• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Weather report
 Fertilizers, feeding stuffs and...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
    Weather report
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Annual summary
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Monthly summary
            Page 30
        Killing frosts
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Comparative annual data for Florida
            Page 33
        Climatological data
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
        Report for January 1909
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
    Fertilizers, feeding stuffs and foods and drugs
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 53
            Page 54
        New York wholesale prices current
            Page 55
            Page 56
        State valuation
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Bureau of fertilizers
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
        Bureau of feedstuffs
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Analyses of feedstuffs
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
        Food and drug analyses
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
        Miscellaneous
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
Full Text











FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


APRIL 1, 1909



B. E. MCLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I--Crops. Part 2--Weather Report.
Part 3--Fertilizers and Feed Stuffs.

Entered January 31.1903. at Tallahassee," Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA
c


:
;.-.i.j


VOLUME 19


NUMBER 2

















[I _I I..

v, I
41 TAYLOR

ALAC..UA V


-r -
.1-o, 0RAGE
E

( R 0


PASCO



\0\







I 0
ii0'
L E E



WALTONi


uu
L 77

















PART I.


CROPS
















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun.
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-ll.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.


Northeastern Division
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duv:i1,
Nassi ii,
Putnm in,
St. Johns--

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia-9.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,


Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.
















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DivisioN.-Planting of upland cotton began
in a few localities about the 24th of March, but the bulk
of the planting will not be done till about the 1st to the
10th of April, when it will be under general headway. In
the Sea Island cotton growing section generally, the
climate being somewhat more forward, planting is a little
more advanced. It appears that the acreage being
planted is somewhat reduced from that of last year, and
more especially of Sea Island cotton. It is more im-
portant that the reduction in acreage be confined to the
upland cotton, as it is the only variety affected, particu-
larly in value, by a very large crop production, and it is
to be hoped that the acreage planted will be no larger
than is indicated by our tabulated, report. The corn crop
just planted is undoubtedly very much larger than that
of last year, and it is also indicated that a very consider-
able increase in the acreage of all standard field crops
will be planted this year. The weather has been generally
much more favorable for farm work this spring than
last, and it is confidently anticipated by farmers that
good stands of all crops will be obtained unless some-
thing unusual should occur to prevent it; good rains have
fallen at favorable times and in sufficient quantity to
put the soil in fine condition for planting and cultivating.
There has been a falling off in the tobacco acreage, at-
tributable to the slump in prices caused, by the "panic,"
so called; but it is looked upon by most of the growers
as being only temporary in its effects. Generally, con-
ditions of all crops and fruit trees are better than last
year, and the prospects are quite promising at this date.












WESTERN DIVISION.-Planting of crops generally began
sooner in this district, also, than last year, and. as is
indicated in the above district, there is an increase in
the acreage planted to field crops other than cotton. The
weather has been more seasonable, and fine rains have
fallen in good time and quantity, putting the soil in
excellent condition for working and planting. giving
promise of better stands of crops than for last season.
Apparently there is also a smaller acreage devoted to
cotton in this section than last year. which it is hoped
will prove true, as less cotton and more food crops are
undoubtedly the best safeguard against low prices ,f
cotton, and then diversification of crop production is the
only correct system of farming. There is not so much
complaint of the lack of labor this season, though it is
still far short of filling the demand; the use of labor-
saving implements is. to a considerable extent, supplying
the deficiency in labor. Crops generally, such as vege-
tables,small fruits, etc.. are in good condition. Commercial
fertilizers, as well as home-mode fertilizers. are being
used to a much larger extent than in any previous year.

NORTHEASTERN DIVISlIO.-In this district there appears
to be an increase in the acreage of all products, including
cotton. The weather conditions have been favorable over
practically all of this district and crops are practically
all in good condition. Vegetable and fruit products are
doing well. and if nothing unusual occurs climatically
the indications are that good yields will result. In this
district the use of commercial and home-made fertilizers
has been much increased, the use of these materials being
well nigh universal with progressive crop growers.

CENTRAL DIVISION.-According to our correspondents.
the conditions that prevailed for two or more years over
much of this district have gotten back to a normal state.
and in place of a destructive drought, abundant rains
have fallen and the growing seasons are about all that
can be desired. The effect of the change is readily ob-
served in the greatly increased acreage to all products












adapted to and usually grown in this section, the increase
in acreage of some crops being quite remarkable, and
show to what proportions some of these crops are attain-
ing commercially, a position hardly dreamed of in the
beginning. Tobacco and peach growing also appear to be
assuming a position of rapidly increasing proportions,
and a great future is predicted for these products.

SOUTHERN DIVISION.-In this division the same im-
proved conditions are readily observed by the marked
increase in both the acreage and condition of crops. No
cotton is grown in this district, but most of the standard
field crops are grown, in addition to fruits and vegetables.
This district is the great vegetable and citrus fruit pro-
ducing section of the State, and the improved climatic
conditions have already restored much of the former pros-
perous condition. Crops of all kinds in this section are
much ahead of the more northerly portions of the State
in regard to time of maturity, and with continuation ol
the present favorable conditions, success is universally
anticipated.














Report of Acreage and Condition of Crops
Planted for Quarter Ending March 30th, 1909, as Compared
with the Previous Year.


COUNTIES. UPLAND SEA ISLAND
COTTON COTTON

NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Acreage.
Gadsden ............... 1501 15u,
H am ilton .............. ............I 75
Jefferson .............. 1001 luo0
Lafayette .............. ... ........ 85]
Leon ................... .100 ............
Liberty ................ 100| ............
Madison .............. G60 40
Suwannee ............. ............ .90
W akulla ............... 501 ............
Div. Average per cent... 931 90
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ............... 751 50O
Escam bia ............. 100 ............
Jackson ............... 100 ............
Santa Rosa ............ | 100 ...........
W alton ................. 85 ............
Washington ............ 80 10
Div. Average per cent...| 901 30
NORTHEASTERN DnTISIOx.
B aker ................. ............ 1.00
Bradford .............. ............. 100
Columbia ............. ............'. '110
D uval .................i............ ............
St. Johns .............. ............ ............
Div. Average per cent.. ............ 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ................. .......... ....... .....
"Hernando ............. ........... .............
Lake .................. ........ ..........
L evy .................. ............ 60
M arion ................ ............ 10.)
Orange .............. ........................
P asco ................. ............ ............
Sum ter ................ ............ 901
Volusia ............... .......................
Div. Average per cent. .......... 83'
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ......................... ............
Dade ............................. ......
DeSoto .... .............. ....... .... .
Hillsborough .......... .......... ............
Lee ................... ...........
Manatee ........... .... .......... ............
O sceola .......... ..... ....... ............
Polk ................... ............ ............
St. Lucie .............. ............. ..........
Div. Average per cent. ............. ..........
State Averages ........ 91' 76'


CORN

A-reag-.
125
100
100
110
125
106
100
100
104

115
110
100
105
110
125
110


10
100
115
i10
103

120
100
100
ion
100
10i
100
100
100
90
101

100

130
130
40
100
120
1 T2,i
105
106
105














REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. OATS. SUGAR PEANUTS TOBACCO
COUNTIES. OATS. CANE

NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage.
Gadsden .......... 125 150 125
Hamilton ......... 75 75 100 50
Jeffeson .......... 100 100 100 125
Lafayette ......... 100 100 100.......
Leon ............. 125 110 100 80
Liberty ........... 100 100 100 ..........
Madison .......... 100 60 75 20
Suwannee ......... 80 80 100 .........
Wakulla .......... 100 100 100.......
Div. Average p. c..| 101 97 100_ 70
WESTERN DIvISION.
Calhoun .......... 105U 125 125 ..........
Escambia ......... 100 100 100 .....
Jackson .......... 100 75 125. .........
Santa Rosa ....... 100 100 85 ..........
Walton ........... 100 100 100.........
Washington ....... 100 1001 100 .........
Div. Average p. c..J 101 1001 1051.........
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker .......... .. 100 100 100 .........
Bradford .......... 100 100 100 .........
Columbia ......... 100 105 100 ..........
Duval ............ 1201 130 ....... ....... ...
St. Johns ........ ......... 10 100 ...........
Div. Average p. c. 107 1001.......... ... ....
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............ 105 125 125 ..........
Hernando ......... 85 90 125 300
Lake .............. ........ 100 100 100
Levy ............. 100 100 100 ..........
M arion ........... 96 100 110 .........
Orange ............ 80 80 ....................
Pasco ............. 80 100 100 110
Sum ter ........... 100 100 90 .........
Volusia ...........I 60[ 100 100 .........
Div. Average p.c...I 881 99| 10G 170
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ........... ........ 100 .. ..... .........
D ade ............. .......... ... ... .... ... .. .. ....
DeSoto ........... 120[ 125 95| 105
Hillsborough ...... 1001 140 .. .. 2 .
Lee .. ............ 25 200 25 ....
M anatee ......... 100 100 .......... .........
Osceola ........... 100T 100 100 ..........
Polk ............. T 100| 125 125 ..........
St. L ucie ......... .......... 100 .......... ..........
'Div. Average p. c... 91 1241 86' 105
State Averages .... 97 105- 991 115














REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. WEET
COUNTIES. RYE RICE POTATOES FIELD PEAS

NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage.
Gadsden .......... .......... I......... 1..) 1"5
Hamilton ......... 50 75 100 75
Jefferson .......... 100 100 1'o 100
Lafayette. ................... .......... 1. 0, 1,'0
Leon .............. .90 .......... 120 125
Liberty ........... ......... ........... 10' 100
M adison .......... 40 .......... O 70
Suwannee ......... 60 70 .......
W akulla .......... .......... ........ 1... 5
Div. Average p. c...| 687 82 9', 93
WESTERN DIV\ISIOX.
Calhoun ........... 100 100 111( 10O
Escambia ................ .. ........... 10 130
Jackson .......... .......... ......... 10 1 ,
Santa Rosa ....... 100 .......... 100 1
W alton ........... 100 .......... 10I 1011
Washington ....... 1 100i 1i 100o 105
Div. Average p. c..| 100| 100 100 106
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............ .......... ........... 100 10
Bradford .................... .......... in. 100 10
Columbia ......... 100' 100' 110i i10
D uval ............. .......... .......... 125 110
St. Johns ......... ..... .... .......... 10) 100
Div. Average p. c.. 1001 1001 107 102
CENTRAL DIVISION.
C itru s ............ .......... .......... 105 ..........
Hernando ......... .......... 100 125 100
Lake .. .... ... .. .......... ......... 100 100
Levy .............. 100 .......... 100 100
M arion ...................... ..........' 100 (10
Orange ........... .......... .......... 100c l10
Pasco .............I 1001 1101 lnn 105
Sum ter ...........I 751..........' 10 100
Volusia ........... .......... .......... 10i 1,0o
Div. Average p. c.. 91 105 107' 101r
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ................... .......... I 10 -lO -
Dade ............. .....................! 100 .........
DeSoto ........... .......... 1251 110' 115
Hillsborough ...... .......... 101) 125! 100
L ee .............. .......... 1 301 200' 100
Manatee .............. ..... .. ....... In 100
Osceola ......................I 100 10 100
Polk .............. 70! 100 120' 100
St. Lucie ......... I .........!.... ...... 100 .........
Div. Average p. e.. 70' 91! 110 102
State Averages .- 86! 96 104' 101











13

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. CASSAVA

NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage.
Gadsden ........... ..........
H am ilton .......... ..........
Jefferson .......... ..........
Lafayette ......... 100
Leon .......................
Liberty ............ .........
M adison ........... ..........
Suwannee ...................
W akulla ........... .........
Div. Average p. c.. 1001
WESTERN DIVISION.


VELV
BEA

Acrea


,ET
SS


CABBAGE


ge. Acreage. Condition.
100 125
100 75 75
100 .......... .........
100 100
110 125 100
.... 100 100
40 100 25
80 ..
100 .......... ..........
100 1001
881 100| 88


Calhoun ........... ........ 150 100 100
Escambia .......... ....... 110 100 120
,Jackson ........... .......... 100 ...... ...........
Santa Rosa ................ 100 .......... ..........
W alton ............ .......... 110 .......... .........
Washington ....... 150 125 ...................
Div. Average p. c... 1501 1161 1001 110
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. ........... 100.........
Bradford ..... ... ......... 100 ......... .........
Columbia .................... 100 ...................
Duval ....................... 110 120 100
St. Johns ......... .......... 100 ......... .........
Div. Average p. c.. .......... 1021 1201 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............. .......... 90 100 100
Hernando .......... ........... 150 125 75
Lake ........................ 100 100 100
Levy .............. 100 110 100 100
Marion ...................... 100 150 100
Orange ...................... 100 120 100
Pasco ............ 80 100 90 90
Sumter ...................... 90 100 90
Volusia ........... 10 60 100 70
Div. Average p. c..l 631 1001 1091 92
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ........... 1001 50 10) 90
bDade ........................ 100 100 90
DeSoto ............ 110 125 110 100
Hillsborough ...... 100 110 140 100
Lee ............... 200 ... 150 75
Manatee .................... 100 100 100
Osceola ............ 100 200 120 100
Polk .............. 1001 80 120 120
St. Lucie ................... 1001 1001 110
Div. Average p. c.. 1181 1081 116? 98
State Averages ..... 1071 1031 1091 98














REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. IRISI POTATOES TOMATOES

NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. |Condition.
Gadsden ........... 1001 125 ......... ......
Hamilton .......... 75 60 50 60
Jefferson .......... .......... ...... .......... .........
Lafayette ......... 100 100 100 100
Leon .............. 100 90 110 90
L iberty ............ .......... .......... ..........
M adison ........... .......... .......... 50 50
Suwannee ......... 80 75 70 75
W akulla ........... .......... .......... ......... ..........
Div. Average p. c.. 76 75_ 76 75
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ........... 120 110 1001 110
Escambia .......... 110 110 100 100
Jackson ........... 80 80 1001 80
Santa Rosa ....... 100 90 ..............
W alton ............ ........ .............. .... ..........
W ashington ....... 100 80 ..........
Div. Average p. c..| 102 941 100 97
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.


Baker .............
Bradford ...........
Columbia ..........
Duval ............
St. Johns ..........
Div. Average p. c..
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus .............
Hernando .........
Lake ..............
Levy ..............
M arion ............
Orange ............
Pasco ..............
Sumter ............ I
Volusia ............ .....
Div. Average p c..
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard .....
D ade ..............
DeSoto ............ I
Hillsborough ......
Lee ...............
Manatee ........
Osceola ............
Polk ..... .
St. Lucie ..........
Div. Average p. c...
State Averages .... I


100

100
100!
100;
100!

115!
100
100
100
100
1001
100!
1001

102!


100'
100'

100!
901
1001

1201
1051

991
94'


100 90
.. .........


1251
1001
108'

90!
2001
1001
110'
50'
100'
100'
1 t10'
90
104'

100
100'
105'
1501
100'
100'
1251
1001
100'
109'
99'


100
100
97

100
100
100
100
75
100
100
100
90
96

100
105
90
100
85
100
80
125
100
95
92


~ __











15

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. CUCUMBERS ENGLISH PEAS

NORTHEBN DIVISION. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
Gadsden .......... .... . ....... ...I --
H am ilton .......... .......... ..... .......... .....
Jefferson .......... .......... .................... ..........
Lafayette .......... .................... 100 90
Leon .............. 100 75 100 80
L iberty ...... ...... ... I......... .......... ..........
Madison ......... ..... .... ... .. ..
Suwannee ......... 80 801 70 70
W akulla ....... .... .... .. ................... ..........
Div. Average p. c.. 901 781 901 80
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ......... I.. 100 100 100 100
Escambia .......... 100 100 100 90
Jackson ........... ...... .... ..... .. .........
Santa Rosa ........ 90 75 100 90
W alton ............ .......... .... ...... .. ..........
W ashington ........ .......... .......... .......... ......
Div. Average p. c..1 971 921 100| 91
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. .......... ................... .......
B radford .......... .......... .......... .......... ........
Colum bia ........ .......... .......... .......... ..........
Duval ........................ ...... .... 150 100
St. Johns .......... .......... ......................
Div. Average p. c.. ............ ........ 150 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus .......... 100 100 .......... ..........
Hernando .......... ............ ....... I .. ...
Lake .............. 100 100 100 100


Levy ............
M arion .......... ...
Orange ............
Pasco .............
Sumter ............
Volusia ...........
Div. Average p. c...
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ...........
Dade ..............
DeSoto ............
Hillsborough .......
L ee ............... I
Manatee ............ ..
Osceola ............
Polk ..............
St. Lucie .......... I
Div. Average p. c..1
State Average .. .7..


