• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Main
 County map of state of Florida
 Crop conditions
 Classification of soils
 Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods...














Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00012
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crop conditions
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
    Classification of soils
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Fertilizers, feed stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 37
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 40
            Page 41
        New York wholesale prices current
            Page 42
            Page 43
        State valuations
            Page 44
            Page 45
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Commercial state values of feedstuffs for 1909
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Soil analyses
            Page 55
        Water analyses
            Page 56
        Cotton seed meal law
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Pure food law
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Bureau of fertilizers
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
        Bureau of feedstuffs
            Page 84
            Page 85
        Analysis of feedstuffs
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Special food analyses
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
Full Text











FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


JULY 1, 1909


B. E. MCLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I--Crops. Part 2--Classification of Soils.
Part 3--Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs and Foods and Drugs.

.Entered January 81,1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June, 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED fREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA
loo


00 __ -_- _


VOLUME 19


NUMBER 3











COUNTY MAP OF STATE OF FLORIDA


















PART I.

CROP CONDITIONS.

















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are the divisions
ties contained in each:

Northern Division.

Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Fafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-11.

Western Division.

Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.


of the State, and the coun-


Northeastern Division.

Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.

Central Division.

Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia-9.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,


Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.

















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIvIsIoN.-The acreage of cotton in this
division is about the same as last year, and up to this
date, favorable weather conditions have obtained, and the
crops are somewhat grassy, but as a rule they are doing
well. Corn and other standard crops are in fine general
condition, with a certainty of probably the best corn
crop for several years. The oat crop just harvested is
also reported as unusually fine in all parts of the division.
The tobacco crop generally is not quite up to last year
in quantity, but reported as quite as good and, in some
instances, of finer quality than last year; slight damage
by storm in a few instances are reported, but nothing
serious has occurred to affect the crop. The growers are
beginning to harvest the crop, which will probably be
under full headway in a short time.
Live stock is in finer condition than usual, healthy and
no diseases apparent anywhere.



WESTERN DIVISION.-The same weather conditions prac-
tically prevail in this district as in the Northern. Cotton
is somewhat backward, but is in excellent growing condi-
tion where properly cultivated, and that is in general
respects better than last year. The acreage is practically
the same as last season. Field crops generally, and espe-
cially corn, is in fine shape, and the oat crop, which is
just harvested, is a better one than usual, also a much
larger acreage was planted to oats than usual. The defi-
ciency of farm labor has become a serious handicap to
farmers in both of these districts, and prevents any de-
gree of expansion in planting, in fact it is a serious prob-











lem with many farmers as to how they will be able to
harvest the crops already maturing. An increase in good
labor is the one thing most desired by the farmers; it is
the same thing every year, but growing worse continually.
Live stock, both on pasture and farm, are in fine con-
dition.



NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this district the crops are
in quite as good condition as in the two previously con-
sidered. Corn and cotton are in excellent condition, and
in the case of corn perhaps it is the largest crop planted
for several years; corn acreage is about the same as last
year, and the plant appears generally to be in fine con-
dition.
The vegetable and fruit crops in this district are the
finest for several years, and the yields in both cases are
the heaviest for years. The seasons, of course, being so
unusually favorable have much to do with it. The prices
received for the crops marketed are reported quite satis-
factory in most instances. As in the former district, live
stock is in general fine average condition, and pastures
good.



CENTRAL DIVISION.-This district, which suffered for
about two years of disastrous drought, has regained its
former condition and is in first-class shape again, seasons
have been as good as desired, and the crops planted on
a larger scale than before are in first rate condition, ac-
cording to our reports. The fruit and vegetable crops
have generally yielded fine results and the market prices
have been generally satisfactory. Not for a long time
have the citrus fruit groves been in such universal fine
condition, which will compare quite favorably in most
instances with the condition of the memorable year of
1894. Live stock is in fine condition and pastures good.



SOUTHERN DIvIsIoN.-There is practically little differ-
ence between conditions in this and the foregoing district.









9

The effects of the long, disastrous drought have disap-
peared, and but for the knowledge that it had occurred
there is no evidence remaining. In its place have come
the usual favorable climatic conditions and good crops of
much increased proportion. All crops are in fine shape
and have yielded what is perhaps the largest, and at the
same time, the most remunerative crops ever grown in
this district. The condition of the cattle ranges has never
been better, and the live stock that graze on them is per
haps in better condition than for many years. Surely the
people of this district are blessed without measure.








10
Report of the Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops, Fruits,
and Fruit Trees, and Condition of Live Stock, for Quarter
Ending June 30th, 1909, as Compared with the Same Period
Last Year.

Upland a SugSeaar
Cotton Island Corn Cane
COUNTIES. Co



Northern Division. 0 0 0
Gadsden .............. 100 ..... 15 7
familton ............. ..... 90 85 60
Jefferson .............. 90 90 100 90
Lafayette ............. ..... 100 110 85
Leon ................. 95 .. 100 100
Liberty ............... 80 ..... 90 80
Madison .............. 40 60 60 50
Suwannee ............. ..... 90 90 85
W akulla .............. 100 ..... 100 90
Div. Average per cent. 84 84 98 79
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 10 100 125 10
Escambia ............. 65 ..... 100 100
Holmes ............... 80 ..... 85 85
Jackson .............. 100 ..... 125 100
Santa Rosa ........... 80 ..... 80 90
W alton ............... 80 ..... 90 80
Washington .......... 85 ..... 100 75
Div. Average per cent. 84 100 101
Northeastern Division,
Baker ................ .... 85 90 90
Bradford .................. 90 100 100
Clay .......................... 85 100
Columbia ............. 100 105 '95 100
Div. Average per cent.. 100 70 92 97
Central Division.
Citrus ........ ..... ... 200 100
Hernando 100 100
Hernando ............. .... ..... 100 100
Levy ... .... 100 100 100
Marion ............. ..... 100 80 100
Pasco ................ ..... 110 100
Sumter ............... ..... 90 100 100
Volusia ................ ....... 80 I90
Div. Average per cent.. ..... 97 110 99
southern Division.
Brevard ............... ..... .150 100
D ade ................. ..... .... .... 100
DeSoto ............... ..... ..... 130 120
Hillsborough ......... .... ..... 110 110
Lee ................... .... .... 100 100
Manatee .............. ..... ... 100 100
Osceola ............... .... ..... 300 200
Polk .................. ..... ..... 150 120
St. Lucie ............. ..... ..... *** ..... ...
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ..... 149 119
btate Averages ....... 89 88 110 97









11
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Rice Sweet Field Cassava
CUce Potatoes Peas cassava
COUNTIES.


o O o
Northern Division. 0 o o
Gadsden ...... ...... ..... 100 100 .......
Hamilton ............. ..... 95 90 .......
Jefferson .............. ..... 100 90 .......
Lafayette ............. ..... 90 90 .......
Leon ................. ..... 100 100 .......
Liberty ............... ..... 75 90 .......
M adison .............. ..... 60 40 .......
Suwannee ............ 80 80 100 .......
W akulla .............. 75 100 100 .. ...
Div. Average per cent.. 77 89 89 .......
Western Division.


Calhoun ..............
Escambia .............
H olm es ...............
Jackson ..............
Santa Rosa ..........
W alton ..............
Washington ..........
Div. Average per cent..


75
100




50


'b0





100


7r5 8-7 -83 1 87


Northeastern Division.
Baker ................. ..... 100 100 .......
Bradford .............. ..... .100 100 ...
Clay .................. .. 100 100 100
Columbia ............ 90 80 100 .......
Div. Average per cent.. 90 95 100 100
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 150 100 .. ....
Hernando ............. ..... 100 100 .......
Levy ................. ..... 100 100 100
M arion ............... 60 100 100 .......
Pasco ................ 100 100 75 95
Sumter ............... 90 100 100 .......
Volusia ............... ..... 70 80 .......
Div. Average per cent..j 83 103 94 97
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. 1 ......
Dade ................. 100 90 100
DeSoto ............... 115 110 120 130
Hillsborough .......... 100 110 100 ......
Lee .................. 100 100 100 100
M anatee .............. ..... 100 100 ..
Osceola ............... 100 140 140 100
Polk .................. 110 100 100 100
St. Lucie ............. ..... ..... .
Div. Average per cent.. 104 108 108 10
State Averages ....... 86 96 95 9









12
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Tobacco Peanuts Pastures elvet
COUNTIES. _____


O_ 0 3 '
Northern Division. U U I
Gadsden .............. 75 150 0 .......
Hamilton ............. ..... 80 90 90
Jefferson .............. 80 100 80 100
Lafayette ............. ..... 105 85 110
Leon .................. 95 100 100 100
Liberty ............... ..... 80 100 90
Madison .............. 50 50 75 50
Suwannee ............. ..... 100 100 100
W akulla .............. ..... 100 100 90
Div. Average per cent.. 75 91 91
Western Division.


Calhoun ..............
Escambia .............
Holm es ...............
Jackson ..............
Santa Rosa ...........
W alton ...............
Washington ..........
Div. Average per cent..


100
75


100
125

00.
100
100
100


Northeastern Division,
Baker ................ ..... 100 0 1100
Bradford .............. ..... 100 100 100
Clay .................. ..... 100 90 100
Columbia ................ 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. ..... 100 97 100
Central Division.
Citrus ................ ..... 150 100 125
Hernando ............. ..... 90 100 100
Levy ................. ..... 100 90 110
Marion ............... ..... 100 100 100
Pasco ................. 90 95 100 100
Sumter ............... ..... 100 100 100
Volusia ............... ..... 80 90 90
Div. Average per cent.. 90 102 97 104
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. ..... ..... 100 100
Dade ................. ..... ..... 100 100
DeSoto ............... ...... ..... 120 130
Hillsborough .......... .... ..... 100 120
Lee ................... ..... 100 100 100
M anate ............... ...... ..... 100 100
Osceola ............... ..... .... 150 150
Polk .................. ..... 120 120 100
St. Lucie ........... ..... ..... ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. ..... 110 111 T2
State Averages ........ 84 101 101









13
Condition and Prospective Yield


of Crops-Continued.


Alfalfa Guavas




o a
COUNTIES.



Northern Division. 0 CL4 -
G adsden ............... ........ ........ ..........
H am ilton .............. ........ ........ .........
Jefferson .............. ........ ........ ..........
L afayette .............. ........ ........ ..........
L eon .................. 100 ........ .....
L iberty ................ ........ ........ ..........
M adison ............... ........ ........ .........
Suw annee ............. ....... ........ ..........
W akulla ............... 100 ........
Div. Average per cent.. 100 ........ ..........
Western Division.
Calhoun ............... ........ ....
Escam bia ............. 100 ....... ......
H olm es ................ ........ ....... ..........
Jackson ............... ........ ........ ..........
Santa R osa ........... ........ ........ ..........
W alton ................ ........ ........ ..........
W ashington ........... ........ ........ ..........
Div. Average per cent... 100 ........ ..........
Northeastern Division,
B aker ................. ........ ........ ..........
Bradford .............. ........ ........ ..........
Clay ................... ........ ........ ..........
Colum bia .............. ........ ........ ..........
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ........ ..........
Central Division.
Citrus ................. ........ ........ ..........
Hernando ............ ....... ........ ..........
Levy .................. ........ ........ ..........
Marion ............... ........ ........ ..........
Pasco ........... ... ........ 75 50
Sumter ................ ........ ......... ..........
Volusia ................ ........ ....... ..........
Div. Average per cent.. ........ 7 5
Southern Division.
Brevard ............... ........ 100 200
Dade .................. ........ 100 100
DeSoto ................ ...... .. ........ ..........
Hillsborough ........... ........ 100 100
Lee .................... ........ 100 100
Manatee ............... ........ 100 100
Osceola ................. ........ 120 80
Polk ................... ........ 100 100
St. Lucle .............. ........ 1 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. ........ 102 110
State Averages ........ 100 8 -9 8









14
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Bananas Orange Trees

COUNTIES.



Northern Division. Q -
Gadsden ...........
H am ilton .......... ....... ...
Jefferson ........... .. .. ....
Lafayette ............. ..... .... ..........
Leon ................. ..... ..... 90 80
Liberty ................ ...... ..... 90 50
M adison .............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Suw annee ............ ..... ..... ..... .......
Wakulla .............. ......... ....
Div. Average per cent.. ..... .... 90 6
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 00 120 00 150
E scam bia ............. ..... ..... ..... .....
H olm es ............... ..... ..... ..... .
Jackson .............. ..... ..... ...
Santa Rosa .......... ..... ..... ......
W alton ............... ..... ..... ..... ....
W ashington ........... ..... .....
Div. Average per cent.. 100 120 100
Northeastern Division.
Baker ................ ..... ..... 100 100
Bradford .............. ..... ..... 100 125
Clay .................. ..... ..... 100 100
Columbia ............. ..... ..... 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ..... 100 10
Central Division.
Citrus ................ ..... ..... 125 1 2
Hernando .................. ..... 100 110
Levy ............... ..... ..... 100 70
M arion ............... ..... ..... 100 80
Pasco ................ 85 90 100 110
Sum ter ............... .... ..... 100 100
Volusia .............. ..... ... 90 80
Div. Average per cent.. 8 90 12
Southern Division.


Brevard ..............
D ade .................
DeSoto ...............
Hillsborough ..........
L ee ...................


100

90
100


Manatee .............. 100 100 100 100
Osceola ............... 100 100 100 150
Polk .................. 100 120 100 125
St. Lucie .............. 100 100 100 125
Div. Average per cent.. -96 -F00T-
State Averages ....... 93 1 3









15
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Lemon Trees Lime Trees
COUNTIES.


-------a on ag
o 0


Northern Division. -
Gadsden .............. ..... ...
H am ilton ............. .. .. .....
Jefferson ............. .. ... ....
Lafayette ............. .. .. ....
L eon ................. ..... ..... ..... .......
L iberty ............... ..... ..... ... .......
M adison ............. .... ..... ..... .......
Suwannee ........... .... ..... ..... .......
W akulla ............. ..... ..... ..... ...
Div. Average per cent. .... ..... ..... .......
Western Division.
Calhoun ............... 1 0 125 .... .......
E scam bia ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
H olm es ............... ..... ..... ..... .......
Jackson .............. ..... .... ......
Santa Rosa .......... ..... ... ....
W alton ............... .....
Washington ......... ...... ... ..... ....
Div. Average per cent.. 100 125 .....
Northeastern Division.
B aker ................ ..... ..... .... .....
Bradford ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
C lay .................. .. .. .. .
Columbia .............
Div. Average per cent.. .. ..... ..... .......
Central Division.
C itrus ................ ..... ..... ..... ...
hernando ............. ... ..... .....
L evy ................. ..... ..... ..... ..
M arion ............... ..... ..... ..... .......
Pasco ................. .... ....
Sumter ............... 100 100 ... .
Volusia ............... 90 80 ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. 9 .... .......
Southern Division.
Brevard ............... 100 100 ..... .......
Dade ................. 90 90 100 95
DeSoto ................ 100 120 100 120
Hillsborough .......... ..... ..... 100 100
Lee .................. 90 90 90 90
Manatee .............. 100 100 ... ......
Osceola ............... 100 150 100 150
Polk .................. 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie ............. 100 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. '- 98 F0 99 10
State Averages ........ 97 107 99 108








16
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Grape-fruit Trees Egg Plants
COUNTIES.

o oa

Northern Division. a _
Gadsden .............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Hamilton ............. ..... ........... ...
Jefferson ............. ..... ...... .. ....
Lafayette ............. ..... ..... ....... .....
Leon ................. ..... ..... 100 75
Liberty ............... ...... ..... ... .......
Madison .............. ... ..... ..... .......
Suwannee ............ ..... ..... ..... ......
Wakulla ........... .. .... .............
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ..... 100
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 100 120 100 100
Escambia ............ ....... ..... 100 100
Holmes ............... ..... ..... ... .... .......
Jackson .............. ..... ..... ..... ......
Santa Rosa .......... ..... .. ..... ......
W alton ............... ..... .... ..... .......
Washington ........... ..... ... ... .....
Dev. Average per cent.. 00 120 100
Northeastern Division.
B aker ................ ..... ..... ........
Bradford ............. ..... ..... ..... .....
Clay .................. ..... ..... ..... .......
Colum bia ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ..... ..... .....
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 125 12b ..... .......
Hernando ............ 100 110 ..... .......
Levy ................. ..... ..... .......
M arion ............... 100 80 .. .... ..
Pasco ................ 100 110 90 90
Sumter ............... 100 100 100 100
Volusia ............... 90 70 ..... ......
Div. Average per cent.. 102 99 95 95
Southern Division.
Brevard ............. 100 100 75 50
Dade ................. 100 110 100 100
DeSoto ............... 100 120 100 130
Hillsborough ......... 100 90 ..... .......
Lee .................. 100 75 ..... .......
Manatee .............. 100 100 ..... ......
Osceola ............... 100 90 100 100
Polk .................. 100 120 100 125
St. Lucie ............ 100 75 ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. 100 98 95 101
State Averages ....... 101 105 97 U3









17
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Plums Pears
COUNTIES.
o CC) 0


Na rthern Divi.ion. &.... ..

