products of said oil mill are not liable to
contain, or to aid in disseminating what is known as the
Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil, and may therefore be safely
admitted into uninfested States or territory. Such ship-
ments are, however, always subject to the State Quaran-
tine Regulations existing at point of destination.
This certificate should be kept on file by the party to











whom it is issued. It becomes INVALID AFTER July
31, 191........., and may be revoked or recalled, for cause.
( S ig n e d ) ....................................................................................................
Inspector of Nursery Stock.
Shippers should provide an affidavit to accompany each
WAY-BILL with every shipment made into any State quaran-
tining only against INFESTED AREA. Blank froms for these
affidavits may be obtained by requesting the number desired of
the Inspector of Nursery Stock.
This form of certificate is issued only to oil mills.

AFFIDAVIT RELATING TO MEXICAN COTTON BOLL WEEInL.
Based on Florida Certificate No...................

WAY-BILL No..............................Car (Initials & No.)...
S h ip p e d to ............................. .................a.......... 1 ..... ...
Shipped by ..... .... .......................... ...... fro .....
Nature of shipment ...................
State of Florida,
C o u n ty o f..........................................
B efo re m e, ...................................... ....
a Notary Public (Justice of the
Peace) in and for said State and
County,
personally appeared this (lay ........................ ........... who, after
being by me duly sworn, deposes and says as follows:
T h at lie is.................. ....................................... of... ...............................
lo ca ted a t. ....................... ... .............. C o u n ty ................ .................. F la .
and that to his certain knowledge said oil mill has used
to date during this oil mill season of 191......... 1....., cotton
seed grown or ginned at or shipped from points or places
in the follow ing coun ties only :............ .................................. .................


He further states Ihat said oil mill has filed with the
Florida Inspector of Nursery Stock an affidavit setting
forth the above facts and that said oil mill has received
from said Inspector of Nursery Stock, and now has on
file BOLL WEEVIL CERTIFICATE No. ............................












which is dated at Gainesville, Fla.,...................................... 191.......
Signed with (position or title)..... ......................... ......... ..
Sworn to and subscribed to before me thi
S ea l of ....................................... d ay of ........................................................
N otary ........................... ......... ... ................... N otary P public.
My commission expires..................................... 191.......
This Way-bill affidavit form is used only by oil mills hold-
ing certificate.

Affidavit Form B, No. .................

AFFIDAVIT IN APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATE RELATIVE TO
BOLL WEEVIL.

Describe fully
n a tu re of sh ip m en t ......................... ......................................
Offered for
shipm ent by .......... ............... fro ...... ..... .......... S tate of....................
Ship to.............. ..... a....................... .......... ............ S tate of................
State of Florida,
C ou n ty of....................................
B efo re m e, .........................................................
a Notary Public (Justice of the
Peace) in and for said State and
County,
personally appeared this day ............................ .......... who,
after being by me duly sworn, deposes and says as follows:
That to his certain knowledge the shipment described and
addressed as above shown originated within ........................
miles (direction) ....................................from shipping point shown
above, or was grown entirely within the following de-
scribed area : at......................................... County of..... ................
State of..................................., or w within counties of ....................................
State of........................................... and that said shipment contains
no seed cotton or cotton seed grown nearer to the area
infested by the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil than the
territory described above, or beyond a radius of........................













miles South, Southwest or West of shipping point men-
tioned above.
In case of HOUSEHOLD GOODS offered for shipment
at points within counties wholly or partly included with-
in the quarantined area, the shipper deposes as follows:
That said shipment does not contain any of the following
items: Seed cotton; cotton seed; seed cotton sacks; cotton
seed sacks and cotton pickers' sacks, any of which has
been used within eight months preceding date hereof;
cotton seed hulls between August 1st and December 31st;
Spanish moss or corn in the shuck between ()ctober Ist
and June 30th, whether used as packing or in any other
way; or any living stage or stages of the Mexican Cot on
Boll Weevil or any specimens of their work, or sugar
cane when not cut back and stript of its leaves, according
to the best of his knowledge and belief.
(S ig n ed ) .........................................
Sworn to and subscriibed to before me this
S eal of ........................d ay of .................... .... ... ..., 191 ..
Notarv
........................................................................, N o ta ry P u b lic.
M y com m mission expires................. .......... 19 ......
This affidavit must be fully executed and then mailed 'o the
Inspector of Nursery Stock in order to secure a CERTIFIC \ E
authorizing shipment.
This form is used for individual shipments of household
goods or cotton seed oil mills, etc.

O 'II'IAI. (CE'ITlFI.I'A': lBOLL W EEVIL N ........

I s su e to ....................................... .. ........... ... .. ................. 1
Located at. .......................................... ..... Cla.
For shipment of.........................
B killing A address ...........................................
Accompanying
W ay-B ill ..............................Car (Initials & N o.)....
To Wl7hom It May Concern: This is to certify thai.
(N am e) ............... .......... .................... of ...................... .................. F la.,
his filed in this office an affidavit Form B (File No................)











stating that shipment described and addressed as above
shown originated within ..........................................miles (direction)
........................................... from shipping point shown above, or
was grown entirely within the following described area:

With HOUSEHOLD GOODS, there is not included any
of the following items during periods specified: Seed
cotton; cotton seed; seed cotton sacks, cotton seed sacks
and cotton pickers' sacks, any of which has been used
within eight months preceding date hereof; cotton seed
hulls between August 1st and December 31st; Spanish
moss or corn in the shuck between October 1st and June
30th, whether used as packing or in any other way; or
any living stage or stages of the Mexican Cotton Boll
Weevil, or any specimens of their work, or sugar cane
when not cut back and stript of its leaves, according to
the best of his knowledge and belief.
In accordance with said affidavit, I hereby certify that
the above described shipment is not liable to contain or
to aid in disseminating the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil,
and may be accepted and transported as shown above.
( S ig n e d ) ......................................................................................................
Inspector of Nursery Stock.
NOTICE: This certificate must be attached by railway agent
to Way-Bill of shipment for which issued, and is INVALID for
any other use. Agents should fill in Way-Bill and car numbers
above.
This form is issued for all individual shipments and accompa-
nies Way-Bill with shipment.

21. That shipments of household goods originating in
infested territory when ollered for transportation wheth-
er by public or private conveyance into non-infested ter-
ritory, during the period of prohibition applying to each,
must be accompanied by an affidavit stating that they
contain none of the articles named under Rule 18. With
railroad or boat shipments, this affidavit shall be at-
tached to Way-Bill.
22. That interstate shipments of quarantined articles











passing through an on-infested territory in the State of
Florida, shall be made in tightly closed box cars, and the
carriers shall exercise every reasonable precaution during
transit and in making transfers to avoid the possibility
of disseminating weevils thereby.
23. That no person except the Inspector of Nursery
Stock at Gainesville, his authorized deputies, Entomolo-
gists and investigators of insect problems at the Experi-
ment Station and University of Florida, the Woman's
College, the Colored School, the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and other Entomologists and investi-
gators of insect problems connected with institutions of
learning and investigation, of this State and the United
States, may lawfully receive, transport, have or keep in
his possession outside of the weevil infested area, any
living stage (egg, larva, pupa, or adult), or any weevil
work containing such stages of the Mexican Cotton Boll
Weevil.
Provided that any person may send living specimens of
the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil or its work, when en-
closed in strong, tightly wrapped and sealed packages,
preferably of metal or glass, not easily broken, to any
Entomologist or investigator of insect problems, qualified
and permitted by the preceding paragraph to have such
in his possession.
24. That all railroad, steamboat and express compa-
nies, or other common carriers, and all private parties
operating vehicles, boats, and all other means of trans-
portation, in the State of Florida, are especially enjoined
to comply with the requirements of these Rules and Regu-
lations and of the Laws of the State of Florida govern-
ing the same.
25. That a zone of 20 miles in width, immediately
adjoining but outside of the area of actually known wee-
vil infestation, is hereby established, which shall be
known as the "20 Mile Safety Zone," and all Rules and
Regulations herein promulgated shall apply to this zone,












exactly as though it were known to be actually infested
by the weevil; except as provided in Rule 17.
26. *That the Inspector of Nursery Stock shall at
least once each year, or oftener if necessary, issue a cir-
cular of information to the Press of the cotton-growing
counties, and others interested, setting forth the area and
line of actual weevil infestation as determined by the
United States Bureau of Entomology in cooperation with
the States infested.
27. All shipments, as hereinabove specified, shall be
subject to inspection and examination at the discretion
of the State Inspector of Nursery Stock or of any duly
authorized deputies, whenever such shipments shall be
known or suspected to be infested with the Mexican Cot-
ton Boll Weevil.

THE MANGO WEEVIL.

Rules and Regulations Governing the Importation, Transpor-
tation, and Exchange of Mango Seeds and Mango Fruit
Infested or Suspected of Being Infested with the Mango
Weevil.

2S. That, in order to prevent the introduction in lt
Florida, of the Mango Weevil ('ryptorlhyitnc is ,n"ii,,/
fera), the importation of Maango Seeds, except as bcel-Ji
after provided, is hereby prohibited.
29. That, since the seeds from imported mango fruii
are frequently used for planting, the importation of muan
goes infested with the Mango Weevil or with any other
injurious insect, or infested with any injurious disease, is
hereby prohibited. Healthy mango fruit may be imported
without inspection and without certification.
30. That, in order to meet the needs of growers of
*The present line of weevil infestation in Florida extends due
south from Pollard, Alabama. At the end of the dispersion
period of 1911 (October), Escambia County and part of Santa
Rusa County were found to be infested. The establishment of
the "20 Mile Safety Zone" (Rule 25) locates the danger line 20
miles further to the east.-Inspector.











young mango trees, importation of mango seed from
countries not infested with the Mango Weevil may be
made by special permit of the Inspector of Nursery Stock.
31. That all railroads, steamboat and express compa-
nies, and other common carriers, and all private parties
operating vehicles, boats, etc., in the State of Florida, are
especially enjoined to comply with the requirements of
these Rules and Regulations, and of the Laws of the State
of Florida governing the same.
32. All shipments of mangoes and mango seeds shall
be subject to inspection and examination at the discretion
of the State Inspector of Nursery Stock or of any of his
duly authorized deputies, whenever such shipments shall
be known, or suspected, to be infested with the Mango
Weevil. (See also Rule 11, Nursery Inspection Circular 1.)