115 105] 100 100
....... .......... 100 100
100! 1001........ ...........
95 901 901 90
50! 1001 751 80
100 100 o 1001 100
941 991 941 95


501
100!
105!
1001
51
.....
1001
100!
100!
831
911


100T 100 100
100 1.......... I ..........
901 1001 80
1001 1001 100
401 51 40
....... .I .......... ..........
751 1001 90
1251 1001 150
105. .......... .........
921 84C 93
90! 104! 92













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. BEANS LETTUCE
SNORTIIERN DIVISiox. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
Gadsden ........... ............ ... .... .. .: .. ..........
Hamilton .......... 501 50 .......... ..........
Jefferson .......... .......... .......... .. .....
Lafayette .......... 100 80 ..................
Leon .............. 100 75 125 SO
L iberty ........... 100 85 .......... .........
M adison ........... .......... .......... .......... .........
Suwannee .......... 80 751 6, 7
W akulla ................. ... ..
Div. Average p. c.. 861 73 93 78
WESTERN DIVISIoN.
Calhoun ........... 90 100 110 100
Escambia ......... 100 100 100 100
Jackson ......100 75 100 100
Santa Rosa ....... .......... .......... ..........
Walton ............ .......... ............ .....
Washington ................. .......... ...................
Div. Average p. c..l 97 921 113 100
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. 90 80. 90 90
B radford .......... ..................... .
Columbia .......... o100 801 100 100
Duval ............. 125[ 75, 150 100
St. Johns .......... 100[ 100 100' 100
Div. Average p. c..| 1041 891 110 98
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............. 100 .......... .......... ..........
Hernando ......... 100 100 75' 100
Lake .............. 100 1001 100! 100
Levy .............. 100 1001 100 100
Marion ............. 100 100 100' 100
Orange ............ 100 1001 100' 100
Pasco ............... 100 901 85! 90
Sumter ............ 901 80' 75' 85
Volusia ...... .. 100 1001 100' 100
Div. Average p. c. 99[ 961 92 97
SOUTHERN DIVISION~.-
Brevard ........100 100 10 10
Dade ............... 100 100 ......... ..........
DeSoto ....... 120 100
Hillsborough ....... 150 100'.......... .........
Lee ................ 50 651 5 90
Manatee ........... ... I.. .......... 110' 100
Osceola ........... I 1501 1001 120' 100
Polk .............. 120! 1501 o10 120
St. Lucie .......... 1 100' 1001 100 100
Div. Average p. c..j 1091 1021 89 102
State Average ..... 991 90 97 95













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. EGG PLANTS

NORTHEN DIVISION. Acreage. Condition.
Gadsden ........... .......... .......... .
Hamilton .......... .......... ............
Jefferson ........... .......... ...........
Lafayatte ......... .......... .......... .
Leon ........... .. .......... ...........
Liberty .. ............................
Madison ........... ..................
Suwannee ......... .....................
W akulla ................................


CELERY

Acreage. Condition.




.... 50 50.. ..
......... ..........




.......... .........*
.......... I ..........


Div. Average p. c.. .......... ..........I 501 50


WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ........... 75 100 75 100
Escambia .......... .......... ......... 100 100
Jackson ........... .......... .......... .......... ..........
Santa Rosa ........ .......... .......... .......... ..........
W alton ............ ........ .... .......... ..........
Washington ............ ... ...... ..........
Div. Average p. c.. 75| 1001 881 100
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. ........ ........ .. ..... ..........
Bradford .......... .... ............. ........ .. ........
Columbia .......... ........... .......... ..... .........
Duval ................................. ...................
St. Johns .......... 85 90 100 100
Div. Average p. c... 851 901 1001 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ................. ......... ....................
H ernando .......... .......... ......... .......... ..........
Lake .............. 100 100 100 100
Levy ........ ........ -. ..........
Marion ................... .. .............. .
Orange ............ .......... .......... 120 120
Pasco .............. ..... .......... ........ ....... ....
Sum ter ............] 75 5 .......... .........
Volusia ............ 70 80 100 100
Div. Average p. c...) 811 851 1071 100
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard 50 75 .......... .........
Dade ............. 100 1001.......... ..........
DeSoto ............ ) 90 100 .......... .........
Hillsborough .. .]... ....... 110 100
Lee ............... 200 80 10 75
Manatee ........... .......... .......... 120 100
Osceola ... ........ 100 60 150 120
Polk .............. 100 100 .......... ..........
St. Lucie .......... ........... ...... ........ ..........
Div. Average p. c... 1071 861 971 99
State Averages ... 871 901 881 90
2--Bul











REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. BEETS WATERMELONS.
NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
SGadsden ........... .......... .. ... 125 80
Hamilton ................... ..... ... 100 75
Jefferson .......... .......... .......... 110 100
Lafayette .......... .................... 1001 90
Leon .............. 100 100 125 90
Liberty ........... .......... .......... 110 95
Madison ..................... .......... .60 80
Suwannee ......... 60 60 80 80
W akulla ........... .......... .......... 100 75
Div. Average p. c.. [ 801 80 101r 85
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ......... 75 100 115' 100
Escambia .......... ....... ......... 110 90
Jackson ........... .......... .... ......
Santa Rosa ........ .......... .......... 100 85
W alton ............ .......... .......... 110' 85
W ashington ........ .......... .......... 1001 80
Div. Average p. c..| 751 1001 1071 88
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. .......... ........... 100 90
Bradford .......... ........ ....... .. 100' 110
Columbia .......... .......... .......... 100' 100
Duval ....................... ......... 125 100
St. Johns .......... ........ ......... 100 100
Div. Average p. c... ..........! .......... 105' 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ...... ...... 100' 100; 125 100
Hernando ......... 2001 100o 200! 100
Lake .............. .100 1001 100 100
L evy .............. .......... .......... 90 100
Marion .......... .. 100! 100 90 100
Orange .......... .. ........ ............ 100'
Pasco ............. ....................... 90 l00
Sumter ............ 501 701 l10' 100
Volusia ............ 100' 100 9 90 9
Div. Average p. c.. 108 9. 109 97
SOrTTITERN DIVISIOx.
Brevard ........... 100 100 10 1l0)
Dade .............. .......... .......... ..................
DeSoto ............ .......... ........... 120 100
Hillsborough ...... 120! 1001 100' 100
Lee ................ 5! 901 100 90
Manatee ...........1 1001 100 100' 100
Osceola ........... 1001 1001 120 75
Polk .............. I 100! 1501 100' 100
St. Lucie .......... .......... .......... 100 100
Div. Average p1. c..i 871 1071 1051 90
State Averages ..... 87 951- O5-- 93











19

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. CANTALOUPES STRAWBERRIES
NORTHERN DIVISION. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
Gadsden ........... .......... .......... .......... ..........
Hamilton .......... 50 50 50 60
Jefferson .......... 90 80 100 90
Lafayette .......... 100 80 .......... .........
Leon .............. 125 90 80 60
L iberty ............ .......... .......... .......... .........
M adison ........... .......... .......... 50 60
Suwannee ......... .................... ......... ..........
W akulla ........... ............. .. .. .. .... ..........
Div. Average p. c... 911 751 701 68
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ........... 1001 100 100 100
Esacmbia .......... 100 85 100 90
Jackson ........... .......... .................... ..........
Santa Rosa .......; ...................... 1001 75
W alton ............ .......... .......... 95 80
W ashington ................. .......... 100 80
Div. Average p. c..| 1001 921 99 85
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. .......... .. .... ..... .. .......
Bradford .......... .......... ............ 100 100
Colum bia .......... ..... .... ... ......... ..........
Duval ............. 150 100 125 100
St. Johns .......... 100 100 .......... ..........
Div. Average p. c.... 1251 1001 1121 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............. 1001 100 .......... ........
Hernando .... ... ..... .......... ... ......... ...........
Lake .............. 120 100 .......... ..........
Levy .............. 85 100 100. 100
M arion ............ 80 1001 .......... ..........
Orange ............. .. ........ ....... .... .......... .........
Pasco .............. 90 100 100[ 100
Sum ter ............ 7 75 80 .......... .........
Volusia ............ .......... ........... 10O 100
Div. Average n. e... 1 92 97 1001 100
SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ........... 50 5 100 10
D ad e .............. .......... ..... .. ... .. ...
D eSoto ............ .......... .......... 1001 100
Hillsborough ....... 1 100 100 1501 100
L ee ............... .......... I .......... .. ... .. ..........
M anatee ........... .......... .......... I 1101 100
Oscedla .......... I 100' G0! 1001 90
P olk ............... .... ...... .......... 120 150
St. Lucie .......... .......... .......... 1 1001 105
Div. Average p. c...! 1! 70i 111! 106
State Averages ... I 98s 871 981 92











20 ,


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

Orange Lemon Trees. Grapefruit
COUNTIES. Trees. Trees. Lime Trees.

NORTEKRN DIVISION. Condition. Condition. Condition. Condition. Condition.
G adsden ..... ..| ...... .......... I..
Gad-sde ....................................................
H am ilton ......... ......... I
Jeferson .......... .......... .......... .......... .........
Lafayette .................................................
L eon .............. 75 .......... .... ..... 60
Liberty ............ .......... ............................
Madison ...... ...... .......... ...... ....................
Suwannee ....................... ........ ..........
W akulla ........... ....... .......... ........ ..........
Div. Average p. c... 75............ ...... 60
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ........... 150 100. .......... 125
E scam b ia .......... .......... ....... ... ....I .. ..........
Jackson ........... ............................... ....
Santa Rosa ............. ......... ....................
W alton ............ ... ....... .......... .. ........ ..
W ashington ....... .......... ....... ... .......... ..........
Div. Average p. c... 1501 1001 .......... 125
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.
Baker ............. 100| 100 .......... 100
Bradford .......... .......... ......... ........... .........
Colum bia .......... .......... .......... .......... .........
D uval ............. .......... .......... ...... .
St. Johns .......... 1............................. .
Div. Average p. c ... 100 100 .......... 100
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus .............I 1001 1001 .......... 100
H ernando .......... 1251........ .. ........ .125
Lake .............. 1251 100 120 120
Levy ............... 1101.......... ...................
M arion ............ 120 .......... .......... 120
O range ............ 1201.......... .......... 80
Pasco .............. 100. .......... ........... 85
Sumter ............ 1001 75 75! 100
Volusia ............ 1101 100 ..........! 100
Div. Average p. ... 111( 941 971 101
SorrrirRNa DIVISION.
Brevard ........... 1001 751 50' 10
Dade .............. 100' 90' 90' 100
DeSoto ............ 1201 1201 120'..........
Hillsborough ....... 100( 1001 100! 100
Lee ............... 1001 901 90' 100
Manatee ........... 1001 1001 1001 100
Osceola ..... . 100 1001 1001 100
Polk .............. 150! 100 1001 125
St. L ucie ..........I 951.......... ...... 105
Div. Average p. c... 1071 1221 94' 104
State Averages .... I 891 104! 951 98












21


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

COUNTIES. Bananas. Pineap'le Guavas. Peaches Pears.
NORTHERN DIVISION. Condition i Condition CConditi Condition Condit'n
Gadsden .............. ..... .. ..7 ...... .... ..
Hamilton ........ ........ ...... ........ 751 75
Jefferson .......... ........................ 100 100
Lafayette ......... ........................ 751...
Leon ............ ....... .. 100 100
Liberty ........... ........ ........ ........ 90 80
M adison .......... ........ ........ ........ ...... ...... .
Suwannee ........ ........ ................ .. 100 80
Wakulla ................. ........ ........ .... 25 10
Div. Average p. c................... ......... 811 74
WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun .......... o100 ............. 10 110
Eiscambia ......... ........ .... ... :::.. 75 70
Jackson .......... ........ ....... ......... 100 ......
Santa Rosa ...... ........ ................ ........ .......
W alton ........... ... ... ........ ....... ........ ........
Washington .............. ........ ..................
Div. Average p. c..| 100 ........ ........ 921 90
NORTHEASTERN DIVIsION.
Baker ............ .... .. ...... .. ....... 10 90
Bradford .......... ........ ........ ....... 100 .......
Columbia ....... ................... ........ 100 90
Duval ............ ..... ... ..... ... 110 .......
St. Johns ... ...... ... 110 100
Div. Average p. c.. ........ ........ ........ 1041 93
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............ ........ ........ ........ 150 ........
Hernando ......... ...... ....... 50 ........
Lake ............. 10 ........ 140 120 100
Levy ............. 100 ...... ........ .. 110 100
Marion ............ .. .... .. ..... 100 .......
Pasco ............. 80 40 95 50
Orange ........... ........ ........ ......... ........
Sumter ........... ....................100 90
Volusia ........... .... ... .. ... ........ 80 80
Div. Average p. c.. 931........I 901 101 84
SOUTHERN DIVIION.
Brevard.......... 50 100 100 75.......
Dade ............. 100 100 95 ................
DeSoto ........... ...... ........ ........ 125 ......
Hillsborough ..... .............. 100 100 ........
Lee ............... 100 100 100 ................
Manatee .......... 100 100 100 20......
Osceola ........... 80 100 140 100 40
Polk .............. 100 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie ......... .. 100 .............. ................
Div. Average p. c... 90| 1001 1051 871 70
State Averages .... 941 100) 971 93_ 82





















PART II.


WEATHER REPORT.

















U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


CLIFIATOLOGICAL SERVICE
OF THE

WEATHER BUREAU

Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION.

A. J. MITCHELL, Section Dircetor.




ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1908.



THE WEATHER BY MONTHS.

JANUARY.-The mean temperature, 57.4 degrees, was
lower than the average by nearly 1 degree. The highest
temperature occurred in the central and southern por-
tions, and the lowest in the interior of the northwestern
counties. The mild weather during the first part of the
month, the maximum at several stations ranging from 80
to 85 degrees, was succeeded by freezing in the western
counties on the 8th, and low temperatures continued over
the upper counties until the 10th; frost occurred in the
north-central portions. A second cold period prevailed
over most of the State from the 14th to 18th, resulting in













heavy frosts in the south-central counties, and light frost
in Monroe County, on the 15th. The month's rain was
slightly above normal.

FEBRUARY.-The month averaged colder than January,
and the mean temperature, 56.4 degrees, was nearly I
degrees below normal. The highest temperature occurred
in the central portion, and the lowest, 20 degrees. in sev-
eral of the western counties. The spring-like weather of
the last of January continued until the night of the 1st,
when a sharp cold wave swept over the western and some
of the northern counties, and the cold spell continued
over most of the State until the -th. A second sharp fall
in temperature occurred in the western section on the
16th, and except for a few warm days, the cold continued
until the close of the month. The warmest period was
generally from the 9th to 15th. The month was unusually
dry, and no general rain occurred until the 10th. Vegeta-
tion was backward.

MARCH.-The principal features were the unusually
high temperatures, the maximum being 95 degrees, the
continued dry weather, and, except on a few days, the
generally moderate winds. The cold during the last of
February was followed by warmer during most of the
first decade. The lowest temperatures occurred mostly
on the 1st, 21st, and 22d, and the warmest, from the 15th
to 20th, and during the last decade. The month was
without frost. The drought which began several months
previous assumed severe proportions and the average pre-
cipitation, about three-fourths inch, was nearly three
inches below normal.

APRIL.-The warm weather during the last days of
March extended into April, the latter month proving to be
the warmest of that name since 1892; the excess in tem-
perature was more than 6 degrees. The coolest weather
occurred generally on the 3d and 4th, followed by slowly













rising temperature, which culminated in afternoon rec-
ords of 90 degrees at some central and southern stations.
The warm weather advanced vegetation, altho the effect
of the drought of the previous months was still evident.
While the precipitation for the State, as a whole, was
above normal, the distribution was irregular over the
peninsular section.

MAY.-The month was practically a normal one with
regard to temperature, altho it opened much colder than
usual for May; the minimum occurred generally on the
1st and 2d. A moderate cool wave prevailed from the
8th to 11th. During the rest of the month the tempera-
ture was generally above normal, culminating in the
highest for the month on the 29th, when 102 degrees was
recorded. Local storms on the last day of the month did
considerable damage in Calhoun County. The precipita-
tion was more than an inch below normal, and the distri-
bution was unsatisfactory. The greatest amounts occurred
in the western and southern counties.

JUNE.-The weather was slightly cooler and much
drier than normal, altho the maximum temperature aver-
aged about 90 degrees, and extremes of 100 degrees were
recorded on the 13th, 22d and 23d. A maximum of 104
degrees has occurred in June of previous years. The
warmest of the month occurred in the interior of the
central section, and the coolest at coast stations, although
there was comparatively cool weather in the western
counties from the 10th to the 15th, and in the northern
counties from the 26th to the 30th. The showers of May
continued thruout the first week of June. Clear skies pre-
vailed on the 28th, and the annular eclipse of the sun was
successfully observed.

JULY.-As a whole, the month was characterized by
nearly normal temperature, and a slight deficiency in
precipitation. The warmest weather occurred generally













in the interior of the central section, and the coolest in
the extreme northern and western counties. Rain fell
daily in some sections of the State, and totals, generally
in excess of normal, were reported from Washington,
Leon, Jefferson, St. Johns, Clay, Duval, St. Lucie, Dade.
and Walton Counties. The bulk of the rain fell from the
1st to 11th, and from the 17th to 29th.

AuGusT.-The mean temperature, 81.1 degrees, which
was 0.3 degrees below normal, was the same as for July.
The month began with rather high temperature thruout
the State, the most pronounced warm period being from
the 1st to the 3d, and from the 17th to 21st. The coolest
weather prevailed during the last few days of the month,
and the temperature was below normal at all southern
stations-due to the almost daily showers. The distribu-
tion of the month's rain was very irregular; the greatest
amount occurred in DeSoto County. Thunder storms
were numerous.

SEPTEMBER.-Slightly cooler and much wetter than
normal, were the main features for September. The warm-
est weather occurred generally in the northern and central
counties, and the coolest in the western district. The
first pronounced cold spell of autumn set in on the 28th,
and the last two days of the month were sufficiently cold
for frost in some extreme western counties. Precipita-
tion was generally above normal, except in the south. The
precipitation at some stations during the month consti-
tuted about one-third of the annual amount. Rains were
heavy in Duval, Volusia, Brevard, Clay, and St. Johns
Counties.

OcToBER.-Unusually cool, and drier than normal,
except in the southeast portion, characterized the weather
for the month. The coldest occurred during the first and
last days, and the first frost formed in the western coun-
ties on the 30th and 31st; the temperature was in the











30's on the former date in Escambia County. The precip-
itation was unevenly distributed, except in the southern
portion, where it was heavy to excessive.

NOVEMBER.-Altho the second month of autumn was
about 3 degrees below normal, there was a return to
nearly average conditions during November, when the
temperature was slightly above normal, and the precipi-
tation about one-third inch below. The first frost occurred
during the first decade, and a second cold spell set in on
the 14th, and continued over a large section until the
21st. The precipitation was unevenly distributed, and
the bulk fell from the 2d to 4th, and from the 12th to 14th.
The wind velocities were moderate.