H am ilton ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Jefferson ............. 90 80 40 40
Lafayette ............. .... ..... .. .. .......
Leon ................. 100 90 50 50
Liberty ............... ..... ..... 40 10
M adison .............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Suwannee ............ ..... ..... ..... ......
Wakulla .............. 50 50 75 40
Div. Average per cent.. 80 73 51 35
Western Division.
Calhoun ............. 125 125 110 100
E scam bia ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Holmes ............... 75 50 75 50
Jackson .............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Santa Rosa ........... 75 75 25 25
W alton ............... ..... ..... 25 20
Washington ........... ..... ..... 15 05
Div. Average per cent.. 91 83 42 4
Northeastern Division.
Baker ................ 100 100 ..... ......
Bradford ............. 100 90 .. ......
Clay .................. ..... ..... ......
Columbia ............. 100 100 ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. 100 97 ..... ......
Central Division.
Citrus ................ ..... ..... 100 300
Hernando ............. .... .... ..... ......
Levy ................. 100 10 ..... .......
M arion ............. ...... ..... .... .......
Pasco ................. 100 100 75 50
Sum ter ............... ..... ..... 50 50
Volusia .............. ..... ..... 60 50
Div Average per cent.. 100 5 1 112
Southern Division.
B revard .............. ..... .. ..... .......
D ade ................. ..... ... .
DeSoto ............... 100 135' 100 140
hillsborough .......... 80 80 90 90
L ee ................ ..... ..... ..... .......
M anatee .............. ..... ... .. .......
Osceola ............... 100 100 80 70
Polk .................. 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie ............. . .........
Div. Average per cent., 95 104 92100
State Averages ....... 93 82 64 7










Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Peaches Watermelons
COUNTIES.
o 0


Northern Division. P U P4
Gadsden .............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Hamilton ............. ..... ..... .... .......
Jefferson ............. 25 30 80 100
Lafayette ............. ..... .... ..... .......
Leon ................. 75 30 100 110
Liberty ............... ..... ..... 100 80
M adison .............. ..... ..... 80 75
Suwannee ............ ..... ..... 100 100
Wakulla .............. 80 90 75 90
Div. Average per cent.. 60 50 89 ~
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 90 75 120 120
Escambia ............. ..... ..... 100 125
Holmes ............... 65 50 80 100
Jackson .............. 75 75 100 100
Santa Rosa ........... 85 90 100 85
Walton ............... 25 20 100 100
Washington ........... 20 25 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. 60 56 100 104
Northeastern Division.
Baker ............... ..... ..... 10085
Bradford ............. ..... ..... 100 100
Clay .................. ..... ..... 100 100
Columbia ............. ..... ..... 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. ..... ..... 100
Central Division.
Citrus ................ 125 200 150 150
Hernando ............. ..... ..... 100 100
Levy ................. 100 50 100 100
Marion ............... 100 70 100 100
Pasco ................ 90 85 95 95
Sumter ............... 75 75 100 100
Volusia ............... 80 60 70 80
Div. Average per cent. 90 90 102 104
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. 80 75 100 175
Dade ................. 100 100 100 100
DeSoto ............... 100 140 100 160
Hillsborough .......... 100 100 100 90
Lee ................... ..... ..... 100 100
Manatee .............. 50 25 100 100
Osceola ............... 80 90 90 80
Polk .................. 70 50 100 100
St. Lucie ............ ..... ..... ..... .......
Div. Average per cent. 83 83 99 113
State Averages ....... 73 70 98 102








19
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Cantaloupes Pineapples
COUNTIES.

---------- t Z)S 4
oa>+

Northern Division. o -
Gadsden .............. ..... ..... ... .......
H am ilton ............. ..... ... .......
Jefferson ............. 80 100 ..... ... ..
Lafayette ............. ..... ... .......
Leon ................. 100 100 .. ...
L iberty ............... .. ... ..... ..... .......
M adison .............. .... .... .... ... ....
Suwannee ............ ..... ..... ..... .......
W akulla .............. .... .... ..... .......
Div. Average per cent.. 90 100 ..... ......
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. 120 100 ..... .
Escam bia ............. 75 75 ..... .......
H olm es ............... 75 80 ..... .......
Jackson .............. ..... ....... .......
Santa Rosa ........... 60 60 ..... .......
W alton .............. 75 80 ... .......
Washington ........... 100 100 ... ......
Div. Average per cent.. 84 83 ..... .......
Northeastern Division.
Baker ............. ... .... ..... .......
Bradford ........... ..... ..... ..... .......
Clay .................. ..... .. ..... .......
Columbia ............. 100 100 ..... .......
Div. Average per cent. 100 100 .......
Central Division.
C itru s ................ ..... ..... ..... .......
H ernando ............. ..... ..... ..... .......
Levy ................. 100 100 ..... .......
M arion ............... 100 100 ..... .......
Pasco ................ 70 65 .. ...
Sum ter ............... 90 90 ... .......
Volusia ............... ..... .
Div. Average per cent.. .....
Southern Division.
Brevard .............. ..... ..... 100 100
Dade ................. ..... ..... 100 110
D eSoto ............... ..... ..... ..... ......
Hillsborough .......... 80 80 100 100
L ee ................... ..... ..... 100 100
Manatee .............. 50 50 75 75
Osceola ............... 100 120 100 120
Polk ................. 90 70 100 100
St. Lucie ............. ..... ..... 100 110
Div. Average per cent.. 80U 80 97 108
State Averages ....... 89 90 97 108







20
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continuea.


Horses
Grapes and Mules
COUNTIES.


0 0
Northern Division. U L -
-Gadsden ............... ....... .. .... 100
H amilton .......... .. ........ ..... 100
Jefferson .............. 100 100 100
Lafayette .............. ........ ......... 110
Leon .................. 100 100 100
Liberty ............. .. ......... ........ 90
M adison ............ ... ........ ........ 75
Suwannee ............. 100 100 90
Wakulla ............... 65 60 80
Div. Average per cent.. 91 90 4
Western Division.
Calhoun ............... 90 100 125
Escambia .............. ........ ..... .100
Holmes ................. 80 80 85
Jackson ............... ........ ........ 100
Santa Rosa ............ ......... ........ 100
Walton ................ ........ 100
W ashington ......... ........ ........ 110
Div. Average per cent.. 85 90 103
Northeastern Division.
Baker ................. 100 100 100
Bradford .............. 100 100 100
Clay ................... 100 100 100
Columbia .............. 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. 100 0100 1
Central Division.
Citrus ................. 100 125 100
H ernando .............. ........ ..... 100
Levy .................. ........ 100
M arion ............ ... ....... ....... 100
Pasco ............... 100 100 95
Sumter ................ 50 50 100
Volusia ................ 100 100 70
Div. Average per cent.. 87 945
Southern Division.
Brevard ............... 100 100 100
Dade .................. ........ ........ 0100
DeSoto .............. ... ........ 125
Hillsborough .. ...... ...... .... .. 100
Lee .... .............. 90 90 100
Manatee ............... 100 100 100
Osceola ............... 100 140 100
Polk ................... 100 120 100
St. Lucie ............. ..... .. .. 100
Div. Average per cent.. I 98 110 -103
State Averages ........ 92 97 -











21
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Cattle Hogs Sheep
COUNTIES.
d d d
S .20


Northern Division. o 5
Uadsaen .............. 75 80 .......
Hamilton .............. 90 100 ..........
Jefferson .............. 100 100 100
Lafayette .............. 100 120 ..........
Leon .................. 100 100 100
Liberty ................ 90 100 80
Madison ............... 80 50 40
Suwannee ............. 85 80 .........
Wakulla ............... 80 50 50
Div. Average per cent.. 89 687 __
Western Division.
Calhoun ............... 100 85 90
Escambia .............. 100 75 75
Holmes ................ 80 75 75
Jackson ............... 80 ........ 80
Santa Rosa ............ 100 75 90
W alton ............... 100 90 100
Washington ............ 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent.: 94 83 88
Northeastern Division.
Baker ................. 100 100 100
Bradford .............. 100 100 ..........
Clay ................... 100 85 90
Columbia .............. 0105 100 100
Div. Average per cent.. 101 70 97
Central Division.
Citrus ................. 100 100 ..........
Hernando ............. 100 90 .........
Levy .................. 75 50 75
Marion ................ 100 100 100
Pasco ................. 95 85 70
Sumter ................ 100 100 75
Volusia ................ 90 90 90
Liv. Average per cent.. 94 88 8
Southern Division.
Brevard ............... 100 80 ..........
D ade .................. 100 ........ ..........
DeSoto ................ 125 110 110
Hillsborough ........... 100 90 ..........
Lee .................... 100 100 90
Manatee ................ 100 100 100
Osceola ................ 1 10100 120
Polk .................. 100 60 100
St. Lucie .............. 100 100 ..........
Div. Average per cent.. 103 93 104
State Averages ........ 9 84 89










22
Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Estimated Estimated Estimated
Yield of Yield of Yield of
COUNTIES. Tobacco Honey Wool

Pounds Pounds Pounds
Northern Division.
G adsden ............... ........ ........ ..........
H am ilton .............. ...... ........
Jefferson .............. ........ ........ 1,000
Lafayette .............. ........ ........ ..........
Leon .................. 500,000 .......
Liberty ................ ........ 15.000 7,000
M adison ............... ........ .....
Suwannee ............. ....... ...............
Wakulla ............ .. 50.000 600
Div. Average per cent.. 500,000 65,000 8,600
Western Division.
Calhoun ............ ........ 130,00 13,000
E scam bia .............. ........ ........ ......
Holmes ............... 500 1,000 25,000
Jackson ............... ............ ..........
Santa Rosa ............ ........ 15,000 70,000
W alton ................ ........ ........ 55,000
Washington ........... ........ 3,000 37,000
Div. Average per cent.. 500 149,000 200,000
Northeastern Division.
B aker ................. ..............
B radford .............. ........ ........ ..........
Clay .................. ........ ........
Columbia .............. ........ 2,000 300
Div. Average per cent.. ........ 2,000 300
Central Division.
Citrus ................ ........ 1,200 ..........
Hernando .............. ........ ........ ..........
Levy .................. ........ 5,000 4,000
M arion ................ ........ 3,000 20,000
Pasco ................. 18,000 12,000 20,000
Sumter ................ ........ 1,000 5,000
Volusia ................ ........ 75,000 15.000
Div. Average per cent.. 18,0 97,200 64.000
Southern Division.
B revard ............... ....... ........
Dade ................. ........ 4,000
DeSoto ................ ........ 500 300
H illsborough ........... I ................
Lee ................... .I ........ 10,000
M anatee ............... ........ ...
Osceola ................ ........ 5,000 40,000
Polk .................. ........ 1,500 18,000
St. L ucie .............. ........ ........ ..........
Div. Average per cent.. .... 21,000 58,300
State Averages ....... 718,500 ] 334,200 330,900


















PART II.
CLASSIFICATION OF SOILS.

















GENERAL CLASSIFICATION

OF FLORIDA SOILS


This article is necessarily general in scope and is in-
tended to supply information on this important subject
in a brief way to those seeking such information, before
coming to this State to make new homes. With no funds
for immigration purposes, we are limited to small space
in the Bulletin, to supply that which every proposed im-
migrant wants and should have, and which we cannot
give in any other way. In all subsequent issues of the
Quarterly Bulletin the same space will be devoted to some
subject of equal interest in a general way to the people
of the State as well as intending immigrants.
The average soil of Florida is sandy, mixed with more
or less clay, lime and organic matter. The greater por-
tion of the lands may be designated as pine lands, be-
cause of the pine timber which predominates. There are
lands on which the timber is a mixture of pine, white oak,
red oak, water oak, live oak, gum, bay, hickory, magnolia,
cabbage palmetto, etc.; these lands are termed mixed
hammock lands.
The general classification of soils is in the following
order: First, second and third rate pine lands, and high
hammock, low hammock and swampy lands.
The pine lands cover much the larger portion of the
State and the soil is apparently all sand but not so; over a
greater portion of the State this sand is thoroughly mixed
with small particles of shells which contain carbonate 'of
lime, other minerals and decomposed, finely granulated
vegetable matter. It is true that Florida has her pro-
portion of poor lands, just as have all other States and
countries, but compared with some other States the ratio
is very small. With the exception of a very small area
of supposedly irreclaimable swamp lands, there is scarcely
an acre in the entire State which cannot be made, under
the wonderful influence of her tropical climate, to pay











tribute to man's energy. Lands, which in a more north-
erly climate would be utterly worthless, will, in Florida.
for the reasons above stated, yield valuable productions.



FIRST-CLASS PINE LANDS.

First-class pine land in Florida is wholly unlike any-
thing found in any other State. Its surface is usually
covered for several inches deep with a dark vegetable
mould, beneath which to the depth of several feet, is a
chocolate colored sandy loam, mixed for the most part
with lime stone pebbles and resting upon a substratum of
marl, clay, or lime stone rock. The fertility and dura-
bility of this character of land may be estimated from the
well-known fact that in the older settled districts this
kind of soil has been cultivated for as many as twenty
years successfully in corn or cotton without a pound of
any sort of fertilizer, and are still as productive as ever;
practically, then, these lands are indestructible. It is on
this class of lands that both truck and fruit growing is
most successful, and which produces the finest quality of
Sea Island cotton. It is also fine farming land and yields
good crops under ordinary methods of cultivation. By
the growing of leguminous plants these soils and all other
pine lands can be continually kept in a high state of fer-
tility.



SECOND-CLASS PINE LANDS.

The second-class pine lands, which make up the largest
portion of lands, are practically all productive. They
are not hilly, but for the most part undulating in their
surface. In some places, however, these elevations
amount to hills. Some of these hills in Hernando County
are regarded among the highest points in the State.
Underlying the surface is clay, marl, lime rock and sand.
These lands, from their accessibility and productiveness,
the facility of fertilizing with cattle penning and the im-
pression of their greater healthfulness than hammock












lands, have induced their enclosure and tillage, when the
richer hammock lands were near by, but more difficult to
prepare for cultivation.
Some of these lands have no regular compact clay under
them, or, at least, not in reach of plant roots. This fact
is taken frequently as an evidence against them, since
the popular prejudice is decidedly in favor of a clay sub-
soil. This objection, if it really be one, is taken for more
than it is worth, for clay proper, or aluminum, as the
chemists call it, is not food for plants. Its uses to the
plant are purely mechanical. It serves as a reservoir
for the storage of moisture in times of drought as well
as to hold firmly the roots of the growing trunk, but not
to feed the hungry or thirsty plant. Sometimes it has been
found in small quantities in the ash of woods, but this
is because the rootlets take up more or less of whatever
salts is in solution about them, and clay has been taken
up in this way, just as poisons may be taken up; for trees
are sometimes killed by pouring poisonous liquids about
their roots, but clay never makes any part of the organism
of plants, nor is it numbered among the elements which
contribute to their growth.
Also a well-established fact as to the value of a clay
sub-soil is, that without its presence the applied fertil-
izers will leach through and be lost. The fertilizers used
are generally lighter than 'the soils to which
they are applied, or than the water coming down from
the clouds. As the rains fall some of these fertilizers are
carried down, after a time of drought; as the soil fills
they are borne upward again by the waters to the sur-
face, and both as they go down and come up, whether
they be liquid or gaseous, the humus of soils has a strong
absorbing affinity for them and readily appropriates and
retains them for the uses of the plant, when the super-
abundance of water has passed away. But if the soil is
not filled to the surface, so as to bring back directly any
fertilizer in solution that was carried down, it is safer
there in the sub-soil than on the steep hillsides of clay,
where what is applied is frequently carried away by
the floods, together with the soil, to the vales below.
Whereas, what has gone down in the porous soil is
brought back by the capillary attraction of the surface
soil, in time of drought, to the reach of the growing crop.
One of the uses of drought is, that it thus brings up from












the sub-soil, with the assistance of shallow cultivation,
any mineral food that may be there, to where it will be
in reach of the growing crop.
But light, sandy soils, though they may produce freely
at first, soon give way, and this fact, for frequently it is
a fact, is regarded as conclusive as against loose and porus
sub-soils, whereas it only proves that these light soils
were not sufficiently supplied with humus and the limited
supply soon exhausted. Such lands can easily be restored
to their original fertility by the use of leguminous plants,
rotation of crops and careful cultivation; in fact, by such
means they can be vastly improved over their original
condition.


THIRD-CLASS PINE LANDS.

Even the lands of the "third rate," or most inferior
class, are, by no means, worthless under the climate of
Florida. This class of lands may be divided into two
orders; the one comprising high, rolling sandy districts,
which are sparcely covered with a stunted growth ot
"black jack" and pine, and near the lower east coast,
scrub hickory and gaulberry shrubs. It is also on much
similar soils along the east coast that the finest pine
apples are produced; the other embracing low, flat,
swampy regions, which are frequently studied with "bay
gauls," and are occasionally inundated, but which are
covered with luxuriant vegetation, and very generally
with considerable quantities of valuable timber. The
former of these, it is now ascertained, is also well adapted
to the growth of Sisal Hemp, which is a valuable tropical
production. This plant (the Agave Sisaliana), and the
Agave Mexicana, also known as Maguey, the Pulque
Plant, the Century Plant, etc., have both been introduced
into Florida, and they have both grown in great perfection
on the poorest lands of the country. As these plants de-
rive their chief support from the atmosphere, they will,
like the common air plant, preserve their vitality for
many months when left out of the ground.
The second order of the third-rate pine lands are not
entirely worthless, as these lands afford fine cattle ranges,
and in some localities large tracts of timber adapted to
the manufacture of naval stores and milling purposes.