IRISH POTATOES.

Rules and Regulations Governing the Transportation, Imnporta-
tion and Exchange of Irish Potatoes.

33. That in order to prevent the introduction of the
"wart disease" (Cl., i!,,,1ih1 t;l endlobiotica) of Irish 1o-
tatoes into the State of Florida, the importation of Irish
potatoes, affected with said disease, whether for planting
or eating, from English, WalesN,'Scotland, Ireland, Ger-
many, Hungary and New Foundland, or any State of the
United States or foreign country as soon as it becomes
infected with the "wart disease," is hereby prohibited.
34. That all potatoes intended for planting (so-called
"seed potatoes"), when imported into Florida from an-
other State or foreign country or from any locality not
prohibited, shall have been immersed for at least one and
one-half hours in a solution of formaline (made by mix-
ing one pound 4% formaldehyde solution and 30 gallons
water) for the purpose of destroying the spores of the
potato scab (Oospora scabies) and other injurious dis-
eases frequently found infecting potatoes. Any other












treatment of equal effectiveness, such as fumigation with
formaldheyde gas or dipping in corrosibe sublimite solu-
tion, may be substituted for the formaline treatment, at
the discretion of the proper Government or State Official
under whose jurisdiction the treatment is made.
35. Each and every package of a shipment of "seed
potatoes"' hall have a certificate attached as per Rule 6
(Nursery Inspection Circular 1). This certificate shall
also state that the potatoes have been treated with forma-
line, formaldehyde gas, or corrosive sublimite as previously
directed.
3Gi. Each and every package of a shipment of "seed
potatoes" shall have conspicuously marked upon it the
place where potatoes were grown, shipping point, con-
signor, consignee, and destination.
;17. iintil further notice is given, potatoes grown in
Florida need not be inspected or treated, but may be
exchanged and transported without a certificate; pro-
vided, however, that they are free f from injuroius insects,
pests and diseases. See also Section 4, Chapter 6156,
Laws of Florida ( Nnrsery Inspection Circular 1).
8S. Transporla ion companies an;d private carriers are
especially enjoineil to aid in making these Rules and
Regulations effective by rehlfsing shipments not properly
certified and by reporting uncertified shipments received,
according to Rule 8 (Nurserly Inspection Circular 1).
;3. All shipments of Irish potatoes shall be subject to
inspection and examination at the discretion of the State
Inspector of Nursery Stock or of any of his duly author-
ized deputies, whenever such shipments shall he known, or
suspected, to be infested with any injurious insect or pest,
or infected with any injurious disease. See also 11
(Nursery Inspection Circular 1).












FRUIT FLIES.

Rules and Regulations Governing the Importation, Transpor-
tation, and Exchange of Fruit Infested, or Suspected of
Being Infested, with Fruit Flies.

40. That in order to prevent the introduction of the
Morelos Fruit-fly (Anastrcpha (1'ryli It) ludens) from
Mexico or from any other State or country, or of the
Mediterranean Pruit-fly (Ceratitis (Halterophora) capi-
tatfea from the Mediterranean Countries, Africa, Austra-
lia, Hawaii, or from any other State or country, the im-
portation of any and all fruit infested with the injurious
Morelos Fruit-fly, the Mediterranean Fruit-fly, or any
other fruit-fly, is hereby especially prohibited. Provided,
that healthy fruit may be imported without inspection
and without certification.
41. It is further provided, that when, in the discretion
of the Inspector of Nursery Stock, the safety of the fruit
industry in the State is endangered, lie may, through the
publication of a circular so stating, altogether prohibit
the importation of fruit from any State or country in-
fested with any of the injurious iruit-flies mentioned in
Rule 40. Such prohibition shall remain in .I,-.i until
revoked by the State Board of Control.
-12. All shipments of fruit infested, or suspected of
being infested, with any fruit-fly, whether in transit, or in
hand of the purchaser or consignee, shall be subject to
inspection and stoppage in Iransit, and if found infested
shall be deported and destroyed, upon the order of the
Inspector of Nuresry Stock, at the expense of the owner,
consignor or consignee, or the person, firm or corporation
transporting the same.
43. Transportation companies and private carriers are
especially enjoined to comply with the requirements of
these Rules and Regulations and of the Laws of the State
of Florida governing the same.












EXCEPTIONS TO RULE 1

(Nursery Inspection Circular 1.)

Provided, that, until further notice is given, or at the
discretion of the Inspector of Nursery Stock, the plants
and parts thereof listed herewith, when apparently free
from injurious insects, pests and diseases, need not be
inspected, lbut may be exchanged and transported without
a. certificate attached. These exceptions do not apply to
any plants or parts thereof imported from foreign coun-
tries, nor from the possessions of the United States on the
mainland of North America. These exceptions do not
imply Ihat any less importance shall be placed upon the
other Rules and Regulations, or upon Section 4 of the
Law, Chapter G156*.

ExI:'ETi riNS.

Forest trees and forest shrubs when nol grown in a
nursery; seeds (except mango seed, and cotton seed in
localities infested with the Mexican Boll Weevil) ; vege-
table plants and other herbaceous plants; the roots, bulbs
and lubers (for Irish potatoes see Rules 33 to 39) of vege-
tables and other herbaceous plants: cut flowers; pine-
apple plans when not grown in a regular commercial
nurs'vry and when free from mealy-bugs and other injuri-
ous insects and diseases.

*Violation of any Rule or Regulalion adopted by the Board
of Control in accordance with Chapter 6156, Laws of Florida,
constitutes a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine not to exceed
$500.00, or by imprisonment not to exceed six months, or both,
in the discretion of the court (Sections 4 and 5, Chapter 6156,
Laws of Florida, Nursery Inspection Circular 1).
Violations of all Rules and Regulations should be reported
to the County Proseculing Attorney and to the Inspector of
Nursery Stock, setting forth the facts in the case.-Inspeetor of
Nursery Stock.





















PART II.

CROP AND LIVE STOCK CONDITIONS.


4-Buul



















DIVISION Of THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are Ihe divisions of
ties contained in each:

Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Halmilii)n,
J elfersoin,
Lafayetie,
Leon,
Liberly,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla-11.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holines,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
1Washington-7.


the State, and the coun-


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Haker,
Bradford,
Clay,
( Columbia,
Iuval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns---.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco.
Suiter,
Volusia-9.


Southern Division.


IBrevard,
I)ade,
DeSoto,
Hillsboroughn
Lee,
Manatee.


Monroe,
Osceola,
Palm Beach,
Polk,
St. Lucie-11.

















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. A. McRAE, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT. Chief Cleik



CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIVISION.-The reports from our correspond-
ents throughout all of this division are discouraging, to
say the least of it, as regards standard crops. Last year
there was an increase in almost every crop of from 25 to
35%. This year the reverse seems to represent the true
condition. Last year at this time the condition of cotton
in this division was 115, showing 15 points above what
is usually considered perfect condition. This season 63
represents the comparative condition with 100 as the unit
of condition, of course. The same relative condition can
be stated as regards Sea Island cotton. It is a little
better, but not much. Corn is also in bad shape, not only
from the effects of excessive rainfall, but unusually late
andi cold seasons to begin with, which is really the prin-
cipal cause of the poor condition of both cotton and corn.
Complaint is universal of deterioration through some
cause with almost all of the standard crops. It seems
also to have affected live stock conditions as far as hogs
are concerned, there apparently being more losses from
cholera tlln for many years. Our correspondents attrib-
ute these conditions to the unusual unfavorable seasons
making unusual conditions as regards animals unsani-
tary. Undoubtedly, unless there is a change in climatic
conditions in the very near future, the cotton crop will
be a very bad failure. The corn crop is already demon-
strating a very short one, and in its present condition
there is little chance for it to improve before maturity.











WESTERN DIVISION.-The conditions in this division are
practically the same as ill the one just noted. The cli-
matic conditions have been the same and the effect on
crops and live stock has not differed materially, conse-
quently both cotton and corn are not only in poor condi-
tion, but are practically certain to be very far short of a
normal crop. As to the condition of live stock, horses and
cattle are reported in excellent condition, while the hogs
have suffered quite as much from cholera, etc., as in the
preceding division. Favorable climatic changes are un-
questionably necessary, not only to the health of the live
stock, but to the maturity of the crops.

NORTIIEAs'rTEiN DIVISION.-'ractically the same condi-
tions exist in the counties forming this division as in the
preceding ones. If anything, in some respects the condi-
tion of the crops are lower. In some counties it is reported
that both cotton and corn in some sections will be a total
failure, and this condition is ascribed chiefly to the exces-
sive rainfall, primarily produced by wet and late spring.
It will be noted by comparison that the condition of the
cotton last year at this time in this division was 100. At
this time it is 59 and our correspondents state positively
that this is not in the least overdrawn. Corn is almost
as bad, and most of the other crops equally so. The condi-
tion of hogs is slightly better than in the preceding di-
visions, but still very poor. In this connection it is proper
to say that the work of the agents of the State Board of
Health in the distribution and administration of the hog
cholera serum is doing a vast amount of good and un-
doubtedly the administration of this serum is saving
thousands of hogs to the farmers which, of course, means
hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Note.-In another part of this Bulletin a list of agents
and an article containing much information on the sub-
ject of hog cholera will be found.











