• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 County map of state of Florida
 Sugar production in Florida
 Insecticides, fungicides and spraying...
 Crop conditions
 Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods...














Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00017
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Sugar production in Florida
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Insecticides, fungicides and spraying calendar
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Fungicides
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Insecticides
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Combined fungicides and insecticides
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Spraying calendar
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
    Crop conditions
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
    Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 71
            Page 72
        New York wholesale prices
            Page 73
            Page 74
        State valuations
            Page 75
            Page 76
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Commercial state values of feedstuffs for 1910
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
        Special fertilizer analyses
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
        Official fertilizer analyses
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
        Special feeding stuff analyses
            Page 91
        Official feeding stuff analyses
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
        Special food analyses
            Page 97
            Page 98
        Official food analyses
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Official drug analyses
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
Full Text












FLORIDA
QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


OCTOBER 1. 1910


B. E. McLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I--Sugar Production in Florida.
Part 2--Insecticides, Fungicides and Spraying Calendar.
Part 3--Crops.
Part 4--Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs and Foods and Drugs.

Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June, 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED fREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM


T. J. APPLEY ARD. State Printer
Tallahasse. Fla.
AD--1


__


.J


VOLUME 20


NUMBER 4











COUNTY MAP OF STATE OF FLORIDA


















PART I.
SUGAR PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA.


















SUGAR PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA



CANE CULTURE, AND SYRUP MAKING.

BY R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

The culture of sugar cane, and the manufacture of raw
sugar or sirup in Florida, dates from tlie earliest settle-
meni. The plant was introduced by the Jesuit Fathers and
largely cultivated on the East Coast, near St. Augustine
and New Smyrna, by the early Spanish settlers, the canes
having been introduced from the West Indies, where it
was cultivated on a commercial scale as early as 1518.
The remains of sugar factories, and evidences of sugar
culture on an immense scale, are still found at New
Smyrna in the Turnbull hammock. A drainage system
is still in use, established by sugar and indigo planters
more than two hundred years ago. There is no reason
to doubt that Florida was the first of the United States
to cultivate and manufacture sugar on a large scale.

ANCIENT MACHINERY AND METHODS
EMPLOYEE ).

I regret to say that the same primitive methods used
in those ancient days still prevail, and that a modern,
economical sugar factory does not exist in the State to-
day. To this fact, and the lack of modern apparatus, I
attribute the present condition of the industry. No
effort has been made to improve the wasteful two-roller
horse mill, with wooden frame, and the old Jamaica
kettle set in a clay furnace, the mill extracting not ex-
ceeding 50 per cent. of the juice, and frequently less,
while the kettle, juice trough and skim barrel account
for a loss of 20 per cent. or more of the small quantity
secured by the mill. I am convinced, by observation of
a number of sirup plants in the Slate, that, on an aver-
age, not to exceed 40 per cent. of the sugar content of
the cane is secured, and that (60 per cent. is wasted after










producing the cane and hauling it to the mill. The meth-
ods generally pursued in Florida are as primitive as those
still followed in Mexico and South America. A few
modern sirup plants have been erected, notably in Gads-
den and Jackson Counties.

MODERN APPARATUS REQUIRED.

A modern factory, with improved mills, evaporators,
filters, bagasse burners and other modern labor-saving
devices, properly constructed clarifiers, filters, etc., will
readily secure double the quantity of sirup or sugar, of
a much better quality, from the same amount of cane,
than can possibly be accomplished by the crude and
wasteful apparatus universally employed in Florida to-
day; at far less cost.

ONLY CRUDE METHODS EMPLOYED.

In no other agricultural and manufacturing enterprise
has the farmer and manufacturer failed to take advan-
tage of the improvement in methods and machines. I can
only attribute this to the generally accepted belief that
cane growing and sirup making, even under the present
crude and wasteful method, is considered a most profit-
able business. I have talked with hundreds of farmers
in all parts of the State, from Pensacola to Key West,
from Jacksonville to Tampa, and have yet to meet one
who did not positively assert that he derived more cash,
with less labor per acre, from his cane patch than from
any other crop.

MAXIMUM TONNAGE PRODUCED.

The fact that we produce crops of cane of from fifteen
to thirty-five tons per acre, with an easy average of twenty
tons, cannot be gainsaid.

QUALITY OF CANE SUPERIOR.

That this cane is equal to any in sugar content, and far
superior to that grown in other States, cannot be denied.
Too many tests and analyses have been made from canes
taken from all parts of the State, and from all kinds of
land, by eminent chemists and sugar makers, who have











unqualifiedly slated that our canes are eqnal to any, and
sllupelior to nlst,( grown! in America, or even in Cuba, to
permit a doubt to exist as to the peculiar advantages of
Florida's soil and climate for producing a plant of maxi-
muln tonnage and sugar content.

IMPROVED APPARATUS IN LOUISIANA.

Louisiana for years struggled with the horse mill and
open keltle, making brown sugar an(d molasses. This
had to be sent to the refinery and treated by the old "clay
process." Gradually the methods of the refiners im-
proved, clt.iiicition was peli'ccled, liliers were improved,
the juice was made chemiically :iid mechanically clean,
the vacuum pan was evolved, which led to the "double
eft'ct" (()i vacuum evaporator), hie mill was increased
from two to three, then five, then six, and now nine roll-
ers are used. The extraction formerly thought very good
at 60 per cent. has been increased to 8:1 per cent., leaving
practically only the dry fibre of the cane. The fuel bill,
formerly three cords of woo-(d, or equivalent in coal, per
acre, has been eliminated, the pulp or bagasse of the cane,
in a well-balanced modern factory, furnishing all the
necessary fuel for all purposes. The evolution in the
sugar factory of Louisiana has been in keeping with the
progress along all other lines. Twenty years ago the
modern "central factory" was the exception; to-day it is
tile rule; there are hundreds of such factories in Louisi-
ana, handling from 500 to 1200 tons of cane per day, mak-
ing large profits, while selling granulated sugars at 41
to 5 cents per pound. These factories extract and produce
fully 100 per cent. more sugar from a given amount of
cane than can possibly hle secured by using ihe antiquated
mill and open kettle. At the same time, the quality is
such that the value of the sugar per pound is increased
from :. to 4, or .5 cents, or from 50 to 65 per cvni. increase.

RAW SUGAR, OR SIRUP. COMPARED TO REFINED
OR PURE SUGAR.

A ton of cane, producing 90 pounds of "aw sugar,
worth $2.70, will, with improved apparatus of large ca-
pacity, produce 180 pounds of granulated goods, worth
not less than 4 cents per pound, or $7.20, while the cost












of producing this 180 pounds of granulated goods will be
less than to produce the 90 pounds of brown sugar.

BEET SUGAR FACTORIES EMPLOY ONLY IM-
PROVED MACHINERY.

The only reason why it is possible to make beet sugar
profitably is the fact that none but the most modern ap-
paratus is used, making it possible to secure all the sugar,
at the least possible cost, from the beet, a plant well
known to be inferior to tropical cane in average sugar
content and also containing larger percentages of impuri-
ties. No beet sugar factory would attempt to make raw
sugar and sell it to the i n i... I-. al the price fixed by the
refiners. The result would be disastrous to the grower
and manufacturer of raw sugar. On lie contrary, the
beet sugar factory makes none butl the finest granulated
goods, g'oes directly inlo the market, and demands and
receives the market price fixed by the sugar refiner for
firsl-class goods. The culture of beets is one of the most
precari-ous and difliuIlt crops known, requiring extraor-
dinary skill and immense labor; the crop is subject to
many disasters; in infancy it is delicate and easily de-
stroyed by adverse climatic conditions; it requires skill-
ful culhtre, heavy fertilizing and proper irrigation. When
ready for harvest the work must le promptly finished,
the crop stored free of frost, and carefully handled at all
times. Five acres per hand for culture is a fair task,
while a yield of ten tons, with an average of 12 per cent.
sugar, is a fair average yield, or 2400 pounds of sugar
per acre, paying the grower a maximum of .5.00 per ton
of beets, or .4250l.00 per annum for culture, harvest and
delivery of five acres of beets, will a total failure ex-
pected two years out of five from drought, rain or frost.

SUGAR CANE A [ G'( E. ROBITT, PLANT. EASILY
('CLTIVATEI) AS INDIAN CORN.

To a Florida audience I need not say that cane is a
robust, rugged plant, as easily cultivated ias corn. requir-
ing no thinning to a sand at ecnrmous cost of labor, no
special care. and seldom properly fertilized: still. I have
yet to learn of a total failure (Io a can( crop fr(om drought,
flood or insect pest.












ACREAGE PER MAN EMPLOYEl).

Twenty acres per ]hand, with a yield of 20 tons of cane
per acre, is not unusual. (With Ihe same amount of fer-
tilizing and labor as demanded by beets, one man can
grow 30 acres, wilh an average of not less thln 25 tons
of cane per acre, that will yield in a modern factory 10
per cent. of pure grannulaed sugar per ton of cane, or
5,001) pounds per acre. or 125.,00(0 pounds per hand used
in cnllure). I'nderstand Ihal while one man can culti-
vate 20 acres under ordinary conditions (and :10 if he
works as hard and co('nsintly as the beet grower), no
onIe aman can harvest such a crop, nor e(in the beet grower
harvest his five acres without help. This cane, delivered
at ihe factory will furnish practically all the fuel neces-
sary. The beet factory must use (oal. This, however, is
ofset by tlie value of 1he beet pulp for feeding purposes;
slill. the beet factory is, compared t t he cane sugar fac-
tory of equal capjacily, more costly, while lie process of
nannfactire is more complicated and expensive. The
extraction. clarifying, filtering and purifyinii of beet
juice, owing o Hie large amount of impurities, is far
more dillietll than in handling cane juice. Raw beet
sugar is no1 tit for consumption by m11an11 or boast. This
fact has liha m1ch influence on Ile industry avnd forced
the empllloyeniei of 1Hie best and most scientific methods
in beet sugar imanufaciure. (ane sugar, as we all know,
is a most palatable and nutritious food, from lhe cane
itself up through the various preparations of sirlp, raw
sugar, molasses candy, to refined sugar, or' rock candy.
In no stage can it be said sugar cane and its products
are not lit for food.

COST OF CANE SUGAR, COMPARED TO BEET
SVGAR.

I have frequently staled, and again assert. that first-
class granulated sugar can lbe made from Florida cane
at a large profit when selling lhe sugar at less than it
costs to produce beet sugar. That if these facts were in-
telligenily placed before the American farmer and capi-
talist. the enormous sums now being invested in beet cul-
ture and manufacture would he diverted to the sugar belt
of the South, and particularly to Florida.











FACTS DEMONSTRATED.

It requires no experimentation, there are no facts to
d(nionsjlrane. they are here ready for investigation; the
plant, tI e 1anonuit it will produce per acre. its sugar con-
tent, tlhe cost of pIroduction, in labor and time; these
factors are the only ones that i eed to be authoritatively
established by our Agricultural DIepartment, or by our
own people, to i(ndnce the intlus of labor and capital.
While I iam not an advocate of sirup making as a
general industry, knowing that it is but a crude and
wasteful method, and at most )bt an expedient, still, a
well-made silup, cleanly prepared, properly clarified and
neatly packed, is in demand at fair prices and will pay
fair dividends on lie investment.

CENTRAL FACTORIES NEEDED.

Until our people are educated to the necessity and
value of "central factories," where the farmer may sell
his cane direct to 11P factory for more than he now gets
for his sirup. it will b) well to encourage the sirup in-
daslry. Provided none ibut the best is made, top prices
ray ble expected; if thin, dirty, dreggy slons, packed in
a sour keg or dirty barrel, is produced, it is only fit for
the pigs-and not good for them.

WHAT GOOD STRUP IS.

In making sirup (good sirup). the object is to pro-
duce a thick, clear liquid, that will not granulate or
"sugar off." It may be startling to a number of my
auditors when I assert that first-class sirup contains but
comparatively little sugar. A first-class sirup, be it made
from cane, maple sap, corn, rice, potatoes, beets, water-
melons or other vegetable substance, is but a solution of
glucose, or "invert" sugar, with no appreciable quantity
of sucrose, or sugar: hence, to make a good, thick, heavy,
clear sirup, we proceed to change our sugar to glucose, or
"invert" sugar, exactly opposite to the desire of the sugar
maker. The sugar maker seeks to prevent the "inversion"
of his sugar to glucose, and to get his sugar to the "grain"
as quickly as possible: he desires as little glucose as pos-
sible, and separates the molasses and glucose from his
crystals as rapidly as possible.











Starch, glucose and sugar are all closely related, all
carbo- hydraies-ithe basis of fats in animals, v.hich are
hydrocarbons. The lii,, ii,, between sugar and glu-
cose is but the addition of one molecule of waler. Sugar
being "('1, 1122, 11," by adding one nmoleciul of water
("'II-0") we have glucose---"Cl, IH-1, ()i'." .By the
addition of water, in the presence of heat, acids or fer-
ments, sugar takes up a molecule of water and becomes
glucose. Starch also in the presence of an acid and heat,
or a ferment, becomes glucose.
Sugar does not ferment, it must become glucose, "in-
vert" sugar, first; neither does starch ferment, it must
also be changed to glucose before it ferments. Another
fact to be remembered is that glucose, in the presence of
heat and moisture, will allack and convert sugar into
glucose; by the action of long-continued heat the whole
of the sugar will be converted or "inverted." A quantity
of pure sugar, dissolved in pure water, kept simmering
on a stove for some time, the evaporation supplied will
in lime become a solution of "invert" sugar, with no
sugar (sucrose in it. If the juice of an apple, orange
or a few grapes, or olier acid fruit, is added to the vessel
the "inversion" will occur more quickly.
Cane juice is a solution of sugar, glucose and other
solids and 'uins. Ripe cane has but little glucose-fre-
quently less tllhn 1 per cent., generally 2 to 2 per cent.
Unripe cane has a much larger percentage of glucose,
sometimes as much as 50 per cent.; the immature tops
of cane are always high in glucose and poor in sucrose,
or sugar. Evidently the starch in the cane (or what
would be starch in corn, rice or potatoes) is first formed
in the inmmature part of the cane. It is by the subtle
chemistry of nature changed into sugar, a chemical feat
the despair of the most eminent scientists. To change
a sugar into glucose is a daily performance in the labora-
tory and factory; to remove the molecule of water and
change glucose to sugar has been the dream of the chem-
ists for years; so far it has not been accomplished.

SUGAR MAKING DISTINGUISHED FROM SIRUP
MAKING.

Knowing now the materials we have to deal with, and
their behavior in the presence of acids, heat and ferments,












we can proceed to prepare the substance we require. If
we want sirup, we do not demand ripe cane, which the
sugar maker requires; a quantity of glucose in the un-
ripe tops will do no harin, hence we begin grinding when
the canes are ripe from one-half to io-thirds the length
of the stalk (say October 15), though ripe cane makes
more sirup in proportion than unripe cane. Unripe cane
will make good sirup, but not good sugar. Ripe cane,
quickly "boiled off," will certainly granulate if boiled to
the proper density; unripe cane can hardly be made to
granulate by lle most expert sugar makers.

RIPE CANE FOR SUGAR.

To make sugar, use ripe cane. cut off the iinatlure tops,
leaving as little unripe cane as possible, clarify and evap-
orate rapidly, place in coolers of large area to allow quick
cooling and granulation.

UNRIPEJ' CANE MAY BIE ISEI) FOR SIRUEP.