Just here we feel that it is not out of place to say a
few words on the topography and influence of these lands
on the health of the inhabitants thereon. A general fea-
ture in the topography of Florida, which no other country
in the United States possesses and which affords great
security to the health of its inhabitants, is that the pine
lands which form the basis of the country, and which are
almost universally healthy, are nearly everywhere studded
at intervals of a few miles, with hammock lands of the
richest quality. These hammocks are not, as is generally
supposed, low, wet lands; they never require ditching or
draining; they vary in extent from a few acres to many
thousand acres. Hence the inhabitants have it every-
where in their power to select residences in the pine
lands, at such convenient distances from the hammocks
as will enable them to cultivate the latter without en
dangering their health, if it should so happen that the
hammock lands appeared to be less healthy than the pine
lands.
Experience in Florida has satisfactorily shown that
residences only half a mile distant from cultivated ham-
mocks are entirely exempt from malarial disease, and
those who cultivate these hammocks and retire at night
to pine land residences, maintain perfect health. Indeed
it is found that residences in the hammocks themselves
are generally perfectly healthy after they have been one
or two years cleared. Newly cleared lands are sometimes
attended with the development of more or less malaria,
a fact that, under similar conditions, is no more peculiar
to Florida than any other State. In Florida the diseases
which result from these clearings are generally of the
mildest type of bilious fever.
The topographical feature here noted, namely, a gen-
eral interspersion of rich hammocks, surrounded by high,
dry, rolling, healthy pine woods, is an advantage which
no other State in the Union enjoys; and Florida forms,
in this respect, a striking contrast with some other south-
ern States whose sugar and cotton lands are generally
surrounded by vast alluvial regions, subject to frequent
inundations, so that it is impossible to obtain, within
many miles of them, a healthy residence.
'At first thought it would seem improbable to many peo-
ple that the malarial diseases of Florida (abounding in
these rich hammock lands and exposed to a tropical sun),











should so generally be of a much milder form than those
which prevail in more northern latitudes. But such, how-
ever, is the fact. It is suggested, in explanation of this
fact, that the luxuriant vegetation which, in the Southern
and Middle States, passes through all the stages of decom-
position, is, in Florida, generally dried up before it
reaches the stage of decomposition, and that consequently
the quantity of malaria generated is much less than in
climates more favorable to decomposition. This view is
strengthened by the fact that the soil of Florida is almost
everywhere, of so porous and absorbent a character that
moisture is seldom long retained on its surface, that its
atmosphere is in constant motion, and that there is more
clear sunshine than in the more Northern States. It is
further suggested that the uniform prevalence of sea
breezes, and the constant motion of the atmosphere in the
Peninsula, tend so much to diffuse and attenuate what-
ever malaria is generated, that it will generally produce
only the mildest form of malarial diseases, such as inter-
mittent fever.
The lands which in Florida are universally denominated
"rich lands" are first, the "swamp lands"; second, the
"low hammock lands"; third, the "high hammocks," and
fourth, the "first rate pine, oak and hickory lands."



SWAMP LANDS.

The swamp lands are, unquestionably, the most dura-
ble rich lands in the State. They are the most recently
formed lands, and are still annually receiving additions
to their surface. They are intrinsically the most valuable
lands, because they are as fertile as the hammocks and
more durable. They are alluvial in character and occupy
natural depressions, or basins, which have gradually filled
up by deposits of vegetable debris, etc., washed in from
the adjacent and higher lands. Drainage is indispensable
to all of them in their preparation for successful culti-
vation. Properly prepared, however, their inexhaustible
fertility sustains a succession of the most exhausting
crops with astonishing vigor. These lands have been
known to produce as much as 600 gallons of syrup, or
about 5,000 pounds of sugar per acre, without fertilizer.











We mention sugarcane in this connection as showing the
fertility of the soil, because it is known to be one of the
most exhausting crops. It is not, however, quite fair to
make this the measure of fertility of similar lands situ.
ated. in different climates and countries, for we find on
the richest lands in the State of Louisiana the product
of sugar is little more than about half what it is in
Florida.
But this great disparity in the product of these coun-
tries is accounted for, not by any inferiority in the lands
of Louisiana or Texas, but by the fact that the early
visitations of frost in both these States render it neces-
sary to cut the cane in October, which is long before it
has reached maturity, while in Florida it is permitted to
stand, without fear of frost, till the last of November or
December, or till such time as it is fully matured. It is
well known that it "tassels" in South Florida, and it
never does so in either Louisiana or Texas. When cane
"tassels" it is evidence of its having reached full ma
turity. In consequence of the considerable outlay of
capital required in the preparation of this description of
land for cultivation, and from the facility formerly ex-
isting for obtaining hammock land, which requires no
ditching nor draining, swamp land has been but little
sought after by persons engaged in planting in Florida
until in recent years; now, however, there is a great and
ever increasing demand for these lands by individuals and
incorporated companies, thus suddenly recognizing their
immense productive value.
The greater part of what are known as swamp lands
proper are mostly located in East and South Florida, al-
though there are numerous and quite extensive bodies in
North, Middle and West Florida.



THE EVERGLADES.

While the soils of this region differ little in their gen-
eral characteristics from the swamp lands above consid-
ered, still, owing to their prominence as such and as the
greatest reclamation undertaking in recent times, also
their unique geographical position, we submit a brief











description under their own heading. These lands are
being rapidly and successfully drained by the State as
well as by private and corporate owners.
"The Everglades of Florida cover an area of about
4,000 square miles, embracing more than half of the por-
tion of the State south of Lake Okeechobee. The sub-soil
of this vast region is a coraline limestone. Upon
this surface lies an immense accumulation of sand, allu-
vial deposits and decayed vegetable matter, forming a
mass of sand and mud from two feet to ten feet or more
in depth, that overspreads all but a few points of the first
strata."
"Upon the mud rests a sheet of water, the depth varying
with the conformation of the bottom, but seldom at dry
seasons, greater than three feet. The whole is filled with
rank growth of coarse grass, eight or ten feet high, having
a serrated edge like a saw, from which it obtains its
name of 'Saw Grass.' "
In many portions of the Everglades the saw grass is
so thick as to be almost impenetrable, but it is intersected
by numerous and tortuous channels that form a kind of
labyrinth, where outlets present themselves in every di-
rection, however, terminating at long or short distances
in apparently impenetrable barriers of grass. The sur-
face of water is quickly affected by rain, the alternate
rising and falling during the wet seasons being rapid.
The difference of level between highest and lowest stages
of water is from two to three feet. The general surface
of the Everglades was thus subject to great changes prior
to the inauguration of the system of drainage now so
successfully under way. Small keys, or in reality, ham-
mocks, are here and there met with which are dry at all
seasons; upon them the soil is very rich. There are many
such. Undoubtedly they were often made the site of
Indian gardens.
Large areas covering many square miles, which but a
few years ago were marshes covered with saw grass and
rushes, are now open meadows, dry all seasons, excepting
the rainy months, affording pasture for many thousan.l
heads of cattle. The fall or rapids at the heads of atl
streams running from the glades have receded towards
the center of the glades and Lake Okeechobee several
miles.












The Florida Everglades at present may be described as
a wet prairie, being a strip of land about one hundred
and fifty miles long by fifty five miles wide, and lying be-
tween the pine and swamp lands which have grown over
two reefs of rock running parallel with each other from
north to south. No rivers penetrate into the glades be-
yond these rock reefs on either side and the land is very
level, only about twenty-one and one-half feet above sea
level, being composed chiefly of muck and sand lying in a
basin with a rock bottom. The annual rainfall over this
territory averages nearly sixty inches. It has for this
reason, and because this rainfall has no other outlet over
these reefs, been and is too wet for cultivation. The
muck which overlies the sand and rock varies from about
two feet on the edge of the glades to a depth of twenty
feet in the middle, and would average over the whole
territory a depth of between six and eight feet. The land
is free from trees and stumps and almost free from
bushes; the item of clearing being of no consideration
whatever, simply requiring mowing down the grass and
burning it, when the soil is ready to be tilled, as soon as
the excess water is run off by the drainage canals.
The soil as compared with other portions of the coun-
try, taking into consideration its natural richness, loca-
tion and climate, is more valuable for agricultural pur
poses than any that is known, being particularly adapted
to the growth of cane, cotton, Irish potatoes, celery, toma-
toes, cabbage, turnips, beets, onions and, in fact, any crop
will grow well on these lands except such as require a
colder climate.
The composition of the soil being almost entirely de-
composed vegetable matter, is rich in nitrogen but lacking
to a great extent in the mineral constituents necessary
to make a perfect soil, consequently, phosphoric acid and
potash will have to be supplied in varying quantities for
a majority of crops, in some of these muck soils, especially
where rock or clay is absent or too far below the surface
to exert any appreciable influence. With these ad-
ditions, when necessary, however, these soils will with-
out doubt, be the most productive in this country,
and the equal of any in the world. Without the addition
of the chemical fertilizers mentioned these soils will not
equal in productiveness the first grade of swamp lands.
3-B.











LOW HAMMOCKS.

Low hammocks, which are practically swamp lands,
are not inferior to swamp lands proper, in fertility, but
are considered not quite so desirable. They are mostly
level, or nearly so, and have a soil of greater tenacity than
that of the high hammocks. Some ditching is necessary
in many of them. The soil in them is always deep. Thesj
lands are also extremely well adapted to the growth of
cane, corn and in fact all vegetable crops, nor are these
soils as subject to the effects of prolonged drought as
higher lands. There is not nearly so large a proportion of
low hammock as there is of swamp lands.


HIGH HAMMOCKS.

,High hammocks are the lands in greatest favor in Flor-
ida. These differ from low hammocks in occupying
higher ground, and in generally presenting an undulating
surface. They are formed of a fine vegetable mould,
mixed with a sandy loam, in many places several feet
deep, and resting in most cases on a substratum of clay,
marl or limestone. It will be readily understood by any-
one at all acquainted with agriculture that such a soil, in
such a climate as Florida, must be extremely productive.
The soil scarcely ever suffers from too much wet; nor does
drought affect it in the same degree as other lands, owing
to its clay subsoil. High hammock lands produce with
but little labor of cultivation all the crops of the country
in an eminent degree. Such lands have no tendency to
break up in heavy masses, nor are they infested with
weeds.
To sum up its advantages, it requires no other prepa-
ration than clearing and plowing to fit it at once for the
greatest possible production of any kind of crop adapted
to the climate. In unfavorable seasons it is much more
certain to produce a good crop than any other kind of
land, from the fact that it is less affected by exclusively
dry or wet weather It can be cultivated with much less
labor than any other lands, being remarkably mellow, and
its vicinity is generally high and healthy. These reasons
are sufficient to entitle it to the estimation in which it
is held over all other lands











Some of the counties in Middle Florida, Gadsden, Leon,
Madison and Jefferson, and Jackson, Holmes and Wash-
ington Counties in West Florida, have large areas of fine
high hammock land underlaid with a stiff clay These
are the best lands of the State for the growth of short:
staple cotton, and are indeed the cream of the State for
general farming purposes. They are of the earliest for-
mation of the Florida lands. As before stated, areas of
these lands in varying extent are found in every section
of the State, almost every county.
Some of the largest bodies of rich hammock land in
East Florida are to be found in Levy, Alachua, Columbia,
Marion, Hernando, Citrus, Pasco and Sumter Counties.
There are in Levy County alone not less than one hundre 1
thousand acres of the very best description of lands
adapted to sugar cane culture, and there is but a small
proportion of any of the counties here mentioned, that
will not produce remunerative crops of short staple and
Sea Island cotton without the aid of manure.
The first rate pine, oak and hickory lands are found
in pretty extensive bodies in many parts of the State.
From the fact that these lands can be cleared at much
less expenses than the swamp and hammock lands, they
have generally been preferred by the small farmers and
have proved remarkably productive.



PRAIRIE LANDS.

There are, besides the lands already noticed, extensive
tracts of prarie lands, which approximate in character,
texture of the soil, and period and mode of formation, to
the s-amp lands, differing only in being practically des-
titute of timber. Some of these lands are, however, ex-
tremely poor and non-productive, owing mostly to a sub-
strata of hard pan, clay, which is impervious to moisture
andimpenetrable alike to the roots of fruit trees or plants;
the most of them afford excellent pastures during the
greater part of the year. In fact it is this class of lands
that make up the great cattle ranges of the State on
which hundreds of thousands of cattle thrive the yea,
round; these lands are found in tracts of varying extent
in every section of the State, but in Southern Florida, in










southern Hillsborough County, in Manatee in the great
Myaka River prairie region, in southern Polk County,
and in DeSoto, Osceola, Brevard and Lee Counties, which
include the Alifia, Kissimmee and Caloosthatchee River
valleys, is found the greatest grazing region east of the
Mississippi River The climate is perfect, never cold
enough to kill the grasses, which grow as green in Jan-
uary as in June, and where water is in bountiful supply
at all seasons of the year



EASE OF CULTIVATION.

Perhaps the most attractive feature peculiar to the
soils of Florida is the ease with which they can be culti-
vated as compared with stiff heavy soils of other States,
while quite as fertile. Another is that the greater part
of the farm labor and tillage can be, and much of it is,
performed during those months of the year when the
ground further north is frozen. Still another peculiarity
is, that fertilizers can be applied to greater advantage,
because the fertilizing material will remain in the soil
until the stimulating chemical ingredients are assimilated
and absorbed into the earth, and are not carried away
by washing rains as they are in broken or mountainous
countries, and also because the porosity of the soil enables
the atmosphere, through oxidization, more readily to aid
the fertilizers in the work of decomposing the minerals of
the soil, thus setting free the food elements they contain
for the use of the growing crops.




















PART III.


Fertilizers,
Feed Stuffs, and
Foods and Drugs












REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMERCIAL
FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE COMMIS-
SIONER OF AGRICULTURE.

SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.
Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and
A FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES
(ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO THE COMMIS-
SIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT LESS THAN
EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE ACCEPTED
FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to make the necessary determinations,
and to allow the preservation of a duplicate sample in case
of protest or appeal. This duplicate sample will be pre-
served for two months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare cases
is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently sent in
paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and fre-
quently in very small quantity (less than ounce); fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the law,
which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and ad-
dress must also be on the package, this rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.











INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer and each pack-
age of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have, securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis re-
quired by law, and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. This provision of the law-Section 3 of
both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not bear
on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee re-
quired by law, and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag and
stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence of the
guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manufacturer
or dealer has not complied with the law. Without the guar-
antee tag and stamp showing what the goods are guaran-
teed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse against the
manufacturer or dealer.. Such goods are sold, illegally and
fraudulently, and are generally of little value. All repu-
table manufacturers and dealers now comply strictly with
the law and regulations by placing the guarantee tag and
stamp on each package.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is called
to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties. This de-
partment expects each Sheriff to assist in maintaining the
law and protecting the citizens of the State from the impo-
sition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient Commercial Fer.
tilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-
IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA
PORTS, JANUARY 1, 1909.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent Ammonia ...........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
m onia ..................
Dried Blood 15 per cent. Am-
m onia ..................


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.


$60.00


$59.50 $59.60


74.00 73.50 73.00

60.00 59.50 59.00

54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K,0).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20) .
Muriate of Potash 50 per
cent Potash (K,O )......
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per
cent. Potash (K20) (90 per
cent. Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Ams., 42
Potash (KO0) ............
Kainit 12 per cent Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (KO0) Potash...


50.00 49.50 49.00

30.00 29.50 29.00

46.00 45.50 44.00


110.00 -

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent. Ammonia.....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
6 per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.
Raw Bone 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid..............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00













Ammoniates.


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.


Ammonia and Phosphoric Acid:
Ground Castor Pomace, (i
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid..... $25.00
Briht Cottonseed Meal, 8
per cent. Ammonia, market


quotations ..............
Dark Cottonseed Meal, 5


31.00


per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations .............. 24.00


$24.50 $24.00


29.50 29.00


23.50 23.00


PHOSPHORIO ACID.


High Grade Phosphoric Acid,
16 percent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid .............
Acid Phosphate, 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack, 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acidi.
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00

14.00

24.00
25.00


14.50 14.50

13.50 13.00

23.50 23.00
24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.,


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash .............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ..................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
(K20) Potash ...........
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1j per
cent. Ammonia, 1j per
cent. Potash ............
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks.......


25.00

16.00


23.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


24.50 24.CO

15.50 15.00


22.50 22.00


18.50
14.50
10.25


18.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.












NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES CURRENT JAN.
1, 1909-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AM MONIATES.


Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, spot, per 100
Ibs. ................................ $
futures ......................


2.85 @
2.874@


Ammonia, sulphate, domestic, spot...... 2.874@
futures ...................... 2.90 @
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p.c. ammonia and 14
p. c. bone phosphate, f o. b. fish works,
per unit .......................... 2.65 &
wet, acidulated, 6 p.c. ammonia, 3
p.c. phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish
works ...................... 2.40 &


2.871
2.90
2.90
2.921


10


35


Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11
p.c. ammonia and 15-17 p.c. bone phos-
phate, c. i. f. N. Y., Balto. or Phila..
Tankage, 11 p.c. and 15 p.c., f. o. b. Chi-
cago ..............................
Tankage, 9 and 20 p.c, f.o.b. Chicago..
Tankage, 6 and 25 p.c, f.o.b. Chicago..
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 per cent f. o. b. Chicago....
Garbage, tankage ....................
Sheep manure, concentrated, f. o. b.
Chicago, per ton ...................
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit....
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York .........................
Dried blood., high grade, f. o. b. Chicago.
Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c. spot, per 100 lbs
futures, 95 p. c...............