DECEMBER.-This was the warmest December, except
one, of record, the excess in temperature being more than
4 degrees. Warm weather continued during most of the
time until the last week, when colder weather set in, and
the temperature was freezing or below on the 27th over a
large portion, with frost in the lower counties. The pre-
cipitation was deficient at every station. The bulk of the
month's rain fell on the 4th, 12th, 22d, 30th, and 31st,
except that the distribution was fairly general in the
western section from the 19th to 22d.











30

MONTHLY SUMMARY, 1908.


Temperature. Precipita- Average cN
Sion. of Days.
- - -- -

MONTH. .




January ............. 57.4 -0.8 85 21 3.29+0.27 7 15 8 8
February ............ 56.4 3.6 87 20 2.361-1.50 6 16 7 6
March ............... 69.3 +3.8 95 3500.78--2.66 2 20 S' 3
April ................75.4 6.3 99 3713.34 0.87 6 15 10 5
May ................. 76.1 +0.1102 40 2.74'- 1.12 6 19 10 2
June ................ 79.3 0.6'100 56 5.931- 1.04 13 11 13 6
July ................. 81.11- 0.31103 60:6.78 -0.46 14 10 161 5
August .............. 81.1 -0.3 103'61'6.67'--0.75 13 12 14 5
September ........... 78.5!-0.7 98'46 9.45 -2.32 14 9 13' 8
October .............. 69.71- 2.9 93133 3.16'--0.93 6 18 8 5
November .......... 65.5 0.6 93 2511.81'-0.3S 4 '19 4
December ........... 62.9 +4.11 932411.02'-2.08! 4 17 10' 4











KILLING FROSTS.

SLast in First in
STATIONS.
Spring. Autumn.

NORTHERN SECTION.
Archer ........................ Nov. 17
Cedar Keys .................... None. None.
Federal Point ................. Feb. 21 Dec. 27
Fernandina .................... Feb. 21 None.
Gainesville .................... Feb. 22 Dec. 27
Hilliard ....................... No rep. Dec. 8
Huntington .......... ... ... Feb. 23 Dec. 27
Jacksonville .................. Feb. 21 None.
Jasper ......................... Feb. 23 Nov. 16
Johnstown ..................... Feb. 28 Dec. 10
Lake City ..................... Feb. 29 Nov. 17
Live Oak ...................... *
Macclenny .................... Feb. 29 Nov. 16
Middleburg ................... Feb. 29 Nov. 17
St. Augustine .................. Feb. 23 None.
Satsuma Heights .............. Nov. 18
Switzerland ................... Feb. 29 Dec. 27
CENTRAL SECTION.
Bartow ....................... Feb. 29 Dec. 27
Broksville ..................... Feb. 19 None.
Clermont ................... None.
DeLand .................. .... Feb. 29 Dec. 27
Eustis ......................... Feb. 21 None.
Fort Meade .................... Feb. 29 Dec. 27
Fort Pierce (near) ............. None. None.
Grasmere ...................... Feb. 3 None.
Inverness ..................... Feb. 29 Nov. 18
Kissimmee ..................... Feb. 3 None.
Malabar ........................ None. None.
Merritt's Island ................ None.
New Smyrna (near) ........... Feb. 28 None.
Ocala .......... ........... Feb. 28 Dec. 27
Orange City ................... Feb. 29 Nov. 18
Orlando ..................... Feb. 3 Dec. 27
Panasoffkee .................. Feb. 28 No rep.


* Record incomplete.








32

KILLING FROSTS-Continued.

Last in First in
STATIONS. Spring. Autumn.

Plant City .................... Feb. 29 None.
Rockledge ..................... No rep. None.
Rockwell ...................... Feb. 28 Dec. 26
St. Leo ........................ Feb. 28 Nov. 18
Tampa ........................ None. None.
Tarpon Springs ............... Feb. 21 None.
Titusville ..................... None.
SOUTHERN SECTION.
Arcadia ............ .... ..... Feb. 29 None.
Avon Park .................... None. None.
Flamingo ..................... None. No rep.
H ypoluxo ...................... one.
Jupiter ..................... None. None.
Key W est ..................... one. None.
Manatee ....................... None. None.
Miami ............ ........ ..... None. None.
M years ......................... None. None.
Sand Key ..................... None. None.
WESTERN SECTION.
Apalachicola ............ ....... Feb. 20 None.
Blountstown ... ................ No rep. Nov. 14
Bonifay ....................... Feb. 28 Nov. 15
Carrabelle ......... ....... .... \.. re, Nor. 16
DeFuniak Springs ............. Feb. 23 Nov. 15
Fenholloway .................. Feb. 24 Dec. 9.
Galt .......................... Feb. 28 No rep.
Madison .................... ... Feb. 28 Dec. 27
Marianna ...................... No. rep. Dec. 9
M olino ........................ Feb. 28 Nov. 6
Monticello ..................... Feb. 28 Dec. 9
Mount Pleasant ............. .. Feb. 29 Nov. 15
Newport ................. Feb. 28 Nov. 16
Pensacola ..................... Feb. 21 None.
St. Andrew .................. .. Feb. 28 Nov. 16
Tallahassee .................... Feb. 21 Nov. 15
W ausau ...................... Feb. 28 Nov. 14
Record Incomplete.













COMPARATIVE ANNUAL DATA FOR FLORIDA.
TEMPERATURE. PRECIPITATION

YEAR.


1892 ............. 70.4 101 22 47.99
1893 ............. 71.0 101 19 53.01
1894 ............. 71.2 104 12 52.51
1895 ............. 69.9 100 11 45.50
1896 ............. 71.0 103 20 49.62
1897 ............. 71.2 102 17 56.69
1898 ............. 70.5 102 17 48.36
1899 ............. 71.0 104 2 53.93
1900 ............. 70.7 104 13 61.19
1901 ............. 68.8 107 12 58.47
1902 ............. 70.8 105 15 51.24
1903 ............. 69.8 105 17 55.79
1904 ............. 69.9 102 20 48.15
1905 ............. 70.5 103 10 61.43
1906 ............. 70.9 101 14 53.76
1907 ............. 71.5 102 21 49.15
1908 ............. 71.2 103 20 48.54











CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT: FLORIDA SECTION.

Climatological Data for the Year 1908.


STATIONS.





Northern iSection.

A rcher ..........................
Cedar K eys ......................
Federal Point ..................
Fernandina.....................
Gainesville. ....................

Hilliard. ........................
Huntington. .....................
Jacksonvile. ....................
Jasper. .........................

Johnstown. ......................
Lake City. .......................
Live Oak. ......................
M acclenny. ......... ..........


COUNTIES.







Alachua ................
Levy. ...................
Putnam ...............
Nassau. ...............
Alachua ................

Ntissiu. ................
Putnam. ................
Duvap ................
H amilton. ...............

Bradford...............
Columbia. ..............
Suwannee ...............
Baker. ..................


Temperature in


aE1








26 .... 100 June 22
12 71.7 94 Aug. 15
16 70.9 100 July 16
12 69.2 97 Aug. 20
2370.3 99 May 28*

1 .... ... ........
12 .... 100 May 29*
37 19.3 95 Aug. 2
11 .... 99 Aug. 18

13 .... 97 May 22
20 69.2 98 May 28*

13 6R.G 97 May 28*


Degrees, Fahrenheit.


33 Jan. 24*
30 Jan. 25
27 Feb. 23
27 Jan. 25*


27 Jan. 25*
28 Feb. 3
24 Feb. 3

22 Feb. 3
23 Jan. 25
.. ......


22 |Feb. 3









Middleburg .....................
St. Augustine. ...................
Satsuma Heights.................
Switzerland .................... .

Central Section.

Bartow ........................
Brooksville.....................
Clermont ......................
DeLand ........................

Eustis. .........................
Ft. M eade. .....................
Ft. Pierce (nrar) .................
Grasmere. .......................

Inverness. ......................
K issim m ee .....................
Malabar. .........................
Merritt's Island. .................

New Smyrna (near) ..............
Ocala. .........................
Orange City .................... .
Orlando ..........................

Plant City. .....................
Rockledge ......................
Rockwell .......................
St. Lee........................


Clay. ............. ...
St. Johns ...........
Putnam ................
St. Johns. ................



Polk ........ ...........
Hernando. \..............
Lake ...................
Volusia .................

Lake. ...................
Polk. ...................
St. Lucie ...............
Orange .................

Citrus ...... ...........
Osceola. ................
Brevard ................
Brevard ................

Volusia .................
Marion .................
Vnolusia .................


Orange .................

Hillsboro ..............
Brevard ................
Marion ...............
Pasco .................


10
10
98
10



115
126
105
27

56
125
6
175

43
65
24
20

9
98
39
111

121
10
10
140


9 .... 99 May 22 21 Feb. 3
59170.1 96 July 8* 28 Feb. 3
1 .... 100 July 15* .... ......
12 69.5 95 Aug. 19* 27 Jan. 25*



14 72.8 100 May 29* 30 Jan. 15*
16 72.6 101 Aug. 2 28 Feb. 3*
16 .... 101 July 16 .... .... ....
8 ... ............ 28 Feb. 3*

19 72.0 99 Aug. 2 29 Jan. 25*
26 72.4 100 May 18 29 Jan: 15
18 73.8 98[July 31* 38 Jan. 15*
12 .... .. .. .... 31 Jan. 15*

8169.8 96 April 26* 25 Jan. 25
17 72.5 99 July 16 32 Feb. 3
7 73.7 100 July 18* 31 IFeb. 29
28 ... .... ....

21 70.9 96'May 28* 31 Feb. 2*
22 ... .. ... .. 26 Jan. 25*
18 .... 102 May 29 27 Jan. 15*
19 72.8 100 May 29* 31 Jan. 15

17 .... ..... ... 30 Feb. 2*
1*..... .......... .
9171.61100 Aug. 3* 25 Jan. 25
14171.8 97 July 16* 29 jJan. 15*











CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT : FLORIDA SECTION.-Continued.

Climatological Data for the Year 1908.

Temperature in Degrees, Fahrenheit.


STATIONS. COUNTIES



5 I I i
______________"L^J a s" S &


Tampa. .......................... Hillsboro. ...............
Tarpon Springs. ................. Hillsboro ...............
Titusvile. ........................ BRvard. .................


Southern Section.

Arcadia.......................
Avon Park. .....................
Flamingo. .......................
Hypoluxo. .....................
J u p iter. .........................

Key W est ......................
M anal ..........................
M iami .......... ...............
Myer. ..........................
Sand Key. .....................


1)eSoto. ................
DeSoto .................
Monroe................
Dado. ..................
Dade. ........... .......

Monroe ..................
Manatee. ................
Dn) e. .............. ..
L e t ...................
Monroe. ................


20 19 72.3 96 Aug. 2
20 25 71.2 9G Aug. 15
6 17 ...1 ... .........



56 1|73.1 101 July 17
150 12 73.3 98 July 16
4 8 ... .. .
4 12 .... 96 July 18
28 21 74.0 951July 18

22 :28 7(.8 91 Aug. 25
8 25172.5 95 May 23*
5 13 75.9 95 July 18*
12 25 72.9 94 May 22
251 517I;.5 941Aug. 8


33 Feb. 3
27 Jan. 25




29 Jan. 25
34 Feb. 29


40 Jan. 25

51 Feb. 21
33 |Feb. 29
40 Feb. 28
:l(; Feb. 23
53 ]Jan. 25










Western Section.

Apalachicola .....................
Blountstown ....................
Bonifay. ..........................
Carrabelle. ......................

DeFuniak Springs................
Fenholloway ...................
Madison .......................
M arianna. .......................

Molino. ........................
M onticello. ......................
M t. Pleasant. ...................
N ewport. .......................

Pensacola. ......................
St. Andrew. ......... .............
Tallahassee. ....................
W ausau. ........................

Means and Extremes.............


Franklin. ..............
Calhoun. ..............
Holmes.................
Franklin ... ...........

W alton. ................
Taylor ........ ....
M adison ...............
Jackson ...............

Escambia. ...............
Jefferson ..............
Gadsden .... ...........
W akulla ...............

Escambia .. ...........
W ashington ..............
L- on. ..................
W ashington .............


24 5 ....
... 1 ....
111 8 68.4
10 13 ....

193 12 ....
70 2 ....
200 69.4
80 9 ....

49 7 67.2
207 4 68.5
260 3 68.4
... 1 ....

56 3068.3
14 11 68.4
2431 24 68.0
2501 11 68.5
-- ... 71.2
.1.. 71.2


July 16

Aug. 15*
Aug. 6*


100 Aug. 3*
103 Aug. 16

96 July 17*
99 May 24
95 May 30*
96 Aug. 18

93 Aug. 15
97 July 10
94 Aug. 18
100 Aug. 6*
103-Aug. 16
1031Aug. 16


24 IFeb. 3
... .......

23 Feb. 3
25 Feb. 3
20 Feb. 3
25 Dec. 27

28 Jan. 24
22 Feb. 3
24 Feb. 3
20 Feb. 2

20 Feb. 2*












CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT: FLORIDA SECTION.--Continued.

Climatological Data for the Year 1908.


STATIONS. COUNTIES.


Northern Section.

Archer ............
Cedar Keys .......
Federal Point ......
Fernandina ........
Gainesville ........

H illiard ...........
Huntington ........
Jacksonville......
Jasper. ...........

Johnstown .........


Alachua.....
Levy .......
Putnam .....
Nassau .....
Alachu ....

Nassau ....
utnain .....
Duval. .......
I amilton. .o.

Bradford ....


Precipitation in Inches.


26 .
12 45.25 15.80
16 45.54 11.31
12 56.17 16.79
23 43.12 9.62


12 44.14 14.10
37 55.44 21.79
11 ..... .....

13 ... .....


0.23
0.62

0.10
!-'















0.40
0.47


Cd


d

0
1-.
rt
'3

4 I)
a 2
o s
S z


Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Dec.


Mar.
Nov.


Sky.

0


Io








...... Nw.




121 52 Sw.
71 83 Se.
... ... Ne.


.E ... E.
138 84 Sw.
... ... Sw.

.. . .. .










Lake City. .........
Live Oak. .........
Macclenny. ........

Middleburg. .......
St. Augustine. ......
Satsuma Heights...
Switzerland ........

Central Section.

Bartow. ...........
Brookksville ......
Clermont. .........
DeLand. ...........

Eustis ...........
Ft. Meade ........
Ft. Pierce (near) ...
Grasmere. .........

Inverness .........
Kissimmee. ........
Malabar. ..........
Merritt's Island. ...

New Smyrna (near)
Ocala.............
Orange City. .......
Orlando...........

Plant City. ........


Columbia. ...
Suwannee ...
Baker ......

Clay. ........
St. Johns.....
Putnam .....
St. Johns.....



Polk. ........
Hernando ...
Lake .......
Vo':usia ...

Lake .......
Polk. ........
St. Lucie ....
Orange ......

Citrup. ......
Osceola. .....
Brevard .....
Brevard .....

Volusia. .....
Marion ......
Volusia......
ran'e. .....

HIillsbor~ ..


29.83

37.85


58.64

49.82



48.89
43.44
49.78


42.98
46.57
63.00


46.28
46.86
62.77


63.80

54.24
49.64

40.49


4.85

7.44


16.22

15.65



13.72
9.62
16.02


11.39
11.20
15.44


11.03
9.40
19.96


21.49

14.10
9.94

13.92


July

Sept


Sept

Sept



Sept
Sept
Sept


Sept
Sept
Sept


Sept
Aug.
Sept

Sept

Sept

Sept

Aug.


0.35

0.31


0.53

0.44



0.02
0.10
0.03


0.02
0.18
0.33


0.47
0.26
0.06


0.32

0.07
0.25

0.o00


Nov.

Nov.


Nov.

Dec.



Mar.
Mar.
Mar.


Mar.
Dec.
Mar.


Mar.
Mar.
Mar.


Mar.

Mar.
Mar.

Mar.x


156 :88. Ne..


Ne-Se.





Ne.
W.



W.
Se.
Se.


Sw.
Ne.
Se.




Sw.
....,..











CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT: FLORIDA SECTION. -Continued.


Climatological Data for the Year 1908.


STATIONS.






Rockbedge........
Rockwell ..........
St. Leo. ..........

Tampa. ............
Tarpon Springs.....
Titusville .........

Roitlhern scction.

Arcadia. ...........
Avon Parlk ........
Flamingo. ..........
Hypoluxo. ..........
Jupiter ..........


COUNTIES






Brevard. t....
Marion .....
Pasco.......

Hillsboro.
Hillsboro. ..
Irevard. .....



DeSoo ...
DeSoro. ..
Monl O. .....
Dade .. ......
Dade ......


Precipitation in inches.


0



o






41.69 10.12 June

32.25 7.48 Aug.
140.21 7.75 Aug.
. .. . .



63,62 18.21 Aug.
42.46 10.30 Sept
2..2. 1. Au.....


70.07 19.(;7 Oct.
70.42 20.43 Oct.


0.







0.07
0.10


0.08






0.027
0.10
0.55


Sky.


---j ---
0
I .









Dec. .. ..
Mar. 112 147

Mar. 109 184
Mar. 88 284
.... .- . .



Dec. 13R8 ...
Mar. 111 191

Mar. 145 1 83
Mar. |161 831


o







0W.



W.

Ne.
W.


.. ... E .
122 53 Nc-So.

1:0 53 So.
2211 59 Se.









Key West .........
Manatee..........
M iam i, ............
M years. ...........
Sand Key. ........

Western 'Section.

Apalachicola. ......
Blountstown ......
Bonifay. ...........
Carrabelle. .........

DeFuniak Springs..
Fenholloway. ......
Madison ..........
Marianna. .........

Molino. ..........
Monticello. .........
Mt. Pleasant. .......
Newport .........

Pensacola. .........
St. Andrew. ........
Tallahassee ......
W ausau ..........

Means and Extremes


Monroe .....
Manatee ....
Dade .......
Lee ........
Monroe....



Franklin ..
Calhoun ..
Holmes .....
Franklin ....

Walton. .....
Taylor ....
Madison ...
Jackson .....