CENTRAL DIVISION.-Reports of crop conditions in this
division are somewhat better than in the preceding ones
and with reference also to the conditions of live stock as
well, and though the rainfall has been excessive in this
district also, it has not had the same effect on the growing
crops, they not being so subject to excessive moisture as
the principal farm crops of the farming districts. Citrus
fruit trees and others have apparently been benefited by
the rains. Attention is also called, not only in this dis-
trict, but in all the others, to the conditions of pastures.
About the only thing that the excessive rainfall has bene-
fited is the grass. The conditions just referred to in this
division will assist greatly in the production of a large
citrus fruit crop if the investigations of our correspond-
ents are correct. The favorable season has enabled the
trees to hold a large amount of fruit which would have
dropped off the trees had there been a shortness of mois-
ture. Our reports also indicate that good crops of citrus
fruits of all kinds are to be expected. Live stock in this
district is also in excellent condition.

SOUTHERN DIVISION.-As far as climatic conditions are
concerned there is little difference between this division
and the foregoing one. This being the great fruit and
vegetable producing section of the State, it naturally re-
quires greater amounts of moisture than other portions
and the effects of evenly distributed rains are showing up
well in the large crops of fruit set on the trees. Live stock
is also in good condition in this section and all crops ap-
pear to be better than in any other section of the State.
If no climatic disturbances in the way of storms, etc.,
should visit this section, there will be fine crops of fruits
of all kinds.

Note.-A reading of the tables in this report will give
a considerable amount of interesting information by com-
parison, and we offer the suggestion to farmers and grow-
ers of forage crops in all sections of the State that they










56

can do no better than to grow as much of the forage crops
as it is possible for them to produce. It is a certainty
that the corn crop in the northern section of the State
will hardly afford a supply for much more than half or
two-thirds of the season to come, and with indications of
a short crop in the West, the Florida farmer who is short
of corn and forage will have $1.50 a bushel corn looking
him in the face before March or April next and, therefore,
can do no better than to plant every surplus acre that he
can in forage crops.











57

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF
CROPS, FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES, AND CONDITION
OF LIVE STOCK, FOR QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30,
1912, AS COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD LAST YEAR

COUNTY. Upland Sea Island C
Cotton. Cotton. Corn. Sugar Cane
Northern Division. Condition. i Condition. Condition. I Condition.
Gadsden ....... 5 70 G0 UJ
Hamilton........... ...... 50 C (5 40
Jefferson .... ........ 80 85 75 90
Lafayette ......... ..... 70 75 )00
Leon ................. 70 ...... 75
Liberty ................. ...... 0 90
Madison ................ 45 45 55 75
Suwannee .................. ...... 0 90 9O
Taylor ........................ ...... 90 75 100
W akulla -................... 50 ...... 50 100
Div. Av. per cent...... (0 1 70 (3 85
Western Division.
Callioun ................... 40 40 35 85
Escamnbia ........... I 5 ...... 75 75
Ilolm es ................... 5 -.-.CO 90
Santa Rosa ...........0.. 75 oo
W alton ..........-..-.. ... S5 ...... 75 100
W ashington ............. 70 ...... 70 90
Div. Av. per cent ...... 73 40 (;5 90
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................. ...... (5 75 100
B aker ............................ ------...... | 8 5 55
Bradford ................. 55 75 75
Clay ....................... (0 0
P na ........... ....... ... ....5 )
St. John .......... ... ....... .... 75
Div. Av. ier cent. .... 5 74
Central Division.
Cil rus .--............7.......... 75
IH ernandi o ....... ....... ........ 75
LevNy ...----........ 50 50 80 100(
lM;rion .... ........... ..... 100 105 105
Orange ...................... ...... ..... 100 100
';asco ..-.......... ....-... 0 90 100 100
Soluter ....... -..... 90 90 S5 90
V olusia ............... ........ .. 110 1 10
Div. Av. per cent..... 77 i S2 91 i 4
Southern Division.
P revard ................ .... ...... 85
D ade ......................
I)eSoto ........... ... ... .. ..... 100 80
Hillsborough ........... ...... | 8 95
Osceola .................... ........ 90 90
Palm Beach ......-... .........
St. Lucie ........... ...... 95
Div, Av. per cent ..... .... 90 89
State Av. per cent.... 71 63 78 88













REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY. Rice. Sweet Field Eggplant.
COUNTY Rice Potatoes. Peas. ,'
Northern Division. I Condition. I Condition. I Condition. Conition.
Gaidsden -............... O 90 90 95 ......
IHamilton .................. ...... 100 00
Jefferson ................... ...... 90 90
Lafayette ........-.--...-- ...... 90 .
Leon ........... ......... ... ...... 95 100 95
Liberty ................ ... 100 40
M adison ................... 0 90 SO
Suwannee .................. (0 80 80 50
Taylor ....................... 80 100 80
W akulia ................... ....- 75 50
Div. Av. per cent ...... 65 I 91 SO 72
Western Division.
Calhoun ...............0 (65 .)O 5 50
Esca ia .................. 50 75 50 75
H olmes .......... ....-..- ..-. 95 75
Santa Rosa .............. 90 75 !
Walton ....................... 100 100 100 100
Washington .............. 40 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ..... 09 89 53 I 7
Northeastern Division.
A lachua ................ ...... 0
iaker ................. ..... ...... .i5 j 55 |
Iradlford .................... 75 75 0 .
Clay ........................... ...... 100 100
I' tnalni ...................... 5 85 S5
St. Johns .................... 100 5 75
Div. Av. per cent...... 87 S2 sl I 2
Central Division.
Citrus ....................... 0 1 )00 30 ...
I-Hernando .................- 100 1 ]00
Levy -....................... 100 100 100
M arion ........................ ...... 110 ...
Orange .......... .... .. .. ...... 1 100 100
1'asco ........................ ...... 100 900
S lnil er ...................... 7 90 90 75
Volisia: ....................... ...... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ...... 94 99 99 75
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ .............. 75 90 i
Dade .......................... 100 100 lo
DeSoto ........................ 100 (10 100 1001
Hillslorough .............. 80S 100 90 ;0
Osceola ............. ........ 100 10(0 80 70
Palm Beach ............ ... CO ...... 90
St. Lucie .. ................ ...... 95 ......
Div. Av. per cent ...... 9 90 92 S4
State Av. per cent.... 82 | 90 87 s 80










59

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Cassava. Tobacco. Peanuts. Pasture.
Northern Division. Condition. I Condition. i Condition. j Condition.
Gadsden ........ ..... ...... 115 95 100
Il lam ilton .............. ............ 85 1l)00
Jefferson ................ ........... 1 0 ()1 i(
Lafayetle ............. ....... ...... ...... 100 i (,U
Leon ...................... .i ...... 100 100 | 100
Liberty ................... ...... ...... 0 100
Madison .................... ... 90 05 100
Suwannee ..... .... ........ 100 100
Taylor ................ .... ...... 90 100(
W aklulla .......... .. .... ..... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent .... .... 102 i t; 1o0
Western Division.
Callhoun ..................... ........... 100 1
E]:sca i .......... 1(00 100 1100
Ilol0 m es ........ ............. 3 S5
Sanla Ios;a ........ .... ...... T iJ
W alton .............. ......... !1 100 100
Washington ......... |_ ... 10)0 1 o11
Div. Av. per cent ..... 7 D D5 !
Northeastern Division.
A laciua ............. ....... ........ 75 00
B ak r .............. -..... ..... | 1:
Br lad ord .................. (5 .5
C lay .........................10 1
I'utn; t ..................... ...... S 100
St. Jolh s .................. 7. .
Div. Av. per cent... T. .i 7 I
Central Division.
Cilris .................... ..........
Ieri ndo ............... .. 100
Ievy ..........- 1.....- 11 0 100
M :1rio0 ..-----............-----. 1 o 11
O range .........-- ......... ..... 7
Pas( o ... ............. 100 rio l 100
Suin er ......... .. I .... )0 !10
Volusia ...... .......... 11 100
Div. Av. per cent ......- 100 ) I9S 95
Southern Division.
B reVard ------------- 1-
D a eoto ....................... .. .. .. -100(
DeSoto _---------- 10(4

Osceola -.......... .... .... .. 12 90
Palmn B each .............. -.-..- --.- ...... ......
St. Lucie ....... ........ ........ 1)0
Div. Av. per cent.... 90I ...... 2 9
State Av. per cent.-... 76 9| 92 07











60


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY. Velvet Alfalfa.
Beans
Northern Division. Condition. | Condtion.
G adsden ................................ ... .............. )5 ...
H am ilton ................... ........................... 100
Jefferson ... -....... ..... ........ ......)
Lafayette ............ ............................ ...... .
L eon ....................... ... ..... .............. ...... .... 100
L liberty ... .......................................... .. )10
M adison ......................... .. ............ .... 100
Suwannee ....... ....~..... -..- 90 ...
Taylor ......................................................... | i0 .._
Taylor ......... ......... ............................ 90......
Wakulla ... 0......
D iv. Av. per cent ..5. .....................................0 )
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... -........ 75 ...
E scam bia ...-.. ... .................. ......- -- --. ..- 7
H olm es ... -...... i)................0
Santa Rosa .... so....................i 0
W alton .................. ................ ................. so
W ashington ...... ..... -.. i....
D]iv. Av. )er cent....... ... ........
Northeastern Division.
A lachua -.......... ......... ..................... 9
Baker ........... .. .... .90
Bradford .
C l y ................................ .............. ...... i 100
1'u lnan l ....... -...... ..... ........... .. -- -- -
St. Johns ..... ....... .. ........... ----------....................-------- "
I iv. Av. per 'enlt ... ...............- 0
Central Division.
ci r ------------------ -- ---------
C itru s ..... .. ........... ..... .... ... ...... ........ 1
llernando ...............- 100
L evy ........- .... ........ -............. 100
M a; rion ........ .......... ........ ... ..... ............... -
Ornlge ....... 1................. ...... ...... I ] 00
l'asco ----........................ -.............- --- -------------- -i 100 i
Suniter ............... .......... 100 I
V olusia ................. .... ---- ---.............. .............--- 100
Div Av. per (e it ................ ..
Southern Division.
B rov rd ------ -------- - ------ (F
B revard ........ .............................. .... ... 100
D ade ............ ........ ...... .. .. .
D eSoto .......... ......................-- .......----- 1'0
IH illsborough .... ........................... 50
O sceola ...... ........... ....- ... .... !
Ialm B ench .... .... ....... ---------........- ......
St. Lucie ........ ......... ..................------------------ 100
D iv. A v. per cent ........ ...........--..-....-........ 92 -
State Av. per cent .................. ................. 90 100