2.75 &


2.30 & 10.
2.20 & 10
15.00 @ -

2.25 @ -
6.00 @ 8.00

7.50 @ -
2.30 @ 2.35


2.60
2.50
2.15
2.15


@26.65
@ 2.55
@ 2.171
@ 2.171


PHOSPHATES.

Acid phosphate, per unit............... 50 @ 55
Bones, raw, per ton................... 20.00 @ -
ground, steamed, 3 p. c. ammo-
nia and 50 p. c. bone phosphate 24.00 @ -
unground, steamed .......... 17.50 @ 18.00












South Carolina phosphate rock, undried,
per 2,400 lbs., f. o. b. Ashley River....
South Carolina phosphate rock, hot air
dried, f. o. b. Ashley River...........
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. Port Tampa, Fla........
Florida high grade phosphate hard rocks,
77 p. c., f. o. b. Florida or Georgia ports
Georgia ports ................
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, per ton, 78@80 p.c.
75 p. c. guaranteed ............
68@ 72 p. c...................
POTASHES.


Muriate potash, basis 80 p. c. per 100 lbs.
Manure salt, 20 p. c. actual potash....
double manure salt, 48 p. c...
Sulphate potash (basis 90 p. c.)........
Kainit in bulk, 2,240 lbs..............


5.50 @ 5.75

7.00 @ 7.75

3.25 @ 3.50

9.25 @ 9.75
9.25 @ 9.75


5.00
4.75
4.00


5.50
5.00
4.25


1.90 @
14.75 @
1.16 @
2.18 @
8.50 @












STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1909.

Available Phosphoric Acid............ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............1 cent a pound
Ammonia ( or its equivalent in nitrogen) 16 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash (K20)........ 5j cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... 20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)..,$3.30 per unit
Potash ................................. 1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent, in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu6
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluable Phosphoric Acid. .1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.30- 11.28
Potash ....................7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports.................. $27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid....8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.60
Potash .....................2 per cent.x 1.16- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports.................. $18.30

The above valuations are for cash, for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to-that point must be added.











If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction ft
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:
Available Phosphoric Acid............90 cents per unit
Potash (K0O) .....................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)...2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based, on market prices for one-ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton ?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1909 deducted
therefrom.











46


COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Phosphoric
Ammonia PhoAcid otsh

Nitrate of Soda........ 17 to 19.......................
Sulphate of Ammonia ... 21 to 24 ....... ...............
Dried Blood........... 12 to 17 .................
Concentrated Tankage.... 12 to 15 1 to 2............
Bone Tankage ........... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........I 8 to 11 6 to 8 ..........
Cotton Seed Meal........1 7 to 10 2 to 3 11 to 2
Hoof Meal ............ 13 to 17 1i to 2 ............
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate. ...................... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ......................... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.. ............ 14 to 19 1 to 35
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Actual m a Phosphoric
Potash A nia cid Lime


Muriate of Potash.......
Sulphate of Potash......
Carbonate of Potash ....
Nitrate of Potash......
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag
Kainit .................
Sylvinit ...............
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes..
Wood Ashes, unleached..
Wood Ashes. leached....
Tobacco Stems........
Cow Manure (fresh)....
Horse Manure (fresh)..
Sheep Manure (fresh)..
Hog Manure (fresh)....
Hen Dung (fresh)......
Mixed Stable Manure....


50
to 52
to 30
to 44
to 30
to 121
to 20
to 30
to 8
to 2
to 8
0.40
0.53
0.67
0.60
0.85
0.63


12 to 16 ......... .........



S.... 7 to 9 10
... 1 to 2 .........
......... 1 to 1h 35 to 40
2 to 4 ......... 3j
0 to 41 0.16 0.31
0 to 60 0.28 '0.31
1.00 0.23 0.33
0.55 0.19 0.)8
2.07 1.54 0.24
0.76 0.26 0.70












FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.
To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein by ...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 16.47
Nitrogen into protein, by............ ............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash,multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K0O) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (KO).


COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEED
LAWS.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.
COPIES OF THE PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law, rules and
regulations, standards, blanks, etc., can be obtained from
the Commissioner of Agriculture.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
dent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood; by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of
the law-without charge-the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and man-
ufacturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed; by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
seaport cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at andi exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and) sending of special
samples-on another page.








49
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.


NAME OF FEED .



Bright Cott'n Seed Meal 9.35 39.70

Dark Cotton Seed Meal 20.03 22.89

Linseed Meal ........ 8.76 34.70

Wheat Bran ......... 8.12 15.49

Middlings ............ 5.17 16.82

Mixed Feed (wheat).. 7.80 16.86

Corn Meal ........... 1.64 8.73

Corn (grain) ........ 2.10 10.50

Corn Cobs ........... 30.10 2.40

Corn and Cob Meal.... 6.60 8.50

Corn and Oats, eq'l pts. 5.80 11 151

W heat .............. 1.80 11.90

Oats ................ 9.50 11.80

Soja Beans .......... 4.80 34.00

Velvet Beans & Hulls.. 9.20 19.70

Rice Hulls .......... 35.70 3.60

Gluten Meal ......... 1.25 37.06

Gluten Feed ......... 7.31 24.17

Barley .............. 9.68 14.00

Barley and Oats (equal
parts) ...... .. 9.59 12.90
4-B.


9
Cd


6a
+ *
Qri ca *


28.58

37.14

35.91

55.15

58.74

54.44J

71.321

69.60

54.90

64.80

64.65

71.991

59.70

28.0'0

51.30

38.60

46.52!

54.30

33.35


46.62


7.78

5.48

5.34

3.86

4.17

4.79

3.14

5.40

0.50

3.50

5.20

2.101

5.00

16.50

4.50

0.70

3.27

3.44

3.76


4.38


5.84

4.99

6.12

5.98

4.50

5.30

1.20

1.50

1.40

1.50

230

1.80

3.09

5.40

3.30

13.20

0.68

1.80

2.40


2.75










50

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)


NAME OF FEED.



Hominy Feed .........

Rye Products (bran)..

Barley Sprouts .......

Distillers' Grains ...

Oat Feed ............

Provender ............

Ship Stuff ...........

Victor Feed ..........

XXX Corn & Oat Feeds

Corn & Oats Feeds....

Proprietary Horse F'ds

Molasses Feeds .......

Poultry Feeds .......

Beef Scrap ...........

Quaker Dairy Feed....

Creamery Feed .......

Purina Feed .........


4.05

4.53

10.94

12.90

20.57

3.91]

5.63

11.50

9.941

12.091

9.571

8.49-

4.62



15.53

10.07

8.693


15.57 61.28

27.20 42.66

32.23! 33.34

7.91 54.58!

10.62 67.34

14.61 59.801

8.29! 64.05

9.66 64.66

8.73 61.73

12.48 60.54

16.34 51.72

15.89 60.27

44.70 3.28

14.42 52.12

20.06 51.00

13.21 59.36


c4

7.85

3.02

1.56

12.09

3.26

4.03

4.97

2.60

5.09

3.73

4.27

1.79

5.32

14.75

4.05

5.38

3.61


2.54

3.80

6.34

1.86

5.31

1.83

3.71

3.44

3.24

3.22

2.83

6.18

27.63

29.20

5.31

3.57

3.60












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS
FOR 1909.

For the season of 1909 the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 1909.

Protein, 3 cents per pound...........65 cents per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1j cents per pound. .30 cents per unit
Fats, 31 cents per pound............. 65 cents per unit
A unit being 20 pounds (1 per cent) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

HOMINY FEED-

Protein. ........................10.49 x 65c, $ 6.81
Starch and Sugar ..............65.27 x 30c, 19.58
Fats......................... 7.85 x 65c, 5.10

State value per ton ...................... $31.49

EXAMPLE NO. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-

Protein .......................11.15 x 65c, $ 7.25
Starch and Sugar ..............64.65 x 30c, 19.40
Fats ..................... 5.20 x 65c, 3.38

State value per ton ......................$30.03













FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for formulas for various
crops, and there are hundreds of such formulas published;
and while there are hundreds of "Brands" the variations
in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of
"Brands" put up by the same manufacturer are identical
goods, the only difference being in the name printed on
the tag or sack. A good general Formula for field or
garden might be called a "Vegetable Formula," and
would have the following: Ammonia 3%, available
phosphoric acid 61%, and potash 7%. The following
formulas will furnish the necessary plant food in about
the above proportion. I have purposely avoided the use
of any fraction of 100 pounds in these formulas to sim-
plify them. Values are taken from price lists furnished
by the trade, which we published in our Report of Jan-
uary 1, 1909.
For Cotton, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, and Vegetables:
Ammonia 3j per cent., available phosphoric acid 6j per
cent., potash 71 per cent.

(A) "VEGETABLE."

No. 1.
Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (7j-2j-1) ...... 3.25 Ammonia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).... 6.40 Available
300 pounds of Muriate (or Sulphate) (50 per cent) 7.50 Potash
2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged......$28.60
Plant Food per ton..................... 343 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
1000 lbs of Blood and Bone (6j-8)........ 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 7.00 Avail Phos.
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot.(26 per ct.) 7.80 Potash
2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged ...... $30.20
Plant Food per ton ..................... 360 pounds












No. 3.
Per Cent.
300 lbs of Dried Blood (16 per cent.)..... mm
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent.)... 3.25 Ammonia
1000 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.)... 80 Aovasable
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per ct.) 0 otas

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged......$31.00
Plant Food per ton....................... 381pounds

(B) "FRUIT AND VINE."

No. 1.

Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes: Ammonia 4 per
cent., Available Phosphoric Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.
Per Cent.
1000 lbs of Blood' and Bone (61-8) ....... A
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per ecnt.). 4 Avm nia
500 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 1 Avalale
400 Ibs of Muriate of Potash (50 per ct.).. otas

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged...... $34.00
Plant Food per ton.........................440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Castor Pomace (6-2 per cent.).. Ammonia
200 lbs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent.).... 00 Am ial
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 9.60 Potash
400 lbs of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent.)....

2000


500
100
100
900
400

2000


Commercial value mixed and bagged ...... $32.25
Plant Food per ton....................... 426pounds

No. 3.

Per Cent.
lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (71-24-1) ....
lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent.).. 3.97 Ammonia
lbs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent.).... 8.30 Available
lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 8.97 Potash
lbs of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent.)..

Commercial value mixed and bagged........ $31.65
Plant Food per ton ..................... 425 pounds












(C) "TOBACCO FORMULAS."

No. 1.
Per Cent.
300 Ibs of Carb. of Pot. (60 per cent)....
400 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-5)............ 3.05 Ammonia
200 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (71-2-1) .... 8.95 Available
750 lbs of Bone Meal (4-10)........... 10.50 Potash
300 lbs of concentrated Pros. (25 per cent.)
50 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent.)...

2000
Commercial value per ton mixed and bagged.$38.30
Plant Food per ton........................ 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
300 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42)......
100 lbs of Carbonate of Potash (60 per ct.). 3.05 Ammonia
800 Ibs of Tobacco Dust (2-3)............ 8.95 Available
200 lbs of Bone Meal (3-12) .............. 10.50 Potash
600 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.)

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged..... .$38.30
Plant Food per ton......................... 440 pounds

No. 3.
Per Cent.
400 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42) ......
100 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (71-24-1).... 4.20 Ammonia
700 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-5)............ 9.45 Available
100 lbs of Bone Meal (3-12) .............. 1 10.20 Potash
700 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.)

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged....... .$37.15
Plant Food per ton........................ 477 pounds

No. 4.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42)...... 1 4.45 Ammonia
700 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-3)............r 10.00 Available
800 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.) J 11.55 Potash

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged ...... $39.50
Plant Food per ton ....................... 520 pounds











SOIL ANALYSES.

We frequently have samples of soil sent in for analysis
and a request to advise as to the best methods of fertilizing.
Excepting in extreme cases such as Heavy Clays, Pure
Sand, and Muck Lands, there is but little information
to be derived from a soil analysis that would be of benefit
to farmers. So much depends on tilth, drainage, culture,
and other physical conditions, that an analysis made
under Laboratory conditions is of little value. In this
connection we quote from the Report of the Indiana
Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Indiana, as follows:
"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FERTILIZER
REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is called upon
to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation to
agricultural chemical problems from people all over the
State. In this connection it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze
a sample'of soil, and without further knowledge of the
conditions, write out a prescription of a fertilizer which
will fill the needs of that particular soil.
The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is
no chemical method known that will show reliably the
availability of the plant food elements present in the soil.
as this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop
the type of soil, the climate and biological conditions;
hence we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long nar-
row strips of the field to be tested are measured off side
by side. The crop is plated uniformly over each. Dif-
ferent fertilizers are applied to the different plots, every
third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The produce
from these plots is harvested separately and weighed. In
this manner the farmer can tell what fertilizer is best
suited for his needs. As climatic conditions may influ-
ence the yield with different fertilizers, it is best to carry
on such tests for more than one year before drawing defi-
nite conclusions. There is positively no easier or shorter
method of testing the soil, that we feel safe in recom-
mending.











Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotation
of crops, the econservation of stable manure, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need have
no fear that the proper application of commercial fertil-
izer will injure the land.

WATER ANALYSIS.

We frequently analyse water for public use, city, town
and neighborhood supplies; springs and artesian wells in
which the public is interested; and for individuals when
a question of health or when some economic question is to
be decided, such as the use of water for boilers or similar
uses.
We do not make a complete quantitative determination,
separating each mineral impurity and definitely stating
the quantity thereof. Such an analysis would be costly in
time and labor and of no real value to the inquirer. We
determine the total amount of minerals in the sample and
report them as parts per 100,000 of total solids, naming
them in the order of their predominance. We find Cal-
cium Carbonate (Lime), followed by Sodium Chloride
(Salt), Magnesium Sulphate (Epsom Salt), Silicia
(Sand), and Aluminum Oxide (Clay) is the general order
in which they occur, though on the coast where the total
of solids amount to to 500 parts or more per 100,000 parts
we find Salt is the predominant substance, followed by
Lime and then Epsom Salt.
We require two gallons of each sample in a new jug,
stopt with a new cork, not sealed with parafine or seal-
ing wax, by prepaid express for analysis. We require also
a description of the source of the water, kind and depth of
well, location of well or spring by Section, Township and
Range.
We do not make bacterial examinations, or examina-
tions for disease germs. Such examinations or analyses,
are made by the State Board of Health at Jacksonville.













Cotton Seed Meal Law.


Enacted by the Legislature of 1909. Defining
Standard and Second Class Meal---Pro-
hibiting Qualifying Brands.


CHAPTER 5955-(No. 86).
AN ACT to Fix the Standard of Cotton Seed Meal Sold
in This State; to Prohibit the Sale of Inferior Cotton
Seed Meal Without Notice to the Public; to Prohibit
the Misbranding of Cotton Seed Meal; and Providing
Penalties for Violations of This Act.
Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. That the sale of any cotton seed meal made sale of cer-
from short staple cotton, commonly known as "Bright seed tnal
Cotton Seed Meal," and containing less than 6.18 per prohibited.
cent of nitrogen,-equivalent to 7.50 per cent of ammonia,
-or the sale of any cotton seed meal made from sea
island cotton, commonly known as "Dark Cotton Seed
Meal," and containing less than 3.7 per cent. of nitrogen,
equivalent to 4.50 per cent. of ammonia, is prohibited in
the State of Florida; Provided, That "bright" or "dark"
cotton seed meal, as herein defined, which contains less
nitrogen or ammonia than is specified herein, may be sold
in this State when there is plainly printed, in capital let
ters, on the guarantee tag now provided by law, the words
"Second-Class Cotton Seed Meal."
Sec. 2. That the sale of inferior, mixed, or adulterated use of cer-
materials as cotton seed meal, by qualifying the trade atohi baeds
mark, name or brand, "Feed Meal," "Dairy Meal," "Star
Meal," "Stock Feed Meal," or any other qualifying words
or signs, is prohibited, and all goods sold or offered for
sale as cotton seed meal shall contain the minimum per-
centage of nitrogen specified in Section one of this Act,











except such as are plainly marked in capital letters, "Sec-
ond-Class Cotton Seed Meal," as provided in Section One
of this Act.

Guarantee Sec. 3. That the guarantee tag as is now provided for
tag to be
provided, in the fertilizers and stock food laws of this State shall
in all cases be -attached to each package or sack of cotton
seed meal, showing the minimum percentages of valua-
ble ingredients, with the additional qualifying words,
"Second-Class Cotton Seed Meal," where nitrogen con
tents is less than the standard provided for in Section
one of this Act for "Cotton Seed Meal."

Penalty. Sec. 4. Any manufacturer, or importer, or agent of any
manufacturer or importer, who shall sell, or offer or ex-
pose for sale, any cotton seed meal in a manner prohib.
ited in this Act, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and
fined five hundred dollars ($500.00) for the first offense,
and one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for each subsequent
offense.

Meal not in Sec. 5. Any cotton seed meal found on analysis of the
conformity State Chemist to be materially below the guaranteed
w,.h act
when anal- analysis under which such cotton seed meal was sold, or
ject to seiz- is being offered or exposed for sale, either for the stand
ure. ard cotton seed meal, as the second-class cotton seed meal,
as herein defined; or any second-class cotton seed meal
which has been sold, or is being exposed or offered for
sale, without the words "Second-Class Cotton Seed Meal,"
plainly printed in capital letters on the guarantee tag,
shall be subject to seizure by any of the Sheriffs of the
State, upon the order of the Commissioner of Agriculture.

Sec. 6. This Act shall not repeal any part of the Gen-
eral Fertilizers and Stock Food Laws already in force in
this State, but is supplemental thereto and for the pre-
vention of the adulteration or misbranding of cotton seed
meal.

Sec. 7. This Act shall take effect when passed and ap-
proved by the Governor.
Approved June 8, 1909.














PURE FOOD LAW

ENACTED BY THE

LEGISLATURE OF NINETEEN SEVEN



CHAPTER 5662-(No. 67).

As Amended by Chapter 5935 (No. 66) Acts of 1909.

AN ACT to Prevent the Adulteration, Misbranding and
Imitation of Food for Man or Beast, of Beverages.
Candies or Condiments, of Medicines, Drugs and
Liquors, or the Manufacture and Sale Thereof in the
State of Florida, Prescribing a Penalty for the Viola-
tion Hereof, Providing for the Inspection and Analysis
of the Articles Described by the Florida State Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Charging the State's Attorney
With the Enforcement Hereof, and Providing Means
Therefor, Providing for the Appointment of Additional
Assistant State Chemists or Expert Food Analysts, a
Food and Drug Inspector, to Appropriate the Necessary
Funds to Enforce the Provisions of This Act, and to
Repeal All Laws or Parts of Laws in Conflict With
This Act.

Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. That it shall be unlawful for any person to unlawful
manufacture, sell, keep or offer for sale within the State onodsmedi-u
of Florida, any article of food, drugs, medicine or liquors cines.
which is adulterated or misbranded, or which contains
any poisonous or deleterious substance within the mean-
ing of this Act; and any of the persons who shall violate
any of the provisions of this Act shall be guilty of a mis-
demeanor, and for each offense shall, upon conviction











thereof, be fined not to exceed one thousand dollars, or
shall be sentenced to not more than one year's imprison
ment, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discre-
Penalty. tion of the Court, and for each subsequent offense, and on
conviction thereof, shall be fined not exceeding two thou-
sand dollars, or sentenced to not more than two years'
imprisonment, or both such fine and imprisonment, Tn
the discretion of the Court.
Examina- Sec. 2. That the examination of specimens of food and
tons bhemy drugs shall be made by the State Chemist of Florida, or
ist. under his direction and supervision, for the purpose of
determining from such examination whether such articles
are adulterated or misbranded within the meaning of
this Act, and if it shall appear from any such examine
tion that any of such specimens is adulterated or mis-
branded within the meaning of the Act, the Commis
Authority to sioner of Agriculture shall cause the goods so adulterated
seize food or or misbranded to be seized by the Sheriff of the county
drugs in which they are found, and shall cause notice thereof to
hearing.d be given the party from whom such sample was obtained;
any party so notified shall be given an opportunity to be
heard before the Commissioner of Agriculture and the
Attorney General under such rules and regulations as
may be prescribed by them, and if it appears that any of
the provisions of this Act have been violated by such
party, then the Commissioner of Agriculture shall at once
certify the facts to the proper prosecuting Attorney, with
the copy of the results of the analysis, or the examination
of such article duly authenticated by the analyst or offi-
cer making such examination, under the oath of such offi-
In event of cer. That in case it shall appear to the satisfaction of the
violation. Commissioner of Agriculture and the Attorney General
that the violation of this Act is properly a subject of
are subjects interstate commerce or otherwise comes under the super-
of interstate vision and jurisdiction of the United States, then the
commerce. Commissioner of Agriculture shall certify the case to the
United States District Attorney in whose District the
violation may have been committed, but if it be under
the jurisdiction of the courts of the State, then the Com-
missioner shall certify the case to the proper prosecuting
attorney of the court in the county where the offense oc-
Duty of curred. It shall be the duty of the proper prosecuting at-
prosecuting torney to prosecute all persons violating any of the pro-
attorney. visions of this Act as soon as he receives the evidence












transmitted by the Commissioner of Agriculture. After
judgment of the Court, notice shall be given by publica- jNuien oft
tion in such manner as may be prescribed by the rules and court.
regulations aforesaid.
Sec. 3. That the term "drug," as used in this Act, shall Definition of
include all medicines and preparations recognized in the "drug."
United States Pharmacopia, or National Formulary, for
internal or external use, and any substance or mixture
of substances intended to be used for the cure, mitiga-
tion or prevention of disease of either man or other ani-
mals. The term "food," as used herein, shall include all Definition of
articles used for food, drink, confectionery or condiment food
by man or other animal, whether simple, mixed or com-
pound.
Sec. 4. That for the purpose of this Act, an article
shall be deemed to be adulterated-
In case of drugs:
First. If when a drug is sold under or by a name recog- When drugs
nized in the United States Pharmacopia, or National aidere odn-
Formulary, it differs from the standard of strength, adulterated.
quality or purity, as determined by the test laid down
in the United States Pharmacopia or National Formulary
official at the time of investigation; Provided, That no
drug defined in the United States Pharmacopia or
National Formulary shall be deemed to be adulterated
under this provision if the standard of strength, quality Proviso.
or purity be plainly stated upon the bottle, box or other
container thereof, although the standard may differ from
that determined by the test laid down by the United
States Pharmacopia or National Formulary.
Second. If its strength or purity fall below the pro- Second con-
fessed standard or quality under which it is sold. In sideration.
the case of confectionery: If it contains terra-alba,
barytes, talc, chrome yellow or other mineral substance
or poisonous color or flavor, or other ingredient deleteri-
ous or detrimental to health, or any vinous, malt, or
spirituous liquor, or compound or narcotic drug.
In case of food:
First. If any substance has been mixed or packed When foods
are con-
with it so as to reduce or lower or injuriously affect its sidered
adulterated.
quality or strength. adulterated.
Second. If any substance has been substituted wholly Second con-
or in part for the article. sideration.
Third. If any valuable constituent of the article has Third con-
been wholly or in part abstracted. sideration.












fourth con- Fourth. If it be mixed, colored or powdered, coated or
sideration. stained in a manner whereby damage or inferiority is
concealed.
Fifth con- Fifth. If it contains any added poisonous or other
sideration. deleterious ingredient which may render such article inju-
rious to health; Provided, That when in preparation ot
food products for shipment they are preserved by any
external application applied in such manner that the
preservative is necessarily removed mechanically, or by
maceration in water or otherwise and directions for the
removal of said preservative are printed on the covering
of the package, the provisions of this Act shall be con
strued as applying only when said products are ready
for consumption.
Sixth con- Sixth. If the package, vessel or bottle containing it
shall be of such a composition, or carry any attachment
made of such a composition or metal or alloy as will be
acted upon in the ordinary course of use by the contents
of the package, vessel or bottle in such a way as to pro-
duce an injurious, deleterious or poisonous compound.

Seventh con- Seventh. If it consists in whole or in part of a filthy,
sideration. decomposed or putrid animal or vegetable substance, or
any portion of an animal unfit for food, whether manu-
factured or not, or if it is the product of a diseased animal
or one that has died otherwise than by slaughter.
Application Sec. 5. That the term "misbranded" as used herein
of term
"mis- shall apply to all drugs, or articles of food, or articles
branded." which enter into the composition of food, the package or
label of which shall bear any statement, design or device
regarding such article or the ingredients or substances
contained therein which shall be false or misleading in
any particular, and to any food or drug product, vhich
is falsely branded, as to the State, Territory or country
in which it is manufactured or produced. That for thb
purpose of this Act an article shall also be deemed to be
misbranded-

In case of drugs:

First. If it be an imitation of, or offered for sale under
the name of another article.












Second. If the contents of the package as originally
put up shall have been removed in whole or in part and When "rugs
other contents shall have been placed in such package, branded."
or if the package fail to bear a statement on the label in
as conspicuous letters as is or may be prescribed by the
United States law or rules and regulations of the quantity
or proportion of any alcohol, morphine, opium, cocaine,
heroin, alpha or beta eucaine, chloroform, cannabis
indica, chloral hydrate, or acetanilide or any derivative
or preparation of any such substance contained therein;
Provided, That nothing in this paragraph shall be con-
strued to apply to the filling of written prescriptions, fur-
nished by regular licensed, practicing physicians, and
kept on file by druggists as required by law, or as to
such preparations as are specified and recognized by the
United States Pharmacopia or National Formulary.
In case of food:
First. If it be an imitation of, or offered for sale under When foods
the distinctive sale of another article. barnded"-
Second. If it be labeled or branded so as to deceive or
mislead the purchaser, or purport to be a foreign product
when not so, or is an imitation in package or label of an-
other substance of a previously established name, or, if
the contents of the package as originally put up shall have
been removed in whole or in part, and other contents shall
have been placed in such package, or, if it fail to bear
a statement on the label in conspicuous letters of the
quantity or proportion of any alcohol, morphine, opium.
cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta eucaine, cannabus indica,
chloral hydrate, or acetanilide or any derivative or prepa-
ration of any such substances contained therein.
Third. If in package form, and the contents are stated
in terms of weight or measure, they are not plainly and
correctly stated on the outside of the package.
Fourth. If the package containing it, or its label shall Foods not
bear any statement, design, or device shall be false or mis. considered
leading in any particular; Provided, That an article of or adul-
food which does not contain any added poisonous or dele- terated.
terious ingredients shall not be deemed to be adulterated
or misbranded in the following cases:
First. In the case of mixtures or compounds which
may be now, or from time to time hereafter known as
articles of food under their own distinctive names, and












not an imitation of or offered for sale under the dis-
tinctive name of another article, if the name be accom-
panied on the same label or brand with a statement of the
place where said article has been manufactured or pro-
duced.
Second. In the case of articles labeled, branded or
tagged, so as to plainly indicate that they are compounds,
imitations, or blends, and the word "compound," "imita-
tion," or "blend," as the case may be, is plainly stated
in conspicuous letters on the package in which it is
offered for sale; Provided, That the term "blend," as used
herein, shall be construed to mean a mixture of like sub-
stances, not excluding harmless coloring or flavoring
ingredients used for the purpose of coloring or flavoring
only; and Provided, further, That nothing in this Act
shall be construed as requiring or compelling proprietors
or manufacturers of proprietary foods which contain no
unwholesome added ingredient to disclose their trade for-
mulas, except in so far as the provisions of this act may
require to secure freedom from adulteration or misbrand.
ing; Provided, also, That this Act shall not apply to
stocks of drugs and medicines on hand in this State on
September 1st, 1907, until the first day of June, 1908.
Dealer not Sec. 6. That no dealer shall be prosecuted under the
tobe Prose- provisions of this Act when he can establish a guaranty
wholesale signed by the wholesaler, jobber, manufacturer or other
dealer fur-
nishes guar- party residing in the State of Florida from whom he
anty. purchases such articles to the effect that the same is not
adulterated or misbranded within the meaning of this
Act, designating it. Said guaranty to afford protection
shall contain the name and address of the party or parties
making the sale of such articles to such dealer and- in
wholesale such case the said party or parties shall be amenable to
dealer liable the prosecutions, fines or other penalties which would
under guar-
anty. attach in due course to the dealer under the provisions of
this Act.
Dsposiion Sec. 7. If upon trial of any person convicted under
of drugs or
food in this Act, it shall appear that any article of food, drug or
question, liquor sold, kept or offered for sale by the person con-
victed is adulterated or misbranded, or is of a poisonous
or deleterious character within the meaning of this Act,
the same shall be seized and destroyed, or if not of a
poisonous or deleterious character may be sold or other-














wise disposed of, by order of the Court in such manner as
the Court may in order direct, which order shall guard
against any further violations of this Act by such sale or
other disposition. The proceeds from any sale so or-
dered, less expenses, shall be converted into the General
Fund of the State Treasury.
Sec. 8. That the words "person," or "party," as used Construc-
in this Act, shall be construed to import both the plural words "per-
and the singular, as the case demands, and shall include Orty."
corporations, companies, societies and associations.
When construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, Acts, omis-
sion or fail-
the act, omission or failure of any officer, agent or other ure of em-
person acting for or employed by the corporation, cor- pioyes toap-
pany, society or association, within the scope of his em- player.
ployment or office, shall, in every case, be also deemed to
be the act, omission or failure of such corporation, comr
pany, society or association, as well as that of the person.
Sec. 9. That as soon as this Act becomes effective, the Food and
Governor is authorized to appoint a food and drug inspec- pfiton-
tor for the State of Florida, Who shall hold office during
the pleasure of the Governor, not exceeding four years,
under one appointment, and who shall receive a salary not
to exceed $1,500 per annum, and actual expenses not to Salary and
exceed $750.00 per annum while discharging his duty. expenses.
His whole time shall be at the disposal of the Commis-
sioner, and his duty shall be to travel about the State as Duty of in-
directed, and take samples of such articles as directed, spector.
and forward them to the Department of Agriculture for
scientific examination and analysis. The Governor shall Assistant
also appoint an additional assistant chemist to carry chemist.
out the provisions of this Act, the salary of such assistant
chemist to be fixed by the State Chemist, not to exceed
$1,800 per annum. He may also make such expenditures Expendi-
for apparatus, chemicals and increased laboratory facili- tures.
ties as in his judgment may be required; Provided, That Proviso.
the total expenditures under this Act for any one year
shall not exceed the sum appropriated to carry out the
provisions of this Act; the State Chemist and his assistant
shall also be inspectors of foods, drugs, medicines and
liquors.
Sec. 10. That samples for analysis shall be taken by kin ndcus-
the duly qualified and sworn Inspectors, or Chemists, who care of
shall take samples of such articles as may be directed by samples.
5-B.













the Commissioner of Agriculture, and in the manner pre-
scribed below. Whenever practicable, samples shall be
taken in original unbroken packages; said packages shall
be wrapped in paper and tied securely and sealed. That
in cases where it is not practicable to send a sample for
analysis in an original package, as for instance, in case
of syrups, or other liquids in barrels, or flour in barrels,
etc., the inspector shall take a fair sample of the same in
the presence of the seller, place it in a suitable receptacle,
securely close, seal and forward the same to the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, and in every case where a sample is
taken the person taking such sample shall at the same
time, in the presence of the person from whom the sample
is taken, seal with paper, seals or otherwise, another like
sample of the article taken, on which said sample or on
the seal placed thereon, shall be written the name of the
person taking said sample, and the date when the same is
taken, and the said sample shall be delivered back to the
person from whom it is taken.
Proviso. Provided, That any Health Officer, Sheriff or citizen of
Health of- the State, may submit fair samples of foods and drugs to
ficer, sheriff the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, when
and citizens
may draw drawn in the presence of two witnesses, in the manner
manner pro- prescribed by this Section; said witnesses to subscribe
ided by to, and affix their seals to said packages, one to be deliv
ered to the person from whom it is taken, the other to be
transmitted to the Commissioner of Agriculture. And
on receipt by him of such sample package, properly drawn
and witnessed, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall
trasmit the same to the State Chemist, who shall analyze
the same and certify the results to the Commissioner of
Agriculture, who shall return to the sender a copy of the
said certificate of analysis.
In event the In case any manufacturer, or dealer, shall appeal from
renlsi is the result of an analysis made by the State Chemist, or
appealed by an Assistant State Chemist under his direction and
from. supervision, and shall demand another analysis, the du-
plicate sample sealed and delivered to the person from
whom the same was taken as provided in this Section,
shall be sent for analysis to some reputable chemist, upon
whom the Commissioner of Agriculture, the State Chem-
ist and the person demanding the analysis shall agree.
Evidence of The certificate of analysis of the State Chemist, or his
analysis. Assistant, when properly verified by the affidavit of the













State Chemist or his Assistant, shall be prima facie
evidence in any court of law or equity in this State.
All chemical determinations, or analyses, made by the Methods of
State Chemist, or the Assistant State Chemists, or by analysis.
chemists employed in case of appeal, shall be made ac-
cording to the methods adopted by the Association of
Official Agricultural Chemists of the United States.
Sec. 11. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner Standards of
of Agriculture and the State Chemist to fix standards of purity.
purity for food products where the same are not fixed by
this Act, in accordance with those promulgated by the
Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Agriculture
and the Secretary of Commerce and Labor of the United
States when such standards have been published, and
when not yet published the Commissioner of Agriculture
and the State Chemist shall fix such standards; Provided, Proviso.
That the standards for lard, mixed edible fats and cotton
seed oils are hereby defined as follows: Lard is hereby Lard.
defined to be the fat of freshly slaughtered swine. It
must not be from a diseased animal or any portion of an
animal unfit for food, or contain less than ninety-nine
percent of pure fat. A mixed edible fat is defined to be Mixed edible.
a mixture which contains not less than ninety-nine per fat.
cent. of sweet mixed fat, and may consist of a mixture of
refined cotton seed oil or other edible vegetable oils with
sweet beef fat or other edible animal fat, and must be
sold under a registered or proprietary brand and properly
labeled with a distinctive trade-mark or name, bearing
the name of the manufacturer. Edible cotton seed oil is Edible cot-
hereby defined as refined cotton seed oil, free from disa- ton seed oil.
greeable taste or odors. White cotton seed oil for edible
purposes is cotton seed oil which has been refined in such
a manner as to be nearly odorless, colorless and flavor-
less. Winter cotton seed oils for edible purposes are
those from which a portion of the sterine has
been removed. They may be either white or yei-
low. Whenever the State Chemist may find, by examina- Duty of
tion or analysis, that adulterated, misbranded or istt, oem-
imitation drugs, liquor or food products have been manu- missioner of
Agriculture
factured for sale, or put on sale in this State, he shall and Prose-
forthwith furnish a certificate to that effect to the Com- uen Attor-
missioner of Agriculture, who shall transmit the same
to the proper prosecuting officer in the county where
the said adulterated, misbranded or imitation drugs,













liquor or food product was found, and shall cause the
goods so adulterated or misbranded to be seized by the
Sheriff of the county in which such goods are found. It
shall be the duty of said prosecuting officer to prosecute
all persons violating any provisions of this Act as soon
as he receives the evidence transmitted by the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture.

state Chem- Sec. 12. That the State Chemist shall make an annual
ist to make
report report to the Governor on work done in execution of this
Act, which report may be included in that now made on
Traveling commercial fertilizers and published therewith. The
hepeiss of actual expenses of the State Chemist, or one Assistant
State Chemist, in attendance upon the annual convention
of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists of the
United States, or when officially representing the Depart-
ment of Agriculture by order of the Commissioner, shall
be paid from the funds appropriated for traveling expen-
ses of the State Chemist.

Authority to Sec. 13. That the Commissioner of Agriculture, with
establish
rules. the advice of the Attorney General, shall have authority
to establish such rules and regulations as shall not be
inconsistent with the provisions of this Act, and as in
his judgment will best carry out the requirements thereof.
Discretion He may exercise discretion as to the class of the products
of products. he first subject to rigorous inspection and analysis, real-
izing that-the fullest and most complete execution of this
law under a limited appropriation must be a matter of
First efforts, growth. His first efforts shall be more particularly
directed to fostering the young and growing agricultural
and manufacturing industries of the State, as the dairy,
beef, fruit, cotton seed oil and syrup industries, by sup-
pressing adulteration in butter, cheese, milk and feed-
stuffs, ciders, vinegars and syrups, lard and lard com-
pounds.

Appropria- Sec. 14. Be it further enacted, That in order to enforce
tion. and carry out the provisions of this Act, the sum of five
thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary,
is hereby annually appropriated and set aside out of the
fees arising from the inspection and analysis of fertiliz-
ers, and so much thereof as is necessary is made immedi-
ately available; that the proceeds arising from the fees














of this office be turned into the Treasury for the use of the
General Fund.
Sec. 15. Be it enacted, That this Act shall be in force When act
and effect from and after the first day of September, 1907. elective.
Sec. 16. That all laws and parts of laws in conflict Conflicting
laws re-
with this Act be and the same are hereby repealed. pealed.
Approved June 3, 1907.
Amendments approved June 7, 1909.














BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.




Fertilizer ..................
Cyanamid .................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Cotton Seed Meal..........
Bone Meal and Potash Mix-
ture .....................
Fertilizer No. 1 (Light)....
Fertilizer No. 2 (Dark).....
Nitrate Potash ............

Fertilizer ..................
Cotton Seed Meal...........
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer No. 1............
Fertilizer No. 2...........
Muriate Potash ..........


Phosphoric Acid.


0 0


0d 0 a
1732 ...... 9.22 0.56 9.78 2.18 3.20
1733 ..... ..... ...... ...... 15.32 .....
1734 5.20 12.05 0.60 12.65 4.17 8.05
1735 6.87 8.46 0.86 9.32 4.25 8.57
1736 .. . ... .. .. 8.23 .. .

1737 4.67 5.84 9.67 15.51 2.28 16.86
1738 12.78 10.85 1.44 12.29 1.91 2.13
1739 11.90 8.83 0.60 9.43 2.40 2.11
1740 6.57 ..... ...... .... .. 12.16 41.91

1741 ...... 5.38 0.20 5.58 1.76 6.84
1742 ...... ...... ..... ..... 7.56 ....
1743 8.27 3.18 1.18 4.36 5.76 3.37
1744 4.51 4.68 5.08 9.76 3.24 13.08
1745 7.65 6.73 0.59 7.32 3.60 12.04
1746 ..... ....... ............ 47.32


BY WHOM SENT.


A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy, Fla.
L. Heimburger, Tallahassee, Fla.
V. C. Carrier, Crescent City, Fla.
R. Christensen, Oviedo, Fla.
J. O. Suber, Almo, Fla.
H. L. Bethel (Tallahassee Tob. Co.,)
Tallahassee, Fla.
W. W. Wester, Grand Ridge, Fla.
W. W. Wester, Grand Ridge, Fla.
E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
L. L. Payne, Orlando, Fla.
A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy, Fla.
F. A. Russell Ankony, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
J. L. Ellis, Bonifay, Fla.








Basic Slag ................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer (Veg.) ..........
Cotton Seed Meal.........
Cotton Seed Meal.........
Coton Seed Meal..........
14 per cent. Acid Phosphate
Muriate Potash ...........
Fertilizer (10-4 Acid)......
K ainit .....................
Fertilizer ..................
Cotton Seed meal..........
Am. Superphos ...........
"Phospho Alkali" .........
Fertilizer No. 1...........
Fertilizer ..................
Meal Mixt. Fertilizer.......
Potash No. 1 (Muriate)....
Nitrate of Soda............
Fertilizer No. 3...........
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1....
Potash No. 2...............
Fertilizer No. 3...........
Cotton Seed Meal (A. C. L.
29198) ..................
Cotton Seed Meal (C. N. O.
& T. P. 15288)............
Cotton Seed Meal (St. L. &
S. F. 123358) ............


3.22

8.60










6.43
4.79
8.35
11.30


12.72


5.21
4.14
9.81
6.13



14.14

10.23

8.54

8.40
9.72
7.15
5.09
10.49


11.69


8.86
4.94
1.62
0.45



1.21

0.37

1.35

1.92
3.07
0.82
0.69
0.70


0.97


1769 ...... ...... ......
1770 13.12 9.01 2.04

1771...... ..... ......


1773 .....


14.07.
9.08
11.43
6.58





10.60 .

9.89

10.32
12.79
7.97
5.78
11.19


12.66


11.05


2.90
4.10
2.65
7.85
7.30
6.70




2.15
6.84
2.25
3.84
4.56
3.84
1.75

17.90
2.00
7.50

2.30

6.97

7.34

7.85


14.67
3.26
9.67




51.04
2.66
13.26
2.41

2.40
10.66
9.62
6.15
2.70
49.64

1.63

51.72
1.96


Wm. Bruce, Quincy, Fla.
C. H. Piplar, Pomona, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
Charles Ericsson, Hollandale, Fla.
Kraus, McFarlin Co., Quincy, Fla.
Wilson Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
T. N. Darsey, Concord, Fla.
T. N. Darsey, Concord Fla.
T. N. Darsey, Concord: Fla.
T. N. Darsey, Concord, Fla.
J. A. Sparks, Aucilla, Fla.
J. H. Gray, Concord, Fla.
J. H. Gray, Concord, Fla.
J. H. Gray, Concord, Fla.
J. H. Gray, Concord, Fla.
H. W. Wear, Bartow, Fla.
L. S. Pickering, Brownsville, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
Milton Foster, Red Rock, Fla.
Milton Foster, Red Rock, Fla.
Milton Foster, Red Rock, Fla.
H. A. Jones, Milton, Fla.
H. A. Jones, Milton, Fla.
H. A. Jones, Milton, Fla.

Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.

Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.

Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.


;!













BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphor


NAME, OR BRAND. dS
0 .


(d ,O <1


Cotton Seed Meal (Sea Isl.
I. S. 589A) .............. 1774
Fertilizer .................. 1775
Shomaker's Cotton Food... 1776
Goulding's Stand. Meal Mixt. 1777
Patapsco Am. Dis. Bone.... 1778
Fertilizer ..................1779
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1780
Fertilizer .................. 1781
Fertilizer A................ 1782
Fertilizer B............... 1783
Fertilizer C................ 1784
Fertilizer D................ 1785
Fertilizer E................ 1786
Cotton Seed Meal (EBS No.
11) ......................1787
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1788
Fertilizer .................. 1789
Fertilizer .................. 1790
Fertilizer .................. 1791
Muriate of Potash ......... 1792


3.70
11.20
10.54
10.73
16.87



.. 9






10.361

9.94


*ic Acid.


0 0


9.83
9.51
10.39
5.25
9.60

9.42
7.63
7.51
7.95
10.14
9.23



7.07
8.63
7.02
..... .1.


4.80 5.03
8.37 1.14
9.82 0.57
5.03 0.22
8.01 1.59

8.57 0.85
7.37 0.26
7.16 0.35
7.66 0.29
6.87 3.27
7.93 1.30


...... ......

7.72 0.91
5.72 1.30
......|. .....


14.45
1.94
2.00
2.28
2.53

6.84
7.58
9.15
3.57
9.85
10.55


......
7.71
8.59
8.361
48.64


BY WHOM SENT.


Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
J. R. Shomaker, Cottondale, Fla.
J. R. Shomaker, Cottondale, Fla.
J. R. Shomaker, Cottondale, Fla.
E. Patrick, Turkey Creek, Fla.
W. H. Mosely, Quincy, Fla.
C. B. Messick, Bowling Green, Fla.
Lawton Bros., Oviedo, Fla.
Lawton Bros., Oviedo, Fla.
Lawton Bros., Oviedo, Fla.
Lawton Bros., Oviedo, Fla.
Lawton Bros., Oviedo, Fla.

Wilson Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
F. B. Beinson, Live Oak, Fla.
E. Heimburger, Dania, Fla.
C. Upton, Boynton, Fla.
W. L. Brown, Dania, Fla.
W. W. Nelson, Bonifay, Fla.


I 1





Nitrate of Soda............ 1793

Fertilizer .................. 1794

Fertilizer .................. 1795
Fertilizer .................. 1796
Fertilizer .................. 1797
Cotton Seed Meal (S. A. L.
19258) ................... 1798
Cotton Seed Meal (N. C. &
St. L. (10992) ........... 1799
Fertilizer .................. 1800
Peruvian Guano ........... 1801
Cotton Seed Meal (HF No.5) 1802
Cotton Seed Meal (L. & N.
1998) .................... 1803
Cotton Seed Meal (S. A. L.
15507) ...................1804
Cotton Seed Meal (S. A. L.
26319) ...................1805
Cotton Seed Meal (S. A. L.
24956) ................... 1806
Fertilizer .................. 1807
Fertilizer .................. 1808
Hard Wood Ashes.......... 1809
Kainit .................... 1810
Fruit and Vine.............. 1811
Orange Tree Guano........ 1812
Muriate of Potash.......... 1813
Fertilizer .................. 1814
Fertilizer .................. 1815


1.73

9.35


t12.04


I....


14.13
12.92


1.84
2.75

9.131


10.76
12.32








9.43
11.04


4.74
4.49

6.57
9.37


8.90

0.90
Trace
0.28



1.40
4.66


1 ...... ...... I ...... I


12.16
16.98


1.73 11.16
0.84 11.88


10.48 15.22
10.39 14.88

1.57 8.14
0.89 10.26


2.57
4.71

3.93
2.28


14.901

7.63
5.51
0.52


i


21.20

9.811
14.52
11.70



2.3
1.88








2.28
2.33
5.43
13.15
11.65
6.01
53.80
7.721
2.06


Am. Sumatra Tob. Co., Tallahassee,
Fla.
Douglas, Carmichael & Malone Co.
Gretna, Fla.
II. S. Hobbs, Dania, Fla.
Geo. H. McCullough, Candler, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Florida, Havana and Sumatra Co.,
Quincy, Fla.
Florida, Havana and Sumatra Co.,
Quincy, Fla.
Amos Laird, Gretna, Fla.
William Bruce, Quincy, Fla.
Wilson Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.

Kraus, McFarlin Co., Quincy, Fla.

Kraus, McFarlin Co., Quincy, Fla.

Kraus, McFarlin Co., Quincy, Fla.

Kraus, McFarlin Co., Quincy, Fla.
David Birge, Black, Ala.
C. C. Brown, Geneva, Ala.
R. B. Campbell, Tampa, Fla.
R. B. Campbell, Tampa, Fla.
R. B. Campbell, Tampa, Fla.
R. B. Campbell, Tampa, Fla.
S. A. Dykes, Greenhead, Fla.
C. H. Lundy, Parrish, Fla.
J. R. Shomaker, Cottondale, Fla.















BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. S




Acid Phos. (A. B. & A. 16090) 1816

Complete Cotton, No. 1..... 1817
Complete Cotton, No. 2..... 1818
Fertilizer .................. 1819
Muck C.................... 1820
Muck D.................... 1821
Castor Pomace ............ 1822
Bone "S" (Str. Voorburg).. 1823

Bone "O. P." (Str. Voorburg) 1824

Acid Phosphate ............ 1825
Fertilizer ................. 1826
Fertilizer .................. 1827
Muriate or Potash, No. 1.... 1828
Muriate of Potash, No. 2.... 1829
Nitrate of Soda, No. 1...... 1830
Nitrate of Soda, No. 2...... 1831
Raw Bone Meal........... 1832
"Guano" ................... 1833


--


Phosphoric Acid.



0



...... 31.14 3.761 34.90 ......

8.85 9.13 1.49 10.62 1.95
11.411 8.38 2.39 10.77 2.09
10.691 6.46 1.06 7.52 2.90
...... .. .. .. 1.49
.. | .. .. ... 2 .85
...... .... .... .... 5.75
...... 6.62 13.24 19.86 6.17

...... 9.25 12.58 21.83 3.15

15.52 15.03 0.90 15.93 ......
12.68 10.75 0.63 11.38 2.33
12.12 9.59 0.22 9.81 2.05
. .. .. .. . .

...... ...... .... .. .. 18 .45
.. .... ... .. .. 18.35
...... 7.68 16.67 24.35 4.96
...... 9.65 0.67 10.32 1.63


i
2.13
2.52
8.74








2.79
2.25
52.36
55.36



1.86


BY WHOM SENT.




E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
J. E. Hardee, Madison, Fla.
J. E. Hardee, Madison, Fla.
J. F. DeBerry, Dania, Fla.
Hon. Frank Adams, Jacksonville, Fla. -
Hon. Frank Adams, Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer Fetrilizer Co., Jack-
Sonville, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer Fetrilizer Co., Jack-
Sonville, Fla.
D. D. Martin, Otahite, Fla.
W. W. Boyette, Otahite, Fla.
Milton Foster, Red Rock, Fla.
W. McCarraway, Wacissa, Fla.
W. McCarraway, Wacissa, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Hon. W. G. Watford, Tallahassee, Fla.







L. G. Sulphate Potash......
Fertilizer, No. 1...........
Fertilizer, No. 2...........
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer "No. Al"........
Fertilizer "F2".............
Fertilizer ..................
Comptie Root Pulp........
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer (Acid Phosphate).
Fertilizer .................
H. G. Sulphate of Patosh..
Fertilizer (Dark)...........
Fertilizer (Light). .........
Fertilizer, No. 1...........
Fertilizer, No.2 ............
Fertilizer .................
Fertilizer, No. 1601 ........
Fertilizer, No. 1602 ........
Fertilizer, No. 1604 ........
Fertilizer, No. 1605 ........
Fertilizer, No. 1617 ........
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ..................
Cypress Ashes ............
Fertilizer ..................


1834
18351


..... 6.41
7.21
2.86 3.75
...... 2.84
9.88 8.25
9.00 11.10
...... 6.91
...... 6.95
9.98 9.81
65.30 ......
13.21 7.83
.... 18.05
10.60 9.05

17.60 9.68
12.21 8.60
11.24 7.49
14.28 8.29
...... 10.38
8.19 5.71
8.25 8.25
8.81 6.67
7.35 8.17
8.46 6.50
13.25 11.57
10.25 7.41
9.07 6.28

13.78 9.041


V ml*Y66! 04iJ.io


I


I


0.29
10.38
7.33
0.88
0.33
0.76
1.92
0.86

0.39
0.30
1.05

0.87
0.93
1.30
1.62
1.33
0.94
1.16
0.93
0.32
0.67
0.92
0.77
1.07


7.50
14.13
10.17
9.13
11.43
7.67
8.87
10.67
2.09
8.22
18.45
10.10;

10.55
9.53
8.79
9.91
11.71
6.65
9.41
7.60
8.49
7.17
12.49
8.18
7.35


0.57 9.61 2.03


3.27
4.73
5.87
3.07
3.91
4.91
5.60
2.28
1.56
7.44

3.98

1.70
2.79
2.19
1.89
2.27
4.94
5.22
3.28
4.13
2.59
1.94
4.30
3.52


30.961
11.871
12.11
6.81
16.65
11.77
15.55
5.76
7.76
2.04
0.10
11.09

10.40
51.96
6.95
9.75
5.92
4.48
1.87
5.16
7.23
10.06
12.10
10.90
2.06
11.95
10.33
1.11
2.52


Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
A. Cohoon, Orlando, Fla.
A. Cohoon, Orlando, Fla.
J. W. Boatright, Arcadia, Fla.
J. W. Perkins, DeLand, Fla.
P. Anderson, Pierson, Fla.
Geo. E. Snow, Eastlake, Fla.
J. R. Williams, Citra, Fla.
J. R. Williams, Citra, Fla.
D. D. Martin, Otahite, Fla.
A. B. Hurst, Biscayne, Fla.
John T. Hill, Tarpon Springs, Fla.
L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
Walter Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
H. Meislahn, Clarcona, Fla.
D. E. Murphy, Glendale, Fla.
D. E. Murphy, Glendale, Fla.
W. M. Ventling, Glen St. Mary, Fla.
W. M. Ventling, Glen St. Mary, Fla.
H. T. Lock, Geneva, Ala.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City, Fla.
A. C. Cawthon, Florala, Ala.
G. N. Smith, Wauchula, Fla.
M. C. Mohr, St. Petersburg, Fla.
C. C. Eiland, Milligan, Fla.













BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Fertilizer "B" ...............
Acid Phosphate ............
Fertilizer ..................
Acid Phosphate ............
Fertilizer ..................


J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City, Fla.
J. J. Phillips, Sullivan, Fla.
J. J. Phillips, Sullivan, Fla.
C. R. McArthur, Sullivan, Fla.
C. R. McArthur, Sullivan, Fla.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE--DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. 1909. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by the State Chemist Under Section 1, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.




H. G. V. C. Fla. Fruit Grow-
ers' Farmula ...........

H. G. V. C. Champion Cit-
rus Compound .........

H. G. V. C. Southern States
Spec'l Vegetable Grower


Bradley Fruit and Vine..

Williams & Clark Florida
Vegetable .............


0 r.



1291 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1292 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1293 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1294 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1295 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Phosphoric Acid.








8.00 7.00 1.00 ......
5.56 8.121 0.871 8.99

10.00 6.00 1.00 .....
4.59 6.97 0.52 7.49

8.00 6.00 1.00 ......


10.00 5.50 3.00 ......
7.82 6.60 0.71 7.31

10.00 6.00 1.00 .....
10.37 6.711 1.07 7.78


4.681

3.00
4.20

4.00
4.59

2.25
2.77

4.00
4.08


SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.



I -I
4.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem. "
3.971 Co., Savannah, Ga.

14.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
14.87 Co., Savannah, Ga.

5.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
5.24 Co., Savannah, Ga.

10.00 Am. Agr. Chem. Co.,
9.46 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Am. Agr. Chem. Co.,
5.41 Jacksonville, Fla.



















NAME, OR BRAND. ,6



Bradley Fla. Vegetable .... 1296


Brdaley Fla. Vegetable.... 1297


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1298

Phospho-Alkali with Pot.
Nitrate ................ 1299


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1300


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1301


Vegetable Manure ....... 1302


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


0

10.00
8.64

10.00
9.58




10.00
4.78


10.00
10.34


Phosphoric Acid.


5 Ej
Cs

Es
6.001 1.oo ......
7.09 1.02 8.11

6.00 1.00 .....
6.92 1.11 8.03

...... .... .. 2 .50 |
. ... . . ....

7.00 1.00 ......
11.16 2.69 13.851

...... ...... 2.501

. .... . 2.50
...... ...... 2.50.

6.001 1.00 ......
6.60 0.34 6.94
1 1


0
SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.
0 0


4.00 5.00 Am. Agr. Chem. Co.,
4.10 5.68 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Am. Agr. Chem. Co.,
4.12 5.14 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Montezuma Mfg. Co.,
7.81 ...... Montezuma Ga.

2.50 10.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
2.891 11.281 Co., Savannah, Ga.

7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Tal-
7.75 ...... lahassee, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Tal-
7.96 ...... lahassee, Fla.

3.50 5.00 Blackshear Mfg. Co.,
2.91 5.77 Blackshear, Ga.
I





Siorida Special .......... 1303


Kainit ................... 1304


Favorite Strawberry Spec'l 1305


Veg-etable Special ........ 1306


Celery Special .......... 1307


Special Fruit & Vine.... 1308


Gulf Orange Tree......... 1309


Cane & Corn Special...... 1310


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guaran'td Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Bean & Pea Special...... 1311 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Die Back ................ 1312 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Orange Producer ........ 1313 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


10.00
16.06




10.00
4.68

10.00
6.54

8.00
9.12

8.00
7.61

8.00
6.15

8.00
7.36

7.00
7.141

8.00
8.64

8.001
6.711


9.001 1.00 ......
10.361 0.18 10.54




6.00 2.00 ......
4.841 2.52 7.36

6.001 1.00 7.00
5.561 0.86 6.42

5.00 2.00 ......
5.85 0.21 6.06

6.00 1.00 7.00
6.89 0.16 7.05

6.001 2.00 .....
6.23 0.20 6.43

6.00 1.00 7.00
6.84 0.94 7.781

5.00 2.00 ......
7.80 0.49 8.29

8.00 ....... ...... .
7.971 0.13 8.10.

7.00 1.00 ......
6.18 0.14 6.32


1.50
1.30




2.00
2.38

5.00
4.99

6.00
5.39

3.00
3.30

4.00
4.38

3.00
3.63

4.00
4.00




4.50
4.87


5.00 Blackshear Mfg. Co.,
4.36 Blackshear, Ga.

12.50 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
13.05 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
11.40 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 The Guif Fertilizer Co.,
6.77 Tampa, Fla.

7.50 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
7.91 Tampa, Fla.

13.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co., q
14.04 Tampa, Fla.

10.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
12.08 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
6.11 Tampa, Fla.

6.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
7.31 Tampa, Fla.

13.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
13.94 Tamgpa, Fla.

15.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
15.82 Tampa, Fla.














ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.
CS




Tomato Special .......... 1314


H. G. Vegetable Fertilizer. 1315


Muriate of Potash........ 1316


Acid Phosphate ......... 1317


Tampa Fruiter .......... 1318


Orange Tree Grower...... 1319


Special Mixture, No. 1.... 1320


Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 6.29

Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 6.52

Guarant'd Analysis .....
Official Analysis... ......

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... ......

Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 5.58

Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 6.92

Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 8.18


Phosphoric Acid.



as 3

C3 0


5.00 1.00
5.78 0.61

5.00 2.00
6.39 4.41


.. . .

16.00 ......
17.59 0.19

8.00 ......
10.16 0.17

6.00 1.00
8.62 4.57

6.00 1.00
5.74 1.98


...... 4.00
6.39 4.93

4.00
10.80 4.87





17.78 .. ..

"...... 4.00
10.33 3.91

4.00
13.1PI 4.14

5.00
7.74 4.88


SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.

0


8.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
8.84 Tampa, Fla.

6.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
7.19 Tampa, Fla.

50.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
51.88 Tampa, Fla.

...... Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
...... Tampa, Fla.

12.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
14.39 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
4.65 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.72 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


00
0









Ideal Potato Manure. .... 1321


Ideal Fruit & Vine Manure 1322


Ideal Vegetable Manure.. 1323


Mapes' Vegetable Manure 1324


Mapes' Ora'ge Tree Man're 1325


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1326


Cotton Seed Meal........ 1327


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


8.00
9.85

10.00
8.53

8.00
8.94

12.00
6.84

12.00
10.53


1.00
1.47


0.29

1.00
1.60

2.00
3.25

2.00
4.65


Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... ....
Official Analysis.................. ...


Kainit ................... 1328 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ......
Official Analysis... ...... ......

Nitrate of Soda.......... 1329 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ......
Official Analysis... ...... ......

4 per cent. Potash....... .l13301Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 8.00
S Official Analysis... 10.62 8.73


2.00
0.75


..... 4.00 8.00
7.45 3.94 8.05

...... 3.00 10.00
6.821 3.52 10.96

...... 4.00 8.00
7.80 3.77 8.18

.. ... 5.00 4.00
8.59 4.90 6.28

...... 4.00 3.00
10.47 4.29 4.01

2.50 7.50 1.50
7.98 . .

2.50 7.50 1.50
7.20 ......

...... ...... 12.00
...... ...... 13.13

...... 17.00 .....
...... 17.92 ......

...... ...... 4.00
9.48 ...... 5.02


Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Wilson & Toomer Tertz.
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Mapes' For. & Per. Gu-
ano Co., New York.

Mapes' For. & Per. Gu-
ano Co., New York.

Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Montezuma Mfg. Co.,
Montezuma, Ga.

A. D. Campbell, Chip-
ley, Fla.

A. D. Campbell, Clip-
ley, Fla.

A. D. Campbell, Chip-
ley, Fla.












ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.
0
,n3


Honest Fertilizer ........ 1331


Etiwan Blo'd&Bone Guano 1332


Etiwan Spec. Pot. Mixture 1333


Bigbee Meal Compound...

Bigbee Blood & Bone Fer-


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


1334 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


tilizer ................. 1335 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

16 per cent.Acid Phosphate 1336 Guarant'd Analysis
I Official Analysis...

14 per cent.Acid Phosphate 1337 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
I


10.00
9.31

16.00
12.23

16.00
10.30

16.0(
9.7E

16.0(
12.74

16.0(


16.0(


Phosphoric A







8.001 2.00
7.86 0.83

8.001 2.00
S.511 1.43


8.00
8.31

8.00
8.38

10.00
9.94

16.00
16.221

14.00
15.43.


2.00
1.09

2.00
1.22


dpic e


cidi

0

0 S

... ..| 2.00 2.00



1.00 3.0
8.69 2.00 3.47

.. 2.00 2.00
9.94 2.19 1.88







11.35 2.17 2.074
9.62 1.18 3.47

2.00 2.00



17.31...... ........

.1. ..... .. ....
16. G5 ...... ......


BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.



A. D. Campbell, Chip-
ley, Fla.

Etiwan Fertilizer Co.,
Charleston, S. C.
U,)
SEtiwan Fertilizer Co.,
Charleston, S. C.

Bigbee Fertilizer Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

Bigbee Fertilizer Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.


5

0





0
)/





)







Muriate of Potash........ 1338Guarant'd Analysis 20.00 ...... ......
S Official Analysis...[......( ... .. ......
Muriate of Potash........ 1339 Guarant'd Analysis ..... ........... ..
Official Analysis... . ......
Goulding's H. G. Eng. Gu-
ano .................... 1340 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 10.00 2.00
SOfficial Analysis... 12.75 10.47 1.44
16 per cent.Acid Phosphate 1341 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 16.00 2.00
Official Analysis... ...... 16.07 1.19
Goulding's Bone Comp'nd. 1342 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 8.00 2.00
Official Analysis... 11.11 9.61 1.12
Goulding's H. G. Meal Fer-
tiliizer ................ 1343 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 10.00 2.00
Official Analysis... 12.72 11.01 0.82
Birmingham Stand. Grade
Fertilizer .............. 1344 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 2.00
I Official Analysis... 11.92 9.42 1.85
Wire Grass Meal Comp'nd 1345 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 2.00
Official Analysis... 10.64 8.70 0.70
Georgia State Grange Fer-
tilizer ................ 1346 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 2.00|
Official Analysis... 10.37 8.70 0.70
Cotton Seed Meal........ 1347 Guarant'd Analysis ...... .... ....
Official Analysis... ...... .. . .
Primo H. G. Acid Phos.... 1348 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 14.00 1.00
Official Analysis......... 14.80 1.36
Primo H. G. Blood & Bone 1349 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.00 1.00
Official Analysis... 10.22 10.66 1.41


11.91


17.26

10.73

11.83


11.27

9.40


9.40
2.5u

16.16


12.07


50.00 Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
55.52 Pensacola, Fla.

50.00 Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
56.32 Pensacola, Fla.


2.00 2.00 Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
2.12 2.04 Pensacola, Fla.

..... ...... Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
...... ...... Pensacola, Fla.
2.00 2.00 Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
2.12 2.21 Pensacola, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
2.14 2.38 Pensacola, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Birmingham Fertz. Co.,
2.01 1.84 Birmingham, Ala.
1.00 3.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
1.20 2.15 Montgomery, Ala.

2.00 2.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
1.20 2.15 Co., Montgomery, Ala.
7.50 1.50 Southern Cotton Oil
7.73 ...... Co., Pensacola, Fla.
...... ...... Gulfport Cot. Oil, Fertz.
...... ...... & Mfg. Co., Gulfport,
Miss.
2.00 2.00 Gulfport Cot. Oil, Fertz.
3.34 1.78 & Mfg. Co., Gulfport,
Miss.
~~ --- -- --- ~----\- -" -


1111












BUREAU OF OEEDSTUFFS.


A. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, act approved May


E. PECK GREENE, Assistant Chemist
24, 1905. (Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, O


-3-


'R BRAND.
d Z


Rescue Grass Hay .................

Our Special Feed.....................
U. N. I. Dairy Feed.................
"A" Grade U. N. I. Horse and Mule
Feed ..............................
Corn and Oat Feed ...................

F eed ................................
Mixed Barley and Oats..............
Mixed Barley and Oats..............
Our Own Feed......................
.Feed No. 1, "Bob..................
Feed No. 2, "John" .................
Mixed Feed; Shorts, Cotton Seed Meal,
and Bran ..........................
Sucrene Dairy Feed.................
Purina Feed ........................
Stafolife Feed ......................


91
92

93
94


0


29.02 8.69

10.10 6.58
11.85 21.59

14.40 13.03
4.45 11.32

12.60 10.67
9.95 10.97
9.67 10.97
6.45 9.83
13.15 11.23
10.80 13.25

8.00 21.85
13.35 15.62
12.04 12.15
16.75 12.46


10
9a
Cdi
hg



52.09 1.08

66.87 1.20
47.31 3.98

53.47 2.15
68.78 2.53

60.45 2.23
61.86 3.10
62.24 1.70
67.93 1.30
58.10 3.25
57.18 3.85

49.55 4.33
43.73 7.88
58.07 3.90
48.45 6.77


4.35

3.05
4.90

5.50
1.00

2.30
3.62
3.17
2.57
3.37
3.27

5.20
8.30
3.47
7.00


By Whom Sent.



William Roberts, Tallahassee, Fla.
Co-operative Grocery Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla. a

United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Alger-Sullivan Lumber Co., Century,
Fla.
Aycock Lumber Co., Aycock, Fla.
Brown, Orlando, Fla.
Vertrees & Co., Palatka, Fla.
Austin&Rendleman, Jacksonville, Fla.
Vincent & Gray, Jacksonville, Fla.
Vincent & Gray, Jacksonville, Fla.

T. C. Gibson, Apalachicola, Fla.
T. C. Gibson, Apalachicola, Fla.
J. J. McCaskill, Freeport, Fla.
J. J. McCaskill, Freeport, Fla.


--


-










Marsh Grass Hay.................... 105 25.22112.01136.36[ 1.361 6.72( E. G. Hyde, Chester, Fla.
Oats and Other Grain................. 106 10.7310.92 60.54 4.86 2.77j Jake Brown, Ocala, Fla.

NOTICE.-The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9 of the laws providing for "Special Sam-
ples" drawn by consumers are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the laws and the "Rules and Regulations gov-
erning the taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feedstuffs and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of
the report. Also to compare the "official analysis" and the "market value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases the "market value," or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods-that in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guarantee tag on the bag with the table of "average composition of feed-
stuffs." In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law and regula-
tions, and send in a tin box, sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guarantee tags" off the
packages, to compare with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.
00
CA(











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS, 1909.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. PECK GREENE,


Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Section 2, Act


approved May 24, 190


Assistant Chemist.
5.


NAME, OR BRAND. a



Forest City Feed Meal.. 736 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Sucrene Horse and Mule
Feed .................. 737 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Corno Horse and Mule
Feed .................. 738 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Universal Dairy Feed.... 739 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Universal Horse and Mule
Feed .................. 740 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Banner Feed ............ 741 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Lillie Bran .............. 7421Guarant'd Analysis]
I Official Analysis...


19.051

13.501
8.89

12.00
13.371

12.951
21.27j

16.75
17.90

10.50
10.10

8.501
7.521


'8
0
5-

23.00
23.96

10.00
10.03

10.001
11.851

22.50
15.09

11.501
11.06]

9.75
).001

15.00
15.75


5C


30.00
36.39

50.00
59.71

58.50
55.58

42.00
48.87

52.00
52.57

63.001
63. 781

56.50
57.16


C d

4.50 ......
7.20 4.15

3.00 ......
3.38 5.36

3.50 ......
3.931 3.82

5.25 ......
2.651 5.77

4.75 ......
2.551 3.97

3.751 ......
2.90 3.12

4.00 .....
2.55 5.60


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.




The Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Savannah, Ga.

Americal Milling Company, a
Chicago, Ill.

The Corno Mills Co., East. St.
Louis, Ill.

Universal Stock Food Co.,
Lebanon, Tenn.

Universal Stock Food Co.,
Lebanon, Tenn.

The Quaker Oats Company,
Chicago, Ill.

Lillie Mill Company, Franklin,
Tenn.










Pure Wheat Bran........


Pure Wheat Middlings...


Pure Wheat Middlings...

Pure Winter Wheat Fancy


I 743lGuarant'd Analysis| 9.501 14.50j
Official Analysis... 10.15 14.611

744 Guarant'd Analysis 4.58 16.04
Official Analysis... 5.60 17.29

745 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 15. 15
Official Analysis... 4.70 17.81


Shorts ................ 746 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Pure Wheat Shorts...... 747 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Pure Wheat Shorts...... 748 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Pure Wheat Bran........ 749 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Anchor Bran ............ 750 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Pine Leaf Middlings......I 751 Guarant'd Analysis]
Official Analysis...

Crescent Shorts ......... 752 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Crescent Shorts ......... 753 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


3.90 16.361


15.501

16.00
15.531

16.00
17.38

16.09
16.23

14.50
16.80

15.75
18.251

16.00
19.97

16.00
19.83


6.02j

6.00
6.17

6.00
5.47

7.49
7.55

9.50
9.17i

6.101
5.62

8.00
6.17

8.00
6.30


56.00
54.10

62.48
57.54

40.00
56.74

62.66
58.81

48.00
59.21

48.001
56.451

53.58
55.20

53.50
52.21

57.95
54.83

53.75
52.33

53.75
52.33


4.00 ...
2.75 7.17

4.17 ......
4.65 4.05

4.00 ......
4.45 3.80

4.50 3.15
4.15 4.42

4.00 ......
3.65 4.17

4.00 ......
4.73 4.52

4.68 ...
3.83 5.37

4.00 ... .
4.00 6.30

4.201 4.10
5.551 4.45

4.25 ......
5.38 5.05

4.25 ......
5.40 5.07


Mountain City Mill Company,
Chattanooga, Tenn.