For sirup making, use considerable unripe tops; do
not hurry the process at any point; the juice may stand
in the tank for some time (one or two hours), a little
ferment will not hurt it; clarify and skimi at a moderate
heal; evaporate slowly, and skim carefully. This slow
evaporation will insure a heavy, non-crystalable sirup.
1Much of the excellence of Florida sirup depends on the
slow evaporation in deep kettles, with great heat long
continued. Tlhe delay ill lhe juice barrel between strikes,
and the aIr;e numuint of ferment necessarily added to
the juice 1by tle mill with its wooden frame and lie sour
ness of tli, various strainers and utensils used. The mill
is seldom washed off, and is never "lilmed" to destroy
ferment.
The evaporator is never a favorite witli sirlp makers;
they can't boil thick before ihe sirup sugars. This is a
fact. .I', however, larger quantities were run at a time,
and lie fire kept low, equally as good siirnI could be
made on the evaporator as in the kettle. For practical
purposes, on a fairly large scale (10 to 20 barrels. or 400
to 800 gallons, per day of sirup), I should advise a sepa-
rate clarifier and a partial evaporator, and finish in a
separate vessel. The secret of good sirup is perfect clari-
fying and straining, careful and continuous skimming,











and plenty of lime given to Ihe evaporation, using more
or less unripe cane., wih some fernientalion allowed. Boil
your sirup lo a unii'form density of about 3I degrees
Beaume, while hot; this will yield a sirup of aiout 38
degrees LUeaume, when cold. These sacclarolmelers can
be purchased of any instrument dealer, or can be ordered
through any druggist. They are absolutely necessary for
uniforll work.
AeIARAus.- The first'prerequisite is a first-class hori-
zontal mill, well built and exceedingly strong, to extract
the juice; such a mill can only be had from manufac-
turers who have had long experience in building sugar
apparatus. A first-class liree-roller mill, properly set,
will extract G(0 per cent. of the weight of cane in juice
or 70 per cenl. of the total juice. The clarifier and evap-
oralors should, if possible, be steam-heated, the coils made
of copper, for economical reasons. Copper conducts heat
better than iron; while iron pipes will make as good
sugar, they will require 40 per cent. more fuel to do the
same work; a copper coil will work better with 60 pounds
of steam than an iron coil with 100 pounds.

ADVANTAGES OF STEAM APPARATUS.

The advantage of a steam train is obvious; the manipu-
lator has absolute control of the heat and can regulate it
as circumstances demand. A fire-heated evaporator can-
not be so perfectly regulated. In either case, steam or
fire-healed evaporalors, I strongly advocate a copper heat-
ing surface, on account of fuel economy; the difference in
cost will be more than ot'set during the first season. There
are a large number of reliable manufacturers of first-class
apparatus who cann, and will, furnish apparatus at far
less than ilhe can be designed and built for locally. A
"home-made" apparatus is most expensive and unsatis-
fac lory.
Cu:LTTRE.-It is useless for me to attempt to instruct
Florida farmers in cane culture. The methods are fully
understood by them. I can only say that a large part of
the culture should precede the planting. The bed should
be deeply plowed and in perfect tilth before planting. I
prefer fall planning, particularly in South Florida. By
having Ile ground ready, the planting can be done at the
time of griinding, using the immature tops for seed. An
acre of tops should plant more lhan an acre of new land.












In South Florida, cane should yield at least three good
crops from one planting; frequently, with proper care,
it will last five or six years. The culture should be shal-
low, at all limes working a low ridge around the cane.
For fertilizing, nothing is better than cow-. ii;lI_. which,
however, should be re-inforced by 150 to 200 pounds of
high grade sulphate of potash (45 to 50 per cent. of
potash) and 500 to 1000 pounds-of 10 per ceni. acid phos-
phate. Cane requires potash to mature its juices, as
does all fruit or sugar-producing plants. A general fer-
tilizer for cane should have about these proportions: Am
monia 3, phosphoric acid 6, potash 4. Cotton seed meal,
acid phosphate and kainit mixed in equal parts and ap-
plied, 1000 pounds per acre, will give most excellent re-
sults; this will yield the necessary fertilizing elements
in about the correct proportion.
At present prices, this fertilizer should not cost to ex-
ceed $25.00 per ton at seaports. One thousand pounds
per acre should insure a crop of not less than 20 tons of
cane per acre, with an average of 10 per cent. sugar, or
4000 pounds sugar per acre, or 400 to 500 gallons of first-
class sirup per acre, using a first-class apparatus and ex-
ercising due economy. About one-half this amount can
be secured with the usual apparatus now generally em-
ployed in this State.
_ARIIETIES OF CANE.-There area number of different
canes, probably seventy-five or more known varieties. In
many cases the same cane is known by different local
names. There are not to exceed a dozen kinds that are
valuable in Louisiana and Florida, of which probably
three distinct kinds are worth considering. The "Crys-
taline," from which a number of dili'erent canes have
originated, is generally considered best; the "Red Rib-
bon" and the "Purple" canes come next. The large white
or Hawaiian cane is largely planted in Florida; it is
a favorite for chIwing. It is a slow grower, late in start-
ing. and does not irattoon perfectly.
The "Cr.vstaline" is considered the 1,(! all :irolnd cane.
It is known b, many local names. 7t i-at!tonst well, is
early in sprouting and ready to "lay IiY" hy May 15; its
sugar content is high andm imlpurities snmal.
The "''ed Ribbon" is also an excellent cane. and infe-
rior to the "Cry'staline" only in the fact that it does not
rattoon so perfectly.
The "Pu'rple." or Bourbon cane. is a hardy cane. smaller












than either of the others named; its sugar content is
equal to the "Red Ribbon" or "Crystaline"; it is well
adapted to North Florida, and is almost exclusively cul-
tivated in Georgia; it will stand more frost than the
"Crystaline" or "led Ribbon."
A new seeding cane, perfected by Dr. William C. Stubbs,
recently Director of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Sta-
tion, known as "1)emarrara No. 71," has been largely in-
troduced into Louisiana. It is a robust, hardy, green
cane. witli a nmch larger sugar content than the ordi-
nary canes; a heavy producer, with but few impurities.
It has not yet been extensively introduced into Florida.
Where it has been tried, it has been found desirable, be-
ing early in maturity and has a much larger sugar content
-10 to 15 per cent. more than the ordinary varieties.
A variety known as the Japanese cane was introduced
from the Louisiana Sugar Experimental Station some
fifteen years ago; it rattoons profusely and will grow on
high pine land, making heavy crops where ordinary cane
would fail to produce profitable crops; it makes first-
class sirup, but is not considered a first-class sugar-pro-
ducer on account of its high percentage of glucose, and
solids not sugar. I believe it will be of great value to
those situated on high pine ridges, and as it stands frost
better than ordinary cane, it will be an acquisition to
North Florida and Georgia.

PREPARATION OF SOIL-PLANTING.

Soil for cane (or corn) should be well drained and
deeply plowed; not less than six inches-preferably eighli
or more inches, depending on local conditions. This
should be done as early as practicable in the fall, not
later than November 15 for spring planting; if for fall
planting, in October. The soil should be well harrowed.
putting the seed-bed in first-class tilth. The fertilizer
should be spread, or scattered, broadcast, and thoroughly
harrowed in before planting. Fall planting should be
done in November; spring planting in February or March.
Rows should -be opened six feet apart, four inches deep:
the seed canes laid in the furrow, continuously, lapping
each cane one or two joints, if the seed is sound and the
eyes perfect. In case of damaged seed cane, more is re-
quired; frequently "two canes and a lap" are needed:
the objcl- being to (et one sound eve for every six inches











of row, to insure a good "stand." Cover fall-planted cane
four inches deep, in the spring, when germinalion has
begun; remove part of the covering, to allow the heat and
air to penetrate the soil. Much cane is lost front) too deep
planting. For spring planting, cover not more than two
inches deep.
Germination will frequently begin in North Florida in
February; in Middle Florida in January, when part of
the covering should be dragged ofl, to assist in germinat-
ing. In tropical Florida, below the 28th parallel, cane
will sprout and grow at any time, and can be planted
whenever convenient.

CULTIVATION.

The culture of cane is exactly similar to the culture
of corn; one of the best tools for early cultivation is the
.%\I-.1- i." It can be used at any lime from the planting,
and run in any direedion-with the rows or across them-
and can be used exclusively until the cane is two feet high,
after which a cultivator should be frequently run in the
rows. The culture should at all limes be shallow, not
to disturb the root system. A turn-plow should never be
used to cultivate cane. Continue cultivating till the cane
completely shades the ground. Allow no weeds to grow
in the rows, nor the middles, at any time.

HARVEST.

Harvest begins in Louisiana October 15-though the
cane is far from mature at this date. The large areas,
however, demand early harvest. In North Florida, No-
vember 1 to 15; in South Florida, December 1; below
the 2Sth parallel, harvest may be delayed till January 1,
and is frequently continued till March 15. sometimes till
April 1, the climate being practically similar to Cuba,
adding full sixty days' growth and maturity to the crop.
That portion of the plant which has shed its blades or
leaves is mature; that part to which the blades still cling,
the tops, is not fully mature. Generally two-thirds of the
stalk is matured by November 1st.
When ready for harvest, the cane should be striped of
its leaves, to allow the sun to mature the juices-a lath
is a good tool for this purpose. Enough cane should be
stripped at one time to supply the mill several days.










CUTTING CANE FOR SIRUP.

When cutting cane for sirup, top it high, to leave two
or three of the upper, unripe, immature joints; this im-
mature cane juice is largely glucose, or "invert" sugar,
and tends to prevent crystallization.

CUTTING CANE FOR SUGAR-MAKING.

In cutting cane for sugar-making, top low, using only
the fully matured or ripened cane. Cut only what is
necessary to supply the mill each day. Only fresh-cut
camn should be used for making sugar.

FERMENTATION.

A slight fermentation will not damage cane for sirup-
making. adding to the 'invert" sugar (glucose) and al-
lowing the sirup to be boiled thick without danger of
crystallizing.
A very small amount of fermentation will materially
damage cane for sugar-making, increase the "invert"
sugar--molasses, and decrease the crystals of sugar in
proportion to the amount of glucose present. Fermented
cane cannot be made into sugar, though with proper care
it may be worked into fair sirup.

EXTRACTING-MILLING.

Use none but a heavy, well-made mill, with large shafts,
requiring not less than two good animals to pull it.
A steam-power, horizontal mill should be used when
there are more than twenty acres to harvest.
The pulp (or 1.,_..I.-), when passed through the mill,
should be broken into short, dry fragments, apparently
free of juice. When passing the mill as flat ribbons, un-
broken at the joints, it has not been well ground, and
still has a large percentage of juice left in it. A well-set
hori' mill can be run to extract 60 per cent. of the weight
of hle caine in juice, leaving 25 per cent. still in the cane
(cane is composed of 85 per cent. juice and 15 per cent.
of dry fibre).
Seldom do horse mills extract more than 50 per cent. of
juice, leaving 35 per cent. in the cane. A well-designed,
2-Bul.










powerful, six-roller steam-power mill will, when kept
properly set, extract 75 per cent., still leaving 10 per
cent. of juice in the cane. Seldom do steam mills extract
more than 75 per cent. of the weight of cane in juice.
The most powerful steam mills-nine rollers, with
crusher and "saturation" between the last six rolls-
average not to exceed SO per cent. of the juice, or !3 per
cent. of the total sugar in the cane.
A mill extracting less than 65 per cent. of the weight
of the cane in juice is not an economical apparatus. A
good steam-power mill, with six rolls, will average 75
per cent., a gain of practically 20 per cent. in sirup or
sugar.
Few cane growers realize the enormous losses they sus-
tain by using inferior mills.

STRAINING AND CLARIFYING.

Between the mill and the juice tank, or barrel, a
coarse wire strainer should be placed, to remove coarse
particles of cane or leaves; under this a gunny-bag
strainer; below this a coarse muslin or cheesecloth
strainer. Needless to say, these sirainers must be kept
clean and frequently changed. They should le stretched
on hoops, like sieves, and a number kept on hand for
changing. From the mill to the juice tank, near the clari-
fier, or evaporator, a pipe should be run-generally below
the ground, not to interfere with the team. At its outlet
another strainer of flannel, or "filter cloth," should be
placed.
Thorough straining wonderfully reduces the labor of
skimming and greatly improves the quality of the sirup
or sugar.
The juice tank at the mill need not be of great capacity.
It serves only as a funnel for the pipe to the larger juice
tank near the clarifier or evaporator. This tank should
hold at least sufficient for a charge (or run) of well-
strained juice; it also acts as a settling tank and re-
moves large amounts of heavy impurities that settle to
1he bottom. It should be cleaned at least once a day, and
well washed out.

MILK OF LTME FOR CLARIFYING.

The universally used clarifying agent in all well-con-









ducted sugar or sirup factories is a mixture of freshly
burned quicklime and water. Air-slaked lime will not
answer the purpose, and should not be used. To prepare
this -milk of lime," use one pound of quicklime to one
gallon of waler, thus having two ounces of lime to each
pint of the mixture.
Place 40 pounds of quicklime in a 40-gallon barrel;
slake ii with water; when it is thoroughly slaked, add
water io make 40 gallons (if the water is at all times
above the lime it will keep indefinitely, lit for use).
Before dipping out a portion for use, stir the "milk of
lime" thoroughly to get the necessary lime suspended in
the portion to be used. It should be about like thick
whitewash.
For each 50 gallons of raw, strained juice, use one pint
of this '"milk of lime." Take one pint of "milk of lime,"
add one gallon of water; stir it well to suspend the lime;
scatter this over the surface of the juice in the evaporator
or clarifier; distribute it well and mix it thoroughly
with the juice.
SKIMMING.

Bring the juice to a boil quickly. but do not let it
"boil up"; when the "green blanket" forms and begins to
" Io;. ," draw the fires, or turn off the steam. Remove
the blanket of green scum quickly and carefully. Don't
let 1it scum fall back into the juice at any time.
After cleaning carefully, renew the fires, or turn on the
steam; skim continuously and carefully, while evaporat-
ing; evaporate within moderate heat for sirup, quickly for
sugar.
ACIDITY.

Normal cane juice is always slightly acid. If cane has
been cut some lime. or exposed to the sun for some time,
it frequently Ibecomes quite acid (ferments) The lime is
to neutralize this acid-coagulate the gums and albumins.
Practically all the lime is removed in the scums, or the
settling.
CAUTION.

The amount of lime recommended-one pint of "milk of
lime," equal lo two ounces for each 50 gallons of juice-
is but approximate. Very ripe cane. sweet and unfer-










rented, may require less; green or sour cane, more than
indicated.
For sirup-making, the juice should at all times have a
slightly acid reaction; for sugar-making, it should be
neutral-neither acid nor alkaline.

TEST FOR ACID.

A few sheets of Blue Litmus paper should be pro-
cured. Cut this into half-inch strips, about four inches
long, and keep in a dry bottle. Before liming the juice,
dip one of these strips into the juice. The blue paper
will be at once turned pink or red, depending on the
amount of acid present. After liming, dip another strip
into the limed juice. It should show but a pale pink. If
it remains blue, you have too much lime, and raw juice
should be added till you get a faint pink color on the
paper. Juice for sirup should always be slightly acid,
turning the blue paper a faint pink.

BOILING.

Fon Smiir.-After thorough clarifying and skimming,
boil steadily and slowly (skimming all the time) till the
sirup makes 33 degrees.
FOR SUGAR.-Boil off as quickly as possible, until the
saccharometer shows 36 degrees.

BEATUME SACCHAIIOMETER.

For uniform sirup or sugar making, an instrument (a
hydroneler) called a "Be'aunim Succharomieler" is abso-
lutely necessary. These instruments cosi 50 cents each,
and can be had of any instrument dealer. Any druggist
can order them.
In sirup-making, boil till a sample of the hot juice
shows 3, degrees on the spindle, which will be about
2s degrees when cold.
Vse a ;;lass or tin cylinder about len inches long for
testing: fill the cylinder full of hot juice and drop the
spindle in; it will float at the point of density of the
sirup. Sirup should show 33 degrees when hot; for
sugar, boil to 36 degrees, hot.













PACKAGES.
The finished sirup should be bottled or canned, while
still hot, in perfectly cleaned and sterilized bottles or
cans, and sealed hot. Cans, corks, caps or covers should
be boiled or steamed to sterilize them.
Barrels or other wooden containers cannot be success-
fully sterilized, and will certainly ferment in a short
time. Any sirup, thick or thin, sealed hot, in sterilized
cans or bottles, will not ferment until exposed to the air
and becoming infected by the germs of fermentation. No
harmless preservative (or anti-ferment) is known. Chem-
icals that will prevent fermentation will also prevent
digestion, and are prohibited by good morals, as well as
the pure food laws of the country.
CENTRAL FACTORIES.
A central factory for sirup or sugar, with an assured
acreage of from 200 to 500 acres, where farmers can fur-
nish from 10 to 20 acrcs without too great a haul, should
be a most profitable investment. Such a factory should
purchase cane on the basis of one-half the sirup or sugar
made: the farmer purchasing necessary packages if he
prefers to take his share "in kind." rather than accept
the value of his half at the factory without packages.
The amount of sirup or sugar in the cane is readily de-
termined by the specific gravily of the juice at the mill.
With a good mill and modern apparatus, a yield of 20
gallons per ton of average ripe cane of 8 degrees Beaume
can lie expected. This sirup should be worth 30 cents per
gallon at the factory, or !).00 per ton of cane, of which
the farmer should receive $4.00; at 20 tons per acre his
gross yield is .- ii ill; by proper fertilizing and culture,
he can increase both the sugar content and the tonnage;
20 tons are frequently made, while 40 to 60 tons have been
produced per acre on the rich hammock and muck lands
of the State, when properly drained, fertilized and cnl-
tivaled.
STIRP PACKAGES.
Packages for sirup should not exceed five gallons each.
while one-gallon cans and quart bottles, neatly labeled
and sealed hot, to insure the preservation of the aroma
and peculiar flavor of well-made cane sirup, are prefer-
able. A fair price for good sirup in five-gallon cans is














from 40 to 60 cents per gallon, while quart 1)(bles will
sell from 60 cents to A,1.00 per gallon. Five-gallon cans
will cost 25 cents delivered, each, or 5 cents per gallon;
one-gallon cans will cost 10 to 15 cents each, while quart
bottles will cost 5 cents each. These prices, of course,
can be reduced by purchasing in car lots, or by purchas-
ing the material and having the cans made at the factory,
as is done in most canning establishments. The freight
on ready-made cans is a very large item of expense. An
outfit for making cans is not expensive, while the skill
required is not great.