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Guavas. Bananas.
Northern Division. Condition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
| Yield. Yield.
Gadsden .......... .... ...............
Hamilton ..........................
Jefferson ................... ...... ...
Lafayette .................. ......
Leon ............................ .............
Liberty .................... ......
M adison ................... ...... .. ..
Suw annee ..............-..... ....-
Taylor ....................... --.......
W aul I ulla .................... -.............-
Div. Av. per cent...... ...... ----- ----
Western Division.
Calhoun .................... ............ --.. --
Escanm ia ............... .....- ..
IH oh ies ...................... ...... .........
Sanota l osa -..... -
W aton R..o ................
W ashington .--........ ...... --
D iv. Av. per cent. ..... .... -.- 7 ............
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .................. .... ....
B aker ......................... .........
Bradford .. ...... .......... ... .. ...-
C la ............................ ......
Putnam .................. 100 90
St. Johns ........................
Div. Av. per cent ...... 100 90
Central Division.
C it r u s ----------- --------- ..... ------~-...-
IH ernando .............. ..... ......----
Levy ................... ..........
M arion ................... ......---
Orange ............... 100 100
Pasco ......................... .... -
Sumter ...................... 100 100 90 90
Volusia ....................... 100 100.....
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 100 90 90
Southern Division.
Brevard .................. 100 100 -0
Dade ............................ 100 100 95 5
D eSoto ........................ 100 100 ....
Hillshorough .............. 100 100
Osceola ................. 150 120 150 100
Palm Beach ............. 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie .................. 100 110 100 90
Div. Av. per cent...... 107 I 104 105 2
State Av. per cent....) 102 98 97 I 91











62

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY. Orange Trees. Lemon Trees.
Northern Division. Condition. i Prospective Condition. Prospective
SYield. ___Yield.
Gadsden ....-- ....... ..................
H amilton .. ........ .....................
Jefferson .................. .....
Lafayette .................... ............
Leon .................--. ........... ..
Liberty ........................ 100 100
M adison ...................... ............
Suw annee ................. -- ---- .......
Taylor .....................
W akulla ......... .. .. ..... ... .....
Div. Av. per cent ... 100 100...... ......
Western Division.
Calhoun ................. 100 l05 ]UU 1 0o
Escambia ............... ......
H olm es ...................... ......- ...... ...
Santa R osa .....--..... -- ...... --.. ............
W aton ......... ........ ...... ...... -. .
W ashington .............. ----- ..... .
Div. Av. pcer cent ..... 100 ] 95 T10 10
Northeastern Division.
A lachua ...................... O s 10
Baker 0.... ................ 00 100 100 10
Bradford ........ ........... 95 75 ....
Clay .................... ..
Putuam ................... 100 90 100 !0
St. Johns ............ ........ 100 100 ...
Div. Av. per cent...... 75 s!) O 100 !
Central Division.
Citrus ...................... 100 120 00 5
Hernando .................... 100 100
Levy .. .........-........ 100 100 .....
Marion 0 ......... ....... 110 100 110 101!
Orange ................... 100 50 ---
Pasco ....................... 00 SO
Suinter ..................... 100 100 )0 oi
Volusia ..................... ... 0 50 --....
Div. Av. per cent...... 97 SS 1t00
Southern Division.
Brevard .................... 100 85 -
D ade ............................ 100 0 !10 7
DeSoto ........................ 100 130 s5 75
Hlillshorough ............ 100 100 100 100
Oscoola ......... ....... 100 70 100 7O
Palm Beach ............ SO 75
St. Lucie .................. 100 00 ..----
Div. Av. per cent...... 97 00 92 50
State Av. per cent.... 94 | 02 S "2














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY. Lime Trees. Grapefruit Trees.
Northern Division. ICondition. Prospective Condition. Prospective
SYield. __ _Yield.
U adsden .................... ...... ...... .
H am ilton ............... ...............
Jefferson ................ .........
Lafayette ..... .... ... ...... .........
Leon ................ ....... .. ............
Liberty .................. ... ...... .
M adison .......... ....... ............
M adison ...................... .......
Suwannee .... ........ ........
Taylor ................I. ...... -
W akulla .......................-.. -
Div. Av. per cent .... .... ...... ___.__
Western Division.
Calhoun ........................ ... 100 D5
Escau ibia ................ ... ........
H olm es ........ ....... ...... ......
Santa R osa ............. .......... .
W alton ................. ...... ........-
W ashington ............. ..............
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ..... 100 95
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ..................... ...... -S... 0 0SO
Baker ................. ..... ...... ...... 100 100
Bradlord ...... ......... .............
Clay ..........................
Putnal ...................... 100 00 100 i 0
St. Johns ................... ............ 00 00
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 90 95 a3
Central Division.
Citrus ........................ 100 95 100 120
H ernando .................. ...... ...... 100 100
Levy ................. ........ ........ .
M arion ..................... ...... .. 110 100
Orange ................ ...... ...... 100 50
Pasco ..... .......... ..- ...... .-.... 0 0O
Sum ter ...................... ...... ... 90 0()
Volusia ........- .............. ...... ..... SO 50
Div. Av. per cent. .... 100 95 90 6 .
Southern Division.
Brevnrd ................. ............ 90 SO
Dade ......................... 100 100 100 90
DeSoto .................... 100 90 100 110
Iillsborough ... ....... 100 100 100 100
Osceola ....................... 100 80 120 05
Palm Beach ............. 90 95 85 SO
St. Lucie ................ ----...... 100 00
Div. Av. per cent...... 9 93 09 82
State Av. per cent .... 99 93 97 SS










64


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Plums. Pears.
Northern DVvilson. Col.dilion. Prospective Condition. Prospectfie
I_ Yield. i Yielud.
Gadsden .................. ...... -...... -
H am ilton .......... ...... ... I ...----
Jeuerson ....-- ..... 100 10 20 20
Lalayette ...................... ....-
Leon ......................... 100 100 20 15
Liberty ---...... --- ...... ...... 25 TU
Madison .. ......... .0 80 1
Suwannee ..........I ...... .. ..
Taylor -....~......... ...... .- ..- ..--..
Wakulla .................... 100 100 50 o
Div. Av. per cent...... 95 5 26b
Western Division.
Calhoun ....................... 75 80 50 150
Escambia -................ 50 50o 25 25
Holmes ...........0............ 70 70 t5 40
Santa Rosa -.. .... ...... --. .......
Walton ....4............- S 0 | U 40 50
W ashington ............ 75 75 .......
Div. A\. per cent ..... U 45 0 6J
Northeastern Division.
Aiach ............... ..... .....
Baker ........... .. 100 100 U 5
Bradiurd ............. I .. -- --
Clay ..........................-i ... .
Putnam ...... .. -i 1
St. Juhs ......... 100 100 10 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 10 5 9 2'
Central division.
Citrus .........-_ ....- 100 110 ......
Hernando ... .............- ...... .........
Levy ............... ..... 115 10 10
Marion ....... ....... 100 5 100 0
Orange ....... ...- ... ....- .---- 100 25
Pasco ................ ... 100 100 ......
umter ....... .. 85 75 | CO
Volusia ........ ....-- --...... ..... I ..0- 0 4U
Div. Av. per cent .... 907 101 U 9 45
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ ...... ..... ......

DeSoto ............. __-- --- -..... --
lillsborough .. ...... 85 75 ......
Osceola ................ .. 110 100 150 110
Palm Beach ............ -- ..
St. Lucie ................. ...... .
Div. Av. per cent .... 7 87 150 110
State Av. per cent.-... 92 91 77 (17











65

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Peaches. Watermelons.
Northern Division. Condition. Prospective] Condition. Prospective
] Yield. Yield.
Gadsden ...................... 125 80 100 95
Hamiltonl ................... 50 00 75 05
Jefferson .................. 100 100 75 75
Lafayette .................... .. 75 75
Leon ....................... 100 45 90 SO
Liberty ............. ..... 100 100 100 100
Madison .................... 100 100 90 90
Suwannee .............. ............ 90 90
T aylor ......... .............
Wakulla ................... 100 100 50 50
Div. Av. per cent .... 9i; 8 S2 so
Western Division.
Calhoun ................... 125 85 50 S
Escambia ................ 100 75 75 75
Holmes ...................... SO 90 85 80
Santa Rosa ............... 100 100 100 100
W alton ........................ 100 00 85 85
Washington ................ 75 75 50 0
Div. Av. per cent ...... 97 74 T7
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .................. 10 100 50 45
Baker ...................... SO 75 85 85
Bradford .................... t5 65 75 70
Clay ..........................
Putnam ..................... 100 90 85 80
St. Johns ................ 100 100 ....
Div. Av. per cent......| 89 8U 74 70
Central Division,
Citrus ......................... 100 120 100 1T00
Hernando .................. 100 100 00 80
Levy .......................... 70 SO 90 90
Marion ...................... 105 100 90 90
Orange ...... .............. 100 100 100 100
Pasco ........................ SO S0 100 100
Sunter ................... 75 75 )0 90
Volusia ...................... 100 50 75 50
Div. Av. per cent...... 91 8 92 I SS
Southern Division.
Brevard ...................... ......
Dade .............. ... ..... ..... ...
DeSoto ...................... 100 100 100 100
Hillsborough ............ 100 100 50 50
Osceola ..................... 120 120 80 90
Palm Beach ....... ...... ... 75 (!5
St. L ucie .................. ....... ..... -
Div. Av. per ce(nt...... 107 1-07 7(; 7;
State Av. per cent.... 9(; 8I 709 79


-Bull.












66


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued


COUNTY.


(;ds-deii
H-Ianmilton
Jefferson
Laflayette
Leoll
Liberty
Madis n
SnIiannee
Taylor
Wakulla


Cantaloupes.