The Dunlop Milling Company,
Clarksville, Tenn.

Sweet Springs Milling Co.,
Sweet Springs, Mo.

Akin-Erskine Milling Company,
Evansville, Ind.

Liberty Mills, Nashville,
Tenn.

Star Mills, Nashville, Tenn.


Acme Mills and Elevator Co.,
Hopkinsville, Ky.

Kemper Mill and Elevator Co.,
Kansas City, Mo.

Cairo Milling Company, Cairo,
Ill.

Kemper Mill and Elevator Co.,
Kansas City, Mo.

Kemper Mill and Elevator Co.,
Kansas City, Mo.











ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.



NAME OF BRAND. S ADDRESS OF
o MANUFACTURERS.
_________ I i -


Pure Wheat Shorts...... 754


Cotton Seed Meal........ 755


Cotton Seed Meal........ 756


Coton Seed Meal........ 757


Cotton Seed Meal........ 758


Cotton Seed Feed Meal.. 759


Creamo Cotton Seed Meal 760


Boss Chop Feed ........ 761


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


6.00
6.02

7.00
9.20


8.65


10.75


8.27


11.37


21.37

11.00
9.27


16.00
17.72

43.00
39.30

41.20
41.59

38.52
39.84

38.62
41.68

34.50
37.60

22.00
22.55

8.50
8.60


48.00
55.93

24.00
26.78


27.41


27.51


28.56


30.13.

30.00
38.36

60.00
64.55


4.00 ...... Cumberland Mills, Nashville,
5.03 4.35 Tenn.

9.00 7.00 Marianna Mfg. Co., Marianna,
11.30 5.45 Fla.

...... ...... The Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
7.55 5.95 Pensacola, Fla.

............ Florida Cotton Oil Co., Talla-
7.40 6.00 hassee, Fla.

...... ...... Vienna Cotton Oil Company,
7.70 5.72 Vienna, Ga.

9.00 ...... Farmers' Oil & Fertilizer Co.,
7.75 5.451 Dawson, Ga.

5.0 ...... Tennessee Fiber Company,
4.40 4.62 Memphis, Tenn.

3.50 ...... The Great Western Cereal Co.,
2.88 3.00 Chicago, Ill.














Kyome Feed ............ 762


Ship Stuff ............... 763


Crescent Mixed Feed..... 764


Blair's Shorts ........... 765


Pure Wheat Middlings.... 766


Pure Wheat Middlings.... 767


Pine Leaf Middlings...... 768

Pure Winter Wheat Fancy
Shorts ................. 769


Pure Winter Wheat Fancy
Shorts ................ 770


Pure Winter Wheat Bran. 771


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

SGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


6.56
7.40

8.00
5.80

12.00
13.401

9.00
6.00

5.18
4.95

4.58
5.67

6.10
5.00

3.90
5.75


3.90
5.00


15.05
15.40

14.50
15.49

12.00
12.81

14.50
14.26

17.11
18.04

16.04
15.80

15.75
18.34

16.38
16.41


16.36
16.67

14.00
15.62


59.98
57.88


60.66

61.00
57.44

56.00
59.40

58.18
58.86

62.48
59.41

57.95
56.31

62.66
59.24


62.66
60.41

54.00
54.66


5.12


3.67


3.30


4.42


3.95


4.05

4.10
4.40

3.15
4.47


3.15
3.87


6.32


The G. E. M. Milling Company,
Frankfort, Ky.

The Dunlop Mills, Richmond,
Va.

City Grain and Feed Company,
Columbia, Tenn.

The Blair Milling Company,
Atchison, Kan.

Geo. P. Plant Milling Company,
St. Louis, Mo.
oo
The Dunlop Milling Company, c
Clarksville, Tenn.

Cairo Milling Company, Cairo,
Ill.

Akin-Erskine Milling Company,
Evansville, Ind.


Akin-Erskine Milling Company,
Evansville, Ind.

The Hunter Brothers Milling
Co., St. Louis, Mo.


8.05 i











ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.
Cd


Homco Feed ............ 772 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Corno Chicken Feed...... 773 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Hen-Eeda Scratch Feed.. 774 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Sucrene Dairy Feed...... 775 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Sucrene Dairy Feed...... 776 Guarant'd Anelysis
Official Analysis...

Daisy Dairy Feed........ 777 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Nutriline ................ 778 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Corno Horse & Mule Feedl 779 Guarant'd Analysis
I Official Analysis...


7.00
5.42

3.40
2.02

9.00
2.97

12.00
10.95

12.00
12.22

9.00
14.31

10.00
9.25

12.00
14.75


d .
0 0
o b
2 d


8.50 67.89
10.88 66.16

10.00 70.00
9.35 73.36

11.00 30.00
10.27 67.94

16.50 48.54
18.04 44.96

16.50 48.54
17.99 42.19

14.00 58.00
13.88| 50.30

12.00 58.00
11.06 55.37

10.00 58.50
11.10 55.07


4-
r= '
fe *


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


7.00 ...... American Hominy Company,
6.50 2.37 Indianapolis, Ind.

3.50 ...... The Corno Mills Company, St.
0.70 1.40 Louis, Mo.

3.00 ...... F. S. Mellen & Co., Pensacola,
2.05 2.87 Fla.

3.50 ...... American Milling Company,
8.25 6.35 Chicago, Ill.

3.50 ...... American Milling Company,
6.65 7.95 Chicago, Ill.

3.001...... The Great Western Cereal Co.,
2.14 5.91 Chicago, Ill.

3.50 ...... Nutriline Milling Company,
7.30 7.12 Crowley, La.

3.50 .... The Corno Mills Company,
3.431 3.65 St. Louis, Mo.









Corno Horse & Mule Feed


Creamo Dairy Feed......


Ceralfa Stock Feed........


Grainfalfa Feed ..........


Peck's Mule Feed........


Kornfolfa Feed ..........


Protena Feed ............


Cotton Seed Meal........


Boss Chop Feed..........


Blue Ribbon Feed........


780 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

781 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

78 2Guarant'd Analysis]
Official Analysis...

783 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

784 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

785 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

786 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

787 Guarant'd Anelysis
Official Analysis...

788 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

789 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


12.00
14.42

19.50
20.391

11.50)
12.38

11.00
12.60

11.90!
12.49

10.00
11.47

11.90
13.55


12.75

11.00
10.12

10.50
11.27


10.00 58.50
11.67 55.71

14.50 45.00
15.13 44.28

14.00 55.00
11.89 52.34

11.00 60.00
11.41 53.42

10.00 59.20
11.41 57.50

12.00 58.00
11.67 60.00

12.30 56.00
11.41 57.23

34.50 .....
34.31 32.19

8.50 60.00
7.72 64.88

9.75 63.00
10.79 62.44


3.50 ...... The Corno Mills Company,
2.80 3.45 St. Louis, Mo.

5.00 ...... The Corno Mills Company,
4.35 2.35 St. Louis, Mo.

4.50 ...... J. B. Edgar Grain Company,
5.90 6.90 Memphis, Tenn.

4.00 ...... The Great Western Cereal Co.,
5.02 4.50 Chicago, Ill.

3.80 ...... Illinois Feed Mills, St. Louis,
2.68 5.43 Mo.

4.00 ...... Kornfolfa Feed Milling Co.,
2.21 2.47 Kansas City, Mo.

4.00 ...... Ralston Purina Company, St.
4.01 3.32 Louis, Mo.

9.00 ..... Farmers' Oil & Fertilizer Co.,
7.28 5.25 Dawson, Ga.

3.50 ...... The Great Western Cereal Co.,
3.60 3.60 Chicago, Ill.

3.75 ..... The Quaker Oat Company,
2.20. 4.22 Chicago, Ill.











ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.



Banner Feed ............


Acorn Feed .............


Banner Feed .............


Victor Feed ............


Cotton Seed Meal........


Creamo Cotton Seed Meal.


Creamo Cotton Seed Meal.


Peck's Mule Feed........


ri Cd
aa

00
P-4 02
d J
E ^ *


2Z



791 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

792 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

793 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

794 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

795 Guarant'd Analysis .
Official Analysis...

796 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

797 Guarant'd Analysis .
Official Analysis...

798 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


4i d


3.75 .....
3.42 3.13

3.50 .....
3.14 2.78

3.75 .....
3.46 2.90j

3.00 ......
2.86 2.82


6.20 5.50

5.00 ...
4.52 5.12

5.00 .
4.66 4.75

3.80 ......
3.90 4.14


The Quaker Oat Company,
Chicago, Ill.

The Quaker Oat Company,
Chicago, Ill.

The Quaker Oat Company,
Chicago, Ill.

The Quaker Oat Company,
Chicago, Ill.

Montezuma Mfg. Co., Montezu-
ma, Ga.

Tennessee Fiber Company,
Memphis, Tenn.

Tennessee Fiber Company,
Memphis, Tenn.

Illinois Feed Mills, St. Louis,
Mo.


9.75
9.39

10.50
10.53

9.75
10.13

7.50
6.88

38.62
34.40

22.00
20.36

22.00
20.18

10.00
7.30


63.00
64.96

59.00
60.35

63.00
64.80

62.00
61.98


31.62

30.00
38.92

30.00
20.73

57.00
58.90











Purina Feed ............ 799 Guarant'd Analysis 8.90 12.50 58.00 4.00 ...... Ralston Purina Company, St.
Official Analysis... 9.04 10.88 63.75 3.81 1.17 Louis, Mo.

Pure Wheat Bran........ 800 Guarant'd Analysis 7.49 16.09 53.18 4.68 ...... Acme Mills and Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis... 7.75 13.51 59.63 2.87 5.14 Hopkinsville, Ky.
SPECIAL NOTICE.-The attention of dealers and consumers is called to the table of "Average Composition of
Feedstuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feedstuffs sold
throughout the country. Any material variation from these averages is presumptive evidence of impurity or
adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee
of the manufacturer should not vary materially from this table of averages, while the "official analysis" should
show practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers are requested, in all cases of
suspected inferiority or adulteration, to send a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.











R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
Samples Sent in by Citizens.
SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES.
ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.


A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.


4-1
0

o
S'


NAME, OR BRAND.


216 Export Lager Beer............

217 "Cider" .....................

219 Progress Brand Duessel-Torfer
Style Beer ..................

221 U no ..........................

222 Schlitz Fizz ...................

223 Schlitz Fizz ...................

224 "Acme" Maltale ..............

225 Cider ........................

226 Apple Cider ..................


MANUFACTURER.


FROM


The Florida Brewing Co., Tampa, Fla.I 3.40 P. O. Knight, Tampa.


Indianapolis Brewing Co., Indianapo-
lis, Ind...........................

Red Rock Co., Jacksonville, Fla .....

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee.

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee.


J. B. McCormick, Macclenny.
County Judge of Baker County.

N. Mayo, Summerfield.

Moses Ktite, Tallahassee.

S. E. Gardner, Kissimmee.

S. E. Gardner, Kissimmee.

J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.










227 Cider .........................

228 Apple Cider ...................

229 Peach Cider ..................

230 Cider .........................

231 Apple Cider ................. .

232 Pure Fruit Juice-Catawba....

233 Cider .........................

234 Blackberry Wyno ..............

235 Apple Cider ..................

236 Blackberry Wine ..............

237 Dixie Sweet Grape Cider......

238 Ginger Cider .................

239 Apple Cider ...............

240 Cider ..........................

241 Apple Cider ...................

242 "Cider" .....................


...................................(

....... ................. .... ......












.. ........... .. ...........

....................................


. . . . . . . .

................................. ***


4.10 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
7.95 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
2.00 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
5.60 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
2.70 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
0.65 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
2.00 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
0.65 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
7.15 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
7.15 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
1.30 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
7.10 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
6.35 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
8.80 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
5.60 J. W. Nance, Lake City, Sheriff
of Columbia County.
7.15 H. E. Murphee, Tavares, Sheriff
of Lake County.













NAME, OR BRAND.


243 Beer .......................... L(

244 Beer .......................... T

245 Beer .......................... A.

249 Blackberry-Mezzo ............ A

250 Beer-B. Hunt ................. ..

251 Draft Beer-B. Hunt.............

252 Beer-G. A. Windell..............

253 Draft Beer-G. A. Windell........

254 Draft Beer-Wm. Harrison......

255 Grape Wine .................. J.

256 Schlitz Fizz ................. .. Jo

257 Schlitz Fizz.................... Jo


ALCOHOLIC DRINKS-Continued.



MANUFACTURER.


emp, St. Louis....................

he F. W. Cook Brewing Co., Evans-
ville, Ind.........................
B Co............................

nderson & Co., Atlanta, Ga........

..................................


;"" i





M. Kelly, St. Augustine, Fla......

s. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee.

s. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwaukee.


FROM


14
0





6.35

4.10

5.60

1.20

4.95

4.85

4.95

5.10

4.50

9.30

2.95

2.90


W. F. Sellers, Havana, Marshal
of Havana.
W. F. Sellers, Havana, Marshal
of Havana.
W. F. Sellers, Havana, Marshal
of Havana.
Walker & Handley, Tallahassee.

G. S. Gregory, Quincy, Sheriff c
of Gadsden County.
G. S. Gregory, Quincy, Sheriff
of Gadsden County.
G. S. Gregory, Quincy, Sheriff
of Gadsden County.
G. S. Gregory, Quincy, Sheriff
of Gadsden County.
G. S. Gregory, Quincy, Sheriff
of Gadsden County.
J. M. Kelly, St. Augustine.

H. A. Hendry, Fort Myers, May-
or of Fort Myers.
H. A. Hendry, Fort Myers, May-
or of Fort Myers.










258 Red Heart Mead............... The Jung Brewing Co., Cincinnati, Q.' 1.70 A. D. Stanton, Madison, Sheriff
of Madison County.
S 259 Beer ....................................... .............. 1.90 A. D. Stanton, Madison, Sheriff
d .of Madison County.
260 Maltale ....................... 1.15 G. R. Smith, Crawfordville.









-1










MISCELLANEOUS.

No. SUBSTANCE. RESULTS OF EXAMINATION. FROM

218 Arrowroot Starch ............. Correctly labeled .................. P. A. Henderson, Miami.

220 Vanilla Substitute Extract...... Alcohol by volume, 6.80 per cent..... C. B. Witt, Tampa.

246 Biscuit ........................ Unusually large amount of Alum.... Robin Murphy.

248 XXX Coffee ................... Spent Coffee and Chickory Grounds, W. G. Bradley, Pensacola.
sweetened with Sugar.............
SPECIAL DRUG ANALYSES.

No. SUBSTANCE. RESULTS OF EXAMINATION. FROM

247]Eptozone for the Scalp ........ Resorcinol, ( H; 0, C. A. Smith, Belleview.









FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
OFFICIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY THE STATE INSPECTOR, UNDER CHAPTER 5662, ACTS OF 1907.
FOOD ANALYSES
ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.



'AME, OR BRAND. MANUFACTURER. RETAILER. REMARKS.

z]


159 Mezzo .............


164 "Dixie Farnote" Gin-
ger Ale ..........

165 0. K. Kola.........

184 Grape Cider-Artifi-
cial color and fla-
vor ..............

185 Schnapps Brew Al-
cohol, .50 .........

187 Fruit Cider Nug-I
etts Cherry flavor
188 Mexican Hot........


Anderson & Co., Atlanta, Warren Green, DeFuniak 0.65 Illegal-misbranded. No Alcohol
Ga. .................. Springs .............. statement.

Dixie Bottling Co., Mari- Thompson & Carr, Mari- 0.65 Illegal-misbranded. No Alcohol w
anna, Fla .......... anna ................. statement.

Dixie Bottling Co., Mari- Thompson & Carr, Mari- 0.65 Illegal-misbranded. No Alcohol
anna, Fla. ............. anna, Fla. ............. statement.
Louisville Cider and Vin-
egar Works, Louisville, Staten Douglass, Arca- 3.40 Illegal-misbranded. No Alcohol
Ky. ................... dia ................... statement.

Tampa Bottling Works, Staten Douglass, Arca- 0.65 Legal.
Tampa, Fla. .......... dia ..................

Barrs Mfg. Co., Rich- W. W. Weaver, Lake- 7.15 Illegal-misbranded. No Alcohol
mond, Va. ............ land .................. statement.
The Los Angeles Fruit Theodosios Apostolone, 0.00 Legal.
Cider Co., Atlanta, Ga. Lakeland .............











BUTTERS.


MANUFACTURER.


177 Clover Hill Butter.. Fox River Butter Co.,
Aurora, Ill. ...........
178 Fancy Elgin-I. D. Williams & Moorhouse,
S.-Butter ....... Tamra, Fla. ..........

183 Diamond X Butter.. J. H. McLaurin Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla .........
1971Brookfield Ex t r a Swift & Co., Jacksonville,
Creamery Butter.... Fla.................
De Journett & Co., Cal-
204 Pure Butter ........ houn, Ga. ............


RETAILER.


Dishong Bros., Arcadia..

W. H. Seward, Arcadia..


. z



30.90

28.50


REMARKS.


Legal.

Legal.


M. A. Faircloth, Arcadia. 30.201Legal.

J. A. Putnall, Perry...... 31.00 Legal.

C. D. Seffler, Miami..... 23.25 Legal.




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