1'. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

This question is of such importance that the I'niied
States Agricultural Department has recently undertaken
a series of experiments in Georgia and Florida, along the
line of sirup-making. I believe our State could make no
belter investment Ihan to establish a sugar experimental
station in Florida, along the lines of the Louisiana Sugar
Experimental Station. which has added enormous suns
to Il e profits of our Louisiana sugar planters; has edu-
caied numbers of practical sugar growers and sugar
makers. This station would soon be a self-supporting and
self-sustaining institution, and should be run on practical,
as well as scientific. principles, and thus train our young
men to "know how," as well as to "know why." certain
processes will yield certain results.
BULLETINS AND LITERATURE.

I would suggest to all Ilhose interested in sugar cane,
sirup and sugar-making, to wrile 1o tlie Louisiana Sugar
Experimenial Station, at New Orleans, for a copy of
"Sugar Cane," by Prof. William C. Stubbs. directorr of
the Louisiana Sugar Experimental Station (enclosing 50
cents for the same); also. to obtain from the United
States Agricultural Department, Farmers' Bulletins Nos.
90 and 135, "The Manufacture of Sorghum Sirup." The
apparatus and melthods therein recommended are equally
applicable to the manufacture of sirup from cane.
During recent years experiments under the direction
of tlhe United States Agricultural Department have been
made in Florida and South Georgia in manufacturing
sirup from sugar cane. A report, covering a number of
analyses of soils, and a larger number of analyses of cane













has been published in these bulletins, Nos. 70 and 75, of
the Bureau of Chemistry of the United States Agricul-
tural Department. This report sustains the position
assumed by myself and others that Florida and South
Georgia produce cane equal to any country in sugar
content, and that the tonnage compares favorably with
more tropical territories.

AVERAGE ANALYSIS OF FLORIDA CANE.

The average from Florida and Georgia shows:
Sucrose, or pure sugar ................. 12.08 per cent.
Glucose, or reducing sugars ............ 1.32 per cent.
Co-efficient of purity .................. 79.50 per cent.

SUMMARY.

While these general rules and directions are given,
here are many "kinks" and conditions arising that re-
quire experience and skill to succeed in making a really
good quality of sirup or sugar. The art of sugar boiling
is like all other arts, and requires practice and skill to
become an adept. While it is possible to tell "why" cer-
tain results should follow certain processes, one can only
learn "how" by practice. Numerous failures may be ex-
pected. Some of the most skillful sugar boilers are un-
able to tell "why," but they do know "how" to produce
lie best results. There are numbers of chemists who,
while they know "why" certain results are to be expected
from given conditions and processes, have not the skill
required to boil sirup or sugar successfully. "Sirup boil-
ing" in all sugar-making countries is a distinct art, trade
or profession; skillful sugar boilers frequently being paid
as much, or more, than either the superintendent, man-
ager, chemist or engineer of a sugar factory.
R. E. ROSE.
Tallahassee, Fla., September, 1910.



DR. H. W. WILEY'S CONCLUSIONS.

In conclusion, I quote from Prof. H. W. Wiley, Chief
Chemist, United States Agricultural Department:













"The problems connected with the sugar and starch
products are four or five in number.
"First of all, the soil is to be considered and, therefore,
agricultural interests should pay some attention to staple
crops-that is, crops that have a market the year around
and can be preserved and marketed at any time. Sugar
and starch are types of such crops. These substances
take absolutely nothing from the soil; they are fabricated
by the plant from the atmosphere and water; hence, the
sale of such products does not tend to impoverish the soil.
"The soils of Florida are largely of a sandy nature. ***
**-"- ** Sandy soils are not suitable for producing
wheat, for instance, but they are well adapted for pro-
ducing sugar and starch. In Florida, it is more a ques-
tion of climate than of soil, since, with a favorable cli-
mate, scientific agriculture will produce a crop from
almost any kind of soil.
"The second problem to be considered is that of fer-
tilizers. Perhaps there is no State more favorably situ-
aled than Florida in respect of fertilizers. You have here
inexhaustible deposits of phosphate. In the leguminous
crops which grow here-namely, peas, beans, alfalfa and
beggarweed grass-you have a most valuable means of
assimilating nitrogen from the air. In cotton seed, fish
scrap and other animal refuse, you have access to large
stores of nitrogen. Through your seaports, stores of fer-
tilizer materials, such as nitrate of soda and potash salts,
can be brought from South America and Germany. It
would be hard to find any other portion of our country
where fertilizers could be sold more cheaply than in this
State.
"The third problem is the character of the market. This
country is the greatest sugar and starch consumer in the
world. We use more than 2,000,000 tons of sugar an-
nually. Of this quantity, before the Spanish War we
made only about 300,000 tons-about one-seventh of all.
"Since the Spanish War we have acquired Hawaii,
Porto Rico and the Philippines, all of which gives us
large additional quantities of sugar. This year we will
produce about 100,000 tons of beet sugar, so that at the
present time it may be said that we produce about one-
third of all the sugar we consume; but still there is a
vast foreign market, which we might supply with a home
product.
"There is no danger, therefore, of overstocking our own













market with increased sugar productions, nor is there
danger of the beet sugar driving the cane sugar out of
the market. For many purposes-as, for instance, the
manufacture of sirup-beet sugar is unsuitable, and
there will always be a demand for all the cane sugar that
can be made.
'"The sugar crop of the whole world for the present
year is about 10,000,000 tons, of which nearly 7,000,000
tons are made from the sugar beet.
"The sugar beet cannot, however, be grown in Florida
profitably. Here you must depend on the sugar cane for
sugar, and upon the cassava and potato for starch. From
starch, glucose can also be made, and it seems to me
that in the near future the glucose industry will pass
from the Indian corn belt to the cassava and potato belt.
In one particular industry Florida and the southern
parts of Georgia and Alabama stand pre-eminent, and
that is the manufacture of table sirup from sugar cane.
It is important, however, to secure uniform grades to
hold the markets of the world, and this can only be ac-
complished by mixing together the products of small
farmers, or by the establishment of central factories,
where the cane grown in the neighborhood can be manu-
factured under standard conditions.
"By the development of these great industries, sugar
and starch making, including table sirups, untold wealth
will in the near future flow into Florida.
"From by-products of the factories, immense quantities
of cattle food can be obtained, both from sugar cane and
the slarch-producing plants. Thus. a dairy industry can
be established in connection with sugar and starch mak-
ing, which will add much to the wealth of the State."
























PART II.

INSECTICIDES, FUNGICIDES AND
SPRAYING CALENDAR.















FUNGICIDES, INSECTICIDES AND SPRAY-

ING CALENDAR.


Many of these mixtures can be obtained already pre-
pared front reliable dealers, which saves much time and
trouble in mixing them. The following precautions
should be taken into consideration:
1-Care should be taken to keep all substances em-
ployed in spraying where they cannot be gotten at and
used by mistake. All substances should be correctly
labeled.
2-Solutions and mixtures containing copper sulphate,
corrosive sublimate and arsenate of lead should be made
in wood, glass or earthen vessels.
3--Arsenical solutions should not be applied to fruits,
ec., within two weeks of the time they are to be used as
food.
4-Trees should not be sprayed when they are in blos-
som, as the bees, which are necessary to fertilize the
flowers, may be destroyed.
5-Florida growers interested in spraying and other
means of checking insect pests, not fully covered in this
article, should write the director of the Florida Experi-
ment Station at Gainesville. for further information.



FUNGICIDES.



1 TBORDEAUX MIXTURE.

4 pounds copper sulphate (blue vitriol.)
4 pounds lime unslakedd.)
25-50 gallons water.
Dissolve the copper in hot or cold water, using a
wooden or earthen vessel. Slake the lime in a tub, add-









ing the water cautiously and only in sufficient amount
to insure thorough slaking. After thorough slaking, more
water can be added and stirred in until it has the con-
sistency of thick cream. When both are cold, pour the
lime into the diluted copper solution of required strength,
straining it through a fine-mesh sieve or a gunny cloth,
and thoroughly mix. The standard mixtures are:
(a) 25 gallons (full strength solution, or 4-4-25 for-
mula).
(b) 50 gallons (half strength mixture, or 4-4-50 for-
mula).
It is then ready for use. Considerable trouble has fre-
quently been experienced in preparing the Bordeaux Mix-
ture. Care should be taken that the lime is of good
quality and well burned, and has not been air-slaked.
Where small amounts of lime are slaked, it is advisable
to use hot water. The lime should not be allowed to be-
come dry in slaking, neither should it become entirely
submerged in water. Lime slakes best when supplied
with just enough water to develop a large amount of
heat, which renders the process active. If the amount
of lime is insufficient, there is danger of burning tender
foliage. In order to obviate this, the mixture can be
tested will a knife blade or with ferro-cyanide of potas-
sium (1 oz. to 5 or ( oz. of water). If the amount of
lime is insufficient, copper will be deposited on the knif'
blade, while a deep brownish-red color will be imparted
to the mixture when ferro-cyanide of potassium is added.
Lime should be added until neither reaction occurs. A
slight excess of lime, however, is desirable.
The Bordeaux Mixture is best when first prepared.
Stock solutions of lime and copper can be made and
mixed when required.
2-The following, known as the 6-4-50 formula, is in
very general use:
6 pounds copper sulphate.
4 pounds lime.
F~ gallons water.

3. BORDEAUX MIXTURE FOR PEACH FOLIAGE.

The Bordeaux Mixture, as ordinarily applied, fre-
quently injures to some extent the foliage of the peach,
etc., causing a shot-hole effect on the leaves. This in-









jurious effect has been shown to be largely obviated by
the use of the following:
3 pounds copper sulphate.
6 pounds lime.
50 gallons water.
This is known as the 3-6-50 formula. Some experi-
menters have also recommended the following for peach
foliage:
(a) 2-2-50 formula (Cornell Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 180).
(b) 3-9-50 formula.
The latter contains three times as much lime as copper
sulphate.

4 BORDEAUX RESIN MIXTURE.

5 pounds resin.
1 pound potash lime.
1 pint fish oil.
5 gallons water.
To make resin solution, place resin and oil in a kettle
and heat until resin is dissolved. Cool slightly and then
add lye slowly and stir. Again place the kettle over the
fire, add the required amount of water and allow the
whole to boil until it will mix with cold water, forming
an amber-colored solution. Take 2 gallons of the resin
solution and add to it 10 gallons of water. Mix this with
40 gallons of Bordeaux Mixture.
Recommended for Asparagus Rust on account of its
adhesive properties. (N. Y. Agr. Exp. Sta. (Geneva)
Bull. 1I8).

5 SACCHARATE OF COPPER.

4 pounds copper sulphate.
4 pounds lime.
4 pints molasses.
25 gallons water.
Slake 4 pounds of lime and dilute the same with water.
Dissolve 4 pints of molasses in a gallon of water and mix
with the lime. Stir thoroughly, and let it stand for a few
hours. Dissolve 4 pounds of copper in 10 gallons of water
and pour it into the lime-molasses solution, while stirring
briskly. Allow the mixture to settle. Draw off the clear,
greenish solnlion for use. Recommended in France as a
substitute for the Bordeaux Mixture.









6 AMMONIACAL COPPER CARBONATE.

5 ounces copper carbonate.
3 pints ammonia (260 Beaume).
50 gallons water.
Dissolve the copper carbonate in ammonia. This may
be kept any length of time in a glass-stoppered bottle and
diluted to the required strength. The solution loses
strength on standing.

7 EAU CELESTE.

(Blue Water.)

2 pounds copper sulphate.
1 quart ammonia.
50 gallons water.
Dissolve the copper sulphate in 6 or 8 gallons of water;
then add the ammonia and dilute to 50 or 60 gallons of
water.

8 COPPER CARBONATE MIXTURE.

1 pound copper carbonate.
40 gallons water.
Mix the copper carbonate with a small quantity of wa-
ter to make a paste; then dilute with the required amount
of water. For fruit rot of the peach, etc. (Delaware
Agr. Exp. Sta., Bull. XXIX).

9 COPPER ACETATE.

6 ounces copper acetate (Diabasic Acetate).
50 gallons water.
First make a pasle of the copper acetate by adding
water to it; then dilute to the required strength. Use
finely powdered acetate of copper, not the crystalline
form. For the same purpose, and of the same value, as
the preceding formula.

10 COPPER SULPHATE SOLUTION.

(Strong Solution.)

1 pound copper sulphate.
25 gallons water.
Applied only on trees without foliage.











11 COPPER SULPHATE SOLUTION.

(Weak Solution.)

2-4 ounces copper sulphate.
50 gallons water.
For trees in foliage.

12 POTASSIUM SULPHIDE.

3 ounces potassium sulphide.
10 gallons water.
Valuable for gooseberry mildews, etc.

13 POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE.

1 part potassium permanganate.
2 parts soap.
100 parts water.
Recommended in France for black rot and mildew of
the grape, etc.

14 IRON SULPHATE AND SULPHURIC ACID.

Water (hot), 100 parts.
Iron Sulphate, as much as will dissolve.
Sulphuric Acid, 1 part.
Prepare solution just before using. Add the acid to
the crystals, and then pour on the water. Valuable for
treatment of dormant grape vines affected with anthrac-
nose, application being made with sponge or brush.

15 CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE.

(For Potato Scab.)

2 ounces corrosive sublimate.
15 gallons water.
Dissolve the corrosive sublimate in 2 gallons of hot
water; then dilute to 15 gallons, allowing the same to
stand 5 or 6 hours, during which time thoroughly agitate
the solution several times. Place the seed potatoes in a
sack and immerse in the solution for 1J hours. Corrosive
sublimate is very poisonous; consequently, care should
3-Bul.












be taken in handling it, nor should the treated potatoes
be eaten by stock. The solution should not be made in
metallic vessels.

16 FORMALIN.

(For Potato Scab.)

8 ounces formalin (40% solution).
15 gallons water.
Used for the same purpose as corrosive sublimate, but
not poisonous. Immerse the seed potatoes for two hours.



INSECTICIDES.



17 PARIS GREEN-DRY.

1 pound Paris Green.
20-50 pounds flour.
Mix thoroughly and apply evenly, preferably when dew
is on the plants.

18 PARIS GREEN-WET.

1 pound Paris Green.
1 pound quicklime.
200 gallons water.
Slake the lime in part of the water, sprinkling in the
Paris Green gradually; then add the rest of the water.
For the peach and other tender-leaved plants, use 300
gallons of water. Keep well stirred while spraying.

19 ARSENITE OF LIME.

1 pound of white arsenic.
2 pounds of fresh burned lime.
1 gallon water.
Boil together for 45 minutes and keep in a tight vessel.
Add 1 quart of this to a barrel (50 gallons) of water,
for use.












This insecticide has been recommended by a number
of Experiment Stations, but has not yet been sufficiently
tested at the Massachusetts Station to receive an en.
dorsement.

20 ARSENATE OF LEAI.

4 ounces arsenate of soda (500% strength).
11 ounces acetate of lead.
150 gallons water.
Put the arsenate of soda in 2 quarts of water in a
wooden pail, and the acetate of lead in 4 quarts of water
in another wooden pail. When both are dissolved, mix
with the rest of the water. Warm water in the pails will
hasten 1he process. For the Elm-Leaf Beetle, use 25 il-
stead of 150 gallons of water.

21 WH-ALE OIL SOAP.

2 pounds potash whale oil soap.
1 gallon hot water.
For winter use only.