Pineapples.


D ade ....................
DeSoto ...........
IIillsborough .........
Osceola .........
Palim each ....-.....
St. Lucie ........
Div. Av. per cent...
State Av. per cent-











67


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Grapes.
Northern Division. Condition. Prospective
Yield.
(G dsdeIn .. ... ............. ........... ......
H am ilton ........ .................
Jefferson .................... 100 100

Leon ............ 100 0
L a fa y ette --- -- -- -- -- -- --- -- --- --

L liberty ......................................... 100 (00
M adison ..................................... .. ...... 75 75
Suw annee ---- ..... -................ .-.. ...... ........... SO O
T a y lo r ................................................................ ............
WV akulla .......................... ................. .. 300 100
I ivy. A v. per cent ).... .................................. 3 !!1
Western Division.
('allhoun ............................. ........ .....-- ..... 100 120
E sca n ia ............................................................ 7 7
H olm es .. -..... .................... 5 915
S an ta R osa ....................................... ..... .... .
W alton ............................................... ...
WVaslhington .... ....................... ................. 75 75
D iv. A v. per cont ........-1-..............- ............ S -1--
Northeastern Division.
A la ch u ................................................ ............
B ak er ... ..................... ..................................... 50 50
B radford ....................... ...............--- -----
('lay -------- ------ -----

St. Johnl s .......... .. ............... 100 100
D iv. A v. per ceint................. ................ so --
Central Division.
C itrus ........ ...........-- ...-- -------- ----- .................... 1 ) 111
itr u .... ........... .......................................... 100
Hernando -- --------------------------------- 10) 1))
L evy ... ............. ....... .. .... .- 100 110
M arion ..............................----- --------------.................... .....----...... ....
()O r.l e .................. .......---------- ------- ................... ..... -----
I'as o .............................................. ..............------ !0 10
S n ter ..................... ..... ...... ........ ... ... 7 7
V olu sia 1... .. ............. ....................... .. 100
D iv. A v. per cent -- ................4 --- !l----7
Southern Division.
B revard ......... ..... ......- ................... .
D ad e ...................................-------- ........................----
IleSi to ............-............... .-------------...
Ilillsioronu h ............................... 1

P ali m B each .........- ... ...... ....- .. ....... ..... .... I ---..
St. I iucie ......... ................. ....-......... ...- ------
Div. Av. per cent 110 -110
State Av. per cent...................... ... 3 1)4











68

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Horses and Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Mules.
Northern Division. I Condition. I Prospective| Condition. Prospective
Gadsden ............ SO 90 00 !0
Hamilton ...............5. 100 40 |
Jefferson ................... 10U 100 00
Lafayette ................ 100 00 S3
Leon ........................... 0 95 90 5
Liberty ............... 100 100 100 SOb
Madison .................. 75 110 0 100
Suwannee .............. 0 0 00 90
Taylor ...................I 100 100 SO
Wakulla .................... 100 100 50 100
Div. Av. per cent ... ... 3 9 S0 :
Western Divi'.ion.
Calhouiu .................... 95 95 70
Escambia .................. SO 75 50 50
Holmes ...................... 10 100 CO 100
Santa Rosa .............. 100 100 50 100
W alton ................... 100 100 40 9!
Washington .............. 100 100 1000 ] )
Div. Av. .pr cent.. ... i 9 2
Northeastern Division.
Alaclh a .............. .... 5 100 75 7
Baker -0............ .....--I 90 090 05 90
Bradford .................. 10 100 70
Clay ................... ... 100 100 00 100
Putnam ..... ....... .. 100) 00
St. Johns ....... .. I ...- ......| .--
Div. Av. l'or ceilJ .....-.l 97 89.IS0 soS
Central Division.
Citrus ....... -- ..... 110 110 110 J 10




Pasco ...-.. ... .........i !0 00 W 00
Sumter .................... 100 100 90 7.
Volusia .................... 100 100 100 t00
Div. Av. pier cent...... S 95 100 7
Southern Division.
Brevard ...-............... 00 80 95
Dade .............. ........ 100 100
DeSoto ...................... 100 100 00 (0
IIillsborough ......-... 100 S0 75 00
Osceola ................... 100 110 100 05
Palm each .............. 105 110 100
St. Lucie ..-. ............. 95 90 00
Div. Av. per cent ...... 909 04 ,7 A2
State Av. per cent.... 97 D9i 82 )0












69

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Tobacco. Honey. Wool.
Northern Division. PouPounds. Pounds. Poudns.
Uadsden ......................... 1,500,000 2,000 ...
Hamilton ....... .......... ................
Jefferson ................ ........ ............... 3,000
Lafayette ............... ..... .... ... ........... ....
L eon -.....-. ........................ 150,000 ................ ................
Leon ................................... 150,000
Liberty .................................. ............. 59,400 5.000
M adison .......................... 100,000 ................ ...............
Suw annee ........................... ..............
T aylor ..... ................. ................
W akulla .................. ..... ................... 30,000 1.000
Total ................................ 1,750,000 4,400 0.000
Western Division.
Calhoun .............................. ................ 120,000 ................
Escambia .......................... 8,000 20,000 5,000
H olm es ................................ ................ 45,000 S5.000
Santa Rosa ........................ ................ 20,000 50,000
Walton ........................... 3,000 5.000 75,000
.l ........................ 20,000 45,000
Total .............................. 11,000 230,000 2;0.000
Northeastern Division.
A i achua ......... ............... I --
B aker .................................. 1.000 1.:,00
Brad ord......................... .............. .......
C la l d.... .. .. -- --- -- .......... ...... ................ ...............
Clay .
I'utnaiu .... ....... ................ ............... ..............
Putnam ........... .
St. Johns ........................... ................... ..
T total ...... ........ ........... ................ 1,000 1.500
Central Division.
Citrus ...-..............- .........-... .............. ........... .......
HIcer ancdo ........ .............. ............ .
Levy ............... ....... ... ..... 3,000 1.500
M arion ......- ...... ...---- ---- ---. ..............
O ran e ................................. ............ 5,000 ...............
Pasco ................................. 10.000 ................
Sumter .............. ........... ............... 750 900
Volusia ..... ................ ................ 75,000 20,000
Total ............................. 10.000 3 22 100
Southern Division.
Brevard ......- --... -.. ..----... 25,000 --.
'Da d e .... ............. ... .... ........--- - -..... -------- ...... ........
Datde
)eSoto ......................... .......... 10,000 1,000
Hillshorough ........ ........... .
Osceola .............................. ... 3,000 25,000
Palm Beach ................... ............... 150,000 ................
St. Lucie ................ ................
Total ........................-.... I ............... 188,000 2 -0-i.OO
State Total ................ ... 1,771,000 597.150 315.400























PART III.

Fertilizers,
Feed Stuffs, and
Foods and Drugs.

















MOLDY, MILDEWED, STOCK FEED.


Caution to Owners of Live Stock.

The attention of owners of live stock-particularly
horses and mules-is called to the frequent cases of Blind
Staggers, Grass Staggers, Spinal Meningitis, occurring
at ]resent in the State, notably in those sections of the
State where practically all stock feed is imported.
The cause of this usually fatal disease is attributed to
the use of mouldy, mildewed, fermented, damaged grain
and feed stuff.
There is no economy in purchasing damaged feed, while
there is great danger of the loss of the animals fed
thereon.
The State moard of Health, as well as the Agricultural
Department, have issued circulars on the subject, calling
attention to the danger of using any spoiled, damaged
feed stuff, cautinoninig dealer and consumer that the
use of such damaged 'eed stuiff in'y result in great damage
to the owners of live slock in the State-da.images far in
exc',s o~ tile value of the damaged feed stuff.
Flbvlida imported from other States in 1911 more than
!,00i0 ions of mixed feeds, to say nothing of whole grains,
oais, (corn, barley, wheat and hay.
By far the greatest part of this stock feed was consumed
i,: the Peninsula counties-the vegetable and fruit-grow-
iiqg counties.
It is not economy to pay freights on inferior feed stuff'.
The profits to dealers and transportation companies are
as large on a ton of inferior feed stuff as on a ton of choice
material. Hence, in the purchase of feed stuffs-as in the
purchase of fertilizer-it is economy to buy only the best
and highest grade of material. The actual cost of first-
class material, either stock feed or fertilizer, is less than









74

the cost of inferior material. There is no more economy
in purchasing "cheap," low grade feed, than in purchasing
"cheap," low grade fertilizers. At the same time there
is great danger of loss of valuable live stock, by the use
of damaged, moldy feed.
I. E. ROSE,
Stale Chemist.














STATE OF FLORII)A
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Tul(lll7.ahw,s('i, Flat., June 7, 1912.


CIRCULAR NO. 4.


THE USE OF "PEAT," "PEAT MULL," "PRE-
PARED Il'UM1US," NOT PERMISSABLE IN STOCK
FEEDS.
TIE SALE OF MOULDY AND DAMAGED FEED
STUFF PROllIBITEI) BY LAW.
TO MANIFA(CTUIRERS, DEALERS ANI) CONSUM-
ERS OF CO(31MEIRCIAL STOCK FEED).


The attention of the Agricultural Department of the
State of Florida has been called to the use of Peat Mull
(nimck, or partly decomposed vegetable matter) as a
"filler," or adulterant, for stock feed. The sugar or no-
lasses feeds in particular.

Under Ihe Commercial Feed Stuiff Law-Chapter 5452-
Laws of Florida, Section 3:-

"Any imanlfaclvurer, importer, jobber, agent
mor seller, who slmll sell, oller or expose for sale
or who shall adulterate any feed-
ing stuff with substances such as rice hulls or
chaff, peanut shells, corn cobs or other similar
material of little or no feeding value, *
shall be guilty of a violation of the provisions of
this Act, and the lot of feeding stuff in question
shall be subject to seizure, condemnation and












sale or destruction by the sheriffs under the
direction of the Commissioner of Agriculture."