Escambia. ..
Jefferson ....
Gadsden...
Wakulla ....

Escambia ...
Washington.
Leon. ........
Washington. .


38.83 11.43
48.44 13.41
85.36 27.86
48.53 12.91
21.31 4.76


1 ..... .... .

13 ..... ... .

12 . .
2 41.94 11.07
6 139.32 7.30
9 ..... .....

7 58.54| 7.91
4 48.25 11.51
3 38.32 7.14
1 ..*. .... .

30 42.01 6.82
11 48.98 12.271
24 55.00 10.211
11 148.94 8.321
--- 48.54-27.86
.... 148.54127.861


0.18
0.04
0.86
0.33
0.24





9.72



0.00
0.14


T
0.51
T


0.67
0.05
0.18
0.00

0.001


Nov. ..



Mar. 52 57
Mar. 82 90


Oct. 64 ...
Nov. 116 156
Nov. 70 ...


Nov. 102 135
Nov. 89 ...
Mar. 89 169
Nov. 67 128

Mar.t t100 162


T-Amount too small to measure.


* Also other dates.


x Also November and December.













U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climatological Service of the

Weather Bureau.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION,
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.


REPORT FOR JANUARY, 1909.


GENERAL SUMMARY.
The weather for the month, up to and including the
29th, was unusually mild, and compared with January
during the last eighten years, the month was the warmest
of record, except one. It was, also, notably dry, being
surpassed in this respect only three times since 1892.
The warm weather that characterized December con-
tinued practically unbroken until the 7th, when colder
set in over the western and extreme northern counties,
resulting in the first frost of the month. There was an
early return to warmer, however, and the mean tempera-
ture averaged from 2 to 12 degrees above normal during
most of the second decade. Except a change to colder in
the western and extreme northern counties on the 17th,
unusually high temperatures persisted thruout the last
decade until the 29th, when a severe storm that moved
eastward over the central valleys was followed by a cold
wave. Colder weather set in on the 30th, and on the
31st minimum temperatures ranged from 18 degrees to
22 degrees over the western counties; 20 to 26 degrees












over the northern counties, and 26 to 29 degrees in the
central counties. In the upper portion of the southern
counties the temperature was in the 30's. Vegetation
suffered to a considerable extent. Freezing weather con-
tinued over most of the State on the night of the 31st.
The precipitation was greatest over the southeast por-
tion, and least over the central, extreme northern, and
western counties. Every station, except one, in the north-
ern and western sections, received less than the average
amount of rain, and there were only seven stations in the
other sections that received the normal, or an amount
slightly in excess of normal. The first three days were
dry in the western district, altho scattered, light rains
occurred elsewhere. Showers and locally heavy rains
were fairly general on the 4th and 5th, followed, how-
ever, during the rest of the month by generally light and
widely scattered precipitation. Rain is needed thruout
the State.
ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean atmospheric pressure 'for January, 1909,
reduced to sea level, and determined from observations
taken daily at 7 a. m..and 7 p. m., 90th meridian time, at
six Weather Bureau stations, was 30.13 inches, or 0.01
inch above normal. The highest pressure occurred at
Pensacola, 30.49 inches, on the 31st; and the lowest, 29.63
inches, occurred at Jacksonville, on the 29th, giving a
range for the State of 0.86 inch.

TEMPERATURE.

The mean temperature for the month, determined from
the records of 60 stations, was 62.4 degrees, which is 4.8
degrees above normal. The mean maximum and the mean
minimum temperatures were 72.6 degrees and 52.3 de-
grees, respectively. The highest monthly mean was 71.1
degrees, at Sand Key; the lowest monthly mean was 56.6
degrees, at Molina and Pensacola. The highest tempera-












44

ture recorded was 89 degrees, at Merritt's Island, on the
4th; the lowest temperature recorded.was 18 degrees, at
Marianna, on the 31st. The greatest monthly range at
any station was 65 degrees, at Marianna; the least, 20
degrees, at Sand Key. The greatest daily average was
45 degrees, at Marianna.

PREC IMITATION.

The average precipitation for the State, as determined
from the records of 62 stations, was 1.67 inches. which is
1.36 inches below the normal. The greatest amount
recorded at any station was 5.98 inches, at Jupiter; and
the least 0.34 inch, at Macclenny. Rains exceeding 2.50
inches in 24 hours occurred as follows: Cedar Keys,
2.58, on the 5th; Gainesville, 2.96, on the 5th. The aver-
age number of days with 0.01 inch, or more, of precipita-
tion, was four.

COMPARATIVE DATA FOR THE STATE. JANUARY.


TrEPERATURE


PPECIPITATION


YEAR


1892 ................ 50.6
1893 ................ 52.2
1894 ................ 61.9
1895 ................ 59.7
1896 ................ 56.5
1897 ................ 56.2
1898 ................ 60.4
1899 ................ 59.2
1900 ................ 55.9
1901 ................ 57.3
1902 ................ 55.1
1903 ................ 57.2
1904 ................ 54.9
1905 ................ 52.8
1906 ................ 58.3
1907 ................ 63.4
1908 ................ 57.4
1909 ................ 62.4


C-





-1.0
--5.4
+4.3
+2.1
--1.1
--1.4
S+2.8
+1.6
--1.7
--0.3
--2.5j
-0.4
-2.7
-4.8
+0.7
+5.8
--0.2
14-4.8


22 3.1; +0.13
20 1.95 -1.08S
27 2.16 --0. 7
22 3. (7 -- .4
20 3.96 -. 93
17 1.9' --1.13
16 0.74 -2.29
25 4.53 --1.50
S1:3 3.25 -0. 22
22 2.45 -- .5S
15 0.65 -2.38
18 5.24 -2.21
20 5.2i0 -2.17
12 1.79 -1.24
21 '4.60 --1.57
25 0. OS -2.23
21 3.29 --0.26
18 1.67 -1.36









CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT: FLORIDA SECTION.

Climatological Data for January, 1909.
Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit Precipitation, in inches. Sky

C' d .1 P ZO
~& E~ "s i
5 a_ _________
a> a S-a a ra' &

2) a 0! & a t
STATIONS. COUNTIES. m
-E3 "'R
.30. s d 0
9 a 4 a a t 0Z
A Z z z 5


NORTHERN SECTION.
Archer ............
Cedar Keys.........
Federal Point......
Fernandina ........
Gainesville .........
H illiard ...........
Huntington ........
Jacksonville .......
Jasper ............
Johnstown .........
Lake City .........
Live Oak .........
Macclenny .........
Middleburg ........
St. Augustine .....
Satsuma Heights...
Switzerland ........


Alachua .........
Levy ...........
Putnam ........
Nassau .........
Alachua .........
Na-sau .........
Putnam ........
Duval ..........
Hamilton .......
Bradford ........
'olumbia .......
quwannee .......
Baker ..........
Clay ............
it. Johns .......
Dutnam .........
St. Johns .......


92 25 ..... ..... 80 24 24 31
10111 62.8 +5.6 80 8 26 31
5 15! 62.4 +7.0 83 25 26 31
10 11i 58.8 +5.1 79 12 23 31
176122 60.41+5.8 8123 23 31
...i. 58.3 ..... 8223* 20 31
56,11 62.1 +6.3 80 25 26 31
433Gi 59.3 +5.4 79 24 23 31
152-10l ..... .. .. .. .. .
125 121a58.4 +4.5 a82 24 a23 31
210 19 59.6 +4.1 82 24 20 31
. .................... ..... ..31
125 13|a58.41 +4.2 a82124 a22 31
10 8 h60.01+7.3 182125 h23[ 31
10158 60.61+4.51 78 26 25 31
98|.. 60.4 ..... 77 12* 24 31
10111c60.21+6.5 c79 25 c24 31


2.70-0.69 2.25 2 .
323.02-0.91 2.58 4 25 2
32 2.42 -0.151 1.80 9 13 13 51
27 1.56 2.07 0.74 8 11 6 14
32 3.15 -0.40 2.96 3 20 3 8
400.74 ...... 0.71 2 19 4 8s
31 0.86 -1.01 0.70 2 21 3 7
24 1.17 -1.95 0.98 5 121 9 10
.. .... ....... ..... ... ... ... ...I
41 0.53 2.21 0.53 1 ... ... ...
35 1.00 2.58 0.93 2 15 11 5

37 0.34 2.55 0.30 2... ...I...
36 1.75 1.03 1.55 3.......
32 1.65 -0.97 1.52 2i 19 4 8
29 1.45 ...... 1.24 3 7 21 3
29 2.66 +0.04 2.19 2 .. .. ...


Nw.
Ne.
Ne.


E.
Ne.


Ne.


Ne.

Ne.
N.









CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JANUARY, 1909.-Continued.
STemiperature, in degrees Fahrenheit Precipitation, in inches. Sky.
c3 a

r
STATIONS. COUNTIES. c s *


C a 5
c C C C C C C C C C O i
a r H Q K R ] P O 0 Z Z Z


CENTRAL SECTION.
Bartow ...........
Brooksville ........
Clermont ..........
DeLand ...........
Eustis .............
Fort Meade ........
Fort Pierce (near).
Grasmere** ........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee .........
Malabar ...........
Morritts Islandtt ...
New Smyrna (near)
Ocala ..............
Orange City .......
Orlando ..........
Plant City .........
Rockledge .........
Rockwell ..........
St. Leo ...........


Polk ........... 115 13 64.7 +5.0 83 24 29 31 34
Hernando ....... 126 15 65.2 +7.8 86 25 26 31 31
Lake ........... 105 15 65.4 +5.9 86 4 27 31 30
Volusia ......... 27 7 62.4 +4.6 78 24 27 31 25
Lake ........... 56 18 64.2!+5.9 83 4 28 31 27
Polk ............ 125 24 64.6[+5.7 85 23 30 3134
St. Ilucie ........6 17 a67.1 +4.6 b83 29 a32 31 24
Orange ..........175 11 ..... ..... 81 22* .. ..
(Cilrus .......... 43 71 61.0 +5.5 80 25 25 31 30
Osceola ......... 65 16( (5.0 -5.0 81 23 28 31 28
Brevard ........ 24 9 66.8 +6.8 82 26* 30 31 30
Ilrevard ........ 20 27 68.0 +6.2 89 4 31 31 29
Volnuia .......... 9 20 63.8 +3.8 80 26* 30 31 36
Marion ......... 98 21 1)01.4 i-4 .1 b 23[ 23 b25| 31 31
Volusia ......... :39 17 63.3 4-5.2 84 4 26 31 36
Orange ......... 111 IS 64.8 +5.5 82 23* 28 31 30
Ilill.iorough .... 121 1; 65.8 6.2 85 17* 28 31 33
IHrcvaird ........ ..... 7.2 ..... 82 17 29 31 28
Marion .......... 10 8e64.2 +8.1 e82 23 ... .. 34
I'asco ........... 140 1:3 64.2 +5.2 82 23 27 31 28


0.94--1.79 0.62
1.19--1.90 1.19
1.60 -1.17 1.05
1.75 ...... 1.50
2.29 -0.75 1.45
0.89 -1.54 0.52
4.63 +1.17 1.81
1.34 -1.08 .....
1.45 -1.20 1.20
0.86 -2.14 0.32
2.35-1 0.14 0.81
2.70 -0.35 1.05
2.00 -0.94 0.55
1.271-1.418 1.08
1.25 1.341 1.131
1.311--1.67 1.17
1.43 -0.60 1.11
1.53 ...... 0.71
1.76 -0.891 1.40
1.751-1.751 1.70


5 13 13 5 Ne.
1 22 4 5 Nw.
1 12 15 41 Ne.
2 16 13 21 W.
.. 23 5 31 Ne.
3 18 9 41 Ne-se
12 ... ... .. Ne.
.. 23 6 2 Ne.
2 3 24 4 Ne.
5 19 11 1 Ne.
13 24 4 3 E.
9 17 9 5 Ne.
... ... ... .....
3 13 9 9
21 22 7 2 W.
3 9 16 6 Se.

5 26 3 2 Ne.
4 .. ... ... W.
51 18 91 4 E.










Tampa ............
Tarpon Springs ....
Titusville ..........

SOUTHERN SECTION.

Arcadia ...........
Avon Park ........
Flamingo ..........
Hypoluxo ..........
Jupiter ...........
Key West .........
Manatee ...........
M iami ............
Myers ............
Sand Key .........

WESTERN SECTION.

Apalachicola .......
Blountstown .......
Bonifay ...........
Carrabelle .........
DeFuniak Springs...
Madison ..........
Fenholloway .......
Marianna ..........
M olino ............
Monticello .........
Mount Pleasant.....
Newport ..........
Pensacola .........


Hillsborough ....
Hillsborough ....
Brevard ........



DeSoto ..........
DeSoto ..........
Monroe .........
D ade ...........
Dade ...........
Monroe .........
Manatee ........
Dade ..........
Lee .............
Monroe .........



Franklin ........
Calhoun ........
Holmes .........
Franklin .......
W alton .........
Taylor .........
Madison ........
Escambia ......
Jackson ........
Tefferson .......
Gadsden ........
Wakkulla .......
Escambia .......


20 18
20 24
6 16



... ..
150111
41 7 .
4 11
28 20
22i37
8 24
5 12
12 24
25 4



24 4

111 7
10 12
193111
70 2
200 5
80 8
49 6
207 3
560 29

56 29


65.2 +7.8
64.7 +6.4
65.0 +5.6



66.0 .....
66.1 +5.3

68.8 +3.3
68.6 +4.3
71.0 +2.2
65.8 +5.4
69.6 +4.3
65.8 +3.5
71.1 +2.8



58.6 +4.5

57.4 +5.8
57.0 +3.9
57.4 +6.3
61.2 .....
58.2 +4.01
57.0 +6.4
56.6 +6.2
58.7 +4.0
60.0 .....
57.6 +5.4
56.6 +4.3


81 24
84 23
81 13



83 4*
86 24

83 5
80 26
79 29
85 4
82 29
80 4
78 28



76 26

80 23
78 26
81 6*
86 17
83 24
a83 23*
83 23*
80 24*
84 24
79 27
76122


31 24 1.781-1.02 1.57
31 29 2.081-1.32 1.68
31 3T 1.57 +0.19 0.52



31 30 1.06 ...... 0.69
31 32 0.37 -2.00 0.23

31 28 4.38 +0.87 1.64
31 22 5.98 +2.40 2.39
31 15 1.82 -0.16 1.05
31 30 1.12 -1.58 0.75
31 24 5.45 +8.89 2.23
31123 1.131-1.53 0.61
31110 0.89 -0.06 0.59



31 29 1.11 -2.72 0.90

31 36 1.45 -3.80 0.52
31 28 0.92 -2.19 0.72
31141 0.80 -3.23 0.35
31 37 2.07 ......| 1.401
31 35 1.101-4.16 0.52
31 45 0.471-3.25 0.37
31 39 1.50 -2.75 0.83
31 35 0.64 -2.69 0.43
31 43 0.35--0.59 0.25
31 40 0.50--3.48 0.50
3121711.711-2.33 0.601


4 10 13 81
3 24 5 2
9 12 10 9



7 12 15 4
4 18 10 3
.. ... .
14 17 11 3
17 10 15 6
5 18 7 6
3 22 8 1
9 23 5 3
4j 18 9 4
615 15 12 4


23 4

14 7
24 5
17 5
13 12
71 14
19 10
23 3
151 11
. I .
26j 0
111 12!


Ne.
W.
N.



E.
Ne.

Ne.
E.
Ne.
Nw.
Ne.
E.
Ne.



E.

S.

N.
Sw.
Sw.
Nw.
N.
W.

Sw.
Ne.








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JANUARY, 1909.-Continued.


STemperature,


STATION S. o NrIEl .
o 0 0

a a

St. Andrew ........ Washington .....1410 57.1 +5.2
Tallahassee ........ Leon ........... 24 23 57.8 +5.9
Wausau ........... Washington ....250 10 57.2 +5.8
Late Report
(Dec. 1908)......
Apalachicola ...... ..... .......... 60.0 + 5.0


ill degrees Fahrenheit







75 22 21 31 29
78 24* 21 31 34
82 25 19 30 42


77 1 381 9*125


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature and
precipitation are lasicd only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
The let(lrs a, 1). c., etc., indicate number of (lays missing from report. More than one day.
** 1'. O. Plymouth. tt P. O. Georgianna.


i


Precipitation, in inches.

0 '




0.85-2.97 0.55


1.62 -4.43 0.81
1.871 -2.01| 0.80
1.32-2.39 0.35
0.85 -2.97 0.55


1.62f-4.43 0.81


5| 211 61 41 N-Ne.



















PART III.


Fertilizers,
Feeding Stuffs and
Foods and Drugs
















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMERCIAL
FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE COMMIS-
SIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.
Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed., and
A FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES
(ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO THE COMMIS-
SIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT LESS THAN
EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE ACCEPTED
FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to make the necessary determinations,
and to allow the preservation of a duplicate sample in case
of protest or appeal. This duplicate sample will be pre-
served for two months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare cases
is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently sent in
paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and fre-
quently in very small quantity (less than ounce); fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the law,
which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and ad-
dress must also be on the package, this rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.












INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer and each pack-
age of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have, securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis re-
quired by law, and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. This provision of the law-Section 3 of
both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not bear
on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee re-
quired by law, and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag and
stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence of the
guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manufacturer
or dealer has not complied with the law. Without the guar-
antee tag and stamp showing what the goods are guaran-
teed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse against the
manufacturer or dealer.. Such goods are sold illegally and
fraudulently, and are generally of little value. All repu-
table manufacturers and dealers now comply strictly with
the law and regulations by placing the guarantee tag and
stamp on each package.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is called
to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties. This de-
partment expects each Sheriff to assist in maintaining the
law and protecting the citizens of the State from the impo-
sition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient Commercial Fer
tilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.













MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-
IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA
PORTS, JANUARY, 1909.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent Ammonia ...........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
m onia ..................
Dried Blood 15 per cent. Am-
m onia ..................