22 KEROSENE EMULSION.

Sound hard soap, shaved fine.
1 gallon water.
2 gallons kerosene.
Dissolve the soap in the water, which should be boil
ing; remove from the fire and pour it into the kerosene
while hot. Churn this with a spray pump till it changes
to a creamy, then to a soft butter-like mass. Keep thli
as a stock, using one part in nine of water for soft-bodied
insects, such as plant lice, or stronger in certain cases.

2. MECHANICAL EMULSI(ON.

A substitute for the last. Made entirely by the pump,
which draws water and kerosene from separate' tanks and
mixes them in the desired proportion by a mechanical
device. Several pumps for the purpose are now on th1
market.











RESIN-LIME MIXTURE.


5 pounds pulverized resin.
1 pound concentrated lye.
1 pint fish or other animal oil.
5 gallons water.
Place the oil, resin and 1 gallon of hot water in an iron
kettle and heat till the resin softens, then add the lye and
stir thoroughly; now add 4 gallons of hot water and boil
till a little will mix with cold water and give a clear,
amber-colored liquid; add water to make up 5 gallons.
Keep this as a stock solution. For use, take 1 gallon of
stock solution, 16 gallons water, 3 gallons milk of lime,
. pound Paris Green.
The object of this preparation is to obtain an adhesive
material, which will cause the poison to adhere to smooth
leaves. It has been highly recommended by the New York
State (Geneva) Experiment Station.

25 LIME, SALT AND SULPHUR.

(Oregon Formula.)

50 pounds unslaked lime.
50 pounds flowers of sulphur.
50 pounds common salt.
Slake the lime in enough water to do it thoroughly, add
the sulphur and boil for an hour at least, adding water if
necessary. Then add the salt and boil 15 minutes more.
Add water to make 150 gallons, and spray hot through a
coarse nozzle.

26 LIME. SALT AND SULPHUR.

Marlatt's Formula (from Smii-h.)

30 pounds unslaked lime.
30 pounds sulphur.
15 pounds salt.
60 gallons water.
Roil with istpeam: for 4 hours, and apply hot.












27 CARBOLIC ACID EMULSION.

1 pound hard soap, shaved fine.
1 gallon water.
1 pint crude carbolic acid.
Dissolve the soap in the water, boiling; add the car-
bolic acid and churn as for kerosene emulsion. Use 1
part of this with 30 parts of water.

28 HELLEBORE.

1 ounce hellebore.
j gallon water.
Steep the hellebore in a pint of water and gradually
add the rest of the water. Hellebore may also be dusted
over the plants, either pure or mixed with flour or plaster.

29 INSECT POWDER, PYRETHRUM.

Mix with half its'bulk of flour and keep in a tight can
for 24 hours; then dust over the plants. Or,
100 grains insect powder.
2 gallons water.
Mix together, and spray.



COMBINED FUNGICIDES AND INSEC-
TICIDES.



30 BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND PARIS GREEN.

4 ounces Paris Green.
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.

31 BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND ARSENATE OF
LEAD.

1 gallon arsenate of lead (made by formula No. 20)
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.











32 BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND AIRSENITEI OF
LIME.

12 quarts arsenite of lime(made by formuiia No..1
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.

33 SOAP MIXTURE.

(Used for White Fly.)

1 bar soap (10-cent size).
3 gallons water.
Apply warm, as it thickens on cooling.
Recommended for rose mildew, red spider, plant lice,
etc.
Any common laundry soap, particularly the yellow
resin soaps, dissolved 1 pound of soap to 15 or 20 gallons
of water, is an efficient application for white fly, red
spider, plant lice, etc. The addition of pound of Paris
green to each 50 gallons of soap solution adds to ils effi-
ciency. There is probably no better formula for white fly
than the above.
Equal parts of soap solution and sulphur wash-made
by dissolving 20 pounds of sulphur with 10 pounds of
caustic soda-is a most excellent general application.
Sulphur wash is prepared as follows: First mix 20
pounds of flowers of sulphur into a paste with cold water,
then add 10 pounds of pulverized caustic soda (908/).
The dissolving lye will boil and liquefy the sulphur.
Water must be added from time to time to prevent burn-
ing, until a concentrated solution of 20 gallons is ob-
tained. Two gallons of this is sufficient for 50 gallons of
spray, giving a strength of 2 pounds of sulphur and 1 of
lye to 50 gallons of water. An even stronger application
can be made without danger to the foliage. This mixture
can also be used in combination with other insecticides.
The chemical nominationn of sulphur and lime, known
as bisulphide of lime is, perhaps, a better liquid sulphur
solution than the last as a remedy for mites. It may be
very cheaply prepared h b oiling together, for an hour or
more, ill a small rquanitiy of water, equal parts of flowers
of sulphur and storn lime. A convenient quantity is pre-
pared by taking 5 pounds of sulphur and 5 pounds of
lime and boiling in 1 or 4 gallons of water, until the in.








39

gredients combine, forming a brownish liquid. This may
be diluted to make 100 gallons of spray.
Almost any of the insecticides with which the sulphur
application may be made will kill the leaf or rust mites,
but the advantage of the sulphur arises from the fact
that it forms an adhering coating on the leaves, which
kills the young mites coming from the eggs, which are
very resistant to the action of the insecticides and result
in the plants being reinfested unless prolecled by the
sulphur deposit.








SPRAYING CALENDAR.


Plant. 1st Application. 2d Aoplication. 3d Application. 4th Application.

Asparagus ...... Use No. 4 on all After cutting,
(Rust.) young beds at in- use No. 1-b or
tervals of 2 to 4 No. 4.
weeks from May
to September, ac-
cording to the
weather.


Bean ........... When third leaf 10 days later, 14 days
(Anthracnose, expands, No. 1-b. No 1-b. No. 1-b.
leaf blight.)


Cabbage .....
(Worms, club
root.)


Carnatio ....
(Rust and other
fungous dis-
eases.)


No. 29, dry for 7-10 days later,
worms. Lime, 35 repeat No. 29 dry.
bu. per acre for
club root.

No. 1-b, in field
at intervals o f
from 1 to 2 weeks
according to the
weather.


5th Application.


later, 14 days later,
No. 1-b. Sprayig
with No. 1-b, af-
ter the pods arei
one-half grown,
will injure them
for market.


7-10 days later, Repeat in 10-14
repeat second. days,if necessary,
second.








SPRAYING CALENDAR Continued.


Plant.


Celery ........
(Rust and
blight.)


Grape ..........
(Fungous di s-
eases, rose bug,
etc., leaf hup-
per.)

Nursery atock...
(Fungous dis-
eases.) .... ..


Peach, ]
Apricot, *+
Nectarine
(Rot, mildew,
scab, leaf curl,
curcullo.)


1st Application.


Spray in seed-
bed with No. 1-b,
every two weeks.





In spring, when
buds swell. Nos. I
and 14


2d Application. 3d Application.


Dip plants i n Use No. 1-b un-
No. 1-b before i banking be-
planting. gins every two
weeks.


Just before the
flowers unfold,
No. 30.


When the first 10-14 days, re-
leaves appear, peat; for scale,
No. 1-b and No. treat as for apple.
30 or 31.

As the buds are When fruit has
swelling, for plum set, Nos. 3 and 31
curculio Nos. 3 for curculio.
and 20.


When fruit has
set, No. 30; for
Leaf hopper, No.
22, 15 per cent.


10-14
peat.


days, re-


When fruit is
one half grown,
No. 3, a or b.


4th Application. 5th Application.


Freedom from
disease depends
largely upon good
cultivation and
an abundance of
plant food in the
soil.

2 to 4 weeks No. 11, as fruit
later, No. 11. is coloring.




10-14 days re- 5 7 days later,
peat; for scale, repeat.
treat as for apple.


5-7 days later. 10-14 days late-,
No. 12$; for scale. No. 11.
treat as for apple.









SPRAYING CALENDAR Continued.

Plant. 1st Application. 2d Application. 3d Application. 4th Application. 5th Anplication.

Pear ............. As the buds are Just before the After blossoms 8-12 days later, 10-20 days later,
(Leaf blight, swelling, No. 1-b. |blossoms open, have fallen, if repeat third; for No. 11.
s c a b, psylla, No. 30; when the necessary No. 23. scale, treat as for
coddling moth, leaves open for apple.
blister mite, psylla, No. 23.
slug.)

Plum ....... When buds are When blossoms 10-14 days later, 10-20 days later, 10-20 days later,
(Curculi, blackswelling, No. 1-b; have fallen, No.31No. 31. N. 1; or scale,as fruit is ripen-
knot, leaf blight,before the buds treat as for apple. ing.
brown rot, San swell, No. 23 or
Jose scale.) 21 for scale.


Quince ..........
(Leaf and fruit
spot.)

Raspberry, 1
Blackberry, ..
Dewberry. J
(Rust, anthrac-
nose, leaf
blight.)


When blossom
buds appear, Nus.
1 and 30.


When fruit has
set, No. 30.


Before the buds Just before the
break, No. I-b. blossoms o p e n,
No. 30.


Rose ......... .. No. 33,
(Rose mildew, ever these
red spider.) appear.


when
pests


10-20 days later, 10-0n days later,
No. 1-b. No. 1-b.


(Orange or red
rust i s treated
best by destroy
ing the plants at-
tacked in its early
stages.)


Spray after the 10-20 days later
fruit is gathered, repeat.
with No. 1.









SP'RA N IN( CALENDAR Continued.

Plant. 1st Application. 2d Application. 3d Application. 4th Application.


Strawberry ........ As soon as the When the first Spray the new Repeat third If
(Rust, black pa- growth begins, blossoms open, plantation, N o..weath is moist
ria, etc.) with No. 1-b. Dip spray both young 1-b.
plants 'n No. 1 be- and old plaitation,
fore setting. No. 30.

Tomato ......... Soon after the Repeat as soon Repeat the first Try wek solu-
(Rot, b I i g h t, planting, use No. as fruit is form- when necessary. tion of copper slul-
flea beetle.) 1-b. ed; fruit can bU phate as fruir ie
wiped, if disfigur- gin- t^ ripen.
ed, by No. 1-b. '


5th Application.


Potato .......... Spray with No. Repeat before. R e pea t for
(F I e a beetle, 30, when about4nsects become blight, r o t and|
Colorado be e- one- half grown; too numerous. insects as pota-i
tie, blight and for scab, Nos. 15 toes approach ma-
rot, scab.) and 1fi turity.

Violet .......... Use No. 33 on
(Spot, red spi-first appearance
der.) of spot or insects.

* Paris Green cannot be used on foliage of cherry, peach, Japanese plum, apricot and nectarine without injury
t Black knots on plums or cherries should be cut or burned as soon as discovered.
2 If a pail full of lime wash, well strained, be added to each barrel full of copper solution-4 ounces to 50
gallons-delicate foliage like that of the peach, etc., will not be injured.




















PART III.

CROP CONDITIONS.



















DIVISION Of THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.--11

Western Division.

Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington.-7.


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns.--9.

Central Division.

Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia.-9.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,


Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Palm Beach.
Polk,
St. Lucie-11.



















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk




CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.
NORTHERN DIVISION.-There is little difference in con-
dition of crops at this season and the same period last
year, the corn and cotton crops of this year running prac-
tically the same as last. The lateness of the planting
season for cotton has made the maturing of the crop
practically one month later than ordinary, and the
condition is certainly no better than at this season last
year. This cause of the unfavorable conditions was,
first, the effect.of the drought at planting time, and sec-
ond, the long-continued wet spell of weather, that gave
the grass an opportunity to overcome the cotton in June,
and it has been unable to recover itself in the majority
of cases since that time. Corn is not much better, al-
though in many localities, at first glance, it would appear
to be a maximum crop, but an investigation of the field
shows small stalks and small ears, caused by insufficient
moisture to produce a full-grown plant and, consequently,
full-grown ears of corn. From present indications it
seems that the condition of the cotton in this section
will not exceed 62 per cent. of a normal crop, and that
corn will not exceed 66 per cent. of the normal crop. The
hay crop is probably the best ever made in the country,
and more peas have been combined with grass to produce
the crop than ever before, and will probably exceed last
year's yield 200 per cent.
WESTERN DIVISION.-There is little difference between
this and the foregoing section in the percentage of condi-
tions and prospective yield of the various standard crops.
In this section the yield of crops will be about the same
as in the foregoing one. If any change, it will be prob-
4--Bul.













ably smaller. The same causes operated to produce the
conditions and shorten the yield in this section, as in the
northern. The hay crop is the best in many years and,
perhaps, is the greatest ever made in this country, and
will probably make up for the loss in corn and oat crops,
the latter of which was practically a failure throughout
the entire farming section of the northern part of the
State. All live stock is apparently in good condition,
and we hear of no diseases among the cattle or hogs. The
prospective yield of cotton in this district is 61 per cent.
of a normal crop, and corn about 90 per cent. Other
forage crops generally are good.

NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this division conditions
differ little from the preceding districts, either in cotton
or corn, as the same seasons have affected the crops in
this section as in the preceding districts. The vegetable
crops have done well in this district, also the fruits seem
to be in good condition. The vegetable crops were not
affected by the excessive rains of the early summer, as
they were matured and practically all of them marketed
before the rainy season above referred to had begun.
There has been some complaint from this district con-
cerning the shortness of labor, but it is a condition that
seems to come about with each crop season. The condi-
tion of live stock is about the same as in the rest of the
State and reported in fine condition, and no complaints
of serious trouble or diseases to create losses.

CENTRAL DIVISION.-Agricultural operations in this
division are confined principally to vegetables and fruits.
The climatic conditions have been considerably more fa-
vorable in this section than in the districts previously
mentioned, and crops of all kinds, including the field
crops, indicate the normal yield. The orange and gra pe
fruit crops, however, appear to be short to a considerable
degree, and the yield of fruit apparently will not exceed
60 to 62 per cent. of a normal crop in this district. It is
reported from various sections that the vegetable crop is
equal to any ever produced in the State, in profits as well
as quantity. Live stock is in fine condition. The pas-
tures on the immense ranges are in fine shape, the timely
rains that have prevailed in this section keeping them in
good condition throughout the season.













SOUTHERN DIVISION.-There are few field crops grown
in this section of the State, as the growing of vegetables
and fruits for market being not only more profitable, but
easier to produce. Climatic conditions have been favor-
able for all kinds of crops in this section, with the excep-
tion of the citrus fruits, which are short. The indica-
tions are that the citrus fruits in this district will not
exceed 65 per cent. of a normal crop, which means that the
fruit growers will, with proper management in the mar-
keting of their crops, receive highly remunerative prices.
Live stock is reported also in good condition in this sec-
tion.
Considering the condition of all the crops throughout
the State under the unfavorable conditions with which
they have had to contend, we do not see how it is possible
for the agriculturist and the fruit grower to receive more
than two-thirds of a normal yield, but there is consolation
in the fact that where the grain crops are short the forage
crops will to a great extent relieve the situation and make
good the losses. It is safe to say that the yield of cotton
throughout the State will not exceed 64 per cent. of a
crop, while corn is about 90 per cent., the rest of the field
crops ranging close to a full normal yield in all sections.








52

Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops, Fruits
and Fruit Trees for Quarter Ending September 30th, 1910, as
Compared with Same Period Last Year.