Under the Pure Food and Drug Law, Chapter 6122,
Laws of Florida, Section 4:-

"That for the purposes of this Act, an article
shall be deemed to be adulterated-
"In the Case of Food-(which includes stock
feed) First-If any substance has been mixed
or packed with it so as to reduce or lower or in-
juriously affect its quality or strength.
"Second-If any substance has been substi-
tuted wholly or in part for the article."

Under both the "Commercial Stock Feed Laws" and
the "Pure Food and Drug Law," the use of "Peat Mull"-
"Prepared Humus" (muck, partly decomposed vegetable
matter) as an ingredient in stock feed, or as a "filler,"
is clearly illegal, it being of "little or no feeding value"
and tends to "reduce or lower or injuriously .I1 o i its
quality or strength" and "has been substituted wholly or
in part for the article."
Complaint has recently been male to this I)epartinent
of "milloiidy and dainmi'ed feeding stuff" being sold and
offered for sale in the State.
The attention of both lihe dealer and the consumer is
called to the provisions in Section 3, Chapter 5452, Laws
of Florida (The Commercial Stock Feed Law), as follows:

"The sale of mouldy and damaged feeding stuff
is prohibited in this State, except on full notice
in writing to the purchaser of the nature and
extent of the damage."

Several instances have been called to the attention of
the Department of the death of live stock, caused pre-











sumably by the use of mouldy, damaged grain and mixed
feed stuff.
There have been several outbreaks in recent years of
"Blind Sl;,-. I-" (Spinal Meningitis) among work ani-
mals, traced directly to the use of mouldy, damaged feed
stuff, containing the specific bacteria (Micrococcus Men-
ingitis), the cause of this generally fatal disease.
All mouldy, worm-eaentei, damaged grain or feed is harm-
ful to live stock and often contains the specific poison
causing "Blind Staggers" -r Spinia Meningitis.
The ruling of the Agricul tral Department-the Com-
missioner of Agriculture and the State Chemist-under
Section 15, Conimercial Stock Feed Law and of the Pure
Food and Drug Law, is that "Peat," "Peat Mull," "Pre-
pared h1umus" (muck, or partly decomposed vegetable
matter) can not be legally used as an ingredient or as a
filler in commercial stock feed. That all manufacturers,
importers, jobbers, agents or sellers, who manufacture,
import, distribute, sell, or offer 'or sale any stock feed so
adulterated with "Peat," "Peit Mull" or "Prepared
Humus" will be liable to the penalties of the said laws,
and the olfending material subject to seizure, sale, or
destruction, as the law directs.
Also lant "the sale of moldy, damaged feeding stuff
is prohibited in this State, except on full notice in writ-
ing to the purchaser of the nature and extent of the
damage."
Therefore "any manufacturer, importer, jobber, agent
or seller, who shall manufacture, sell or offer for sale any
such damaged, moldy feed stuff, without due notice in
writing to the purchaser of the nature and extent of the
damage, will be liable to tlie penalties of the law, anld the
moldy, damaged feed stuff subject to seizure, condemna-
tion, and destruction by the sheriff, under the direction
of the Commissioner of Agriculture."
The attention of Inspectors of the Chemical Division
and Sheriffs is especially called to Section 3, of Chapter










78

5452, Laws of Florida-"The Commercial Feed Stuff
Law"-prohibiting the sale of moldy, damaged feeding
stuff, or the adulteration of "Commercial Feed Stuff-
with "* substances of little or no feeding
value or with substances injurious to the health of
domestic animals." Also to Section 4, Chapter 6122,
Laws of Florida-"The Pure Food and I)rug Law"-"in
the Case of Foods" (Stock Feeds)-("Second," "Third"
and "Seventh" clauses, under the head of adulterations,)
and their duties as prescribed in Section 3, Chapter 5452-
"The Commercial Stock Feed Law"-and to Section 9
and 12, of Chapter 6122-The Pure Food and Drug Law."

W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.














STATE OF FLORIDA,
D)EPARTMiENT OF AGRICI'LTURE.
Tallahassee, Fla., June 19, 1912.
CIRCULAR NO. 5,
AMENDMENT TO
CIRCULAR NO. 3, SEPT. 21, 1911

PURE FOOD AND DRUGS LAW, 1911.
Notice to Manufacturers, Dealers, Brokers and Consumers
of Foods and Drugs in the State of Florida.
The Provisions of the Pure Food and Drugs Law, Chapter 6122
Approved June 5, 1911, Became Effective August 3, 1911.
Numerous letters of inquiry having been received from
manufacturers, jobbers and dealers in package goods, in
the State of Florida, and also from other States, asking
an extension of the time allowed to make the necessary
changes in labels on goods now on hand, and disposition
of such goods now legally in the State, or contracted for
for future delivery to the wholesaler, jobber or retailer
prior to Aug. 3, 1911, that do not comply with the amend-
ed Pure Food and Drugs Law.
A conference was held at the office of the Commissioner
of Agriculture in Tallahassee, Florida, June 18, 1912, at
which time the various commercial organizations-Whole-
sale Grocers Associations of Tampa, Jacksonville and
elsewhere, retailers, brokers, manufacturers and repre-
sentative wholesale and retail merchants from other
points in the State, were represented.
After due consideration, discussion, and statement of
facts, the consensus of opinic n was that the law was both
reasonable and just-fair to the manufacturer, dealer and
consumer; and necessary for the protection of the legiti-
mate manufacturer and dealer in honest goods, and the
consumer from the unfair competition of "light weight,












short measure," or diluted and adulterated foods and
drugs.
That its provisions should be enforced at the earliest
possible time consistent with the protection of the legiti-
mate business of the State, and the protection of those
manufacturers, dealers, brokers, wholesale and retail mer-
chants, who have now on hand, legally, under the State
and National Laws, stocks of package goods, and con-
tracts for fall delivery of canned goods-the pack of 1911.
After due consideration of all the facts, and ihe interests
of all parties concerned-tie manufacturer, the dealer,
and the consumer, the following ruling has been adopted:

NEYT WEIGHT AND MEASURE.

1st-The net weight or measure shall be "conspicuously,
legibly and correctly" stated on the outside of all packages
of grain, flour, inmcl. butter, lar, cottolene (or similar
compound), cooking oils. s-yi ,ps, and similar staple gro-
ceries; that printed i.i,. li will be allowed on such
goods on hand, to which they are applicable, which will
protect the same till sold. See Regulation 29.
2nd-That stocks of canned goods, vegetables, pickles,
baking powders, jellies, preserves, etc., in cans, bottles or
cartons, on hand August 3, 1911, or contracted for fall
delivery, if in full compliance with the State and Federal
Laws, and regulations, prior to August 3, 1911, may be
disposed of till February 1, 1913. That printed "stick-
ers," showing the "net weight or measure" of such goods,
shall be applied before February 1, 1913, and shall protect
such goods actually delivered in the State, or bona-fidely
contracted for, for future delivery, prior to August 3,
1911, until sold.
This ruling shall apply only to such goods as were
legally on hand Aug. 3, 1911 fat which time the law went
into effect) and to those contracts as were entered into
prior to Aug. 3. 1911, for future delivery to wholesaler,
jobber and retail merchant-and shall not apply to any













goods purchased or contracted for subsequently to the
date the law went into effect, Aug. 3, 1!11. All goods
purchased subsequent to Aug. 3, 1911, or contracted for,
shall fully comply with the Pure Food and Drugs Law
of 1911, in every respect.
NOTE--Net weight shall be stated in pounds or ounces
avoirdupois or fractions thereof. The unit being the
pound-all packages containing one or more pounds shall
state the iceight in pounds. Weights less than a pound
shall be stated in ounces-i. e. "1 lb. net," "2 lbs. net,"
"50 lbs. net," or, *3 lbs. 2 ao. net," "8 Ibs. 4 oz. net," "17
lbs. 6 oz. net," "4 .1-2 oz. net."
Yet measure shall be stated in U. S. standard gallons,
or in quarts, or fluid ounces, (a flinl ounce being one
thirty-second of a quart by m)easure)-i. e. "one gal. net,"
"One qt. net," "30 fl. oz. net," "7 fl. oz. net," or "3 qts. 8 fl.
lbs. 6 0.. net," "/'.1-2 oz. net."
To express one pound or more in ounces, or one quart,
or more in fluid ounces, will not be permissable.
BENZOATE OF SODA.
:'rd-That goods actually n hand Aug. 3, 1911, con-
taining not more than 1-10 of 1 per cent. benzoate of soda,
and otherwise complying with the State and Federal
Laws, prior to Aug. 3, 1911, may be disposed of till Feb.
1, 1913. That bona fide contracts for such goods existing
before Aug. 3, 1911, will be respected, and the material
allowed to be sold till Feb. 1, 1913, after which date no
goods containing benzoate of soda can be legally sold in
the State.
SACCHARIN.
4th-Goods actually on hand in the possession of the
trade, within the State Aug. 3, 1911, may be disposed of,
Provided, the same are plainly labeled "sweetened with
saccharin," as now provided by law. The manufacture or
importation of any food containing saccharin after Aug.
3, 1911, is not permissible legally, in the State.
6-Bull.













DILUTE STANDARD DRUGS.

5th-No "drug sold under or by a name recognized in
the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary,
that differs from the standard of strength, quality, or pu-
rity as determined by the test laid lown in the United
States Pharmacopeeia, or National Formulary," can be
legally manufactured or imported into the State after
Aug. 3, 1911. Such stocks of dilute standard drugs, that
may be actually on hand, in the State, Aug. 3, 1911, in
the hands of dealers, may be sold till Jan. 1, 1912, Pro-
vided, They comply fully with the State and Federal Laws
and Regulations in force prior to Aug. 3, 1911. After
Jan. 1, 1912, dilute standard drugs cannot be legally sold
in Florida.
6th-All manufacturers and dealers complying with the
letter and spirit of the foregoing rules, will be exmept
from prosecution for misbranding or adulteration. Eva-
sion of this regulation will be considered a breach of faith,
and the goods subject to seizure, sale or destruction, as
provided by Law and Regulations.
7th--It is recommended that the labels of all packages
of food received after Aug. 3, 1911, have the necessary
"stickers" applied to show "net weight or measure," that
they may be in shape to protect such goods till sold. The
application of "stickers" after Feb. 1, 1913, will not be
legally permissible. All packages of food not having the
net weight or measure of the contents thereof, plainly
stated on the label by "sticker," as provided, or printed
on the label, after Feb. 1, 1913, will be considered in vio-
lation of the "Pure Food and Drug Law" and subject to
condemnation as the Law directs.
Approved June 20, 1912.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.