Less than 5to10 10tons
5 tons. tons. & over.

$60.00 $59.50 $59.00

74.00 73.50 73.00

60.00 59.50 59.00

54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per
cent Potash (K0O )......
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per
cent. Potash (KO) (90 per
cent. Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Ams., 42
Potash (K,0) ............
Kainit 12 per cent Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K,O) Potash...


50.00 49.50 49.00

30.00 29.50 29.00

46.00 45.50 44.00


110.00

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent. Ammonia.....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
6 per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.
Raw Bone 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid..............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00













Less than
Ammoniates. 5 tons.
Ammonia and Phosphoric Acid:
Ground Castor Pomace, 6(
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid..... $25.00
Briht Cottonseed Meal, 8
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations .............. 31.00
Dark Cottonseed Meal, 5
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations .............. 24.00


5 to 10
tons.


10 tons
& over.


$24.50 S24.00


29.50 29.00


23.50 23.00


PHOSPHORIC' ACID.


High Grade Phosphoric Acid,
16 percent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ............ .
Acid Phosphate. 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Roneblack. 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid,.
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00

14.00

24.00
25.00


14.50 14.50

13.50 13.00

23.50 23.00
24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems.
:3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash .............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ..................
Tobacco Dust. No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
(K20) Potash ...........
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per
cent. Ammonia, 14 per
cent. Potash ............
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks.......


25.00

1.6.00


23.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


24.50 24.00

15.50 15.00


22.50 22.00


1R.50
14.50
10.25


is.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.













NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES CURRENT JAN.
1, 1909-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMAMONIATES.


Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, spot, per 100
lbs. ................................
futures ......................
Ammonia, sulphate, domestic, spot......
futures ......................
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p.c. ammonia and 14
p. c. bone phosphate, f o. b. fish works,
per unit ...........................
wet, acidulated, 6 p.c. ammonia, 3
p.c. phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish
w orks ......................
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11
p.c. ammonia and 15-17 p.c. bone phos-
phate, c. i. f. 1. Y., Balto. or Phila..
Tankage, 11 p.c. and 15 p.c., f. o. b. Chi-
cago ..............................
Tankage, 9 and 20 p.c, f.o.b. Chicago..
Tankage, 6 and 25 p.c, f.o.b. Chicago..
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 per cent f. o. b. Chicago ....
Garbage, tankage ....................
Sheep manure, concentrated, f. o. b.
Ohicago, per ton ...................
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit....
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York .........................
Dried blood, high grade, f. o. b. Chicago.
Nitrate of soda. 95 p. c. sp6t, per 100 lbs
futures, 95 p. c...............


2.85 @
2.871@
2.87j @
2.90 @


2.65 &


2.40 &


2.75 &


2.871
2.90
2.90
2.924


10


35


10


2.30 & 10.
2.20 & 10
15.00 @ -

2.25@ -
6.00 @ 8.00

7.50 @ -
2.30 @ 2.35


2.60
2.50
2.15
2.15


@26.65
@ 2.55
@ 2.171
@ 2.171


PHOSPHATES.


Acid phosphate, per unit............... 50 @ 55
Bones, raw, per ton .................. 20.00 @ -
ground, steamed, 3 p. c. ammo-
nia and 50 p. c. bone phosphate 24.00 @ -
unground, steamed .......... 17.50 @ 18.00













South Carolina phosphate rock, undried,
per 2,400 lbs., f. o. b. Ashley River....
South Carolina phosphate rock, hot air
dried, f. o. b. Ashley River...........
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. Port Tampa, Fla........
Florida high grade phosphate hard rocks,
77 p. c., f. o. b. Florida or Georgia ports
Georgia ports ................
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, per ton, 78@80 p.c.
75 p. c. guaranteed ...........
68@ 72 p. c...................


5.50 @ 5.75i

7.00 @ 7.75

3.25 @ 3.50

9.25 E@ 9.75
9.25 O( 9.75


5.00
4.75
4.00


5.50
5. 00
4.25


POTASHES.


Muriate potash, basis 80 p. c. per 100 lbs.
Manure salt, 20 p. c. actual potash....
double manure salt, 48 p. c.. *
Sulphate potash (basis 90 p. c.)........
Kainit in bulk, 2,240 lbs..............


1.90 @
14.75 @
1.164 @
2.18 @
8.50 @'












STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1909.

Available Phosphoric Acid............ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia ( or its equivalent in nitrogen) 16A cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash (K2O) ....... 51 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... 20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) ..$3.30 per unit
Potash ................................. 1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. in a ton. We
find this to be The easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluable Phosphoric Acid..1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia ................. .3.42 per cent.x 3.30- 11.28
Potash ......... ........ .7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging ..........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports .................$27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid....8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.60
Potash ......................2 per cent.x. 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging ..........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports................... $18.30

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the 'date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.












If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction af
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:

Available Phosphoric Acid............90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ......................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen).. .$2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets." loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1909 deducted
therefrom.














COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


Nitrate of Soda..........
Sulphate of Ammonia ...
Dried Blood..............
Concentrated Tankage....
Bone Tankage ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........
Cotton Seed Meal.........
Hoof Meal .............


POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Phosphoric
Ammonia Acid Potash

17 to 19 ............ ............
21 to 24 ............ ............
12 to 17 ............ ..........
12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
8 to 11 6 to 8 ...........
7 to 10 2 to 3 1i to 2
13 to 17 l1 to 2 ...........


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate. ............ ............. 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ........................ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.. ............ 14 to 19 1 to 35
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to S
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Actual oa Phosphoric
Potash Ammonia Acid Lime

Muriate of Potash....... 50 ........................
Sulphate of Potash......48 to 52 ......... ......... .........
Carbonate of Potash .... 55 to 30 ................. .........
Nitrate of Potash......40 to 44 12 to 16..................
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag 26 to 30...........................
Kainit ................. 12 to 12 ......... ......... .. ..
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 .........................
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ......... .7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached.. 2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2.........
Wood Ashes. leached.... 1 to 2 ......... 1 to 1i 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems... ..... 5 to 8 2 to 4 ......... 31
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.40 0 to 41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.53 0 to 60 0.28 0).31
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure.... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70












FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein by....................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by ............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 16.47
Nitrogen into protein, by ........ .......... .. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash.multiply by 1.460
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (KLO) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it. multiply 95
per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K0O), multiply 90 by 0.681. equals 61.2'
per cent. actual potash (KO).



COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEED
LAWS.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.

COPIES OF THE PURE FOOD AD DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law. rules and
regulations, standards, blanks, etc., can be obtained from
the Commissioner of Agriculture.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of, the goods purchased
analyezd by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of
the law-without charge-the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and man-
ufacturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed? by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
seaport cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at andi exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and) sending of special
samples-on another page.









62

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.


NAME OF FEED

U C, r
Bright Cott'n Seed Meal 9.35 39.70 28.58 7.78 5.84

Dark Cotton Seed Meal 20.03 22.891 37.141 5.481 4.99

Linseed Meal ........ 8.76 34.70 35.91 5.34 6.12

Wheat Bran ......... 8.12 15.49 55.151 3.86 5.98

Middlings ............. 5.17 16.82 58.741 4.17 4.50

Mixed Feed (wheat).. 7.80 16.86 54.441 4.79 5.30
Corn Meal ........... 1.64 8.73 71.321 3.14 1.20

Corn (grain) ........ 2.10 10.50 69.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Cobs ........... 30.10 2.40 54.90 0.50 1.40

Corn and Cob Meal.... 6.60 8.50 64.80! 3.50 1.50
I I
Corn and Oats, eq'l pts. 5.80 11 1 64.65! 5.20' 2:

W heat ............. 1.801 11.901 71.99 2.10 1.80

Oats ................ 9.50 11.80 59.701 5.00 3.09

Soja Beans .......... 4.80 34.001 28.00 16.50' 5.40

Velvet Beans &Hulls.. 9.201 19.70' 51.301 4.501 3.30

Rice Hulls .......... 35.70 3.60! 38.601 0.70' 13.20

Gluten Meal .........1 1.25 37.06 46.521 3.271 0.68

Gluten Feed ......... 7.31 24.171 54.301 3.441 1.80












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)



NAME OF FEED. g



Hominy Feed ........ 4.05 10.49 65.27 7.85 2.54

Rye Products (bran).. 4.53 15.57 61.28 3.02 3.80

Barley Sprouts ...... 10.94 27.20 42.66 1.56 6.34

Distillers' Grains ..... 12.90 32.23 33.34 12.09 1.86

Oat Feed ............ 20.57 7.91 54.58 3.26 5.34

Provender ............ 3.91 10.62 67.34 4.03 1.83

Ship Stuff ........... 5.63 14.61 59.80 4.97 3.71

Victor Feed ........... 11.50 8.29 64.05 2.60 3.44

XXX Corn & Oat Feeds 9.94 9.66 64.66 5.09 3.24

Corn & Oats Feeds.... 12.09 8.73 61.731 3.73 3.22

Proprietary Horse F'ds 9.57 12.48 60.54 4.271 2.83

Molasses Feeds ....... 8.49 16.34 51.72 1.79 6.18

Poultry Feeds ........ 4.62 15.89 60.27 5.32 27.63

Beef Scrap ................ 44.70 3.28 14.75 29.20

Quaker Dairy Feed.... 15.53 14.42 52.12 4.051 5.31

Creamery Feed ....... 10.07 20.06 51.00 5.38 3.57

Purina Feed ......... 8.69 13.21 59.36 3.611 3.6'0
1 1 1












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS
FOR 1909.

For the season of 1909 the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
nmrcial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 1909.

Protein, 3j cents per pound .......... 65 cents per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1i cents per pound. .30 cents per unit
Fats, 31 cents per pound.............. 65 cents per unit
A unit being 20 pounds (1 per cent) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

HOMINY FEED-

Protein. ........................10.49 x 65c, $ 6.81
Starch and Sugar ............. .65.27 x 30c. 19.58
Fats... ...................... 7.85 x 65c. 5.10

State value per ton ................... .. ..31.49

EXAMPLE No. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-

Protein ..................... .. 11.15 x 65c. 7.25
Starch and Sugar .............. 64.65 x 30c. 19.40
Fats .. ......... ......... .... 5.20 x 65c. 3.38

State value per ton ................... .. 30.03















FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for formulas for various
crops, and there are hundreds of such formulas published;
and while there are hundreds of "Brands" the variations
in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of
"Brands" put up by the same manufacturer are identical
goods, the only difference being in the name printed on
the tag or sack. A good general Formula for field or
garden might be called a "Vegetable Formula," and
would have the following: Ammonia 31%, available
phosphoric acid 61%, and potash 71%. The following
formulas will furnish the necessary plant food in about
the above proportion. I have purposely avoided the use
of any fraction of 100 pounds in these formulas to sim-
plify them. Values are taken from price lists furnished
by the trade, which we published in our Report of Jan-
uary 1, 1909.
For Cotton, Corn, Sweet Potatoes, and Vegetables:
Ammonia 3 per cent., available phosphoric acid 6. per
cent., potash 7- per cent.
(A) "VEGETABLE."
No. 1.
Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (7i-21-1) ...... 3.25 Ammonia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).... 6.40 Available
300 pounds of Muriate (or Sulphate) (50percent) 7.50 Potash
2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged......$28.60
Plant Food per ton........................ 343 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
1000 lbs of Blood and Bone (6h-8) ..... 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 7.00 Avail. Phos.
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per ct.) 7.80 Potash
2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged....... 30.20
Plant Food per ton....................... 360 pounds

5-Bul

















No. 3.
Per Cent.
300 lbs of Dried Blood (16 per cent.) ..... A on
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent.)... 3.25 Ammonia
1000 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.)... i8.0 A ible
600 lbs of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per ct.) 7.80 Potash

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged......$31.00
Plant Food per ton........................ 3 1 pounds

(B) "FRUIT AND VINE."

No. 1.

Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes: Ammonia 4 per
cent., Available Phosphoric Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.

Per Cent.
1000 Ibs of Blood and Bone (61-8)........
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per ecnt.).. I 4 Ammonia
500 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 8 Available
400 lbs of Muriate of Potash (50 per ct.).. 10 Potash

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged...... $34.00
Plant Food per ton .........................440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Castor Pomace (6-2 per cent.).. 0
200 lbs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent.).... 4.00 Ammonia
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 7.70 Available
400 lbs of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent.).... 9.60 Potash

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged...... $32.25
Plant Food per ton ........................ 426 pounds

No. 3.

Per Cent.
500 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (7j-21-1j) .....
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent.).. 3.97 Ammonia
100 Ibs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent.) .... 8.30 Available
900 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent.).. 8.97 Potash
400 lbs of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent.)..

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged........ $31.65
Plant Food per ton ...................... 425 pounds

















(C) "TOBACCO FORMULAS."


300
400
200
750
300
50

2000


No. 1.

lbs of Carb. of Pot. (60 per cent.)....
lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-5) ............
lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (7j-2%-1j) ....
lbs of Bone Meal (4-10) ..............
lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.)
lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent) ....


Per Cent.

3.05 Ammonia
8.95 Available
10.50 Potash


Commercial value per ton mixed and bagged.$38.30
Plant Food per ton ......................... 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
300 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42).......
100 lbs of Carbonate of Potash (60 per ct.). 3.05 Ammonia
800 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-3)............ 8.95 Available
200 lbs of Bone Meal (3-12).............. 10.50 Potash
600 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.)

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged...... $38.30
Plant Food per ton........................ 440 pounds


No. 3.

400 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42).....
100 lbs of Cotton Seed Meal (7i-2-1i)....
700 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-5)............
100 Ibs of Bone Meal (3-12)..............
700 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.)

2000


Per Cent.

4.20 Ammonia
9.45 Available
10.20 Potash


Commercial value mixed and bagged........ $37.15
Plant Food per ton......................... 477 pounds

No. 4.
Per Cent.
500 lbs of Nitrate of Potash (13-42)...... 4.45 Ammonia
700 lbs of Tobacco Dust (2-3)............ 10.00 Available
800 lbs of concentrated Phos. (25 per cent.) 11.55 Potash

2000
Commercial value mixed and bagged ........ $39.50
Plant Food per ton ....................... 520 rounds














SOIL ANALYSES.


We frequently have samples of soil sent in for analysis
and a request to advise as to best methods of fertilizing.
Excepting in extreme cases such as Heavy Clays. Pure
Sands, and Muck Lands, there is but little information
to be derived from a soil analysis that would be of benefit
to farmers. So much depends on tilth, drainage, culture,
and other physical conditions, that an analysis made
under Laboratory conditions -is of little value. In this
connection we quote from the Report of the Indiana
Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Indiana, as follows:

"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FERTILIZER
REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is called upon
to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation to
agricultural chemical problems from people all over the
State. In this connection it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze
a sample of soil, and without further knowledge of the
conditions, write out a prescription for a fertilizer which
will fill the needs of that particular soil.
The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is
no chemical method known that will show reliably the
availability of the plant food elements present in the soil,
as this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climatic and biological conditions:
hence we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long nar-
row strips of the field to be tested are measured off side
by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each. Dif-
ferent fertilizers are applied to the different plots, every
third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The prodlme
from those plots is harvested separately and weighed. In
this manner the farmer can tell what fertilizer is best










69

suited for his needs. As climatic conditions may influ-
ence the yield with different fertilizers, it is best to carry
on such tests for more than one year before drawing defi-
nite conclusions. There is positively no easier or shorter
method of testing the soil, that we feel safe in recom-
mending.
Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotation
of crops, the conservation of stable manure, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need have
no fear that the proper application of commercial fertil-
izer will injure the land."










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid.


I I
NAMI1, OR BRAND.



y-

Dissolved Bone Black No. 1. 1616 ......
Dissolved Bone Black No. 2. 1647 ......
Fertilizer ................... 148 7.Sl1
Dried Blood ............... 1649 .... I
Fertilizer .................. 1650 3.52
Fertilizer .................. 1651 ....
Fertilizer .................. 1652 13.99
Fertilizer No. 1........... 1653 11.GO
Fertilizer No. 2........... 1654 6.351
Fertilizer No. 3............ 1655 15.6;9
Orange IPlruier No. 1275... 1656 8.47
Blood, Hone & Potash No.127G 1657 8.9,
Vegetable No. 1277.......... 1658 11.81
Largo Spec. Frilt & Vine
No. 1278 ................ 1659 9.07
Original No. 1 Mixture, No.
1279 ..................... 16601 10.07


17.00
15.52
7.03

5.32
S.08
6.91
5.90
4.85
;6.59
7.83
8.51
7.75

6;.21

5.45


. .





1.77 18.77 ......
1.36 16.88 .....
1.52 8.55 4.74
..... ...... 16.50
6.70 12.021 4.34
1.83 9.91 2.79
0.96 7.87 2.39
1.84 7.741 1.74
2.04 6.9S 6.25
1.65 8.24 1.20
0.25 S.0S 4.06
0.88 9.42 4.89
1.02 8.77 3.8(;

0.45 G.G(; 3.13

0.64 6.09 4.73


BY WHOM SENT.


.... Southern Ferlz. Co., Orlando, Fla
...... Southern Fertz. Co., Orlando, Fla
8.65 E. H. Hamilton, Terra Ceia, Fla.
...... P. J. Webster, Miami, Fla.
10.39 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
4.53 Gwynn Tobacco Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
10.53 R. E. L. Turner, Parrish, Fla.
6.651 John Parrish, Parrish, Fla.
7.89 John Parrish, Parrish, Fla.
11.40 John Parrish, Parrish, Fla.
12.33 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
7.81 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.
5.99 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.

9.89 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.371 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.