Upland Cotton.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIvISION-


Sea Island Cotton.
0 3


0 0,


Gadsden ............. .. 80 75 .
Hamilton ............... .. ... 50 65
Jefferson .............. 70 70 75 75
Lafayette ............. ... ... 80 80
Leon .................. 65 60 ...
Liberty ................ 80 75
Madison ............... 40 40 40 40
Taylor ....... ... ..... ... ... 70 70
W akulla .............. 50 50 ...
Div. Average per cent.. 64 62 63 66
WESTERN IIVISION-
Calhoun ............... 75 70 .
Escambia .............. 75 65 ..
H olm es ................ 70 65 ..
Jackson ................ 65 60
Santa Rosa ............ 75 65 ..
W alton ................ 50 50
W ashingtonl ............ 56 55 ..
Div. Average per cent.. 67 61 ........
NOR IE.ASTERN )IVISIO--
Baker ................. 57 52 57 52
Bradford ............. ... ... 67 67
Clay ................... ... ... 72 74
Columbia .............. 90 72 90 82
St. Johns ............... 75 60 ... .
Div. Average per cent. 74 61 71 69
CENTRAL DIIISION-
Citrus ................. ... ... 60 70
Hernando ............ .
L ake .................. ..
Levy .................. .. .. 80 60
M arion ................ .. .. 90 90
O range ................ .
Sumter ................ 70 60 70 60
V olusia .......... ...... ...
Div. Average per cent.. 70 60 75 7
SOUTHERN DIVISION-
D ade .................. ...... ...
DeSoto ................. ... ..... ..
Hillsborough ........... .... .. ..
L ee ................... ........
M anatee ............. .. .. ... ....
O sceola ................. ... ... ....
Palm Beach ........... ....... ..
Polk ................ ... .... ... ..
S t. L unci .............. ... .... .
Div. Average per cent. ... ...
State Average per cent.. 69 61 69 68












53
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION-


Corn.

o


0


Sugar Cane.
aC
0
o


o
5 C
I |


Gadsden ............... 85 90 75 100
Hamilton .............. 75 80 40 60
Jefferson .............. 90 90 100 100
Lafayette .............. 90 90 70 75
Leon .................. 70 65 90 90
Liberty ................ 85 80 90 90
Madison ............... 60 60 40 40
Talor ............... 85 90 70 75
W akulla ............... 85 85 90 90
Div. Average per cent.] 81 81 74 80
WESTERN DIVISION-
Calhoun ............... 90 90 100 100
Escambia .............. 85 110 75 65
Holmes ................ 75 90 85 80
Jackson ............... 90 90 90 75
Santa Rosa ............ 100 100 100 100
W alton ................ 67 67 75 75
Washington ........... 87 87 65 65
Div. Average per cent.7 85 91 86 80
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION--
Baker ................. 87 87 65 60
Bradford .............. 97 97 75 75
Clay ................... 80 80 90 90
Columbia .............. 80 80 95 80
St. Johns .............. 100 100 65 70
Div. Average per cent.. 89 89 78 75
CENTRAL DIVISION-
Citrus ................. T10 100 60 50
Hernando .............. 100 100 100 100
Lake .................. 100 125 100 110
Levy .................. 90 85 90 90
Marion ................ 95 95 100 100
Orange ................ 80 80 90 100
Sumter ................ 90 95 100 95
Volusia ................ 100 100 90 80
Div. Average per cent.. 94 97 91 91
SOUTHERN DIVISION-
D ade .................. .
DeSoto ................ 90 90 75 75
Hillsborough .......... 100 110 80 90
Lee ..................... 100 100 100 100
Manatee ............... 100 100 100 i 100
Osceola ............... 80 80 100 100
Palm Beach ........... .... .
Polk .................. 85 90 80 80
St. Lucie .............. 90 90
Div. Average per cent.. 92 94 89 91
State Average per cent.. 88 90 s8 83











54
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.


Field Peas. Rice.
0 0
5 .
^cl a a, '0
0 0
0i A-


NORTHERN DIVISION-- i
Gadsden ............... 1T0 100
Hamilton .............. 75 85
Jefferson .............. 100 100
Lafayette .............. 100 100
Leon .................. 100 125
Liberty ................ 100 100
Madison ............... 30 30
Taylor ................ 90 90.
W akulla ............... 90 100
Div. Average per cent..| 87 92
WESTERN DIVISION-
Calhoun ............... 100 100 100 100
Escambia .............. 50 50 75 50
Holmes ................. 68 80 ....
Jackson ............... 100 90 ..
Santa Rosa ............ 90 90 100 100
W alton ................ 25 25 ...
Washington ........... 90 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. 75 76 94 88
NORTHEASTERN )DIISioN--
Baker ................. 55 45
Bradford .............. 100 100 100 100
Clay ................... 100 100 100 100
Columbia .............. 25 25
St. Johns .............. 70 70 75 75
Div. Average per cent.. 72 68 91 91
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ................. 60 0.
Hernando .............. ... ... 100 100
Lake .................. 100 110 ...1..
Levy .................. 100 90 ...
Marion ................ 100 105 80 80
Orange ................ 90 100 ... .
Sum ter ................ 80 75 ... .
Volusia ................ 100 100 ....
Div. Average per cent.. 90 91 90 90
SOUTHERN DIVISION--
Dade .................. 100 100
DeSoto ................ 100 100 75 75
Hillsborough ........... 75 85 100 120
Lee ................... 90 90 100 100
Manatee ............... 100 100 100 100
Osceola ................ 100 120 100 100
Palm Beach ........... 90 75
Polk ................... 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie .............. ... .
Div. Average per cent.. 92 96 96 99
State Average per cent.. 83 85 93 92













Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Sweet Potatoes.

COUNTIES.


0
NORTHERN DInISION- U


Cassava.



d
I-


Gadsden ............... 75 75 .
Hamilton .............. 40 65
Jefferson .............. 90 9) 100 100
Lafayette .............. G6 0 6 .
Leon .................. 100 100 .
Liberty ................ 90 90 .
M adison ............... 40 40 .
Taylor ................ o60 65
W akulla ............... 85 90 .
Div. Average per cent..l 60 75 100 00
WESTERN DIVISION--
Calhoun ............... 100 10)0 ..1
Escambia .............. 80 75 75 75
Holmes ................ .. 50 75
Jackson ............... 100 90.
Santa Rosa ............ 100 i 00
W alton ................ 67. 7 67
W ashington ............ 90 9 90 .
Div. Average per cent.. 84 i 85 75 75
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
Baker ................. 52 65 ..
Bradford .............. 90 90 90 100
Clay .................. 100 100 ... ..
Columbia .............. 65 60 ...
St. Johns .............. 85 90 60 70
Div. Average per cent.. 78S 81 75 85
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ................. 60 50 ..
Hernando .............. 100 110
Lake .................. 100 125 100 100
Levy .................. 100 100
Marion ................ 100 105 95 95
Orange ................. 80 75
Sumter ................ 75 80 100 100
Volusia ................ s 80 80 .
Div. Average per cent.. 87 [ 91 98 98
SOUTHERN DIVISION-
Dade .................. 100 10 ...
DeSoto ................ 75 75
Hillsborough .......... i 75 90 95
Lee ................... I 90 90 90
M anatee ............... 100 100 ...
Osceola ............... 100 80 ...
Palm Beach ........... 75 60
Polk .................. 90 95 ..
St. Lucie .............. 100 100 .
Div. Average per cent.. 88 86 G 90 9
State Average per cent.. 79 84 88 90










56
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION-


Peanuts.

0
a


o S
C ,.
o !
" (


Broom Corn.


9 =0

0
o r

1) &


Gadsden ............... 100 100
H amilton .............. 75 85 ...
Jefferson .............. 100 100 ..
Lafayette .............. 100 100
Leon .................. 100 100
Liberty ................ 100 100
M adison ............... 50 50
Taylor ................ 90 90
W akulla ............... 90 100
Div. Average per cent.. 89 92
WESTERN DIVISION-
Calhoun ............... 100 100
Escambia .............. o 100 100 10 80
H olm es ................. 60 85 ...
Jackson ............... )100 100 ..
Santa Rosa ............ 100 100
W alton ................ 95 95
Washington ............ 1 85 85 100 100
Div. Average per cent.~. 91 95 l 9
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION--
Baker ................. I 85 85 .
Bradford .............. 95 95
Clay .................. 100 100 .
Columbia .............. 90 120
St. Johns .............. ...
Div. Average per cent..1 93 100 .
CENTRAL DIVISION-
Citrus ................. 100 100 .. .
Hernando ............. 80 80SO
Lake .................. 100 105 ..
Levy ..................... 100 100.
M arion ..................... 100 105 ..
Orange ................ ..
Sum ter ................ 100 100 ...
V olusia ................ ....
Div. Average per cent.. 97 98 ...
OUTHIIERN DIVISION-
Dade ................ .... ...
DeSoto ................ ... -
Hillsborough .......... 75 90 .
L ee .................... 90 90
Manatee ............... 100 100
O sceola ................ ... .. .
Palm Beach .............
Polk ................... 0 SO
St. Lucie ......... ..... ... ...
Div. Average per cent..| S6 90 .
State AveraT e per cent.. i 9 95 10 90











57
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION--


Native Hay. Alfalfa.

o d
o > o o
0 o 0
o 0 0


Gadsden ..... ........
Hamilton .............. 75 75
Jefferson .............. 60 60
Lafayette .............. 60 65 ...
Leon ................... 100 125
Liberty ................ 80 80
Madison ............... 50 50
Taylor ................. 65 70
W akulla ............... 75 75
Div. Average per cent.. 71 74 .
WESTERN DIVISION-
Calhoun ............... 90 90
Escambia .............. 100 100
H olm es ................ 40 50
Jackson ............... 100 100 ..
Santa Rosa ............ 100 100
W alton ................ 95 95 ...
Washington ........... 100 100 ...
Div. Average per cent.. 89 91 ...
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
Baker ................ 80 80 ......
Bradford .............. 100 100 ....
Clay ................... 100 100
Columbia .............. 100 110 ...
St. Johns .............. 100 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. 96 98 100 100
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ................. 80 80 ...
Hernando ............. 100 110
Lake .................. 100 115..
Levy .................. 100 110
M arion ................ 100 105 ..
Orange ................ 100 100
Sum ter ................ ......
Volusia ................ 100 100
Div. Average per ( *.. 98 103
SOUTHERN DIVISION --
Dade .................. 100 100 ..
DeSoto ................ 100 100 ..
Hillsborough ........... 100 120 ..
Lee ................... 100 100
M anatee ............... 100 100 ... .
Osceola ............... 100 115 ...
Palm Beach ........... .....
Polk ................... 100 125...
St. Lucie .............. 100 100 ..
Div. Average per cent.. 100 107 ..
State Average per cent.. 1 95 1 100











58
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION-


Velvet Beans. Pasture.




o 0
0


Gadsden ........................ 125 125
Hamilton ........................ 75 75 90
Jefferson ............. ...... ..... 90 90 100
Lafayette ....................... 100 100
Leon ............................ 100 125 100
Liberty ......................... 80 80 90
M adison ........................ 40 60 75
Taylor .. ................ 75 75 90
W akulla ........................ 85 85 85
Div. Average per cent............ 86 91 90
WESTERN DIVISION--
Calhoun ......................... 100 125 90
Escambia ............. 100 120 100
H olm es ......................... 65 80 25
Jackson ......................... 100 75 100
Santa Rosa ....................... 100 100 100
W alton ............... .......... 70 70
Washington ..................... 100 115 100
Div. Average per cent............ 91 98 86
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
Baker ........................... 60 70
Bradford ....................... 100 110 100
Clay ............................ 100 110 100
Columbia ........................ 95 90 150
St. Johns ....................... 65 75 100
Div. Average per cent............ 84 91 112
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ........................... 65 80 100
Hernando ....................... 90 90 90
Lake ............................ 100 110 115
Levy ..................... ...... 100 105 100
M arion ..................... ..... 100 110 100
Orange ............... ............ 100 100 100
Sumter .......................... 100 110 100
Volusia ......................... 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent............ 94 101 101
SOUTHERN DIVISION-
D ade ............................ 95 95 100
DeSoto .......................... 100 100 100
Hillsborough .................... 100 130 115
Lee .................... ......... 100 100 100
Manatee ....................... 100 100 100
Osceola ......................... 100 320 100
Palm Beach ..................... 100 110
Polk ........................... 90 95 100
St. Lucie ....................... .. 100
Div. Average per cent.......... 98 106 102
State Average per cent.......... 91 9 98











59
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION-


Bananas.

o

o
0 g^
u


Mangoes.



a C,

k


Gadsden ............... ..
H am ilton .............. ... ....
Jefferson .............. ..... .
Lafayette ............. .. ...
Leon .................. ...
Liberty ................ ... ...
M adison ................ ... ... ..
Taylor ........... .. ... ... ......
W akulla ............... ... ..
Div. Average per cent.. ... ..
WESTERN DIVISION--
Calhoun ............... ... .. .~ ~
Escam bia .............. ... ..
H olm es ................ ...
Jackson ...............
Santa Rosa ........... ...
W alton ................
Washington ...........
Div. Average per cent..] ... ..
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
B aker ................. ...
Bradford .............. ... ..
C lay .................. ... .
Colum bia .............. ... .
St. Johns ............. ... -
Div. Average per cent.. ... ...
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ................. ... ... .
Hernando ............. 100 100 ...
Lake .................. 100 50 ...
L evy .................. ...
M arion ................ ...
Orange ................
Sumter ................ 75 75
Volusia ................ .....
Div. Average per cent.. 91 75 .
SOUTHERN DIVISION--
Dade .................. 100 100 100 105
DeSoto ............... ... ... ... ...
Hillsborough ..........
Lee ................... 100 100 100 100
Manatee ............... 100 100 100 100
Osceola ............... 50 50
Palm Beach ........... 100 100 75 30
Polk ................... 50 50
St. Lucie .............. 25 25 25 25
Div. Average per cent.. 75 75 80 72
Scate Average per cent.. 83 75 80 72











60
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.



NORTHERN DIVISION-


Guavas. Orange Trees.

=, 3 ai
a= aa
o a 5

2) 'U
5 IP
0 a


Gadsden ...............
Hamilton ..............
Jefferson ............... .....
Lafayette .............. ... .
L eon .................. ...
Liberty ................ ....
M adison ............... ... .
Taylor .................
Wakulla ............... _______
Div. Average per cent ... 1 -.
WESTERN DIVISION-
Calhoun ............... ... 150 75
Escam bia ................. i
H olm es ................ ... .. ...
Jackson ............... ... ...
Santa Rosa .............
W all on ................ .. ... ....
Washington ...........
Div. Average per cent.. ... 150 75
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
Baker ................. .. ... 100 100
Bradford .............. .. 50 50
Clay ................... ... ... 60 60
Columbia .............. .
St. Johns .............. .. ... 75 80
Div. Average per cent...) ... ... 71 73
CENTRAL DIVISION-
Citrus ................. ...100 75
Hernando ............. ... 75 35
Lake .................. 80 25 80 60
L evy .................. ..
M arion ................ ... ... i 90 50
Orange ................. ... 100 75
Sumter ................ ... 100 65
Volusia ................ .. ... 80 60
Div. Average per cent.. 80 25 89 6
SOUTHERN DIVISION-
Dade .................. 100 100 100 90
DeSoto ................ 50 50 100 65
Hillsborough ........... .. ... 75 50
Lee ................... 100 100 95 80
Manatee .............. 100 100 100 90
Osceola ............... 50 10 100 45
Palm Beach ........... 100 100 100 75
Polk .................. 50 50 85 60
St. Lucie .............. 50 40 100 I 60
Div. Average per cent.. 75 69 95 68
State Average per cent.. 78 47 101 69












61
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.


NnaRTs~~ ITTCPV l


Lemon


0

G.)
o

u


Trees.
'a)
>
*^
S2


Lime Trees.


O


U o ^


Gadsden ............... ... ... ..
H am ilton .............. .. ..
Jefferson ..... ...... .
Lafayette ..............
Leon ... ............ ... .. .. .
L iberty ................ ... ... .. .
M adison ............... ... ... .
Taylor ................. ... ...
W alkulla ............... .
Div. Average per cent..
WESTERN DIVISION--
Calhoun ............... ... . .
Escam bia .................. ..
H olm es ....................
Jackson ................. ...
Santa Rosa ................
W alton ................ .....
W ashington ........... ... .. ... .
Div. Average per cent.. ... .. ..
NORTHEA STIERN DIVISION--
Baker ................. ... ... ...
Bradford ................ ... ..
Clay .................. .. .... .
Columbia ............... .
St. Johns .............. 75 80 75 80
Div. Average per cent.. 75 80 75 80
CENTRAL DIVISION--
Citrus ................. ... ... ...
Hern ndo ................ ... ...
Lake ................. 60 25 50 10
Levy .................. .
Marion ................ 85 30 60 30
Orange ................
Sumter ................ 100 40 95 40
V olusia ................ ... ...
Div. Average per cent.. 81 32 68 27
SOUTHERN DIVISION--
Dade ................. 100 100 100 'ii
DeSoto ................ 100 50 100 50
Hillsborough ...........
Lee ................... 100 100 100 100
Manatee .............. 100 85 100 85
Osceola ............... 100 30 100 30
Palm Beach ........... 100 40 100 50
Polk .................. 65 47 75 25
St. Lucie .............. 100 60 85 50
Div. Average per cent. 06 T 64 95 61
Stalee Avere per cent.. 84 55 1 79 1 56











62
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.
Grapefruit Trees.

COUNTIES.


C,
NORTHERN DIVISION-- 0
G adsd(,n ..................................
H am ilton .................................
Jefferson ...............................
Lafayette ...............................
L eon ................................... .
L iberty ................................. .
M adison .................................. ...
T aylor ................................. .
W akulla ................................. .
Div. Average per cent......................
WESTERN DIVISION-


C alhoun .................................
Escambia ........... ..................
H olm es ............................
Jackson ................................
Santa Rosa ...............................
W alton ...................................
W ashington ...............................
Div. Average per cent......................


150 60






15 60


NORTHEASTERN DIVISION-
B aker .................................... 70 90
B radford ................................ .....
Clay ................................... ... ..
Columbia ................................
St. Johns ................................. 75 80
Div. Average per cent ................... 72 85
CENTRAL DIVISION--
C itrus .................................... 100 75
H ernando ................................. 75 80
L ake ..................................... 90 70
L evy ..................................... .
M arion ................................... 90 50
O range ................................... 100 100
Sum ter ................................. 95 75
V olusia .................................. 80 70
Div. Average per cent...................... 90 74
SOUTHERN DIVISION--
D ade ..................................... 100 95
D eSoto ................................... 100 90
H illsborough .............................. 90 85
L ee ....................................... 100 85
M anatee .................................. 100 80
O sceola ............... ................... 100 60
Palm Beach .............................. 100 75
P olk ...................................... 87 75
St. L ucie .............................. .... 90 75
Div. Average per cent ................... 96 80
State Average per cent.................... 102 75


I I






















PART IV.

Fertilizers,
Feed Stuffs, and
Foods and Drugs.















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE COM-
MISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.



SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and
A FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN O0
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO TH1
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAIASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BR
ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary de-
terminations and to allow the preservation of a dupli-
cate sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate
sample will be preserved for two months from the date
of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of
the method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed
by law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ; fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter, strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The sample must not be less than one-
half pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Conimissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and ad-
dress )nist also be on the package, this rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding sIuff.
5-Bul.











A one-pound baking powder can, properly cleaned,
filled with a fairly drawn, well mixed sample taken from
several sacks, is a proper sample. It should be sealed and
addressed to the Comnurssioner of A qricall,; lr, at Talla-
hassee. The sender's name and address should also be
placed on the package. If more than one sample is sent,
the samples should be numbered so as to identify them.
All this should be done in the presence of the witnesses
and the package mailed or expressed by one of the wit-
nesses.
The tags off the sacks should be retained by the sender
to compare with the certificate of analysis when received,
and not sent to this office. The date of 14he drawing and
sending of the sample, and names of the witnesses, should
also be retained by the sender; not sent to this office.

WATER ANALYSIS.

We frequently analyze water for public use, city, town
and neighborhood supplies; springs and artesian wells
in which the public is interested; and for individuals
when some economic question, boiler, laundry or other
industrial use is to be decided. WE DO NOT ANALYZEI
WATER FOR INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNT WHEREIN THE PUBLIC IS
NOT INTERESTED. SUCH SAMPLES SHOULD BE SENT TO A
COMMERCIAL LABORATORY. THE STATE LABORATORY DOES
NOT COMPETE WITH COMMERCIAL LABORATORIES. Also, we
do not make bacteriological examinations nor examina-
tions for disease germs. Such examinations and analy-
ses are made by the State Board of Health at Jackson-
ville.
We do not make a sanitary analysis, nor a complete
quantitative determination, separating each mineral and
stating the quantity thereof. Such an analysis would
be costly in time and labor, and of no real value to the
inquirer. We determine the total dissolved solids in the
sample and report them as parts per 1,000,000. naming
the principal ingredients in the order of their predomi-
nance. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime), Sodium
Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom salts),
Silica (sand), and Iron, is the general order of their pre-
dominance, though on the coast, where the total dissolved
solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per 1.000,000, So-
dium Chloride (salt) is the predominant substance.
From a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,












unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.
Therefore, we require the following information to be
given in regard to the s~i' of the water:
(1). The source of the water: spring, lake, river, driven
well, dug well, bored well, artesian well, or flowing well;
and also the depth of the water surface below the top of
the soil, and in case wells the depth of the casing.
(2). The locality of the source of the water: town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.
(3). The proposed use of the water: city supply, do-
mestic use, laundry, boiler, irrigation or other industrial
use.
(4). No sample of water will be analyzed unless the
name and address of the sender is on the package for
identification.
lVe require two gallons of each sample of water, in a
new jug, stopped with a new cork, and sent by prepaid
express. We will not accept any sample of water for
analysis not in a new jug. Vessels previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples of water for analysis. Corks, once used for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, whiskey, kerosene, etc.)
are never properly cleaned. In sampling a well water,
the stagnant water in the pump must first be pumped off.
The jug must first be rinsed with the water to be sam-
pled. emptied, and then filled. A sample of spring, river
or lake water is best taken (after rinsing the jug) by
allowing the jug to fill after immersion some distance
under the surface near the center of the body of water.
NOTE.-We find the waters of the State-springs, wells,
driven wells and artesian wells--generally very pure and
wholesome, with but little mineral impurity and that
such as is not harmful. Except in cases of gross care-
lessness, in allowing surface water to contaminate the
well or spring, the waters of the State are pure and
wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted for
their purity and healthfulness.

ANALYSIS OF FOODS AND DRUGS.

Samples of Foods and Drugs are drawn under special
regulations. Application should be made to the Conm
missioner of Agriculture or State Chemist for the neces-












sary blanks, instructions, etc., for drawing and trans-
mitting samples of foods and drugs, including drinks of
all kinds.

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS,
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the re-
spective Laws, including Rules and Regulations and
Standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture or State Chemist. Applications for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture or State
Chemist. The Bulletins of the Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station can be had by application to the Direc-
tor at Gainesville.

SOIL ANALYSIS.

We frequently have samples of soil sent in for analysis
and a request to advise as to the best methods of fertiliz-
ing. Excepting in extreme cases, such as Heavy Clays,
Pure Sand and Muck Lands, there is but little informa-
tion to be derived from a soil analysis that would be of
benefit to farmers. So much depends on tilth, drainage,
culture and other physical conditions that an analysis
made under laboratory conditions is of little value.
A chemical analysis of a soil may indicate a very fertile
soil. rich in plant food, while the facts are the soils are
not productive. This is instanced by the rich Sawgrass,
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are fer-
tile chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also, by the arid lands of the west, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irrigated.
Other soils, with less plant food, but on account of proper
physical conditions, culture and tilth, are exceedingly
productive.
The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils
made by the Agriiultural Experiment Station and the
Stale Laboratory is as follows:
Nitrogen (per cent.) ......................... 0.0413
Potash (per cent.) ........................... 0.0091
Phosphoric Acid (per cent.) .................. 0.1635











This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil series of the State, which comprise by far the
greater portion of the State.
In this connection we quote from the report of the
Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station. Purdue Uni-
versity, Lafayette, Ind., as follows:
"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FER-
TILIZER REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is
called upon to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in
relation to agricultural chemical problems from people
all over the State. In this connection it might be well
to say that there is a widespread idea that the chemist
can analyze a sample of soil and, without further knowl-
edge of the conditions, write out a prescription of a fer-
tilizer which will fill the needs of that particular soil.
"The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is
no chemical method known that will show reliably the
availability of the plant food elements present in the soil,
as this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of
crop, the type of soil, the climate and biological condi-
tions; hence, we do not recommend this method of test-
ing soil.
"The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long,
narrow strips of the field to be tested are measured off
side by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each.
Different fertilizers are applied to the different plots,
every third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The
produce from these plots is harvested separately and
weighed. In this manner the farmer can tell what fer-
tilizer is best suited for his needs. As climatic conditions
may influence the yield with different fertilizers, it is best
to carry on such tests for more than one year before
drawing definite conclusions. There is positively no
easier or shorter method of testing the soil that we feel
safe in recommending.
"Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rota-
tion of crops, the conservation of stable manure, and the
use of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
have no fear that the proper application of commercial
fertilizer will injure the land."












INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each
package of Conmmercial Feeding Stuff, must have, securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis re-
quired by law and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. This provision of the law, Section 3 of
both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each pa, kI.1,r an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag
and stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence of
the guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manu-
facturer or dealer has not complied with the law. With-
out the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the goods
are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse
against the manufacturer or dealer. Such goods are sold
illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of little
value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers now
comply strictly with the law and regulations by placing
the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This Department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.












MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-
IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA
PORTS, JANUARY 1, 1910.
AMMONIATES.
Less than Ten tons
ten tons. and over.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent Ammonia. .$52.00 $51.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25 per cent Am-
nmonia ........................... 70.00 69.00
Dried Blood, 16 per cent Ammonia.... 59.00 58.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 48 per
cent. Potash (K,0)................$50.00 $49.00
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 26 per
cent Potash (K20)................ 30.00 29.00
Muriate of Potash, 50 per cent. Pot-
ash (K20) ...................... 46.00 45.00
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per cent. Pot-
ash 'K2,O ) .........................110.00 .....
Nitrate of Potash, 15 per cent. Am-
monia, 44 per cent. Potash (K,0) .... 90.00 89.00
Kaiuit, 12 per cent. Potash (K.O0)..... 13.00 12.00
Canada Hardwood Ashes, 4 per cent.
Potash (K20) ..................... 18.00 17.00

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone, 10 per
cent. Ammonia, 5.50 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid ...................... 40.00
Blood and Bone, 8 per cent. Ammonia,
10 per cent. Phosphoric Acid........ 36.00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6.50 per
cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent. Phosphoric
A cid ................... ...... 32.00
Raw Bone, 4 per cent. Ammonia, 22
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.......... 34.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 5.50 per cent.
Ammonia, 2 per cent Phosphoric Acid 26.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7.50 per cent.
Ammonia ........................ 34.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 4.50 per cent.
Ammonia ......................... 30.00


$39.00

35.00


31.00

33.00

25.00

33.00


29.00












PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16 per
cent. Available Phosphoric Acid..... 15.00 (14.00
Acid Phosphate, 14 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid ............ .. 14.00 13.00
Bone Black, 17 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid .................. 25.00 24.00
Odorless Phosphate, 14 per cent. Avail-
able Phosphoric Acid.............. 25.00 24.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems,
2 per cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent.
Potash (K,0)................... 22.00 21.00
High Grade Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
2.50 per cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
Potash (KO) .................... 25.00 24.00
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 2 per cent. Am-
monia, 2 per cent. Potash (K20).... 25.00 24.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, 2 per cent. Am-
monia, 4 per cent. Potash (K20).... 20.00 19.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2 per cent.
Ammonia, 4 per cent. Potash (K20).. 19.00 18.00
Land Plaster ....................... 12.00 11.00

The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.












NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT JAN.
1, 1910-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES.

Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, prompt,
per 100 pounds...................$2.65 @ -
futures ..................... 2.65 @ -
Ammonia, sulp., domestic, spot........ 2.671/@ -
futures ..................... 2.651/2@ -
Fish scrap, dried, 11 per cent. ammonia
and 14 per cent. bone phosphate, f. o.
b. fish works, per unit.............. 2.85 & 10
wet, acidulated, 6 per cent.
ammonia, 3 per cent. phos-
phoric acid, f. o. b. fish works 2.35 & 35
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and
11 per cent. ammonia and 15-17 per
cent. bone phosphate, c. i. f. N. Y.,
Balto. or Phila.................... 3.00 & 10
Tankage, 11 per cent. and 15 per cent.
f. o. b. Chicago ................... 2.75 @2.80&10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 per cent., b. Chicago....... 2.75 @ -
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago..... 8.00 @ -
Sheep manure, concentrated, f. o. b.
Chicago, per ton .................. 9.50 @ -
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit... 2.55 @ -
Dried blood, 12-13 per cent. ammonia,
f. o. b. New York.................. 2.95 @ -
Chicago ......................... 2.90 @ -
Nitrate of soda, 95 per cent spot, per
100 pounds ...................... @ 2.10
futures, 95 per cent.......... @ 2.10

PHOSPHATES.

Acid phosphate, per unit ............$ .55 @ .60
Bones, rough, hard, per ton........ 20.50 @ 21.50
soft steamed unground ..... 18.50 @ 21.00
ground, steamed, 1 1-4 per
cent. ammonia and 60 per
cent. bone phosphate...... 19.00 @ 19.50
ditto, 3 and 50 per cent..... 22.50 @ 22.50












raw ground, 4 per cent. ammo-
nia and 50 per cent. bone
phosphate ....... ....... 26.00
South Carolina Phosphate rock, un-
dried, per 2,400 lbs., f. o. b. Ashley
R iver ........................... 5.50
South Carolina Phosphate rock,
hot air dried, f. o. b. Ashley River.. 7.00
Florida land pebble phosphate rock,
68 per cent., f. o. b. Port Tampa,... 3.75
Florida high grade phosphate hard
rock, 77 per cent., f. o. b. Florida
or Georgia ports................. 7
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b., Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, per ton, 78@80
per cent. ........................ 5.00
75 per cent. guaranteed......... 4.75
68@72 per cent. ............... 4.25


@ 27.00


5.75

7.25

4.00


@ 7.50


@ 5.50
@ 5.00
@ 4.50


POTASHES.


Muriate potash, basis 80 per cent, per
100 pounds ....................... 1.90 @
Manure salt, 20 per cent. actual potash 14.75 @
double manure salt, 48 per cent. ... 1.161/2@
Sulphate potash (basis 90 per cent).. 2.181/2@
Kainit, in bulk, 2,240 pounds........ 8.50 @


O











STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1910.

Available Phosphoric Acid............. 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .16 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20)........ 51 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid............... $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... 20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)..$3.20 per unit
Potash ................................. 1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent, in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. .6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid...1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.20- 10.94
Potash .................77.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports.................... $26.91

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid....8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ..................2 per cent.x 3.20- 6.40
Potash .....................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging............... ...........- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports.................... $18.10

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one-
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.











If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:

Available Phosphoric Acid........... 90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) .....................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen). .$2.88 per unit

The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists in one and ten-ton lots are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1910 deducted
therefrom.











77


COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.
I'OUNDS PER IHUNDRlK )


oni Posphorici
Ammonia .(,id


Potash


Nitrate of Soda. ........
Sulphate of Ammonia....
Dried Blood ............
Concentrated Tankage...
Bone Tankage ..........
Dried Fish Scrap........
Cotton Seed Meal ........
Hoof Meal ..............


17 to
21 to
12 to
12 to
6 to
8 to
7 to
13 to


19 .... ....... !............

17 .........................
5. 1 to 2 .............

9 10 to 15 ...........
11 6 to 8 ...........
10 2 to 3 1P to 2
171 .1 to 2 ............


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available I Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
IAcid

Florida Pebble Phosphate. .... ....... ....... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ....................... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 35
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6G 5 to 81 15 to 17
Steamed Bone ........... 3 to 4 0 to 91 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4 13 to 15| 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Artnl ia Phosphoric
Potash Ammonia ci i Lime


Muriate of Potash....... 50
Sull hate of Fotash...... 48 to 52
Carbonate of Potash .... 55 to 60
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26 to 30
Kainit ................. 12 to 128
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30
Wood Ashes, unleached.. 2 to 8
Wood Ashes, leached... 1 to 2
Tobacco Stems ......... 5 to 8
Co.w Manure (fresh) .... 0.40
Horse Manure (fresh)... 0.53
Sheep Manure (fresh)... 0.67
Hog Manure (fresh).. 0.0 C
Hen Dung (fresh) ...... I O.S5
Mixed Stable Manure.... 0.63


2to 6. ........ .........

12 1. . . . . .


.. ...1 7 to 9 10
......... I to 2 .........
........ 1 to 1l 35 to 40
2 to 4 ......... 31
0to0.41 0.16 0.31
0 to.60 0.28 0.31
1.00 0.23 0.33
0.55 0.19 0.08
2.07 1.54 0.24
0.76 0.26 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............. 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
]itrate of potash into notrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash,multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash,multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (KO) by.. 2.33
For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it. multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K2O).



SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of the











law without charge the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer and manu-
facturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for tiem according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
seaport cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at and exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and fer-
tilizer materials will be found in this Bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and sending of special
samples-on another page.









80
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS.


NAME OF FEED



Bright Cott'n Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meal

Linseed Meal, old
process ............
Linseed Meal, new pro-
cess ...............
Wheat Bran .........

Wheat Middlings .....

Mixed Feed (Wheat)..

Ship Stuff (Wheat)..

Corn (grain) ........

Corn Meal ...........

Corn Cobs ...........

Corn and Cob Meal...

Hominy Feed ........

Corn and Oats, equal
parts. ..........
Corn and Oat Feeds..

Barley (grain) .......

Barley Sprouts ......

Barley and Oats, equal
pa rts .. ..


9.35

20.00


7.50

8.40
9.00

5.40

7.80

5.60

2.10

1.90

30.10

6.60

4.05


5.70
12.10

2.70

10.90


6.10


-




39.70 28.60

22.90 37.10


35.70

36.10
15.40

15.40

16.90

14.60

10.50

9.70

2.40

8.50

10.50


10.50
8.70

12.40

27.20


36.00

36.70
53.90

59.40

54.40

59.80

69.60

68.70

54.90

64.80

65.30


64.20
61.70

69.80

42.70


12.101 64.75


L-



7.80o

5.50


7.20

3.60
4.00

4.10

4.80

5.00

5.40

3.80

0.50

3.50

7.85


4.40
3.70

1.80

1.60


5.80

5.00


5.30

5.20
5.80

3.20

5.30

3.70

1.50

1.40

1.40

1.50

2.55


2.20
3.20

2.40

6.30


2.70










81
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Coni.inued.)



NAME OF FEED. =
,


Oats (grain) ........ 9.50 11.80 50.70 5.00 3.00

Oat Feed ............ 6.10 16.00 59.40 7.10 3.70

Rice (grain) ........ 0.20 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40

Rice Bran ........... 9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00

Rice Hulls .......... 35.70 3.60 38.60 0.70 13.20

Rye (grain) .......... 1.70 10.60 72.50 1.70 1.90

Rye Bran ............ 3.50 14.70 63.80 2.80 3.60

Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80

Cow Pea ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Cow Pea Hay ........ 20.10 16.60 42.20 2.20 7.50

Velvet Beans and Hulls 9.20 19.70 51.30 4.50 3.30

Velvet Bean Hay .... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Beggarweed Hay ..... 24.70 21.70 30.20 2.30 10.90

Wire Grass Hay ...... 31.80 5.50 48.60 1.50 3.80

Cotton Seed (whole).. 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cotton Seed Hulls .... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60

Gluten Feed ....... 5.30 24.00 51.20 10.60 1.10

Beef Scrap ......... 44.70 3.28 14.75 29.20
6--Bul.












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS
FOR 1910.

For the season of 1910 the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purcli;rle rs.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 1910.

Protein, 3j cents per pound.......... 65 cents per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1 cents per pound..30 cents per unit
Fats, 31 cents per pound.............. 65 cents per unit
A unit being 20 pounds (1 per cent) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @ $31.00 per ton.
To find, the commercial State value, multiply the per-
oentages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

HOMINY FEED-

Protein ....................... 10.50 x 65c, $ 6.83
Starch and Sugar ..............65.30 x 30c, 19.59
Fat .......................... 7.85 x 65c, 5.10

State value per ton .....................$31.52

EXAMPLE No. 2.

CORN-

Protein ...................... 10.50 x 65c, $ 6.83
Starch and Sugar ..............69.60 x 30c, 20.88
Fat ........................... 5.40 x 65c. 3.51

State value per ton ....................... 31.22













FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for f I i various
crops; there are hundreds of sncli .- iblished;
and while there are hundreds of "Bi-ands"' .e varia-
tions in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of
"Brands" put up by the same manufacturer are identical
goods, the only difference being in the name printed on
the tag or sack. A good general Formula for field or
garden might be called a "Vegetable Formula," and would
have the following: Ammonia 34 per cent, available phos-
phoric acid 6 per cent, and potash 7 per cent. The fol-
lowing formulas will furnish the necessary plant food in
about the above proportion. I have purposely avoided the
use of any fraction of 100 pounds in these formulas to
simplify them. Values are taken from price lists fur-
nished by the trade, which we published in our Report
of January 1, 1910.
For Cotton, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, and Vegetables:
Ammonia 3j per cent, available phosphoric acid 6j per-
cent, potash 7j per cent.

(A) "VEGETABLE."

No. 1.

Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (7j-21-11) ...... 3.25 Ammonia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 6.40 Available
300 pounds of Muriate (or Sulphate) (50 per cent) 7.50 Potash
2000
State value mixed and bagged.............. $26.55
Plant Food per ton......................... 343 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
1000 lbs of Blood and Bone (6Q-8) ............ 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)...... 7.00 Available
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent).. J7.80 Potash
2000
State value mixed and bagged............ $27.48
Plant Food per ton........................ 360 pounds













No. 3.
Per Cent.
80, lbs of Dried Blood (16 per cent).......... 3.25 Ammonia
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)...... 8.00 Available
1000 Ibs of Arid Phosphate (16 per cent)......J 7.80 Potash
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent).

2000
Siate value mixed and bagged.............. $28.48
Plant Food per ton........................ 381 pounds

(TB) F]UIT AND VINE."

No. 1.

Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes: Ammonia 4 per
cent., Available Phosphorie Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.

Per Cent.
10u0 lbs of Blood and Bone (6-S8)..............
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent).... 4 Ammonia
500 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent) ...... 8 Available
400 lbs of Muriate of Potash (50 per cent) .... 10 Potash

2000
State value mixed and bagged ............. $33.30
Plant Food per ion.......................... 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Castor Pomace (G--2 per cent)...... 4.00 Ammonia
200 lbs of Siup. of Am. (25 per cent)........ 7.70 Available
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)......J 9.60 Potash
400 Ibs of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent).........

2000
State value mixed and bagged...............$32.56
Plant Food per ton......................... 426 pounds

No. 3.

500 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (7.-22-1).......
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)....... 3.97 Ammonia
100 lbs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent) ......... 8.30 Available
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)....... 8.97 Potash
400 lbs of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent).......

2000
State value mixed and bagged.............. $32.18
Plant Food per ton........................ 425 pounds








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.


FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1910.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved


L. HEIMBUBGER, Assistant Chemist.
May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.,


Phosphoric Acid.


32
.30
3 w


0
0
0


BY WHOM SENT.


Fertilizer ............ ........ 230 8.54 4.26 2.551
Fertilizer ................ 12309 11.511 10.26 0.121
AciN Phosphate No. 1........ 23110 ...... 15.43 0.553
Fertilizer No. 2.............. 2311 10.42 7.1S 0.70
Fertilizer No. 3 .............'2312 11 .51 S.
Fertilizer No. 1 (10-3-2) ...... 2313 9.58 10.42 0.51
Fertilizer No. 2 (10-2-2) ...... 2314 t10.90 9.S6 1.42
Fertilizer No. 3 (6-6-2) ... 23151 9.961 6.07 0.421
Fertilizer No. 4 (10-0-4) ..... I2316! 9.701 9.83 0.79
Raw Bone ............. ...... 23171. .. .. ....... .
Fertilizer ................. 2318 6.39 14.84 .011
Fertilizer ...2319 14.13 7.10 0.501
Fertilizer No. 1............. 12320 ...... 10.S8 4.50
Fertilizer No. 2........... 2321 ... .. 10.81 4.40
Fertilizer No. 1............. 2322! 8.90! 7.96 1].86


6.81 4.21 10.221
10. S 2.45 1.74
15. 98 ..... ......
7.881 ..... 4.88
8.72 ]. 7 2. 14
10.91 2.72' 3.61i
10.28 2.51t 2.77
6.491 5.48 3.0(
10.621 ...... 4.%8
23.57 4. 1 1...... !
14.851 :.94! 12.411
7.60 3.64 10.221
15.38 4.421 4.40i
10.21' 4.23' 4.,30
9.821 5.17[ 7.12]


C. B. Morrow. Crescent City, Fla.
A. F. Moore, Hester, Fla.
A. N. Keheliy, Holt, Fla.
A. N. KElley. HoIl, Fla.
A. N. Kelley. Holt. Fin.
Bristol Bargain Store, Bristol, Fla.
Bristoi Bargain Slrre, Bristol, Fla.
Bristol Bar aiin Store, Bristol, Fla.
Bristol Barain Stfire, Bristol, Fla.
A. L. Beck. Orlando, Fla.
J. V,. Wright, DeLand, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
Milton Cash Store, Miltou, Fla.
Milton Cash Store, Milton, Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks.,JacksonvilleFla.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1910-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


cXFz
-3


Fertilizer No. ..--"9
Fertilizer No. 2 ............. .. 232
fertilizer No. 3.............. 82324
Fertilizer No. 4............. 12325
Fertilizer No. 5........... 2326
Fertilizer No. 1....... 2327
Fertilizer No. 2. ... .... 2328
Fertilizer No. 3............ 2329
Fertilizer No. 10........ ... 2330
Fertilizer No. 0 ............ 2331
Fertilizer No. 30............ 2332
Fertilizer .................. 2333
Fertilizer .............. .... 2334
Fertilizer .................. 12335
Fertilizer ................... 12336
k fertilizer ................... 2337
Blood and Bone............... 2338
Fish Scrap No. 1............ 2339

Fish Scrap No. 2............ 2340
ii ...


Phosphoric Acid.


0


9.58
8.82
8.94,
5.40
7.54
8.35
3.85



13.13

5.35

6.78

13.68

10.64


7.21 1.43;
6.37 0.661
6.54 0.70
8.34 0.25
6.25 0.45
6.70 1.76
9.4 0.22
9.94 0.23
9.94 0.23
9.76 0.31
6.68 0.28
8.44 0.73

5.95 1.37




..... ......


0 l
8.64
7.03
7.24
8.591
G.70
8.461
14.11
9.661
10.171
10.07
6.96
9.17
11.88
7.32
1.41
3.19
12.92

13.58


BY WHOM SENT.





Armour Fertz. Wks...acksonville Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks.,Jacksonville Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks.,Jacksonville Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks.,Jacksonville Fla.
K. Richardson, Cocoanut Grove, Fla. Oc
K. Richardson, Cocoanut Grove, Fla. -"
K. Richardson, Cocoanut Grove, Fla.
A. D. Campbell, Chipley, Fla.
A. D. Campbell, Chipley, Fla.
A. D. Campbell, Chipley, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
B. E. McLin, Tallahassee, Fla.
J. G. May, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
J. R. Williams, Citra, Fla.
C. F. Wolf, Jensen, Fla.
Jno. H. Blake, Tampa. Fla.
Pensacola Rendering Co., Pensacola,
Fla.
Pensacola Rendering Co., Pensacola.
Fla.


4.101 5.95
2.4', 11.27
3.28 10.06
4.28| 12.11
4.15 6.421
4.27 9.87i
9.39 2.831
3.25 3.03
2.19 6.514
2.55 5.321
2.73 13.011
2.78 6.08S
6.95 4.50
4.51 4.45
5.79 7.76
10.32 ...
8.55 ....

10.03 ......







Dried Blood (N. Y. C. & H. R. 2341 ...
No. 91406)
Fertilizer ................... 2342 ...
Fertilizer No. 1.............. 23131
Fertilizer No. 2... ........... 2344
Fertilizer No. 3.............. 2345 8
Fertilizer No. 4.............. 2346 7
Fish Scrap ......... 42347 1(
Fertilizer (Tankage) ........ 2348 ..
Fertilizer (C. M. Spec. E. T.) 2349 ...

Fertilizer (C. M. Spec. Y. Y.) 2350 .

K ainit ...................... 2351 ..
Fertilizer ................... 12352
Fertilizer ................... 2353
Cotton Seed Meal ........... 2354..
A shes ...................... 2355 .


5.67
).59
.12
.72
.66


7. 36
7.08
.


10.48 0.26
7.29 0.83
6.70 0.30
7.14 0.71
6.87 0.63


5.44 2.31

6.56 2.42


2.35 3.28
6.04 5.93

..... ......


10.74
8.12
7.00
7.85
7.50)
11.64
13.25
7.75

8.98


5.63


15.38 ......

1.8u 2.00,
4.73 6.51
4.92 6.11
2.98 4.36
2.88 4.05[
8.67 ......
2.60 ....
3.13 11.13

3.83 7.41

...... 12.31
7.20 4.64
3.60 8.57
7.65 .... .
...... 3.431


E. O. Painter Fertz. Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
A. J. Strickland, Caryville, Fla.
T. Gaskins, Arcadia, Fla.
T. Gaskins, Arcadia, Fla.
T. Gaskins, Arcadia, Fla.
T. Gaskins, Arcadia, Fla.
T. R. Parker. Peusacola, Fla.
Howard & Kennedy, Terra Ceia, Fla.
Independent Fertz. Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Independent Fertz. Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Jno. H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
C. S. Bixby, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
Lewis, Coon & Platt, Cathaleen, Fla. ,
WN. L. Thompson, Lakeland, Fla. -i
The Gulf Fetz. Co., Tampa, Fla.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1910. L. HEIMBURGER. Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Cane and Corn Special... 1501 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis..

Tomato Special .......... 1502 Guarant'd Analysi,
Official Analysis..

Special Fruit and Vine.... 1503tjuarant'd Analysis
S Official Analysis..

Armour's Fruit and Vine.. 1504!Guarant'l Analysis!
[ Official Analysis...
Armour's Blood, Bone and!1505 Guarant'd Analysis
Polash ................ Official Analysis...

Mapes Orange Tree Mn-150F6 Guarant'd .Analysis
nure .................I Official Analysis...


8.001
7.8:

8.00
10.23;

8.0o0
7.071

10.00'
6.80i

10. c


12.00
12. tI


Phosphoric Acid.







6.00 1.00 7.00
7.06 1.30 8.36

5.00 .n0 .....
6.52 0.l 8 7.40

6.001 1.00! 7.00
C.701 0.25 6.95

6.'00 1 .00 ......
C.25 1.2S 7.53

s.on0 1.0o| ......
7.3 i 5 2.263 10.21!

6,00 2.001 ...... 1
S.S i 1 .S31 11.111
I i


(8
0
a


3.04


4.0(
4.6;

3.0(


2.5(
2.6,

5.00
5.05

4.00
4.32


0
SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.

0

)0 5.00'The Gulf Fertilizr Co..
S5.88 Tampa, Fla.

1 S.0 JThe Gulf Fertilizer Co..
S .771 Tampa, Fla.

0) 13.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
5 14.311 Tampa. Fla.

)0 11.00 The Armour Fertz Wks,
S; 11.07 Jacksonville, Fla.

S7.00 The Armour Feriz.Wks.,
S7.311 Jacksonville, Fla.

S3.00 The Mapes Formul:a andi
2! 3.76 Peruvian Guano Co.,
S New York, N. Y.








Armour's Watermelon Spe-|1507 Guarant'd AnalysisT
cial .................... Official Analysis.. .
Lettuce Special .......... 1508 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


it. G. Sulfate of Potash....


Tampa Fruiter ..........


Irish Potato ..............


Germfert Vegetable ......


One Third Mixture........


Cane Special ............


Germofert Orange Tree
Grower ................

Corn Special Fertilizer...


Germofert Fruit and Vine..


1509 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1510 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1511 Guarant'd Analysis!
Official Analysis...

1512 Gunrant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1513 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1514IGuarant'd Analysisl
Official Analysis...

1515 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1516 Guarant'd AnalysisT
Official Analysis...

1517 Guarant'd Analysis|
Official Analysis...


10.00! 5.00 1.00 ......
7.08' 5.3 1.41 6.77
10.00 O 3.00 2.00 ......
13.601 3.211 1.051 4.29

5 .00i ...... I ...... ......
.00. .. .. .. ..

8.00 6.00 1.00 ....
5.01 6.56 2.5S 9.141

8.001 6.00' 2.00 .....
5.S1i 10.97' 0.53 11.50
I i
5.00o 5.00 7.00 ......
6.42 3.2.1 9.34 12.62

8.001 6.50 1.00 ....
7.45! 6.;62 0.57 7.19

8.001 6.00 2.00 ......
5.96 5.89 6.26 12.15!

5.00 3.00 9.00 ......
4.57 3.22 10.35 13.57

10.001 8.00 .00 ......
8.461 7.75 3.49 11.24

5.00! 3.00! 9.00 12.00
3.71 2.78 9.32 12.10


3.00
3.30
7.00
6.19




4.00
4.18

4.00!
4.48

4.00o
4.081

2.50!
3.27!

5.001
4.78I

4.00
4.50

2.00
1.971

2.00
2.98


8.00 The Armour Fertz.Wks.,
8.74 Jacksonville, Fla.
4.00 The Armour Fertz.Wks..
4.291 Jacksonville, Fla.

50.00 The Armour Fertz.Wks.,
50.40 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 The Tampa Fertilizer
13.79 Co., Tampa, Fla.

8.00 The Tampa Fertilizer
9.21 Co., Tampa, Fla.

6.00iTh- Tampa Fertilizer
5.891 Co., Tampa, Fla. c

4.50 The Tampa Fertilizer
5.431 Co., Tampa. Fla.

4.00! The Tampa, Fertilizer
6.131 Co., Tampa, Fla.

5.001The Tampa Fertilizer
6.631 Co.. Tampa, Fla.

3.00 The Tampa Fertilizer
3.32 Co., Tampa, Fla.

12.00 The Tampa Fertilizer
13.61 Co., Tampa, Fla.


~








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1910.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. -


15 0


Germofert Corn Special.. 1518 Guarant'd Analysis 5.00
Official Analysis... 3.89

Acid Phosphote .......... 1519 Guarant'd Analysis .....
Official Analysis... ......

German Kainit .......... 1520 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... ...... .

Ideal Tomato Special ..... 1521 Guarant'd Analysis 8.001
Official Analysis.. 9.411
Spec. Mix. for Cowpen'd or 1522Guarant'd AnalysisL 10.00
over-Anmmoniated Trees.. Official Analysis... 3.79

Ideal Lettuce Fertilizer... 1523 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 8.17'

No. 1 Peruvian & Fish Gu- 1524 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
ano Mixture ........... Official Analysis.. 5.64


Phosphoric Acid.



0
0 o S



3.00 9.00 12.00 2.00
3.671 12.71 16.38] 2.09

16. 00 .. .. ..
17.63 0.38 18.01 ......


...................

... .. .. ...... 5 0

8. 00 .......
6.96] 3.30 10.26 ......

6 .00 ...... ...... 6.00
6.06 2.28 8.88 5.80

5.00 1.00 ......1 4.00
5.75 1.33 7.08 4.59


M BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.





... Ta a, Fa.

3.00Tlsne Tapa Fooer Fertz.
13.76 Co., Jacksonille, Fla.l

.00The Tampa FToomer Flizr
6.01. Co., amnipa, Fila.
12.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
12.47 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
5.00 Wilson & Toomer Ferlz.
6.011 Co., Jacksonville, FlI.
13.00|Wilsfn & Toomer Fertz.


6.00 Wilson & Toomer Fettz.
5.86 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Fla. Fertz. Co.. Branci,
4.05 Gainesville, Fla.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE. State Chemist. SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1910. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 24th, 1905.


Ck
0 i
NAME, OR BRAND. 1 i 1 BY WHOM SENT.

.2Z U0 2 dr.
II
Oats ................................ 138 11.7 0.71 57.16 3.57 3.03 A. S. Carr, W ilma, Fla.
Beggarweed Hay .................... 139 24.07121.63 35.0S 4.04 3.94 P. H. Fellows, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
Giant Millet ........................ 140 2.28 11.55 67.59 5.15 1.32 W E. Jaques, Jacksonville, Fla.
Pure Wheat Bran ..................141 .7614.48 53.56 3.53 6.84 N. C. Bryan, Kissimmee. Fla.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE--DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE. State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1910. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspector Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24th, 1905.

00,
NAME, OR BRANDNAME AND ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR B MANUFACTURERS.
Coton .... ....9 7i

Cotllon Seedl Meal ........ 989 Guarant'd Analysis 7.001 S.. 24.00 9.001 ..... J. Lindsay Wells Co., Memphis,
Official Analysis... 10.44! 39.09 2S.73 8.89 4.89 Tenn.
Cr.acker Mule Feed....... 990 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.00 r8.00 3.50 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
OfficialAnalysis... 12.60 11.12 5S.981 2.00 3.62 Ill.
Wheat MiMdlings ........ 991 Guarant'd Analysis 8.001 17.00 50.00 5.00 ..... W. A. Coombs Millin- Co.. Cold
Official Analysis.. 10.521 16.851 49.0;, 4.98 5.00 Water, Mich.
Choice Brnn ............. 992 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 1 1.95, 52.25 5.35. ...... Hecker- Jones -Jewell Milling
Official Analysis... 11.27 11.48| 51.90 4.50 6.22 Co., New York.
Pine Leaf Middlings...... 993 Guarant'd Analysis 6.10 15.75 57.95 4.20 4.10ICairo Miling Co., Cairo, Ill.
Official Analysis... 6.03 17.255 55.5 : 4.45 5. 14I
Pure Wheat Bran ........] 994 Guarant'dAnalysis 9.501 14.50 50.00 4.001...... Liberty Mills Nashville, Tcnn.
IOfficial Analysis... 10.60 14.92 51.6; G .771 (;.R2







Wheat Middlings ........


Sucrene Dairy Feed......


Pure Wheat Middlings....

Ground Corn and Oats....


Maizefalfa Feed ..........


Purina Feed .............


Creamo Dairy Feed......


Stafolife Feed ...........


Cotton Seed Meal.........


Excelsior Chop Feed......


Pure Wheat Middlings.... 1005


995 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

996 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

997 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
998 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

999 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1000 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


8.00,
10.s86

12.00
8.60

7.00
10.00
5.80
4.65

11.00
11.35

8.90
9.92

19.50
24.83

12.75
15.48


11.08

11.001
9.851

7.001
10.891


17.001
17.20

16.50
17.81

16.00
16.35
10.75
10.75

10.00
10.44

12.50
11.67

14.50
14.35

11.00
10.27

38.52
37.64

6.00
8.34

16.001
17.111


45.00
41.65

53.00
49.151


50.00
48.04

46.00


50. 00
5- 90
65.00
64.70

60.00
59.81

58.00
59.52


...... .... ...... Floiida Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
28.32 7.50 5.391 sonville, Fla.

60.00 3.50 ...... The Great Western Cereal Co.,
62.17 5.06 3.02 ( ... Ill.

56.00 4.00 ..... National Fecd Co., St. Louis,
49.28 5.36 4.521 Mo.


5.00 ...... W. A. Coombs Milling Co., Cold
5.21 5.42 Water, Mich.

3.50 ...... American Milling Co., Chicago,
3.60i 9.11 111.

4.00 ...... iNalti al Feed Co., St. Louis,
4.93 4.671 Mo.
5.15 ...... Baker & I1olmnes Co., Jackson.
5.63 2.30, viile. Fla.

4.00 ...... Thie Great Western Cereal Co.,
4.15 3.90 Chicago, Ill.

4.00...... Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis
4.45 3.03 Mo.

5.00 ...... The Corno Mills Co., St. Louis,
4.02 5.05 Mo.

6.00 ...... Lawrence & Hamilton Co.,
5.42 9.32 New Orleans. La.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1910-Continued.


Ihi

NAME, OR BRAND.
o
*Z
9-


Pure Wheat Bran......... 1006


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1007


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1008


Durham Brand, C. S. M... 1009


"Arab" Horse Feed...... 101C


Star Middlings .......... 1011


Action Horse Feed........ 101t


Wheat Middlings ........ 1013


0
5...


Guarant'd Analysis 9.501
Official Analysis... 8.211

Guarant'd Analysis......
Official Analysis... 10.52

Guarant'd Analysis .... ,
Official Analysis... 13.871

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 21.04

I Guarant'd Analysis 15.00
Official Analysis... 11.73

Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 8.321

!Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.. 18.90

SGuarant'd Analysis 8.50
Official Analysis.. 8.25


14.50
14.65

38.62
38.79

38.62
38.17

25.75
25.27

9.00
10.27

15.00
16.50

11.50
14.92

14.50
15.09


'0
ho
..
~02
Co r4 .


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


54.00 5.00 ...... Tennessee Mill Co., Estill
53.49 4.03 6.13 Springs, Tenn.

...... ...... ...... Montezuma Mfg. Co., Mont--
24.38 7.95 8.23 zuma, Ga.

.............. ... Camilla Cotltn Oil and Fertil:-
24.38 7.08 5.621 zer Co., Camilla, Ga.

...... ...... ...... Florida Colton Oil Cn, Jack-
26.83 8.05 2.92j sonville, Fla.

59.00 2.00 ...... C. Peters Mill Co., Omaha.
69.68 2.38 4.52 Neb.

54.00 4.00 ...... Star and Crescent Milling Co..
55.80 5.54 2.471 chicago, Ill.

53.60 4.20 ...... ICommonwealth Feed Mills Co..
47.59 3.02 4.651 St. Louis, Mo.

45.00 5.10 5.50Hubbard Milling Co., Mankato.
53.83 5.88 5.73j Minn.








Pure Wheat Middlings.... 1014'Guarant'd Analysis 5.18J
IOfficial Analysis... 4.98

Peck's Mule Feed........ 10l5 Guarant'd Analysis 11.90
lOfficial Analysis... 14.05

Blue Ribbon Foed ........ 1016 Guarant'd Analysis 10.50
Official Analysis... 10.911

Wheat Bran ............. 1017 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 7.65

Pure Wheat Bran........ 1018 Guarant'd Analysis 9.501
Official Analysis... 8.021

Cotton Seed Meal......... 1019 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis... 11.76

Cotton Seed Meal......... 1020 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 14.17

Schumacher Special Horse 1021 Guarant'd Analysis 8.001
Feed .................. Official Analysis... 7.661

Choice Bran ............ 1022 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50j
Official Analysis... 11.34

Corno Horse & Mule Feed 1023 Guarant'd Analysis 12.001
Official Analysis... 11.31

Hammond Dairy Feed .... 1024Guarant'd Analysis 11.00;
Official Analysis... 12.231


17.11 58.18 4.41 ...... eorge P. Plant Milling Co.,
17.02 59.06 4.65 3.13 St. Louis, :Io.

10.00 57.00 3.80 .... Illlinnis FfI~ il Mills, St. L' ils,
11.35 51.31 4.36 8.25 Mo.

9.75 62.00 3.75 ...... The Quniler Oats C,.. C:ie i ,
9.96 61.70 2.58 4.10 Ill.

14.85 54.60 3.58 ...... Yates & Donlsin Co.. M. m-
14.92 56.60 3.87 5.21 phis. TJin.

14.50 52.00 4.00 ...... J. Allen Smith Co., Knoxville,
14.65 53.94 3.89 6.53 Tenn

38.62 ...... ...... ...... .The Prke-ye Cotton Oil Co..
38.00 28.77 6.25 5.40 Selnia, Ala.

38.62 ...... .... ....... The Southorn Cotlon Oil Co.,
40.45 20.85 7.99 6.151 Pensacola, Fla.

9.25 64.50 3.25 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Clicag.),
9.39 66.92 2.70 2.641 1ll.

14.95 53.25 5.35 ...... IHecker- Jones -Jewell Miliing
15.01 51.21 3.021 5.531 Co., N w York

10.00 58.50 3.50 ...... The Corno Mills Co. St. Louis,
10.27 59.741 3.05' 3.661 Mo.
I I I
17.00 50.00 3.001...... IWestern Grnin Products Co.,
17.501 47.19 2.981 8.081 Hammond Ind.








OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1910.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Wheat Bran ............ 1025


U-N-I. Feed, "A" Grade.... 1026


Ship Stuff ............... 1027


Purina Feed ............. 1028


Pure Wheat Bran......... 1029


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


0 3



10.50 14.00
8.70 14.39

14.40 13.03
14.85 12.46

7.00 14.50
6.98 14.65

8.90 12.50
11.35 12.55

9.501 14.50
10.161 14.74


55.00
55.66

53.47
48.97

54.00
57.43

58.00
56.16

54.00
53.72


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.
!

3.95 ...... Dahnke-Walker Milling Co.,
3.71 5.87 Union City, Tenn.

2.15 ...... United Grocery Co., Jackson-
2.82 8.75 villa Fla.

4.00 ...... The Dunlop Mills, Richmond, c
4.18 4.52 Va.

4.00 ...... Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis,
3.11 4.37 Mo.

5.00 ...... Tennessee Mill Co., Estill
3.13 6.32 Springs Tenn.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

FOOD AND DRUGS SECTION.
rP. E. ROSE, State Chemist SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1910. A. M. HENRY, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 10, Act Approved June 7, 1909.
ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.


LABEL. MANUFACTURER.
Z


334 White Top-less than 2% alcohol The Capitol Brewing & Ice Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

335 Beer, "N o. 1................ ... .............. ...........


336 Beer "No. 2.................. ............................


337 Tonic ......................... ....... ...


338 White Top-less than 2% alcohol The Capitol Brewing & Ice Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

339 White Top-less than' 2% alcohol The Capitol Brewing & Ice Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.


o



5.30


3.85


4.96


0.84


5.62


5.54


FROM


G. W. Moore, Jr., Milligan.


J. P. Brown, Titusville, Sheriff of Bre-
vard County.

J. P. Brown, Titusville, Sheriff of Bre-
vard County.

James S. Gee, Quincy, Marshall of
Quincy.

A. D. Burnes, Graceville, Marshall of
Graceville.

Paul Carter, Marianna.


-----------------------------~--









SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1910-ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.-Continued.



LABEL. MANUFACTURER. FROM
0 0


10 White Top-less than 2% alcohol The Capitol Brewing & Ice Co., 5.54 Paul Carter, Marianna.
Montgomery, Ala.

341 White Top-less than 2% alcohol The Capitol Brewing & Ice Co.. 5.54 Paul Carter, Marianna.
Montgomery, Ala.

3421Chatt.-1 71-100% alcohol........ Chattanooga Brewing Co..... 2.33 T. L. McIntosh, Graceville.
3 i I
343 Louisiana Golden Gems.......... New Orleans Brewing Co., 2.23 F. F. Pelt, Chipley.
New Orleans, La.

344 Louisiana Golden Gems......... New Orleans Brewing Co., 1.96 A. D. Carmichael, Chipley.
I New Orleans, La.

345 Uncle's Special-less than 2% al- New Orleans Brewing Co.. 1.72 Paul Carter, Marianna.
cohol. I New Orleans, La.

316 Louisiana Golden Gems......... New Orleans Brewing Co., 2.23 Paul Carter, Marianna.
New Orleans. La.






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND DRUGS SECTION. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Inspector Under Section 9, Act Approved June 3,1907.
OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1910.
CONFECTIONERY.
In the language of the Pure Food and Drugs Law of Florida confectionery is deemed to be adultery ed If it con-
tains terra-alba, barytes, talc, chrome yellow or otner mineral substance or poisonous color or flavy, .r theirr in-
gredients deleterious or detrimental to health, or any vinous, malt, or spirituous liquor, or compel dl r narcotic
drug."
The standard for confectionery is:
Candy is a product made from a saccharine substance or substances with or without the addition of harmless
coloring, flavoring, or filling materials and contains no terra-alba, barytes, talc, chrome yellow, or other mineral sub-
stances, or poisonous colors or flavors, or other ingredients deleterious or detrimental to health, or any vinous, malt
or spirituous liquor or compound, or narcotic drug.
Ash
No. I LABEL. RETAILER. Per COLOR. REMARKS.


401-A All-Day Suckers ......... Tampa Candy Co., Tampa...........

I
401-B Cocoanut Haystacks........... Tampa Candy Co., Tampa..........

401-C Honey Kisses, Tibbetts Bros., Tampa Candy Co., Tampa..........
Tampa, Florida.

402-A Jelly Beans .................. S. H. Kress & Co., Tampa...........

402-B Eclipse Jelly Drops ............ S. H. Kress & Co.. Tampa............


Cent.

0.22 Cochineal...... Legal.

0.58 Vegetable.......Legal.

0.27 Vegetable ...... Legal.


0.20 Coal tar dye... Legal.

0.20 Coal tar dye... Legal.









OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1910-CONFECTIONERY.-Continued.
Ash
EL. RETAILER. Per COLOR. REMARKS.
Cent.


402-C Queen Creams ................ S. H. Kress & Co., Tampa..........

402-D Peppermint Lozenges ........ S. H. Kress & Co., Tampa .........

402-E Wintergreen ............... S. H. Kress & Co., Tampa..........

426-A Stick Candy .................. E. J. Smith Co., Jacksonville........

426-B Peppermint Cakes ............ E. J. Smith Co., Jacksonville ........

426-C Butter Cups ................ E. J. Smith Co., Jacksonvile ........

426-D Peanut Butter Kisses.......... E. J. Smith Co., Jacksonville........

426-E Smith's Mentopine Cough Drops E. J. Smith Co., Jacksonville........

427-A Stick Candy .................. Van. Deman & Lewis Co., Jacksonville

427-B Jap Cocoanut ................. Van Deman & Lewis Co., Jacksonville


0.12 Coal tar dye...

0.09 None..........

0.05 Coal tar dye...

Trace Coal tar dye...

Trace Coal tar dye...

0.41 Coal tar dye...

0.97 Coal tar dye...

0.04 Coal tar dye...

0.52 Coal tar dye...

0.33 Coal tar dye...


Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.

Legal.


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