STATE (F FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 9, 1912.

CIRCULAR NO. 6.

BLEACHED OATS AND BARLEY.
The Sale of Grain, Bleached With Sulphur Fumes
(Sulphur' Dioxide) Prohibited by the Florida Law.
Notice to Manufacturers, Jobbers, Dealers and
Consumers of Feed Stuff.
The bleaching of damaged, mildewed, weather or soil
stained grain, particularly oats and barley, by the use of
Sulphur fumes (Sulphur Dioxide) by which process
such damaged, inildewed and stained grains are caused
to appear soundnd nd of better quality or grade, is clearly
in violation of the Commercial Feed Stuff Law, which
prohibits;

"The adulteration of any feeding stuff with
foreign, mineral or other substances of little or
no feeding value or with substances injurious to
the health of domestic animals."

And also in violation of ihe Pure Food and Drug Law.

"First"-in that "a substance has been mixed
or packed with it so as to reduce or lower, or
injuriously affect its quality or strength"-(ad-
ded Sulphur Di-Oxide and water).
"Fourth"-in that it has been coated or stain.
ed in a manner whereby damage or inferiority
is concealed.









84

Notice is therefore given to all dealers, jobbers, and
consumers that grains bleached with sulphur fumes (Sul-
phur Di-Oxide) cannot be legally sold in the State of
Florida, and that such adulterated bleached grains will
be subject to seizure and destruction as the law provides.
Regulation 15-(d) is modified to conform to this order.
Inspectors and Sheriffs are directed to attach such
adulterated bleached grains, wherever found, sending
samples with full report of all facts, regarding the offer-
ing for sale of such bleached grain, to this office.
\V. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.















SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides for
the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or purchaser,
under proper rules and regulations fixed by law-to be
sent to the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost.
Any citizen in the State who has purchased fertilizers or
feeds for their own use may draw a sample of the same,
according to law, and have the same analysed by the State
Chemist free of cost. And in case of adulteration or de-
ficiency he can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost of price demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmiting "special samples."
This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.
Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.
"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS THIS MA-
TERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE OF
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FERTIL-
IZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."













REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE COM-
MISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.




SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and
A FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT IESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A TIN CAN
OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAIIASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE
ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary de-
terminations and to allow the preservation of a dupli-
cate sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate
sample will be preserved for two months from the date
of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ; fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention to those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.










Hereafter, strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The samples must not be less than one-
half pound, in a tin can or bottle, scaled and addressed to
the Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and
address must also be on the package, this rule applying
to special saiplr of frrt'lizers or commercial fccdilg
stuff.
A one-pound baking powder tin can, properly cleaned,
filled with a fairly drawn, well mixed sample taken from
several sacks, is a proper sample. It should be sealed and
addressed to the Commissioner of Agriculture at Talla-
hassee. The sender's name and address should also be
placed on the package. If more than one sample is sent,
the samples should be numbered so as to identify them.
All this should be done in the presence of the witnesses
and the package mailed or expressed by one of the
witnesses.
The tags off the sack should be retained by the sender
to compare with the certificate of analysis when received,
and not sent to this office. The date of the drawing and
sending the sample, and names of the witnesses, should
also be retained by the sender; not sent to this office.



INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This Department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.










MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA
PORTS, JULY, 1, 1912.

AMMONIATES.
Less than
ten tons.
Nitrate of Soda, 17% .Ammonia ......... ... ... .00
Sulphate of Ammonia, -'",. Ammoni ....... 76.00
Dried Blood, 16% Ammonia ................... .... 60.00
Cynanamid, 18% Ammonia .............. ........... 0.i0
Dry Fish Scrap, 10%; Ammonia......... ... 45.00

PoTASII:ES.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90( Sulphate,
r K 0 ........................................ ..... ... ........... ..................... 5 0 .0 0
Low urade Sulphate of Potash, 48%r Sulphat-e.
26% K ,O ................................................. .. ..... 30.00
Muriate of Potsh, 80 ; 48% IO........................ 48.00
Nitrate of PIot.ish, imported, 15A7 n Ammonia,
44( Potash K O .. .. ........... ................ ....... ......... ...... 120.00
Nitrate of Poiash, American, 13% Ammonia,
42%- potash K ,O ........ .. ......... ............................... .. 4.00
K ainit, P otashI, 12%l~ K ,O 3................... ........... ..................... 13.00
Canada IIardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% KO Pot-
a sh ........ ....... .. ........... ............................................ ........................ .. ... 1 .0 0

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC AcID.

High Grade Tankage, 10/ Ammonia, 51% Phos
p h oric A cid ...... ----........................ ............. .... ....... ......... 4 0 .00
Tankage, 8% Ammonia, 10' Phoshoric Acid...... 37.00
Low Grade Tankage, 61 ,/, Ammonia, 14%, Phos-
phoric A cid ........ ... .............. .. ............ 33.00
Hotel Tankage, '; Ammonia, 7( Phosphoric
A cid ......... .... .. ................. .......................... ................... 2 8 .0 0











Sheep Manure, ground, 3% Ammonia.............................. 24.00
(Figures subject to revision.)
Imported Fish Guano, 10% Ammonia, 10% Phos-
phoric A cid ............................................... ..... .......................... 52.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Ammonia,
22% Phosphoric A cid .............................................................. 31.00
Raw Bone, 4% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric Acid... 35.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% Ammonia, 2%
Phosphoric Acid ............... ............................. ............ 2 .00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2% Ammonia.................. 28.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% Ammonia..................... 2.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
P hosphoric A cid .......... ............................................................$ 15.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid 14.00
Bone Black, 17% Available Phosphoric Acid............ 25.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2%' Ammo-
nia, S % P otash................................................................ ............... 28.00
High Grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
2/ ,% Amm onia, 10% Potash........................................ ...... 28.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2%( Potash.... 24.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2' Ammonia, 4%
P o ta sh ........................... .. ..0........ ........ ...... .. ................. 2 0 .0 0
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash .............................. ...................................... ................. .00
L and P laster, in sacks ...................................................... ........... 12.00
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.











NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
JULY 1, 1912-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AM MONIATES.


Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, prompt............$
fu tu res ..................................................... ............
Ammonia, suplhale, domestic, spot............
fu tu r e s ..................................... .......................
Cyanimide, f.o.b. Baltimore............................
f.o.b. Niagara Falls.........................
Fish scrap, dried, 11% ammonia and
14%bone phosphate, f.o.b. fish works,
p e r u n it ........................................... .....................
wet, acidulated, 6%' ammonia,
;:',, phosphoric acid,delivered
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and
11/, ammonia and 15-17%o bone p1hos-
phate, c. i. f. N. Y., Balto. or Phila.......
Tankage, 11,. and 15% f.o.b. Chicago......
Tankage, 1",. and *"*I f.o.b. Chicago,
g r o u n d ......... ...... ......... ... ........ ......................
Tankage, .. and 20%1 f.o.b. Chicago,
g rou n d .......................................................... ...........
Tankage, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago
14 to 15% f.o.b. Chicago...................................
Garbage, tankage, f.o.b. Chicago..................
Sheep manure, concentrated, f.o.b. Chi-
cago, per ton .................................. ..................
Hoofmeal, f.o.b. Chicago, per unit...............
Dried Blood. 12-13% ammonia, f.o.b.
N ew Y o rk ....... .................................. ...............
C h icag o ................ .................. ................ ...
Nitrate of Soda, 95% spot per 100 lbs....
futures, 95% .............................. ..................


3.40
3.35
3.35
3.26
2.50
2.35


2.40

2.50


@ -
@ -
@ -
@ 3.2S8
@ -
@ -


& 10

& 35


3.10 &
2.70 &


2.30

2.30


& 10

& 10


2.30 &
9.00 @


10.00 & -
2.60 @ 2.70

2.50 @ -
2.50 @ -
2.45 @ 2.471/2
2.45 @ 2.471/2












PHOSPHATES.

Acid Phosphate, per unit..................................... 50 @ 55
Bones, rough, hard, per ton.............................. 22.50 @24.00
soft steamed unground........................... 21.50 @22.00
ground, steamed, 11'/4% ammonia
and 60% bone phosphate............... 20.00 @21.00
ditto, 3 and 50% ...................................... 23.50 2 1.) 0
raw ground, 4'% ammonia and
50% bone phosphate........................ 28.50 @30.00
South Carolina phosphate rock, kiln
dried, f.o.b. Ashley River....................... .......... 3.50 @ 3.75
Florida land pebble phosphate rock,
6S',. f.o.b. Port Tampa, Fla........................ 3.70 @ 3.80
Florida high grade phosphate hard rock,
77( ,f.o.b. Florida ports............................ 5.75 @ 6.25
Tennessee phosphate rock, f.o.b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, TS to 80 per ton 5.00 @ 5.50
75% guaranteed ...................................... 4.75 @ 4.50
68 to 72% ......................... .................... 4.25 @ 4.50

POTASHES.

Muriate of potash, 80-85 basis 80%,
in bags .. .......... .............................. 38.55 @ -
Muriate of potash, min. 95'/), basis 80%,
in bags ................................... ....................................... 40.15 @ -
Muriate of potash, min. 98%, basis 80%,
in bags .................................................. ................ 41.00 @ -
SSulphate of potash, 90-95%, basis 90%,
in b a g s ................................................................................. 4 6 .8 0 @ -
Double manure salt, 48-53%, basis 48%,
in bags ........................................................................... 24.95 @ -
Manure salt, min. 20%, K,O, in bulk......... 13.50 @ -
Hardsalt, min. 16%, K,O, in bulk.................. 10.85 @ -
Kainit, min. 12.4%, K20, in bulk.................. 8.45 @ -












STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1912.