Canada Hard Wood Ashes.. 1661
Fertilizer .................. 1662
Steamed Bone ............. 1663
Fertilizer No. 3............ 1664
Special Mixture No. 1...... 1665

Hastings' Potato Special.... 1666
L. G. Potash No. 1........ 1667
L. G. Potash No. 2........ 1668
H. G. Potash No. 3........ 169
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1670
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1671
Fertilizer No. 3........... 1672
Fertilizer ......... .... ..... 1673
Ashes No. P. 17148......... 1674
Fertilizer .................. 1675
Fertilizer .................. 1676
Fertilizer ................ 1677
Hard Wood Ashes........... 1678
Nitrate of Soda No. 1...... 1679
Dried Blood No. 2.......... 1680
H. G. Sulphate Potash No. 3. 1681
Tankage No. 4............. 1682
Steamed Bone No. 5........ 1683
Fertilizer No. 6............. 1684
Fertilizer No. 1............1685
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1686
Fertilizer .................. 1687
Fertilizer .................. 1688
Fertilizer (S. R. 11039) .... 1689
Fertilizer .................. 1690
Home-Made Fertilizer ...... 1691


4.05 5.73
...... 12.14
5.44 5.78
...... 6.66


10.95


5.27







5.24
6.59
7.27
11.09


9.46


6.29



9.93
7.09
7.21
6.76

5.29
7.87
8.79





11.13
7.00
7.52
7.84
11.27
7.07
7.08
7.22
0.98


4.86 10.59
12.08 24.22
5.82 11.60
1.98 8.68

1.68 7.97



0.24 10.17
0.32 7.41
0.62 7.83
1.35 8.11

0.86 6.15
0.61 8.48
14.91 23.70


[::::::Ii:::'
. . .....

...... 10.09
12.19 23.32
5.05 12.05
6.27 13.79
5.97 13.81
2.59, 13.86
0.74 7.81
0.54 7.62
1.01 8.28
0.151 1.13


4.05
3.69
3.76
5.03

4.70



2.65
4.70
2.81
3.69

6.35
3.69
2.40

17.63
15.91


3.65
6.23
6.00
5.64
3.17
3.98
4.68
4.20
0.72


3.66 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
11.69 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
...... H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
10.96 H. A. Perry, Ponmona, Fla.
5.62 A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine, Fla.

7.07 A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine, Fla.
27.44 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
25.76 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
49.72 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando. Fla.
3.78 R. Y. Burr, Lemon City, Fla.
5.84 R. Y. Burr, Lemon City, Fla.
5.33 R. Y. Burr, Lemon City, Fla.
4.44 B. W. Kennedy, Parrish, Fla.
1.34 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co., Jacksonville.
8.00 Walter Walden, Miami, Fla.
3.78 Thomas D. Moore, Dunedin, Fla.
0.29 Sanders Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.06 M. M. Hall, Punta Gorda, Fla.
...... J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
...... J. Ed. Raluerson, Lily, Fla.
51.48 J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
9.42 J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
...... J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
9.99 J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
7.05 W. Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
7.52 W. Cliff, Crescent City ,Fla.
7.72 J. P. Coburn, Cresecnt City, Fla.
5.49 A. J. Campbell, Arch Creek, Fla.
6.22 Sanders Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
5.321 M. J. Sloan, Arch Creek, Fla.
0.191 T. J. Minor, Ocoee, Fla.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. B BY WHOM SENT.


0 >
4 I -


Cotton Seed Meal..........1692 ......
Raw Bone ................ 1693 .....
Canada Hard Wood Ashes.. 1694 ......
Fertilizer ................. 1695 ......
Ca:cined Carbonate Potash.. 1696......
Oat Mixture .............. 1697 4.60
Foreign Bone ............. 1698 ......'
Acid Phosphate ............ 1699 ... .
"Guano" .................. 1700 .
Fertilizer ................. 1701 10.30
Fertilizer ................. 1702 8.70
Fertilizer ................. 1703 0.67
H. G. Sulphate Potash...... 1704 ......
Fertz. (Wilson's Special)... 1705 .....
Fertilizer ................. 1706 ......
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1707 .. .
Potash & Bone Meal Mixture 1708 ......
Fertilizer "Malone No. 2"...'1709 ......
Blood. Bone & Pot......... 117101 10.54
Watermelon Spec'l......... 17111 7.421


...... 7.84 Douglas, Carmichael & Malone, Quincy
... ...... 23.35 9.80 ..... Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
... ...... 3.13 Dr. A. B. Tadlock, Ellenton, Fla.
8.44 0.48 8.92 4.17 9.97 Easterling Bros., Irvine, Fla.
...... ...... ...... 66.08 Schroeder & Arguimbau, Quincy, Fla.
7.62 0.95 8.57 3.34 13.69 Schroeder & Arguimbau, Quincy, Fla.
13.83! 15.76 29.581 1.581 ...... Schroeder & Arg imbau, Quincy, Fla.
14.14! 0.09! 14.23...... ...... A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy, Fla.
8.75 1.18 9.93 2.221 2.191 A. L. Wilson, Quincy, Fla.
8.32 0.31 8.63 4.251 9.83 C. B. Morrow, Crescent City, Fla.
10.05 0.16 10.21 4.571 7.08 V. I. Carrier, Crescent City, Fla.
5.31 7.71 13.02 2.981 4.68 Walter Cliff, Crescent, City, Fla.
.......... 47.40 T. F. Nevins, Merritt, Fla.
8.66 0.61 9.27 2.541 3.68 A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy. Fla.
.. .. 21.041...... A. B. Barrington, Winter Haven, Fla.
9.75 4.77 17.52 1.741 19.72 A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy, Fla.
7.16 8.09 15.25 2.70 16.48 Douglass. Carmichnel & Malon,. Quincy
>.5:3 9.32 15.851 2.47 15.32 A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy. Fla.
R.31 0.53 8.92 4.94 6.86 Armour Fertz. Wks., .Iacksonville. Fla.
5.26 0.41 5.67! 2.94| 8.841 Armour Fe.rtz. Wks., Jacksonville, Fla.










Fruit & Vine............... 1712 8.75
Special Mixture .......... 1713 5.77
Fertilizer No. 1........... 1714 ......
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1715 ......
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1716 .. ..
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1717 6.45
Fertilizer ................. 1718 ......
Fertilizer .................. 1719 8.71
Ground Tobacco Stems...... 1720 ......
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1721 5.69
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1722 6.71
Nitrate of Potash........... 1723 ......
K ainit .................... 1724 .....
Nitrate of Potash.......... 1725 .....
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1726 11.331
Fertilizer No. 2........... 1727 10.991
Fertilizer No. 3........... 1728 10.61l
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1729 ......
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1730 .....
Fertilizer No. 3............ 1731 ......


6.761 0.70 7.46 2.35 10.97 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville,
8.47 5.62 14.09 7.33 5.57 Armour Fertz. Wks., Jacksonville,
7.48 0.24 7.72 3.22 10.28 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh, Fla.
9.36 1.40 10.76 4.80 8.80 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh, Fla.
7.14 0.19 7.53 4.47 10.38 C. W. Stevens, Tampa, Fla.
7.18 0.17 7.35 4.15 10.96 C. W. Stevens, Tampa, Fla.
6.49 0.08 6.57 4.00 10.48 J. F. Moran, Gillette, Fla.
6.97 0.40 7.37 3.55 9.44 M. O. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
..... ...... ..... 1.83 7.88 1-. J. Webster, Miami, Fla.
8.78 4.55 13.33 2.65 11.36 C. B. Gwynn, Tallahassee, Fla.
7.05 0.75 7.80 4.38 5.00 C. B. Gwynn, Tallahassee, Fla.
................ 14.30 43.20 L. Heimburger, Tallahassee, Fla.
...... .... 13.55 W. S. Mitchell, Marion, Fla.
..... ...... ...... 15.50 44.28 I. Heimberger, Tallahassee, Fla.
9.99 0.43 10.421 1.99 2.73 D. J. Paul, Bonifay, Fla.
9.12 0.19 9.31 2.18 2.27 D. J. Paul, Bonifay, Fla.
10.62 0.07 10.69 2.55 2.19 D. J. Paul, Bonifay, Fla.
6.51 0.95 7.46 3.77( 7.46 Gust Neybe-rg, Dania, Fla.
5.431 1.69 7.121 3.64 7.23 Gust Neyberg, Dania, Fla.
6.381 2.83 9.211 3.10 10.611 Gust Neyberg, Dania, Fla.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE--DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. 1909. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by the State Chemist Under Section 1, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. 6 BY WHOM ANDWHERI
Sa MANUFACTURED.




Wilson & Toomer's Com-1
plete Sweet Potato Fertz. 1241 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 1.00 ...... 2.501 3.50 Wilson & Toomer Fert
Official Analysis.. 13.77 S.29 1.36 9.35 2.00 4.07 Co., Jacksonville, Fl

Wilson & Toomer's H. G.
Pineapple Fruit & Vine. 1242 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 -1.00 .0...... .0O 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert
Official Analysis... 5.98 4.78 :.(;4 S.42 6.28 9.56 Co., Jacksonville, Fl

Seminole Tree (rowrr.... 121:: Giaran i'd Analysis S.00 (;.00 ...... .... 1 4.001 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert
Official Analysis... 11.32 6.241 0.6 (.57 4.22 8.431 Co., Jacksonville, FlI

Idral Fruil & Vim l MaNumnri. 1214 Guarani'd Analysis 10.00 .00 .. 00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert
Official Analysis,.. S.91 5..7S 0.41!) (;.27 3.48 10.24 Co., Jacksonville, Fli

Special Mixiurei No. I .... 1215 Cuaranid Analy;is 8.00 (6.00l 1.00 ..... .00 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz
I Official Analysis...| 9.64i 5.87| 1.6;1 7.68| 5.46 5.821 Co., Jacksonville, Fla


Z.
-:1

a.


Z.

L.
I.


z.

.








Peruvian Veg. Manure....

Armour's Largo Spec'l Ft.
and Vine ..............


Orange Fruiter ..........


Armour's Orig'l No. 1 Mix.


Armour's Fruit & Vine..


Acid Phosphate 16 per cent.


Cotton Sieed Meal......... 1252


Dark Cotton Seed Meal.. 1253


Cotton Seed Meal......... 1254


Cotton Seed Meal......... 1255


Ober's Vegetable ........ 1256


1246 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1247 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1248 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1249 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1250 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1251 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


10.00|
7.93

10.00
7.64

10.00
10.03

10.00
9.07

10.00
8.56

10.00
16.45


12.00
7.43


7.00 2.001 ......
7.41 1.13 8.55

6.00 1.00 ...... I
6.18 1.11 7.29

8.00 1.00 ......
7.34 0.30 7.64

5.001 1.00 ......
5.721 0.38 6.10

6.00 1.00 ......
6.00 0.79 6.79

16.00 i 1.00 ... ..
16.861 0.50 17.36 .


:::: 2.00
.. | ..... ......
. . . . .
. .. . .. .. .

...... ...... 2.50


...... ...... 2.50
. . ..... .. .

6.001 2.00 .....
7.891 0.97 8.86


5.001 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
4.901 8.14 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
2.94 9.72 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 12.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
3.50 11.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
4.87 4.77 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.50 11.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
2.41 11.01 Jacksonville, Fla.

... ...... Armour Fertz. Works,
..... ...... Jacksonville, Fla. oC

7.50 1.00 Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
8.05 ...... Ft. Gaines, Ga.

4.49 ...... Valdosta Cotton Oil Co.,
5.32 ...... Valdosta, Ga.

7.50 1.50Blakeley Oil & Fertz.
7.64 ...... Co., Blakeley, Ga.

7.50 1.00 Eufaula Oil Co., Eu-
6.94 ...... faula, Ala.

5.00 6.00 Ober & Sons, Baltimore,
5.79 7.43 Md.












ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. .



V. C. Fla. Fruit Grower's
Formula ............... 1257 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
DeSoto Brand Orange Tree
Grower ................ 1258 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
DeSoto Brand Fruit & Vine
Manure ................ 1259 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Armour's Waterm'n Spec'1 1260 Guarant'd Analysis
S Official Analysis.. .

Armour's Fruit & Vine... 12(1 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Armour's Largo Special
Fruit, & Vine.......... 1262 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Acid hlios., 14 per crnl. 1263 Guarant'd Analysis
SOfficial Analysis...


Phosphoric Acid.




o a



8.00 7.001 1.00 ......
4.35 7418S 2.18 9.361

10.00 6.00 ...... ......
7.10 6.33 0.47 6.801

10.00 6.00 ...... ......
7.19 6.44 0.781 7.22

10.00 5.00 1.00 .....
6.00 5.25 0.64 5.89

10.00 6.00 1.00 .......
9.99 6.32 0.89 7.211


10.00 6.00 1.00 ......
8.06 6.41 0.93 7.31

11).00 14.00| 1.00 ...... .
7.85 14.691 0.35 15.04 .


t BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




3.50 4.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
3.39 5.00 vannah, Ga.

5.00 6.50 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
5.51 7.52 vannah, Ga.

4.00 12.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4.00 13.88 vannah, Ga.

:.00 8.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
3.13 8.49 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.50 11.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
2.54 11.30 Jacksonville, Fla.


3.00 10.00 Armour Ferrz. Works,
2.91 9.95 Jacksonville, Fla.

.. ...... Armour Fertz. Works,
.... ...... Jacksonville, Fla.










Special Manure, No. 1.... 1264iGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Ideal Fruit & Vine Manure 1265 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Special Mixture No. 1..... 1266 1Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Blood, Bone & Potash.... 1267 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Strawberry Fertilizer .... 1268 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Special Fruit & Vine...... 1269 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Gulf Tobacco Special ...... 1270 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Orange Fruiter .......... 12711Guarant'd Analysis
S Official Analysis...

Vegetable Special ........ 1272IGuarant'd Analysis
S Official Analysis...

Orange Producer ........ 11273 Guarant'd Analysis
I Official Analysis...

Fruit & Veg. Fertilizer... 1274 IGuarant'd Analysis
IOfficial Analysis...


8.00
9.51

10.00
14.50

8.00
10.74

14.00
10.78

8.00
15.08

8.00
5.07

10.00
8.00

10.00
5.22

10.00
7.22

8.00
6.03

5.00
5.431


6.00| 1.00 ... .
6.241 1.12 7.96

6.00 ...... ...... .
5.86 0.26 6.12

6.45 1.00 ...
6.45 1.68 8.13

6.001 1.00 ......
5.93 1.35 7.28

6.001 2.00 ......
6.88 1.58 8.46

6.00 1.00 7.00
6.80 0.15 6.95

6.001 1.00 7.00
6.641 1.55 8.19

6.00 1.00 7.00
6.91 0.05 6.96

6.001 1.00 7.00
10.051 2.00 12.05

7.001 1.00 ......
6.75 0.10 6.85

2.501 5.00 ...
4.64] 10.481 15.12


5.001 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.92 6.34 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
3.35 9.64 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.22 5.77 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 4.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
3.98 3.28 Tampa, Fla.

2.50 8.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
2.10 7.37 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 13.00 Gulf Fertilizer Corn-
4.18 13.26 pany, Tampa, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Corn-
4.44 6.34 Tampa, Fla.

4.00 10.00 Gulf Fertilizer Corn-
4.37 11.40 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Corn-
5.24 5.95 Tampa, Fla.

4.50 15.00 Gulf Fertilizer Com-
5.05 15.03 Tampa, Fla.

4.00 6.00 Germofert Mfg. Co.,
3.98 5.68 Charleston, S. C.










ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. 0
la
0
.oz


Dried Blood ............


Ground Castor Pomace...


H. G. Acid Phos., 16 per ct.


II. G. Ky. Tobacco Stems..


Cotton Seed Meal.......


Simon I'ure No. 1........


Simon I'iiur Spoc'I No. I..


1275 Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1276 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1277 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1278 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1279 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1280 ,Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1281 (unarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


12.00


10.00


10.00
11.85

10.00


7.65


8.00
5.98

8.001
6.08j


Phosphoric Acid.



Ca

c12 "


16.00
16.83


0.50
0.12


6.00 1.00
5.69 0.21

6.00 1.001
6.211 0.261


0 ir
BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


...... 16.00 ...... Sanders Fertz. C.,
...... 16.75 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

1.50 6.50 1.00 Sanders Fertz. Co.,
5.88 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

...... ..... ...... Sanders Fertz. Co.,
16.95 ..... ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 2.50 10.00 Sanders Fertz. Co.,
..... 2.60 10.571 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.25 7.501 1.65 Sanders Fertz. Co.,
...... 8.041...... Jacksonville, Fla.

...... 1 4.00 11.00 0. Painter Fortz. Co.,
5.90 5.75 11.94 Jacktonville, Fla.

..... 2.001 16.001E. O. Painlor Fertz. Co.,
6.471 2.881 16.481 Jacksonville, Fla.


.
.







.









Gem Fruit & Vine........

Precipitated Bone Phos-
phate with Ammonia....


Nitrate of Potash........


Blood Meal ..............


Mapes' Orange Tree Man're


Mapes' Vegetable Manure.


Tobacco Dust ............


V. C. Fruit & Vine........

V. C. Tip Top Tomato
Trucker ...............


1282 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1283 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1284 Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1285 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1286 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1287 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1288 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1289 Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1290 Guarant'r, Analysis
Official Analysis...


8.001 6.00 1.00 ......
6.71 6.17 1.22 7.39

...... 31.00 .. ...
6.14 27.87 9.51 37.38


...... ...... I ...... ......
...... ... ... ..

. . . . . .

12.00 6.00 2.00 .....
14.45 5.25 4.57 9.82

12.00 6.00 2.00 ..
13.66 6.52 3.16 9.68
.
...... ..... ... ......

8.00 6.00 1.00 .....
7.62 6.14 1.17 7.31

8.00 7.00 1.00 ....
7.4t 6.84 1.50 8.34


3.001 10.001E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
3.22 10.39 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 ...... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
6.92 ...... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

16.00 44.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
14.84 43.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

15.50 ...... Armour Fertz. Works,
16.31 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 3.00 Mapes' For. & Per. Gu-
4.251 3.88 ano Co., N. Y.

5.00 4.00 Mapes' For. & Per. Gu- 4
4.92 5.14 ano Co., N. Y. O

1.50 6.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.,
2.10 7.41 Gainesville, Ga.

2.50 10.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.,
2.96 9.441 Savannah, Ga.

4.00 5.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.,
4.01 5.99 Savannah, Ga.











BUREAU OF FEEDSTUFFS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, act approved May 24, 1905. (Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.


Cottonhead Hay (Froelichia Flor-
idana) ...........................
Feed N o. 1.........................
Feed N o. 2.........................
Feed No. 3 ........................
Parcell's Dairy Feed................
Parcell's Ground Feed...............
Purina Feed ......................
Kudzu Vine Stems.................
Corn and Velvet Bean Chops, 2-3
corn .............................
Corn and Velvet Bean Chops, 1-3
C orn ............................
Feed N o. 4 .........................
Feed N o. 5 .........................
FT eed ..............................


gSd
6
z A

77 37.90 4.39
78 5.27 9.39
79 7.50 9.78
SO 7.25 10.79
81 23.25 12.72
82 8.05 10.23
83 10.17 12.11
84 31.41 6.05

85 8.10 10.35

86 10.17 12.72
S7 11.25 11.85
SS 16.47 12.46
S9 14.15|10.71


4o

in _

52.36
67.59
62.95
63.64
47.36
64.62
58.87
29.53

65.63

61.06
57.18
52.37
57.92


By Whom Sent.



1.601 5.85 Charles F. Turner, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
4.481 2.25 Barnard & Hester, Tampa, Fla.
6.05 4.35 Barnard & Hester, Tampa, Fla.
3.25 3.10 Barnard & Hester, Tampa, Fla.
2.00 5.00 E. G. Parcell, Tampa, Fla.
3.45 2.50 E. G. Parcell, Tampa, Fla.
4.20 3.35 T. T. Munro, Ocala, Fla.
1.26 1.97 C. E. Pleas, Chipley, Fla.

3.65 1.521C. M. Fellows, Cottondale, Fla.

3.55 1.85 C. M. Fellows, Cottondale, Fla.
3.35 4.35 Barnard & Hester, Tampa, Fla.
1.98 4.72 Barnard & Hester, Tampa, Fla.
3.n05r ..511 arnan & ilulsey, Tampa, Fla.


NOTICI .--The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9 of the laws providing for "Special Samples"
drawn by consumers are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the laws and the "Rules and Regulations governing










wthe taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feedstuffs and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report.
.Also to compare the "official analysis" and the "market value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases the "market value," or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods-that in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guarantee tag on the bag with the table'of "average composition of feedstuffs."
In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law and regulations, and
send in a tin box, sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guarantee tags" off the packages,
to compare with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS, 1909.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Tak(n by State Chemist Under Section 2, Act approved May 24, 1905.


ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR BRAND. MANUFACTURERS
f MANUFACTURERS.



Banner Feed ............ 6(;GGuarant'd Analysis 10.00 9.00 2.00 3.50 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Ch
Official Analysis... 9.15 9.39. 65.21 1.30 3.25 cago, Ill.
Purina Feed ............. (;7 Guarant'd Analysis 7.90 14.001 60.00! 4.50 ..... Ralston Purina Co., St. Loui
Official Analysis... 10.45 13.78 58.50 4.15 2.27 Mo.
Corn lien Feed..........' ((;s uarant'd Analysis 2.30 10.00o 70.001 3.70 ......The Corno Mills Co., East S
Otficial Analysis... 2.22 10.25 70.96 2.60 1.70! Louis, Ill.
('iorno l orse & Mule Feed. ;6 r (uarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.00 58.5i 0 0 .50 .... The Corno M1ills Co., East S
Offlical Analysis.. 14.1.0 9.13 59.581 3.25 3.22 Louis. Ill,
Iriied lItne P'ulp.......... ;7)( (luaranl'd Analy-is 20.00 8.Oo00 0.00 0.50 ...... Ili Ianuow Milling Co., 1D
Official Analysis... 19.O05 1().271 (0.0,S 0.25 2.80 I ril, Mich.
I I I
V\'ilor F 'rd ............. ] (;71)(!ii;irinl'il Analysis 12.00 7.50] (;2.00 3.00( ..... T e Qu er Onts. Co.. Chl
Offlcial Analysis... 12.351 7.721 (11.3l 6 2.901 2,751 cago, Ill.

S ir(n ni Ilo ;:- & i lle i,'edi 1;72 ( ii ira in 'd Analysis 1:1..50)1 I I ( 1 0 52. 151 3.00 ..... !A iirii;i MIilling (o.. Illil:
()lliri:l Analysis. 7.:1:3 l l~ 61.1; 3; .4 1 7 .19 d(lihln Pa


5, ao


t.


i..


0-


:










Stafolife Feed ...........


Pine Leaf Middlings......


Pure Wheat Middlings....


Pure Wint'r Wheat Middl's.1


Pure Wheat Middlings....


Boss Chop Feed ..........


N utriline ................


Upland Cotton Seed Meal.


Cotton Seed Meal........


Creamo Cotton Seed Meal


Pril- f GerIgia P-c'd Mlcal


G73 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

674 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

675 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

676 Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

677 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

67S Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

679 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

680 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

cS1 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

CS2 Guarant'd Analysis
IOfficial Analysis...

CS=, Guarant'd Analysis
]Official Analysis.. .


11.00
8.67

6.10
4.90

6.00
6.10


4.65


6.05

11.00
9.25

10.00
6.81


10.10


10.001


23.20

...... I
19.55(


11.00 53.00 6.00 ...... Lawrence & Haimlton Feed Co.,
9.92 60.06 6.23 6.30 New Orleans, La.

15.75 57.951 4.20 4.10 Cairo Milling Company, Cairo.
16.85 57.03 4.90 3.87 Illinois.

16.00 63.58 4.50 ...... Hopkinsville Milling Co., Hop-
15.62 57.63 3.85 4.60 kinsville, Ky.
1 I
16.00 56.00 4.00 ...... The Hunter Bros. Milling Co.,
17.55 57.01 4.90 3.82 St. Louis, Mo.

16.45 59.58! 4.54 ...... Inglehart Bros., Evansville,
16.90 56.78 4.85 4.80 Ind.

9.00 62.00 4.00..... The Great Western Cereal Co.. G
8.20 64.161 3.60 3.22 Chicago, Ill.

12.00 58.001 3.50 ...... Nutriline Milling Company.
10.76! 59.75 5.39 4.77 Crowley, La.

38.62? ...... ..... Valdosta Oil Company, Val-
36.331 31.68! 8.771 5.471 dosta, Ga.

38.62 ...... ...... I...... Vienna Cotton Oil Company,
38.96] 29.171 6.951 5.37 Vienna, Ga.

22.00! 30.00 5.00 ...... 'Tennessee Fiber Co., Memphis,
20.581 39.601 4.851 4.021 Tenn.

23.)01 30.001 4.50 ...... Valdosta Oil Company. Val-
24.00] 36.70' .401 4.30? drsta. Ga.










ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Contin ued.

Cd
S, ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR BRAND. MA ASSRERS.
NO MANUFACTURERS.
'_____ 1 __ i
Prid ot Georgia Feed Meal 684 Guarant'd Analysis .. .. 23.00 30.00 4.50 .... Valdosta Oil Company, .Val-
Official Analysis... 19.151 23.(69 36.51[ 6.55 4.20' dosta, Ga.
Stafolife Feed ............ 685 Guarant'd Analysis 11.00 11.001 53.00[ 0.001 ...... Lawrence & Hamilton Feed Co..
S Official Analysis... 8.19 10.39 5G.03 7.33 5.66 New Orleans, La.
Banner Feed........... G uarant'd Analysis 10.00 S.00i 62.00 3.50 ...... The Quaker Oats Company, Chi-
Official Analysis... 8.95 9.56G 63.45[ 3.201 3.02 cago, Ill.
Banner Feed ............ 687 uarant'd Analysis 10.50 9.75 6(3.00| 3.75i ...... Thl Quaker Oats Companyi Chi-
S Official Analysis... 8.92 8.95 66.20 2.53 1.801 cago, Ill.
Purina Feed ............ (;SS Guarant'd Analysis 8.90 12.501 5 .001 4.00[..... Rlalston Purina Company, St.
Official Analysis... 11.22 12.20 57.901 3.43 :.00[ louis, Mo.
Cotton Seed Meal......... (; (;uarant'd Analysis .... S.5.... 2 ............ ..Ilorida Cotton Oil Company
[Oflial Analysis... 8.70 39.05 29.951 8.95 5.45 .Jacksonville, Fla.
Pure Wheat lran ........ (!0(airani'd Analysis' 7.4!9 1;.09 53.5S| 1 .68.... AAcmn Mills and Elevalor Co.,
| 'Offiial Analysis.. 7.85 15.181 55.821 3.SO 5.15 Iloplinsvill.e Ky.
IPure W eat llran ........ (;!1 llCirant'd Analysis 9.49 11. I.;60 57. 23: 4. 06 ..... [Tlh. I)unnlop Milling Co(nllma y.
O Oli h'ial Analysis... 8.85 1 I1.0I 5 .11;7! 3.!98 5.92 Clarlsville, Tenn.
Pure Wheal llran ........ (;921 ;uiraint'd Analysis 91.149 1.1 I.11 57.2 4.2 I .)1..... Thie I)lunlop Millinig (CoinmpalIy.
OlIlclal Analysis.. 10.72 15.271 52.911 3.151| 15 llopl insville. T'enn.









White Middlings ........


Pure Shorts ..............


Ship Stuff ...............


Pure Wheat Bran.........


Pure Wheat Bran.........


Pure Wheat Bran.........


Pure Wheat Bran.........


Cotton Seed Meal.........


Cotton Seed Meal.........


Cotton Seed Meal.........


Dark Cotton Seed Meal..


693 Guarant'd Analysis .....
Official Analysis... 2.65]

694 Gaurant'd Analysis 6.50
Official Analysis. 6.52

695 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00'
Official Analysis... 5.70!

69G Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis... 9.25

697 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis... 8.35

698 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis... 8.10]

699 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis... 8.55

700|Guarant'd Analysis ......
!Official Analysis...1 10.62

701 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.. 18.10

702 Guarant'd Analysis! ......
Official Analysis... 19.95

703 IGeurant'd Analysis ......
TOfficial Analysis... 19.851


17.39 55.101 3.26 ...... Acme Mills and Elevator Co.,
15.27 G4.181 3.38 2.65 Hopkinsville, Tenn.

14.00 55.00 4.00 ...... Washburn-Crosby Milling Co.,
14.74 58.92 3.75 4.80 Louisville, Ky.

.4.50 ...... 4.00 ...... Dunlop Mills, Richmond,
16.15j 58.38 4.35 4.15 Va.

14.50 50.00 4.00 ...... Cumberland Mills, Nashville,
14.92 54.38 2.75 6.10 Tenn.

14.50 54.00 5.00 ...... Tennessee Mill Company, Estill
14.44 55.81 3.10 6.00 Springs, Tenn.

14.50 54.001 5.00 ...... Tennessee Mill Company, Estill
15.27 56.38 3.58 5.401 Springs, Tenn.

14.50 50.00 4.00 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
15.69 55.69 2.701 5.971 nessee.

38.62 ...... ..... .... Vienna Cotton Oil Company,
38.79| 31.17 6.401 6.001 Vienna, aa.

38.52 ...... ...... ... Florida Cotton Oil Company,
22.781 36.84 7.581 4.45! Tallahassee, Fla.

25.00 ........... ...... Florida Cotton Oil Company,
23.08[ 37.45 6.401 4.501 Tallahassee, Fla.
I I I 1
23.17 ...... ...... ...... The Florida Manufacturing Co.,
24.13 35.07 7.081 4.251 Madison, Fla.











ANALYSES



NAME OF BRAND. E
o


Stafolife Feed ........... 704 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Sucrene Dairy Feed....... 705 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Sucrene Dairy Feed....... 706iGaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
I I
Banner Feed ............ 7JT7 iuarantcl Analysis
Official Analysis...

Banner Feed ............ 708 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis.. .

Alfacorn Feed ........... 709 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Ceralfa Stock Feed....... 710 Guarant'd Analysis
'Official Analysis..

Purina Feed ............. 711 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


OF FEEDSTUFFS-




0
I I i





11.05 11.23 54.13

12.00; 16.501 48.54
10.40: 16.15 52.151

12.00 16.50 48.54
9.32 17.20 51.03

iu.o0 U.l.75 o6.
8.551 9.56 64.44

10.50 9.75 63.00|
8.900 10.27 63.48

12.00 12.00......
13.55' 10.88 58.09

11.50 14.00 55.00
8.301 12.55 57.95

8.901 12.501 58.00
10.951 13.43| 58.121


Continued.


G I.
G 6 .
6.201 7.82

3.50 ......
4.33 6.33


4.83 6.95
3.75 ......

3.10 3.00

3.75 .. ...
3.40 3.00

3.50 ......
2.43 3.45

4.50 ......
3.40 5.65

4.00 ......
3.90 2.90


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.



Lawrence & Hamilton Feed Co.,
New Orleans, La.

Ameriacn Milling Company,
Chicago, Ill.

American Milling Company,
Chicago, Ili. oo

1 uake ^ii r ats oomlalJny,
Chicago, Ill.

The Quarker Oats Company,
Chicago, Ill.

Capital Grain and Mill Co.,
Nashville, Tenn.

J. B. Edgar Grain Company,
Memphis, Tenn.

Ralston Purina Copmany, St.
Louis, Mo.









Purina Feed .............


Ship Stuff ...............


Pure Wheat Bran..........


Pure Wheat Bran.........


"Lillie Bran" ...........


Pure Wheat Bran........


M iddlings ............... .


Pure Wheat Middlings....


Pure Wheat Middlings....

Pure Winter Wheat Fancy
Shorts ................ .


Crescent Shorts ..........
I


712 Guarant'd Analysis 7.90
Official Analysis.. 8.22

713 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 4.67

714 Guarant'd Analysis 7.49
Official Analysis... 7.62

715 Guarant'd Analysis 9.49
Official Analysis... 10.22

716 Guarant'd Analysis 8.50
Official Analysis... 6.95

717 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Official Analysis... 9.65

718 Gaurant'd Analysis 5.50
Official Analysis... 4.17

719 Gaurant'd Analysis 5.18
Official Analysis... 5.50

720 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 5.00

721 Guarant'd Analysis 3.901
Official Analysis... 5.95

7221Guarant'd Analysis 8.00!
iOfficial Analysis... 5.80]


14.00 60.00|
13.34 62.11

14.50 ......
16.63 58.77

16.09 53.58
15.40 56.00

14.60 57.23
15.01 54.39

15.00 56.50
15.62 57.60

10.00 50.00
16.76 52.32

18.00 57.00O
17.29 60.02

17.11 58.18
18.20 55.87

15.75 40.0)l
17.95 56.05!

16.36 62.66
16.06 58.991

16.00 53.75J
18.91 54.241


4.50 ..... Ralston Purina Company, St.
3.,73 2.35 Louis, Mo.

4.00 ...... Dunlop Mills, Richomnd,
4.38 4.00 Va.

4.C8|...... Acme Mills and Elevator Co.,
3.58 5.25 Hopkinsville, Ky.

4.06 ...... The Dunlop Milling Company,
2.73 6.70 Clarksville, Tenn.

4.00 ...... Lillie Mill Company, Franklin,
2.93 5.10 Tenn.

3.50 ...... John Wade & Sons, Memphis,
3.30 6.37 Tenn.

4.50 ...... H. C. Cole Milling Company,
4.45 3.45 Chester, Ill.

4.41 ...... Geo. P. Plant Milling Company,
5.13 4.25 St. Louis, Mo.

4.00 ...... Sweet Springs Milling Com-
5.05 4.00 Sweet Springs, Mo.

4.50 3.15 Akin-Erskine Milling Company,
4.631 4.35 Evansville, Ind.

4.25 ...... Kemper Mill and Elevator Co.,
5.251 4.651 Kansas City, Mo.











ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.



NAME OF BRAND. ci ADDRESSOF
0 S 0 MANUFACTURERS.
r? ^1. +- Co
r|P, I 9w w E.


Pure Wheat Shorts.......


Pure Shorts .............


Homco Feed .............


Fancy Feed .............


Corno Hen Feed ......... .


Poultry Feed .............


Purity Feed .............


Victor Feed ..............


I I I I


723 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

724 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

725 Gaurant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

726 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

727 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

728 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

7291Guarant'd Analysis
SOfficial Analysis...

730iGaurant'd Analysisl
SOfficial Analysis...


12.00'
6.20

6.501
6.101

7.00;
3.101

4.50
7.00

2.30
2.42

4.00i
3.051

5.50
5.60

12.00
6.801


10.00
17.07

14.00
15.09
8.50
11.14

11.00
10.88

10.00
10.79

11.001
10.971

10.00
9.30o

7.501
7.631


50.00
55.99

55.00
58.94

67.89
63.79

60.00
65.82

70.00
69.361

65.00
68.781

65.00
66.261

62.00]
68.801


3.50 ...... John Wade & Sons, Memphis,
4.60 4.67 Tenn.

4.00 ...... Washburn-Crosby Milling Co.,
3.551 4.65 Louisville, Ky.

7.00...... American Hominy Company,
9.401 3.00 Indianapolis, Ind.

2.00 ...... City Mills Company, Colum-
3.35 2.05 bus, Ga.

3.70 ..... The Corno Mills Company.
3.18 1.30 East St. Louis, Ill.

3.60..... Ralston Purina Company, St.
3.381 1.90] Louis, Mo.

5.00 ..... John Wade & Sons, Memphis,
4.401 2.02] Tenn.

3. 00 ....... .The Quaker Oats Company.
3.131 3.171 Chicago, Ill.