Available Phosphoric Acid............................................ 5c. a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ...................................... Ic. a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)......18,c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, KO) ............................. 51c. a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................................................ 00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ........................................... 20c per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)......... 3.65 per unit
P otash ............ ......... .................. ........ ........................... 1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, lake for
example a fertilizer which analyze s a follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ..........22 per ceni.x.l.0O-.$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .........50 per cent.x .2-- .30
Am m nil ia ....p n....................... ............... 42 per cen .x 3..- 12.4
'Potalsh ........... .. ..................... 23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
-/. .... .. ... .... .... ... .... ... .... .... ... .. .. .. .. ....---1 .-




Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Ihosphoric Acid ........... per cent.x$1.00--$ 8.00
Am m onia ......................... .................... ...2 per cent.x 3.65- 7.30
P otash ............ ..... .............. ...................2 per ceni.x 1.10- 2.20
M ixing and Bagging ...................... ......... .......... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports....................................$19.00












The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one-
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

STATE VALUE;.

It is not intended by tie "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
-.MoU, ,." They may, but seldom do, vary from the market
prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight advance
or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and pournals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida. seaports.
These price lists are published in this report, with the
"State values" for 1912 deducted therefrom.











94


COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Phosphoric
Ammonia Acid Potash

Nitrate of Soda......... 17 to 19 ........... ............
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 24 .......................
Dried Blood ........... 12 to 17 ............ ...........
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
Bone Tankage ......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 8 to 11 6 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal....... 7 to 10 2 to 3 11 to 2
Hoof Meal ............. 13 to 17 14 to 2 ...........
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate ......................... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ........................ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............. 14 to 45 1 to 35
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED


Actual
Potash

Muriate of Potash..... 50
Sulphate of Potash.... 48 to 52
Carbonate of Potash... 55 to 60
Nitrate of Potash..... 40 to 44
Double Sul.of Pot.&Mag 26 to 30
Kainit ................ 12 to 12J
Sylvinit .............. 16 to 20
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes 15 to 30
Wood Ashes, unleached 2 to 8
Wood Ashes, leached.. 1 to 2
Tobacco Stems ....... 5 to 8
Cow Manure (fresh)... 0.40
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.53
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.67
Hog Manure (fresh)... 0.60
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85
Mixed Stable Manure.. 0.63


Ammonia




12 to 16






2 to 4
0 to 0.41
0 to 0.60
1.00
0.55
2.07
0.76


Phosphoric
Acidl


Lime


7 to 9 10
1 to 2 ......
1 to 14 35 to 40
......... 31
0.16 0.31
0.28 0.31
0.19 0.33
0.19 0.08
1.54 0.24
0.26 0.70













FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by.................................... 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by...................................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by ..................................... 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by......................... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by......................................... 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Muriale of potash into actual potasl, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1,583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.41
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by.................. 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (KO) by...... 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.

Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K,0), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K:O).




COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER, STOCK FEED AND
PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAWS.

Copies of the Laws, Regulations and Standards will be
furnished by the Commissioner of Agriculture on appli-
cation.










96
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS.


NAME OF FEED.



Bright Cot'n Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meall
Linseed Meal, old pro-I
Ce ss ................... .......................
Linseed Meal, new pro-I
c e s s ...........................................

W hea t B ran .......................... ...

Wheat Middlings .........

.Mixed Feed (Wheat) ......

Ship Stuff (Wheat) ............

Corn (grain) ..............

Corn Meal ............................

C orn C obs ................. .........

Corn and Cob Meal ....

Hominy Feed .....................
Corn and Oats, equal!
p a rts ......................... ..............

Corn and Oats Feeds......

Barley (grain) .....................
Barley and Oats, equal)
p a rts .........................................


7.50i :5.701 30.001

8.401 :I;0. 36.70

90.00 15.40 53.901

5.40 15.40 59.40

7.80J 1.S90 54.40!

5.0 14.601 59.80

2.170 10.50 69.601
I i
12.10! 9.701 6(.701

30.10! 2.40 54.901

0.00 8.50 64.80

4.051 10.501 65.301

5.701 10.50 64.201
1 1 r
12.101 8.70 61.701

2.701 12.40 69.801

6.101 12.10] 64.751


7.80

5.50

7.201

3.601

4.00

4.10

4.80

5.001

5.401

3.80

0.501

3.501

7.851

4.401

3.701
1
1.801

3.401


5.80

5.00

5.30

5.20

5.80

3.20

5.30

3.70

1.50

1.40

1.40

1.50

2.55

2.20

3.20

2.40

2.70











97
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS- (Continued.)


NAME OF FEED.



O ats (grain ) ..........................

O at F eed ......................................

Rice (grain) ......................

Rice Bran ..........................

R ice H ulls ............................

Rye 'grain) ..........................

R ye B ran ................................

Wheat (grain) ...............

C ow Pea .......................................

Cow Pea Hay...........................

Velvet Beans and Hulls

Velvel Bean Hay..................

Beggarweed Hay ...............

Japanese Kudzu Hay......

Cotton Seed (whole).......

Cotton Seed Hulls...............

Gluten Feed ......................


Beef Scrap ..................
7-Bull.


9.50

6.10

0.20

9.50'

35.70

1.70
3.50

1.80

4.10

20.10

9.20

29.70)

24.70

32.14

23.20

44.40

5.30
1


................ 1...............


11.80

16.00

7.401

12.101

3.60

10.60

14.70

11.900

20.80

1 G.60

19.70

14.701

21.70

17.431

18.40

4.00(

24.00

44.70


ri [


5!).70 5.00 3.00

54.90 7.10 3.70

79.20 0.40 0.40

49.901 8.80! 10.00

38.600 0.70 13.20

72.50 1.70 1.90

63.80 2.80 3.t0(

71.90 2.10 1.80

55.70 1.40 3.20

42.20 2.20 7.50

51.30[ 4.50 3.30

41.001 1.701 5.70

30.20 2.301 10.90

30.20 1.671 6.87

24.70 19.90 3.50

36.60 2.00 2.60

51.20 10.60 1.10

3.28 14.75 29.20












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFFS
FOR 1912.

For the season of 1912 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEED STUFFS FOR 1912.

Protein, 3.53c per pound ............................................... 70.6c per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1.56c. per pound.....................31.3c per unit
Fats, 3.52c. per pound..................................................... 70.5c per unit

A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @ $33.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE No. 1.

HOMINY FEED-
P protein ............................ ...................................10.50 x 70.6c, $ 7.41
Starch and Sugar.........................................65.30 x 31.3c, 20.43
F at ................................. ... ......... ........... .... 7.85 x 70.5c, 5.53

State value per to n................................... ....... ...................... $33.37

EXAMPLE No. 2.

Protein ......................... .......................... 10.50 x 70.6c, $ 7.41
Starch and Sugar .......................................... 69.60 x 31.3c, 21.78
F at ............................................................................... 5.40 x 70.5c, 3.81

State value per ton........................... ................. ............... $33.00











FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for formulas for various
crops, and there are hundreds of such formulas published;
and, while there are hundreds of "brands," the variations
in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of "brands"
put up by the same manufacturer are identical goods, the
only difference being in the name printed on the tag or
sack. A- -o od general formula for field or garden might
be called a "vegetable formula," and would have the fol-
iov, ing: Alnmonia, 3:'%; available phosphoric acid,
G; : and potash, Ti'o. The following formulals will
fulu-isih he necessary plant food in about the ivove pi,'-
po -iou. I have purposely avoided the use of an- 'fr '*.:i
',f )() pounds in these formulas to simplify the Vtiies
are taken from price lists furnished by the trade, January
1. 19l12.
For cotton, corn, sweet potatoes and vegetables: Am-
monia. :8;'; available oliosphoric acid, (,'%: potash,

( A "VEGETABLE."

No. 1.
Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (7`-2-1l) ..... n.25 Ammonia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 6. !. Available
300 pounds of Muriate or (Sulphate) (50 per cent) 7.50 Potash

2,000
State value mixed and bagged ............. $28.11
Plant Food per ton........................ 43 pounds
No. 2.
Per Cent.
1,000 lbs of Blood and Bone (6i-8) ........... 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 7.00 Available
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent) 7.30 Potash

2.000
State value mixed and bagged............ $29.04
Plant Fooil per ton ........................ 360 pounds










100

No. 3.
Per Cent.
300 lbs of Dried Blood (16 per cent)......... 3.25 Ammonia
100 Ibs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)..... 8.00 Available
1,000 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).....: 7.80 Potash
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot.(26 per cent)

2,000
State value mixed and bagged............ $30.04
Plant Food per ton ....................... 81 pounds

(B) "FRUIT AND VINE."

No. 1.
Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes: Ammonia, 4 per
cent., Available Phosphoric Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.

Per Cent.
1,000 Ibs of Blood and Bone (6-8) ............
400 Ibs of Muriate of Potash (50 per cent) 8 Available
500 Ibs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).. 4 Ammonia
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent) 10 Potash

2,000
State value mixed and bagged ...............$35.22
Plant Food per ton ........................ 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Castor Pomace (6-2 per cent)..... .1.00 Ammonia
200 !bs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent) ........ 7.70 Available
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)..... i).;0 Potash
400 lbs of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent).........

2,000
State value mixed and bagged............ $34.48
Plant Food per ton........... ........ 426 pounds

No. 3.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (7N-24-14) ......
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent) ..... 3.97 Ammonia
100 Ibs of Suln. of Am. (25 per cent)......... 8.30 Available
900 Ibs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 8.97 Potash
400 lbs of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent)......

2,000
State value mixed and bagged ............. $34.27
Plant Food per ton........................ 425 pounds




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