Victor Feed ............... 731


Macon's Mill C. S. Meal.. 732


a:acon's Mill C. S. Meal.. 733


Cotton Seed Meal......... 734


Cotton Seed Feed Meal.. 735


Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Official Analysis... 12.551

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 10.77

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.... 12.221

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 12.70
I 1


Guarant'd Analysis ......


7.501 62.00 3.00 ...... The Quaker Oats Company,
7.28 62.37 2.83 3.551 Chicago, Ill.

3S.62 ................ .. .Georgia Cotton Oil Company,
37.73 30.55 6.58 5.40 Macon, Ga.

38.621 ...... ...... .... Georgia Cotton Oil Company,
35.98 31.701 6.25 5.15 Macon, Ga.

38.62 ..... Montezuma Manufacturing Co.,
35.851 31.001 6.65 5.15 Montezuma, Ga.

32.18 ..... ...... ....... Florida Cotton Oil Company,


Official Analysis...i 14.30' 31.411 33.241 6.80| 4.901 Jacksonville, Fla.


SPECIAL NOTICE.-The attention of dealers and consumers is called to the table of "Average Composition of
Feedstuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feedstuffs sold
throughout the country. Any material variation from these averages is presumptive evidence of impurity or
adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee
of the manufacturer should not vary materially from this table of averages, while the "official analysis" should
show practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers are requested, in all cases of
suspected inferiority or adulteration, esnd a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.









FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.
OFFICIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY THE STATE INSPECTOR,. UNDER CHAPTER 5662, ACTS OF 1907.

RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF LEMON EXTRACTS.


SName or Brand. Manufacturer. Retail Dealer.


100 Florida Lemon Ex- South'n Drug Mfg. Co., C. Algero, Tallahassee,
tract ........... Jacksonville, Fla.... Fla ..............

101 Sauer's Lemon Ex- C. F. Sauer & Co., Randolph & Fenn, Tal-
tract ........... Richmond, Va...... lahassee, Fla........

i102 astine's Fure Ex- BabtiLe &, C., Ne T. yr & Co., T
tract of Lemon. York ..............lahassee, Fla........

103 Eddy's Tripple Ex- Eddy & Eddy Mfg. Co., P. T. Mickler, Talla-
tract of Lemon.. St. Louis, Mo....... has,see, Fla.........

104 Blue Ribbon, Ter- Greever-Lotspeich Mfg. J. W. Collins, Tallahas-
peneless Extract. Co., Knoxville, Tenn. see, Fla ...........

1051Kitch'n Qu'n Lem- Interstate Chem. Co., E. B. Shelfer, Havana,
on Extract ..... Baltimore, Md...... Fla ..............

140 Kitch'n Qu'n Lem- Interstate Chem. Co., R. A. Haygood, Talla-
on Extract ...... Baltimore, Md...... hassee, Fla. ........


00 1 REMARKS.
0i...


0.00 27.75sMisbranded-does not contain
standard amount of Lemon Oil
(5 per cent.)

5.00 78.98 Standard Lemon Extract.


5.00 83.49 Standard Lemon Extract.

7.40 83.50 Standard Lemon Extract.

0.00 53.77 No Citral found, hence not stand-
ard Terpeneless Lemon Ext.

4.80 87.59 Standard Lemon Ext., but mis-
I branded-no statement on label
of alcohol percentage.

5.40 83.70 Standard Lemon Ext., but mis-
Sbranded-no statement on label
Sof alcohol percentage.









106 Clover Extract of McCormick & Co., Bal- W. B. Munroe, Quincy, I
Lemon ......... timore, Md.......... Fla. ................ 5.80 79.17 Standard Lemon Extract.

107 Sauer's Lemon Ex- C. F. Sauer Co., Rich- A. L. Wilson, Quincy,!
tract ........... mond, Va........... Fla. ............... 6.30 77.68 Standard Lemon Extract.

108 Blue Ribbon Ter- Greever-Lotspeich Mfg. E. B. Woodberry, Quin-
peneless Extract Co., Knoxville, Tenn.I cy, Fla............. 0.00 51.38 No Citral found, hence not stand-
ard Terpeneless Extract.
109 Silver Lemon Corn- Silver Extract Co., Bal- Love & Hearin, Quincy,
pound .......... timore, M d......... Fla. ............... 0.00 55.18

112 Imitation Lemon Austin Nichols & Co., Wilkerson & Spiller,
IFlavor ...........I New York.......... Jacksonville, Fla.... 5.00 84.42 Standard Lemon Extract.

114 Lemon Extract.... Chas. G. Harris Co., T. H. Sompayrac, 0.00 26.13 Misbranded-(1)Below standard
Jacksonville, Fla.... Jacksonville, Fla.... (5 p. c.) Lemon Oil. (2) No=
statement of alcohol percent-
Sage, on label.
1151Moulie s Sans Pa- E. Moulie, Jacksonville,!T. H. Sompayrac,
reil Lemon Ext.l Fla. ................. Jacksonville, Fla.... 11.00 83.03|Standard Lemon Extract.

117|Cannon Brand L. Cannon Bros., Jackson- F. L. White & Co.,
Extract ........ ville, Fla. ......... Jacksonville, Fla.... 1.40 66.17Misbranded-Below standard (5
I [ per ecnt.) in Lemon Oil.
119 Imitation Lemon Thomas Packing Co., F. L. White & Co.,
Flavor ......... New York ......... Jacksonville, Fla .... 0.00 53.29

13G6Bastine's Pure L. Bastine & Co., New T. B. Byrd, Tallahas-
Extract ........ York ............... see, Fla. ............ 5.70179.461Standard Lemon Extratc.
I I Ip











RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF VANILLA EXTRACTS.


Name Manufacturer
or or
S BWholesaler.
o Brand.
Cd


110 Cannon Brand Va- Cannon Bross., Jackson-
nilla Extract.... ville, Fla..........

111 Imitation Vanilla Austin Nichols & Co.,
Flavor ......... New York ........

113 Sans-Pareil Vanilla E. Moulie, Jacksonville,
Flavor ......... Fla ...............

116 Eddy's Extract of Eddy & Eddy Mfg. Co.,
S Vanilla ........ St. Louis, Mo.......

118 Imitation Vanilla Thomas Packing Co.,
Flavor ......... New York .........

141 Clover Extract of McCormick & Co., Bal-
Vanilla ......... timore, Md. ........


Remarks.


Bittjeman & Heims,
Jacksonville, Fla.....

Wilkerson & Spiller,|
Jacksonville, Fla.. ...

T. H. Sompayrac, Jack-!
sonville. Fla. .....

J. V. Fairhead, Jack-
sonville, Fla........

F. S. White & Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla. .......

R. A. Haygood, Talla-
hassee, Fla .........


49.20 Standard Vanilla.


38.60 Standard Vanilla.


19.401Standard Vanilla.


52.80 Standard Vanilla.


22401

39.75 Misbranded-no statement of percent-
age of alcohol on label.










RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG PRODUCTS.


0 Name
B or
Brand.



120 La Gitana Brand
Olive Oil comp'd

121 Royal Palm Cof-
fee ............

122 T. M. Blend Cof-
fee ............

123 Cracker Boy Blend
Coffee ..........

124 De-tan-ated Coffee


125 Great American
Hop Ale ........


126 Red Rock Ginger
A le ............


Manufacturer
or Retail Dealer. Analysis and Remarks.
Wholesaler.



Joseph Reina, Ybor Joseph Reina, Ybor A Compound of Olive and Cotton Seed Oil.
City, Fla. .......... City, Fla. .......... Misbranded-not properly labeled.

Triumph Mills, Tampa,I Triumph Mills, Tam-
Fia .............. pa, Fla ........... Properly labeled.

Triumph Mills, Tampa, Triumph Mills, Tam-
la ................. pa, Fla. ............. No adulterants found. Properly labeled.

Turner & Wilson, Tam- R. L. Law & Bros.,
pa Fla. ............ Tampa, Fla. ........ No adulterants found. Properly labeled.

Clark, Coggin & John- R. L. Law & Bros., Misbranded-contains 10.4 per ecnt. Caffe-
son Co.,Boston, Mass. Tampa, Fla......... tannic Acid.

American Bever'ge Co.,
Atlanta, Ga., Mem- Pepsi-Cola Bottl,g Co., Contains 1.3 p. c. alcohol. Misbranded-does
1:his. Tenn. ........ Jacksonville, Fla.... not bear statement of alcohol p. c. on label.

Red Rock Co., Jackson- Red Rock Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla .......... ville, Fla. .......... Contains no alcohol.











RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG PRODUCTS.


Name Manufacturer
or or Retail Dealer. Analysis and Remarks.
Brand. Wholesaler.


12S St. Charles Evapo- St. Chas. Evap. Milk P. H. Boyer & Co.,
rated Milk...... Co., St. Charles, Ill. Jacksonville, Fla.... Standard milk. Contains 9.6 per cent. fat.

129 Blue Label Ketch- Curtis Bros. Co., Roch- Bittjeman & Helms,
up .............' ester, N. Y.......... Jacksonville, Fla.... No adulteration and properly labeled.

130 Mil-kow Milk Pow- Merrill-Soule Co., Syr- Jones & DeLoach....
der ............ acuse, N. Y......... Jacksonville, Fla.... No Preservative found. Fat 0.0 per cent.

131 Trumilk Milk Pow- Merrill-Soule Co., Syr- Jones & DeLoach, Jack-Fat in milk made from powder according to
der ............ acuse, N. Y......... sonville, Fla........ directions on can, 3.2 per cent. standard.

132 Assorted Candy........................ Warrock & Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla. ....... IFree from harmful dyes and minerals.
133 Queen Cream Can-
dy ............. ........... .......... S. H. Kress & Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla. ....... Free from harmful dyes and minerals.

134 1Pruna ... Peruna Mfg. Co., Co- Holmes Drug Co., Tal- Guaranteed to contain 18 per cent. alcohol.
I umbus, Ohio....... lahassee, Fla. ...... Fround 18.5 per cent. alcohol.

17 Wine of Cardui...!Chattanooga Med. Co., Tallahassee, Drug Co., Guaranteed to contain 20 per cent. alcohol.
I I Chattanooga. Tenn.. Tallahassee, Fla.... Found 19.05 per cent alcohol.










138 Swift's Specific.... Swift Specific Co., At- Tallahassee Drug Co., Guaranteed to ocntain 16 per cent. alcohol.
lanta, Ga. ........... Tallahassee, Fla..... Found 14.3 per cent. alcohol.

1: 'Atwood's Bitters.. Ioses Atwocd, George- Hardee-Smith Drug- Guaranteed to contain 17.5 per ecnt. alcohol.
1 town, Mass. ........ Co., Tallahassee, Fla. Found 14.2 per ecnt. alcohol.











Co











SPECIAL MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. Samples Sent in by Citizens. B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.




3 IDENTIFIED AS FROM
1-i



197 Liquid "No. 1." Alcoholby volume............ 6.35 per cent. W. S. Preston, Bartow Fla.

From G. C. Durrance:
198 Liquid "No. 2." Alcoholby volume............ 5.6 per cent. W. S. Preston, Bartow, Fla.

201 "Liquid." Alcohol by volume .................. 4.10 per cent. B. C. Williams, Bartow, Fla.

202 Liquid "No. 1." Alcoholby volume............10.5 per cent. C. H. Chrisman, Micanopy, Fla

203 Liquid "No. 2." Alcohol by volume............ 7.95 per cent. C. H. Chrisman, Micanopy, Fla.

204 Larcenaria Tenufolia. Alcohol by volume..... 15.1 per cent. E. E. Philbrick, Tallahassee, Fla.

205 International Stock Feed: Composed of Salt, Pepper, Gentian,
Sodium Phosphate and Wheat Offal ........................ G. G. Gibbs, Tallahassee, Fla.

206 Benzoated Lard, with Salicylic Acid.......................... J. F. Harness, Tampa, Fla.

207 "No. 1." Vomitus.
No Arsenic found .........................................I John D. Gable, M. D., Bonifay, Fla.









208


209


210


211




212


213


214



215


"No. 2. Stomach contents of poisoned dog."
No Arsenic found........................... ............

Milk Sample "A:"
Fat ........................................ 4.6 per cent.

Silver Spray:
Alcohol by volume. ........................... 0.62 per cent.

Pure Cider Vinegar:
Total solids .................................. 2.20 per cent.
Ash .......................................... 0.31 per cent.
Acetic Acid.................................. 4.02 per cent.

"Hat-Cleaning Preparation:"
Oxalic A cid ................................ ..............

"Roach Food:"
S Cinnamon Bark and Borax ................................

"No. 1. Annie:"
Alcohol by volume ............................. 5.6 per cent.
Acetic Acid (vinegar) .......................... 2.4 per cent.

"Lexoid"- Methyl'ene Blue....................... ............


John D. Gable, M. D., Bonifay, Fla.


J. E. Liddy, W. Palm Beach, Fla.


Lewis Lively, Tallahassee, Fla.


R. P. Foley, Winter Park, Fla.




H. A. Dillaway, Jacksonville, Fla.
-:1

W. E. Pollock, New Smyrna, Fla.


W. E. Law, Brooksville, Fla.


Mr. Culley, Tallahassee, Fla.
















M-ISCELLANEOUS.



'(Address by R. E. Rose, State Chemist, at the Farmers'
Institute, DeFuniak Springs, March 19, 1909.)
We are told that in the beginning the Creator placed
Adami in a garden, giving him supreme dominion over
it and the beasts of the field. We can imagine that this
Garden, designed and created by God Himself, lacked
nothing in fertility and productiveness; that the fruits
were perfect, free of blemish, canker, scab or scale; that
weeds did not trouble Adam; nor did he have to "haul
manure," "scatter fertilizer," nor give his note to pay
for "guano."
However, we all know "the devil finds work for idle
hands to do," and that "an idle brain is the devil's work-
shop." Adam, being idle and alone, with no cares or
responsibilities, certainly must have found' time hang
heavy on his hands. Being a young, vigorous man, perfect
in health and physical structure, he doubtless yearned for
companionship. The Creator, sympathizing with him in
his loneliness, provided him with a companion, which
simply doubled Satan's chances. You can well imagine
the conditions-two young, healthy human beings, perfect
in every way, full of life, vigor and energy; without care
for the future, with no want or desire unsatisfied, wilh
nothing to do, no duties to perform. Can you not imagine
the result? How every pleasure would pall-how the
idea of a new sensation would be welcomed! Having tried
all the other fruits of the garden, they would long to try
the "forbidden fruit."
How much better, Mr. Chairman, were the forbidden
fruits of our boyhood-the melons, apples, peaches, etc.,
which we "hooked"-than those provided for us! How-
ever, I am getting on forbidden territory. Prohibition is














not a subject for a Farmer's Institute. We will get back
to the First Farmer, Adam.
Until he became greedy and wanted the whole earth
and all its products, even the forbidden tree and its fruits,
Adam was at least idle-I won't say happy, because I
can't imagine an idle man being happy, even in Paradise.
Having nothing else to do, Adam suggested to Eve that
they find a new diversion. Then Satan got in his work.
Here I have always been ashamed of my sex. Instead of
Adam fessingg up," he turned the blame on Eve. The
Creator, however, knowing man's proneness to lie out of
a scrape if he could, was not deceived, but passed the
sentence 'hard labor for life" on both.
Right here began the Art of Agriculture, and the first
fertilizers ever used were "man's sweat" and "woman's
tears." After the expulsion from the Garden, where there
had been no labor or care, Adam found it necessary to
"hustle" to make a living for himself and family. He
soon put Eve and the children to work also, and has
continued the practice. Though he found the ox and
horse more economical in farm work, he still expects the
woman to do her part; as we know, the churn and the egg
basket are both important factors in farm economy.
Seriously, Mr. Chairman, agriculture began with the
dawn of intelligence. The art of producing food and
raiment from the soil, the fields and the pastures, was
practiced by the earliest intelligent human beings. Until
very recently, Agriculture was but an Art-men learned
"how" by experience and tradition. They did not know
"why" certain conditions produced certain results, or
why crops grew better.and yielded larger returns when
cultivated. They did not know why the removal of weeds
or the application of certain manures-waste material
unfit for other uses, or material that had once served as a
food for man or beast-would again serve as food for
plants. It is said that the Indians taught the Pilgrims
on the bleak New England shores the use of fish as a
fertilizer for corn; and today we have no better general













fertilizer than "fish scrap," thousands' of tons of which
are used annually.
But a few years ago, the Science of Agriculture began
to dawn. Liebig was among the first to recognize the
close relationship between good crops and the use of
Nitrogen, Phosphoric Acid and Potash, and to publish
his findings. Gradually the Chemist and the Experi-
mentalist began to discover some of the laws governing
the proper feeding of plants. Much progress has been
made; though we are still far behind it the struggle for
knowledge-each step involves another. There is much
yet to learn. The future offers fields of broader scope
and greater possibilities, such as the best fertilizer for
different crops, the best method of application, the ques-
tion of drainage, irrigation, seed selection, diseases,
insects, fungus pests; all are problems which we are
trying to solve. But a few years ago the use of mineral
phosphates was unknown. The Carolina phosphates were
discovered by Drs. Shepard and Pratt, in 1859 and 1860.
These phosphates were not used as fertilizer until after
the "civil war," when a small factory was erected at
Charleston to make "Guano" and "Dissolved Bone"-two
trade names that still exist, though no "guano" or "bone"
was, or is, used in the manufacture. It would have been
folly to attempt to sell ground rock to the farmers of
that day.
I remember when cottonseed was considered poisonous,
when strong fences were built around the seed lot to
prevent the cows eating them. It took years to discover
that they were good for fertilizers, and more years to
learn that they were good food. Hundreds of thousands
of tons were shipped to England and Holland for cattle
food before our own people recognized their value as
fertilizer or food. It took years to learn the value of our
Florida and Tennessee phosphates, and today by far the
largest part of their output goes to foreign lands.
Florida, though considered a sterile and unproductive




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs