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 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Climate
 Fertilizers, feeding stuffs and...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00009
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Report of condition and prospective yield
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
    Climate
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Weather report
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
        Climatological data for August 1908
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
    Fertilizers, feeding stuffs and foods and drugs
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
        Bureau of fertilizers
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Analyses of fertilizers
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
        Bureau of feedstuffs
            Page 54
        Analyses of feedstuffs
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
        Special food and drug analyses
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
        Miscellaneous
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
Full Text

jT D A


VOLUME 18


NUMBER 4 1


FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT



OCTOBER 1, 1908


B. E. McLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE E
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part 1-Orops


Part 2-Weather Report


Part 3-Fertilizers and Feed StufT


Entered January 81,1903, at Tallhahassee.,Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June 1900.0--

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUtD FREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

CAPITAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
State Printer.
Tallahassee, Florida.
..lp ?"-









COUNTY MAP OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA

















PART I.

CROPS
















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-11.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.


Northeastern Division
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia-9.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,


Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Luci--10.


















































































*













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.
NORTHERN DIVISION.-The crops of this Division show
by comparison very much the same condition that existed
last year; the seasons were not favorable for good field
crops, and the cotton crop is apparently shorter than last
year; it is probable cotton will not make more than 62
to 64 per cent of a crop, if that, in some sections, and the
low price is prevailing the picking, as it will not bring
on sale but very little more than it costs to gather; con-
sequently large quantities of it are still standing in the
fields, and will remain there unless some change for the
better speedily comes about. Labor is scarce, and money
still scarcer, and in the harvesting of crops, particularly
cotton, the farmer is in bad shape. The corn crop is by
no means a full crop; in some localities it is short; the
average yield of the district will be about the same as
last year. There has been a good Hay crop harvested, and
put away in fine condition.

WESTERN DIVIsION.-There is practically no difference
in the conditions existing in this Division and the North-
ern. The percentage of condition and prospective yield
is somewhat lower, but in all essential respects the crop
situation is very much the same. The shortness of the
principal crops and the impossibility of their regaining
the loss is now perfectly well known to even the most
optimistic person; the cotton crop is certain to be very
near to 40 per cent short, with corn about 25 per cent,
and other crops in proportion. The scarcity of labor,
high wages, and poor prices, are complained of in this
district as elsewhere, and no improvement in sight. A
fair hay crop has been harvested; live stock is in good
condition, and pastures are in pretty good shape.













NoaTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this Division crop condi-
tions are little different from the preceding districts, hav-
ing suffered and are still laboring under pretty much the
same difficulties. In some portions of the district the
vegetable and small fruit crop suffered greatly, and in
later months the field crops also lost ground very gen-
erally. As in the foregoing districts cotton is in puor
shape generally, and no possibility of its recovery; com-
plaints are numerous and strong of the low crop condi-
tions, and the scarcity as well as inefficiency of labor, the
price of which has gone beyond the value of the crops,
and has brought on a sort of demoralized condition among
farm laborers. With cotton, the leading farm crop of
this country, selling below the cost of production, a read-
justment of wage prices is soon inevitable.


CENTRAL DIVISION.-In this Division, which is more of
a vegetable and fruit growing district than general farm-
ing, the conditions have been somewhat better, though in
some portions of the district, the conditions for favorable
crop growing have been exceedingly poor, and results
have been discouraging and unprofitable. In some parts
of this district the volume of the orange crop is asserted
to be very large; in others it is claimed to be short; but
a comparison of the reports by our correspondents indi-
cate that, the crop will be very little, if any, in excess of
last year, while information from the same source indi-
cates that the grapefruit crop is about the same as last
year. In some sections of this district the supply of labor
is as serious a problem as in other districts above men-
tioned; numerous complaints being to the effect that
crops could not be gathered for want of labor.


SOUTHERN DIvIsION.-The principal industry in this
Division is that of fruit and vegetable growing, the stand-
ard field crops being comparatively little grown. Such
field crops as are grown, are confined to corn, sweet po-
tatoes, suargcane, and hay, in small areas, and they have












prospered only in spots, so to speak. In this district
there have been dry areas, and wet areas, the rains hav-
ing fallen in scattered localities; however, the vegetable
crops thrive better under adverse moisture conditions
than any other class of crops, and this section has pro-
duced fair crops of vegetables; the fruit crops have suf-
fered most, and apparently have little more than held
their own in point of both condition and production.
Reviewing the situation as to the cotton and fruit
crops of the State, a comparison of conditions indicates
that the cotton product of the State will be close to
57,000 to 58,000 bales, a reduction of 30 per cent of the
normal crop. A comparison of the condition of the pres-
ent orange and grapefruit crops with condition at same
date last year indicate only a very slight increase in either
crop. The orange crop of 1906-7 amounted to 3,006,534
boxes, and the comparative conditions go to show that the
crop of 1907-8 will be very little larger-hardly a greater
increase than 250,000 boxes, so that it is very probable
that the crop now on will not exceed 3,256,000 boxes. The
grapefruit shows a little better condition, and by the
same sources of comparison there is a slight increase
also. The grapefruit crop of 1906-7 amounted to 450,304
crates, and the present indications are that it will not
exceed 472,819 crates for 1907-8. An error that is harm-
ful to both crops is that of estimating both oranges and
grapefruit as one; they should be kept entirely separate,
and then both buyers and sellers of fruit have a fairer
field of operation. We therefore estimate the orange
crop of 1907-8 at approximately 3,256,000 boxes, and the
grapefruit crop of 1907-8 at 472,819 crates, or a total of
citrus fruit products of 3,728,819 boxes or crates.










REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD

OF CROPS, FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES FOR QUARTER ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908, AS COMPARED
WITH AN AVERAGE DURING SAME PERIOD OF 1907.


COUNTIES UPLAND COTTON SEA ISLAND CORN SUGAR CANE FIELD PEAS
COTTON
NPrTHERN D Cpec Condi- Prosec- Condi- prosec- Condi- Irospec Condi- Propec
NORTHERN DIVISION. Condi- tive- ive tive tire tive
tion yield on yield yield tion yield tion yield
y... yi el I r i o o E I nI o I
.-,


Fran lin ........................
Hamilton ........................
Jefferson .........................
Lafayette .......................
Leon ..........................
Liberty ..........................
Madison ......................
Suwannee ......................
W akulla ........................
Division average per cent...........


..... 75
100 70 100
...... ..... 50
75 50 .
80 85 90
50 50 40
...... ..... 70
50 55 .....
71 62 71


75
80
50

90
30
70

66


50
100
90
75
55
60
90
100
78


50
100
75
80
55 0
50
90
100
75


WESTERN DIVIsION.
Calhoun .......................... 75 76 ..... ..... 110 100 100 100 75 75
Escambia ........................ 66 66 ..... ..... 100 100 120 110 100 100
Holmes ............................. 60 60 .....100 100 100 100 95 95
Jackson ......................... 65 65 ..... ..... 100 100 100 100 90 95
Santa Rosa ................... .. 80 ..... ..... 100 100 95 100 90 90
W alton .......................... 6. 5 70 ..... ..... 70 70 70 70 75 75
Washington ...................... 66 65 60 70 80 85 75 80 80 75
Division average per cent ........ 68 69 60 70 | 94 94 | 94 | 94 86 86














NOBTHEABTERN DIVISION.
Alachua .......................... ......
Baker ........................... 65
Bradford ........................ ..
Clay ............................. ....
Columbia ....................... ......
Division average per cent ........ 65
CENTRAL DIvIsION.
Citrus ........................... ......
Hernando ................. ; ...... ....
Lake ......................... ......
Levy ........................... ....
M arion .......................... .
Orange. ............ ... ......
Pasco ............................ .
Sum ter ......................... ......
Division average per cent.......... .....


SOUTHERN DIVIsION,


..... ... 60
..... .. .. .. 85
.. .. .. .. ... 90
..... 85 75 90
..... 50 50 100
.... ... .. I .. 75
.... ..... ..... 90
..... 90 90 75
... 75 | 72 83


55 80 75 90 90
95 90 90 75 75
90 85 85 95 100
90 90 90 100 100
100 80 80 .
75 ..... .....I 50 50
90 80 85 100 100
75 95 95 95 95
84 86 86 86 87


Brevard .......................... .... .. ..... .....
D ade ............................ .... ..... ..... .
DeSoto ........................ ...... .. .
H illsboro ......................... ...... ..... ..... .....
L ee .............................. ...... ..... ... .....
M anatee .......\ .................. .
Polk ............................ ...... ..... ..... .....
St. Lucie ........... ............ ........ .....
Division average per cent .. ....... .. I ....
State average per cent.......... 68 1 65 I 71 71


100
100
33
92


80.

81
90


100
100
33
92


65

78
89


75
100
70
100
100
100
75
100
90
89


50
100
85
75

100
70

80
82


50
100
85
80

100
70

81
r 81







CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTIES

NORTHERN DIVISION.

Franklin ........................
Ham ilton ........................
Jefferson ........................
Lafayette ........................
Leon ...........................
Liberty ..........................
M adison .......................
Suwannee ......................
W akulla .........................
Division average per cent..........


RICE SWEET POTATOES CASSAVA PEANUTS BROOM CORN
Condi- Prospec- Condi Prospec- ;Condi- Prqspec- Condi- Prospec- Condi- Prospec-
tion yield tion yield tion yield tion yiel tion yied
.. .... 90 100 ..... ..... 75 75 50
75 75 75 80 ..... ..... 75 75 50 50
...... ..... 100 100 ..... ..... 100 80 ....
90 75 90 80 80 80 90 90 ..... ....
..... .... 100 110 ..... ..... 90 85 ... ....
100 100 85 95 ..... ..... 90 85 ... .
.... ..... 75 60 ..... ..... 50 50 ..... ....
75 75 100 100 ... ..... 100 100 ..... ....
...... ..... 100 100 ... ..... 100 100 ..... ....
85 81 91 92 80 80 86 82 50 50


WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ......................... 95 95 112 110 .......... 100 90 50 .50
Escambia ........................ 80 75 125 125 ..... ..... 100 125 100 100
Holmes ......................... ...... ... 100 100 ..... ..... 90 90. ..
Jackson ......................... ...... ..... 110 100 | .. ..... 90 90 ..... ....
Santa Rosa ............................ ..... 95 100 .. 100 0 .... .
W alton ........................ .. ..... .... 80 90 ..... ..... 50 60 ..... ....
W ashington ...................... ...... ..... 85 90 ... 75 75 .. ..
Division average per cent.......... 87 85 101 102 ..... ..... 86 90 75 75
NORTHEASt ERN DIVISION.
Alachua ........ ... ...... ..... 100 100 ..... ..... 80 80 .....
Baker ....................... ...... .... 60 75 .. .. ... 85 87 ..... ....
Bradford ............. ............... ..... 120 120 .... 90 90 .....












Clay ................ ......... .
Columbia .............. ........... 60 50
Division average per -ent........ 60 50


CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ...........................
Hernando ........................
Lake ...........................
Levy ...........................
M arion ...........................
Orange ...........................
Pasco ...........................
Sumter ....... ..............
Division average per cent.........


SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard .........................
D ade ........................... .
D eSoto ..........................
H illsboro .........................
Lee ............................
Manatee .........................
Polk ............................
St. Lucie .............. .........
Division average per cent. ........
State average per cent..........


95





95. ....
95


125
85
100
100
75

97
85


90





L 9


125
90
100
80
80
80


110 115 ..... .... 100I 100 1..... ....
90 75 ..:. .I 90 90 1 ..... I ....
96 1 97 1 ..... I ..... 1 89 1 89 ..... I ....


100
100
100
85
100
100
85
100
96
96


85





85


..... 10085
S. 1 85

100
100
..... 90
. 5 10 9 0
.... 100
85 1 96


100
90

100
100

75
100
94


co
100 ..... .. 75 75
112 .... 100 100 .. ..
110 100 100 110 110 ....
90 80 80 72 75
100
100 ..... ..... .. .. ... .. .. ...
100 100 100 100 100 ..... ....
80 100 80 ..... ..... ..... ....
S. .... ..... ..... I ...... ....
99 __ 95T -901- | 911 92W ....
977 877 85 89 89~ 62 --6


I


L I I T









CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued -,-, i 5 _

PASTURE 1 /
COUNTIES. HAY GRASSES. VELVET BEANS GASSED BANANAS PINEAPPLES.

Condi- Prospec- i Prosi- Con di- l rospec- Coni Prospec- Condi- Prospec
tion yield tion .3, 1 tion j n tio. yield til tion field
NOBTIIER~~~~~~~~V DVSO tv i tv v ie


iranKlin ........................
H am ilton .......................
Jefferson ........................
Lafayette ......................
L eon ...........................
Liberty .........................
M adison .........................
Suwannee ........................
W akulla .........................
Division average per cent.........


WESTERN DIVISION.
Calhoun ........................
Escam bia ........................
H olm es ..........................
Jackson ..........................
Santa Rosa ......................
W alton ..........................
W ashington ......................
Division average per cent.........


100
100

100
85
40
100
95
89


luO
100

115
90
40
100
95
91


100 100
120 125
100 100
100 100
100 100
80 90
80 85
97 | 100


.100
100
90
100
100
30

90
87


100
100
90
100
100
20

90
87


..... ....
..... ....
..... .. .


14-


100 100 ..... ..... ... ...
100 120 ..... .. ...
85 85 ..... ... .... ....
90 95 ...
100 100 ...
80 90 .. ....
80 90 .. ....
S 91 | 97 1 ..... I ..... I ..... I ....


Nol l,\IiiAFERtN DIVISION.
Alachua ......................... 90 90 75 65 90 90 .. .... .....
Baker ............................ 100 100 100 100 0100 1 00..
Bradford ........................ 80 80 100 100 ..... .... ]. ..










Clay ..........................
Columbia ......................
Di-rivinni nv-erap neer cent-- ..-


100 I 100 100 1 100 100 100 ...
60 1 60 90 90 75 70 ..... .....
S86 86 1 93 I 91 I 91 I 90 I ..... I .....


-- p I ..........
CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus .. .... ... ............... 100 100 75 75 100 100 ..... .... ..... ....
Hernando ........................ 90 90 100 90 100 100 ..... ..... ..... ....
Lake ............................. 90 90 80 85 95 90 75 75 ..... ..
Levy .............. ............. 110 125 100 100 100 100 ..... .... ..... ....
Marion ..... .......... ........ 100 100 80 80 100 100 ..... ..... ... ....
Orange .......................... 60 60 40 40 ..... ...... ... ... ....
Pasco ............................ 100 90 75 80 100 100 90 90 ..... ....
Sumter .......................... 100 100 90 95 100 100 ....... ....
Division average per cent.......... 94 94 8 80 81 1 99 | .99 1 82 82 .... ..


SOUTHERN DIVISION.
Brevard ..... .................
D ade ........................... .
DeSoto ...........................
H illsboro ..................... .
L ee ..............................
Manatee ..................... .
Polk ... ...... ........... .
St. Lucie ................ ..... .
Division average per cent..........
State average per cent ..........


100 100 .....
100 125 100
125 125 100
100 100 85
100 100 ...
100 80 100
90 85 60
1100 0 100
102 1 102 91
94 1 95 84


100
100
85

100
50
100
89
85


100
100

95
80
100
80
95
93
92


100
100
95
80
100
90
90
94
93


75 75
95 100

85 85
100 100
100 100
50 55
100 90
87 874
84 I 84


I::
.I


100 C
105
100
70
100
100
75
105
95
95


I f I ,I


t I










CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTIES.


NORTHERN DIVISION.


GUAVAS. ORANGE TREES
[IeV Co i rIujc


Con(li-
tion


rl law- I Condi-
tive
yiel 1 tion
..... .....


..... 85

S ....'. '60
.....i .....


F franklin ......................... ......
S anam ilton ....................... ......
Jefferson ....................... ......
L afayette ........................ .....
Leon ........................... ......
Liberty ...............................
M adison ........................ ......
Suwannee ....................... ......
W akulla ........................ ......
Division average per cent......... ......
WESTERN DIVISION.
C alhoun ......................... ..
E scam bia ........................ .....
H olm es .......................... .....
Jackson .......................... ....
Santa R osa ...................... .
Walton ......................... ...
W ashington .................. ......
Division average p(er cont.......... I......


NORTHIIEASI',utI DIVISION.
A lachua .......................... ..... .
B ak er ......................... .. .... .
B radford ... ..................... ..... .


r iuspe
tive
yield




25

40
.....


LEMON TREES.

Condi- Prospec-
tive
tion yield


100






100


T GRAPEFRUIT
LIME TREES. TGREESU

Condi- prosspec- Condi- Prospec-
S tive ti tive
tion E yield tion yield


90


15




15


..... ..... ..... 100 100
. ....... ..... ..... ..... .... oo





. ...... ..... 100 1 100


90 40 ..
100 100 G 60 .
... ... ... ..... .....


1 35
100


I I I


-L-


. ... I .. ..


..... 70
..... 100
..... I .....


i Ijl I



I .... i










CG ay ............................... .... I ..... 1 120 100
Colum bia ........................ .. .........
Division average per cent.......... ...... ..... 103 80


S .... ..... : ..... ..... ..... ::::: ..:::
I 6.... 6 ..... ..... 85 67
I 60 60 ..... | ..... I 85 | 67


CENTRAL DIVISION.
Citrus ............................. ... 100 10 I 100 100 100 100 100 100
Hernando ........................ 75 "75 95 65 ..... .......... .... 95 60
Lake ............................ 100 100 100 100 100 100 80 85 85 90
Levy ....................... ...... ... ..... 100 85 ..... ..... ..... ..... 100 80
Marion .......................... ... .. 50 50 .... ..... ..... ..... 60 60
Orange ......................... 80 80 ..... ..... ..... ..... 60 60
Pasco ............................ 40 25 95 10J ..... .... ..... ..... 95 100
Sumter .......................... .... ... 100 100 100 100 ..... ..... 100 100
Division average percent..........l 72 1 67 1 90 | 85 lu I 100 J 90 1 92 87 | 81


w SOUTIJERN DivisION.
Prevard ......................... 125
D ade ............................. 100
DeSoto .......................... 200
H illsboro .........................] 95
L ee .............................. 100
M anatee .......................... 100
Polk ............................. 95
St. Lucle ........................ 95
Division average per cent..........] 114
State average per cent.......... 93


75
95

95
90
100
90
75
89
83


75
95
80
90
75
90
75
83
87


..... I.... 100 100
95 97 95 100
......... 100 90
95 85 100 90
90 90 100 100
100 75 100 100
..... 90 78
100 100 85 85
96 89 96 93
93 90 92 | 71


, ,I


tl:



















PART II.















Weather Report


U. S. Department of Agriculture.

CLIMATOLOGICAL SERVICE
of the

WEATHER BUREAU

Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION,
A. J. Mitchell, Section Director.
Report for August, 1908


GENERAL SUMMARY.
The weather for the month, as a whole, was slightly
cooler and drier than the normal, altho there were some
stations that received much more than the usual amount
of rain, the excessive amounts occurring, as a rule, during
thunderstorms that prevailed over widely separated dis-
tricts. The mean temperature for August has been below
normal during eight of the last seventeen years, normal
twice, and above normal on seven years. The precipita-
tion has been below during thirteen years of the same
period.
The month began with rather warm weather thruout
the State. The highest temperatures occurred in Jack-
son, Marion, Orange, Polk. Washington, Hernando and
St. Johns Counties, the maximum at the stations named
ranging from 100 to 103 degrees. The most pronounced
warm periods were generally from the 1st to 3d, and from
the 17th to 21st, except in the western counties, where
the warmest weather prevailed mostly from the 3d to 6th,
and from the 14th to 21st. The coolest weather was
recorded over most of the State during the last days of












the month. Every station in the southern district was
cooler than the August normal; elsewhere, however, there
was about an equal division between the plus and minus
departures at the various stations.
The distribution of the month's rainfall was decidedly
irregular. The greatest amounts, varying from eleven to
eighteen inches, were recorded in DeSoto, Taylor, Hilla-
boro, and Levy Counties, and the least amounts in Nas-
sau, Duval, Hamilton, Bradford, Columbia, Baker. Clay,
and Holmes Counties. Showers occurred almost daily in
the southern counties, and they were fairly frequent in
the central district. The dates of rain in the northern
district were mostly from the 7th to 11th, and from the
20th to 28th. Rain was not general in the western coun-
ties until the 21st, on which date showers began and con-
tinued until the 26th; thereafter fair weather ensued.
There was no day without precipitation.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean atmospheric pressure for the month, reduced
to sea level, and determined from observations taken daily
at 7 a. m. and 7 p. m., 90th meridian time, at six Weather
Bureau stations, was 30.01 inches, or 0.02 of an inch
above the August normal. The highest pressure occurred
at Jacksonville, 30.16 inches, on the 31st, and the lowest,
29.87 inches, occurred at Jacksonville, on the 19th, giving
a range the State of 0.29 of an inch.

TEMPERATURE.

The mean temperature for August, 1908, determined
from the records of 57 stations, was 81.1 degrees, which
is 0.3 degree less than normal. The mean maximum
and the mean minimum temperatures were 90.4 degrees
and 71.9 degrees, respectively. The highest monthly mean
was 83.0 degrees, at Clermont; the lowest monthly mean
was 79.4 degrees, at Satsuma Heights. The highest tem-
perature recorded was 103 degrees, at Marianna, on the
16th; the lowest temperature recorded was 61 degrees,












at Molino, on the 30th. The greatest monthly range at
any station was 40 degrees, at Marianna; the least, 20
degrees, at Jupiter and Key West. The greatest daily
range was 34 degrees, at Marianna.

PRECIPITATION.

The average precipitation for the State, as determined
from the records of 56 stations, was 6.67 inches, which
is 0.75 of an inch below the normal. The greatest amount
recorded at any station for the month was 18.24 inches,
at Arcadia; and the least, 1.11 inches, at Macclenny. Ex-
cessive rains (2.50 inches or more in 24 hours) occurred
as follows: Apalachicola, 3.71 inches, on the 23d; Arca-
dia, 4.12 inches, on the 31st; Cedar Keys, 2.63 inches, on
the 23d, and 5.48 inches, on the 26th; Fenholloway, 3.30
inches, on the 21st and 22d; Fort Meade, 2.50 inches, on
the 12th; Orange City, 2.54 inches, on the 23d; Plant
City, 4.60 inches, on the 24th; St. Augustine, 2.55 inches,
on the 28th; Tallahassee, 3.75 inches, on the 23d; and
Tarpon Springs, 2.70 inches, on the 26th and 27th. The
average number of days on which 0.01 of an inch, or more,
of precipitation occurred was 13.

SUNSHINE AND CLOUDINESS.

The percentages of the possible sunshine as recorded
at the regular Weather Bureau stations, were as follows:
Jacksonville, 66; Jupiter, 68; and Tampa, 75 per cent.
For the State, there was an average of 12 clear days, 14
partly cloudy days, and 5 cloudy days.

WIND.

The prevailing direction of the wind for the State was
southwest. The total movement at regular Weather
Bureau stations was: Jacksonville, 7102 miles; Jupiter,
5802 miles; Key West, 4516 miles; Pensacola, 6268 miles;
Sand Key, 7103 miles; and Tampa, 4947 miles. The
highest wind velocities were: Jacksonville, 53 miles from
the south, on the 20th; Jupiter, 36 miles from the east,















on the 14th; Key West, 40 miles from the west, on the
27th; Pensacola, 36 miles from the west, on the 22d;
Band Key, 47 miles from the east, on the 13th; and Tampa,
26 miles from the south, on the 26th. The average hourly
velocities were: Jacksonville, 9.5 miles; Jupiter, 7.8;
Key West, 6.1; Pensacola, 8.4; Sand Key, 9.5; and Tampa,
6.4 miles.


COMPARATIVE DATA FOR THE STATE-AUGUST.

TEMPERATURE PRECIPITATION




Si
YEAR aI


-0.5
+0.1
-0.4
-0.1
+0.6
+0.2
-0.6
+0.8
+1.0
-1.0
+0.7
+1.0
-1.3
-0.5
0.0
0.'6
-0.3


7.84 +0.42
6.68 -0.74
7.33 -0.09
6.20 -1.22
5.81 -1.61
6.68 -0.74
12.96 +5.54
6.02 -1.40
4.20 -3.22
10.58 +3.16
4.60 -2.82
6.86 -0.56
7.40 -0.02
11.24 +3.82
7.20 -0.22
5.97 --1.45
6.67 -0.75


1892
1893
1894
1895
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900
1901.
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908


80.9
81.5
81.0
81.3
82.0
81.6
80.8
82.2
82.4
80.4
82.1
82.4
80.1
80.9
81.4
81.4
81.1


'
""'''

'










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR AUGUST, 1908.


STemperature, in degrees Fahrenheit.


00
*0
9 9
0 0
a .s a a
^ I t :
.- a6 V
0 aa o J a
all
;T i P a a q a


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer.............. Alachua....... 92 25 81.2-0.3
Cedar Keys......... ievy........... 10 11 82.1 +0.6
Federal Point....... Putnam........ 515 81.0 0.0
Fernandina......... Nassau......... 10 11 80.6 -0.2
Gainesville ......... Alachua........ 176 22 81.2 0.0
Hilliard............ Nassau............ ........
Huntington......... Putnam........ 56 11 82.0 +0.4
Jacksonville........ Duval.......... 43 36 80.4 +0.3
Jasper............. Hamilton....... 152 10 80.8 -0.3
Johnstown.......... Bradford....... 125 12 81.4 +0.2
Lake City.......... Columbia....... 51 19 80.4 -0.9
Live Oak........... Suwannee...... ... .. ..... .....
Macclenny.......... Bhker.......... 125 13 80.2-2.0
Middleburg......... Clay........... 10 8 e80.8 +0.2
St. Augustine....... St. Johns...... 10 58 80.6 0.0
Satsuma Heights... Putnam........ 98 79.4.....
Switzerland......... St. Johns....... 101111a80.7 +0.5


98 2* 6529 27
94 15 69 29 22
98 1* 67 9* 28
97 20 69 29 20
96 2* 67 13* 25

102 2 67 13* 29
95 2 68 29 18
99 18 65 21* 30
c97 2* 67 5* 27
97 2 65129 27


Precipitation, in inches.


aEs a

S.5 a


So 5 a


5.08
15.80
4.76
1.93
5.31

7.20
2.90
2.15

2.55

1.11
2.36
8.56
3.91
3.17


-2.47
+8.08
-2.62
-3.98
-2.41

-0.12
-3.31
-4.47

-3.88

-6.05
-4.75
+2.82

-3.10


STATIONS.


Sky.


.... V
0(CV Ve
g ;' "-
hW
se
e

sw
sw

ne

e-sw

se
ne


~










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR AU GUST, 1908-Continued.


Bartow.............
Brooksville..........
Clermont...........
DeLand.............
Eustis..............
Fort Meade........
Fort Pierce (near).
Grasmere..........
Inverness..........
Kissimmee.........
Malabar............
Merritts Island.....
New Smyrna (near)
Ocala...............
Orange City........
Orlando ...........
I'anasoffkee........


Polk...........
Hernando......
Lake.........
Volusia.........
Lake...........
Polk...........
'St. Lucie.......
Orange.........
Citrus.........
Osceola.........
Brevard.......
Brevard......
Volusia... ...
Marion ........
Volusia ... ..
Orange........
Sumter........


Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit


115 13 82.0 +0.1 100
126 15 81.8 +100 101
105 15 83.0 +0.3 99
27 7.. ...
5618 82.1 -0.1 99
125 24 80.9 -0.3 97
6 17 82.0 +0.3 98
175 11 ..... ..... ...
43 7 80.0 -0.7 96
65 16 81.1 -1.2 96
24 9 82.2 +0.2 99
20 27 ..... ..... ...
9 20 80.8 +0.9 96
98 21 .. ... ..... ..
39 17 82.2 +0.2 100
111|lal82.3 +0.2 a9u
... 1. I..... I,... ....


Precipitation, in inches.


13* 29 8.92 +0.88
29 29 7.80-1.24
23 26 7.48 +0.23

14 26 5.73 -1.14
13 27 9.83 +0.64
23 25 7.51 -1.62
12* ....... ......
13* 27 7.73 +0.08
11 24 9.40 +2.35
23 27 8.57 +4.30

8* 26 6.10 +0.09

13 32 9.00 +1.88
13* 25 7.04 -0.44
... .. ..... ... 1


2.03
1.58
1.62

1.90
2.50
1.62


1.47
2.20

1.40

2.54
1.40


w
SW













w


sw
se

SW
W






SW
se

SW
SW
s

se

sW
sW












Plant City..........
Rockledge .........
Rockwell...........
St. Leo............
Tampa.............
Tarpon Springs.....
Titusville ...........

SOUTHERN SECTION.

Arcadia............
Avon Park.........
Flamingo...........
Hypoluxo...........
Jupiter.............
Key West...........
Manatee............
Miami..............
Myers ..............
Sand Key...........

WESTERN SECTION.

Apalachicola ........
Blountstown ........
Bonifay .........
Carrabelle..........
DeFuniak Springs...
Fenholloway ........
Madison ...........
Marianna .........
Molino.............


Hillsboro.......
Brevard........
Marion ........
Pasco..........
Hillsboro.......
Hillsboro.......
Brevard.......



DeSoto.........
DeSoto.........
Monroe........
Dade...........
Dade..........
Monroe ........
Manatee .......
Dade..........
Lee............
Monroe.........



Franklin.......
Calhoun........
Holmes........
Franklin.......
Walton ........
Taylor.........
Madison........
Jackeon ........
Escambia.......


12116 81.3 0.2 97 1* 68 14*
79.7 ..... 92 20 68 28*
10 8 e82.9 +1.1 elO0 3* e66 31
14013 81.1-0.7 97 2 68 29
20 18 81.2 +1.2 96 2 68 27
20 24 81.2 +0.1 96 15 69 14
6 16 ..... ..... .... ... ... ...



81.0 ..... 98 1 66 13
15011 81.4 -0.5 96 1 6713
4 7 ..... ..... .... ... .. ...
4 11 81.0-0.2 92 8* 70 4*
28 20 80.4 -1.1 90 20 70 26
2237 82.21-1.6 9125 71 28
824 80.7 -0.5 94 2 66 13
512 82.0-0.4 95 10 69 3
1224 79.8-1.5 93 2 68 13
25 4 82.2-0.3 94 8 68 13



24 4 81.6 +0.1 93 3* 68 28*
... ..81.1 ..... b98 18 b64 10
111 7 81.8 +0.1 98 15 65 11
1012 80.6-0.6 95 6* 6629
193 1 k80.8 +0.4 k98 15* k62 13
70 2 ..... ..... ....... 65 30
200 5 81.8 -0.6 100 3* 4 29
80 8 d82.0 +1.1 d103 16 d63 11*
49 6 80.0--0.8 96 14* 61 30


13.921+4.66


3.43
5.31
5.83
7.46
7.75




18.24
7.32

5.33
9.20
7.74
7.40
7.76
9.14
4.76



9.83
6.17
2.20
7.71

11.07
5.25
3.45
5.01


-6.43
-4.69
-1.11
-2.33




-0.30

+0.09
+3.35
+3.05
-1.64
+0.22
..1.14
+2.14



+0.67

-3.04
-1.01


-2.19
-2.95
-2.96


131...


11 17
10 17

11 15
3 21
4 18
8 16
11 15
10 20
3 22



12 9

18 5
17 5

0 25
4 17
2 .. 7
23 7








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR AU GUST, 1908-Continued.


Monticello.......... Jefferson....... 207 3 80.4 +1.2
Mount Pleasant.... Gadsden....... 260 2 79.6 ....
Newport........... Wakulla......... .. ..79.6 -1.2
Pensacola........... Escambia...... 56 29 81.0 0.0
St. Andrew.......... Washington.... 14 10 81.1 -0.5
Tallahassee......... Leon........... 192 23 79.5 -0.2
Wausau........... Washington.... 25010 82.5 -1.0


97 17* 6429 26 5.25-3.25 1.51 12 7 16 8 sw
95 18* 62 11 26 4.98 -0.52 1.50 8 ... ... .......
96 18 66 11* 24 7.79 -0.21 2.10 7 22 0 9 sw
9315 69 29 18 3.66 -3.50 1.81 6 13 9 9 sw ct
94 4* 65 11 24 6.92-2.0412.19 10 25 5 1 sw
9418 64 29 20 8.44 +1.08 a.75 11 17 11 3 s
100 6* 62 28 30 3.40 -4.751.04 4 8 16 7 s


All records are used in determining State means but the mean departures from normal temperature and precipi-
tation are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
The letters a, b, c, etc., indicate number of days missing from report. *More than one day.



















PART III.



Fertilizers,
Feeding Stuffs and
Foods and Drugs














REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.



SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disiniterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OB
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILIj
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary deter-
minations, and to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for two months from date of cer-
tificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce); fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and
address must also be on the package, this rule applying to
*vecial samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.












INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each
package of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have,
securely attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed
analysis required by law, and the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the inspector's fee. This provision of the law-
Section 3 of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 ,of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.


INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment
of the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee
tag and stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence
of the guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manu-
facturer or dealer has not complied with the law. Without
the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the goods
are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse
against the manufacturer or dealer. Such goods are sold
illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of little
value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers now
comply strictly with the law and regulations by placing
the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.


INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-


IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA
JANUARY, 1908.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia ..........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
monia ...................
Dried Blood 15 per cent Am-
m onia ...................


SEA PORTS,


Less than 5 to 10 0 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.

$60.00 $59.50 $59.00


74.00

60.00


73.50 73.00

59.50 59.00


54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per
cent. Potash (K20) ......
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per
cent. Potash (K20) (90 per
cent. Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Ams., 42
Potash (K20) ...........
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash.,.
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash...


50.00


49.50 49.00


30.00 29.50 29.00

46.00 45.50 44.00


110.00 --

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.0O)


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent Ammonia.....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
6 per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.
Raw Bone 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid .............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.08


3 Bul











Ammoniates.
Ammonia and Phosphoric Aci
Ground Castor Pomace, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
Scent Phosphoric Acid.....
Bright Cottonseed Meal, 8
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ...............
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ...............


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.
d.


$25.00 $24.50 $24.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


24.00 23.50 23.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


sigh Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00 14.50 14.50

14.00 13.50 13.00

24.00 23.50 23.00
25.00 24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stems .............. ..
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
(K20) Potash ...........
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per
cent. Ammonia, 1i per
cent Potash .... ..... ..
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks......


25.00 24.50 24.00

16.00 15.50 15.00


23.00 22.50 22.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


18.50
14.50
10.25


18.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.












STATE VALUATIONS.


For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1908.

Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia ( or its equivalent in nitrogen) 16 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash. K20) ........ 5 cents a pound

If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid............... $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid................20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .$3.30 per unit
Potash ............................ ..... $1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent, in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid. .6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid...1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.30- 11.28
Potash .......... .......... 7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging...........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. .27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia .................... 2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.06
Potash ......................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging ..........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. $18.30

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida sea ports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.













If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:

Available Phosphoric Acid ............90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) .....................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen).$2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertiliers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1908 deducted
therefrom.














COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


POUNDS PER HUNDRED


Phosphoric
Ammonia Acid


Potash


Nitrate of Soda.........
Sulphate of Ammonia ...
Dried Blood...............
Concentrated Tankage....
Bone Tankage ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........
Cotton Seed Meal.........
Hoof Meal .............


17 to 19 ............ ...........
21 to 24 ......................
12 to 17 ............. ........
12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
8 to 11 6 to 8 ...........
7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
13 to 17 1 to 2 ...........


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
Acid

Florida Pebble P-hosphate........-................. 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.............. ............ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.. ............. 14 to 19 1 to 35
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED
Actual \ Phosphoric
Potash Ammonia AciM Lime

M uriate of Potash....... 50 ......... ....... .........
Sulphate of Potash...... 48 to 52 .................. .........
Carbonate of Potash .... 55 to 30 ......... ......... .......
Nitrate of Potash...... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ......... .........
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag 26 to 30 ......... .................
Kainit ................. 12 to 12 ..........................
Sylvinit ............. 16 to 20 ........ ........ .........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached.. 2 to 8 .......... 1 to 2 .........
Wood Ashes. leached.... 1 to 2 ......... 1 to Ij 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems... ..... 5 to 8 2 to 4 ......... 34
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.40 0 to 41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.53 0 to 60 0.28 0.31
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure.... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein by..................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 16.47
Nitrogen into protein, by ........... ...... .. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.;32
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply. by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by.... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want o know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).




COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEED
LAWS.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.

COPIES OF THE PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law, rules and
regulations, standards, blanks, etc., can be obtained from
the Commissioner of Agriculture.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fetilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods pur-
chased analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of
the law-without charge-the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. 'When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and manu-
facturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
sea port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at and exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and sending of special
samples-on another page.













AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.


NAME OF FEED




Bright Cotton Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meal

Linseed Meal .........

Wheat Bran ..........

Middlings ............

Mixed Feed (wheat)..

Corn Meal ...........

Corn (grain) .........

Corn Cobs ...........

Corn and Cob Meal....

Corn & Oats, eq'l p'ts..

W heat ..................

O ats .................

Soja Beans ...........

Velvet Beans & Hulls..

Rice Hulls ...........

Gluten Meal ..........

Gluten Feed .....


7.05



8.76

8.39

6.36

7.80

1.64

2.10

30.10

6.60

5.80

1.80

9.50

4.80

9.20

35.70

1.25

7.31


0
-- CL|

38.83

21.43

34.70

15.10

17.23

16.86

8.73

10.50

2.40

8.50

9.60

11.90

11.80

34.00

19.70


27.57

36.56

35.911

57.28

56.70

54.44

71.32

69.60

54.90

64.80

66.10

71.99

59.70

28.00

51.301


9.22

5.45

5.34

3.65

4.42

4.79

3.14

5.4(

0.5(

3.5(

4.41

2.1(

5.0(

16.5(

4.5(


3.60 38.60 0.71

37.06 46.52 3.2'

24.17 54.30 3.4


6.60

.. .

6.12

5.33

4.30

5.30

[ 1.20

S1.50

S1.40

0 1.50

0 2.20

0 1.80

) 3.09

0 5.40

0 3.30

3 13.20

1 0.68

i 1.80












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)



NAME OF FEED. 'a S d

I Q I

Hominy Feed ......... 4.05 10.49 65.27 7.85 2.54

Rye Products (bran).. 4.53 15.57 61.28 3.02 3.80

Barley Sprouts ...... 10.94 27.20 42.66 1.561 6.34

Distillers' Grains .... 12.90 32.23 33.34 12.09 1.86

Oat Feed ............. 20.57 7.91 54.58 3.26 5.34

Provender ............ 3.91 10.62 67.34 4.03 1.83

Ship Stuff ........... ...... 16.30 58.14 4.28 ... ..

Victor Feed .......... 10.63 8.83 62.46 4.02 3.64

XXX Corn & Oat Feeds 9.94 9.66 64.66 5.09 3.24

Corn & Oat Feeds..... 12.09 8.73 61.73 3.73 3.22

Proprietary Horse F'ds 9.57 12.48 60.54 4.27 2.83

Molasses Feeds ....... 8.49 16.34 51.72 1.791 6.18

Poultry Feeds ........ 4.62 15.89 60.27 5.32 27.63

Beef Scrap .................. 44.70 3.28 14.75 29.20

Quaker Dairy Feed.... 15.53 14.42 52.12 4.05 5.31

Creamery Feed ....... 10.07 20.06 51.00 5.38 3.57

Purina Feed .......... 12.601 15.10 56.50 4.10] 4.65
I I












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED-
STUFF 1908.
For the season of 1908, the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn ,to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 1908.

Protein, 3j cents per pound..........65 cents per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1j cents per pound..30 cents per unit
Fats, 3j cents per pound.............. 65 cents per unit
A unit being 20 pounds (1 per cent) of a ton.
Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per-ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1
HOMINY FEED-
Protein .........................10.49 x 65c, $ 6.81
Starch and Sugar................. 65.27 x 30c, 19.58
Fats .......................... 7.85 x 65c, 5.10

State value per .ton ........................$31.49

EXAMPLE No. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-
Protein .......................... 9.66 x 65c, $ 6.27
Starch and Sugar................. 62.46 x 30c, 18.73
Fats ............................ 5.09 x 65c 3.30

State value per ton ........................... 28.30

R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. A. ROSH, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.




Fertilizer No. 1..............
Fertilizer No. 2...............
Fertilizer No. 3..............
Fertilizer No. 4...............
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer ............ ........
Fertilizer .....................
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1........
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2........
Steamed Bone No. 1..........
Steamed Bone No. 2..........
Fertilizer .....................
H. G. Blood & Bone, "Sinclair
Product" ...................

Marked Double Super Phosphatel


1535 ....
1536
1537 ....
1538 ....
1539 8.39
1540 ....
1541 116.74
1542 ....
1543 ....
1544 ....
1545 ....
1546 6.47

1547 6.58

1548 ....


Phosphoric Acid.



e I



12.06 1.65 13.71
11.14 1.28 12.42
9.50 2.07 11.57
10.76 1.24 12.00
6.34 0.07 6.41
9.26 2.41 11.67
10.84 0.25 11.09
.... .... ....

.... .... 24.79
.... .... 26.93
7.16 1.60 8.76

.... .... 10.96

42.73 .23 42.96


M

0
s



1.66 1.53
1.97 1.59
1.59 3.99
2.03 2.09
4.24 12.72
2.85 12.74
1.46 2.37
7.3S ....
7.67 ....
2.94 ..
2.75
3.66 6.24

10.25 ....
.... ....


BY WHOM SENT.





W. P. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
W. P. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
W. P. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
W. P. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
W. S. Ryall, Auburndale, Fla.
0. C. Parker, Tallahassee, Fla.
J. W. Henderson, Luanna, Fla.
E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy, Fla.
E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.

American Agricultural Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
E. E. Thompson, Avon Park, Fla.










ANALYSES OF SPECIAL SAMPLES-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Fertilizer .....................
Cotton Seed Meal..............
Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer No. 1...............
Fertilizer No. 2................
Fertilizer (Bone Mixture).....
Tankage .....................
Acid Phosphate ..............
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer No. 3535............
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer .....................
Cotton Seed Meal...............
K ainit .......................
Fertilizer No. 1 (Ground Meat
Pulp .......................
Fertilizer No. 2 (Tankage)....
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent....


Phosphoric Acid.
ci, 5 .
r> ]


S o
!d t U4 .O lI


1549 .... 7.53 .22 7.75 4.00 4.56
1550 .... .... ... .... 7.62 ...
1551 8.42 3.82 .74 4.56 5.44 8.30
1552 13.76 10.52 1.51 12.03 2.82 2.37
1553 16.27110.20 1.77111.97 3.53 2.89
1554 14.15 8.96 1.90 10.86 2.10 1.45
1555 4.52 .... .... 14.32 3.99 1.26
1556 .... .... .... 5.53 9.37 ....
1557 .... 15.32 3.53 18.85 ... ...
1558 .... 8.58 1.82 10.40 2.16 1.28
1559 4.68 3.08 9.33 12.41 4.07 6.44
1560 5.96 5.18 4.04 9.22 7.06 6.50
1561 3.05 17.34 2.18 19.52 2.74 0.14
1562 19.23 9.86 1.62 11.48 1.57 1.42
1563 .... .... .... .... 6.55 ....
1564 .... ...... ... .... 12.71

1565 .... 11.37 6.57 17.94 6.94 ....
1566 .... 3.96 1'56 5.52 112.08 ....
1567 7.95 14.74 .0814.82 .... ....


BY \HOM SENT.


P-Jlip Fisher, Lakeland, Fla.
Judson D. Clark Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
J. B. Galloway, Kathleen, Fla.
a. W. McCuhough, Glendale, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
John Parish, Parish, Fla.
Jacksonville Fer. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Fer. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
John McCullough, DeFuniak Spgs., Fla.
E. F. Sperry, Orlando, Fla.
Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
G. C. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
W. D. Griffin, Stuart, Fla.
M. R. Senterfitt, Holt, Fla.

L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
American Agricultural Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.










Acid Phosphate 16 per cent....

Fertilizer ("Gold Medal") ....
Fertilizer ('Grand Republic")
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer (Steamed Bone and
M eal) ......................
Dark Cotton Seed Meal........
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer ...................
Bright Cotton Seed Meal......
Cotton Seed Meal.............

WooA-d-s-es No. 1.............
Wood Ashes No. 2...........
Wood Ashes No. 3............
Wood Ashes No. 4............
Wood Ashes No. 5............
H. G. Sulphate Potash.........
Nitrate of Soda................
Fertilizer (Pineapple Mixture).
Fertilizer No. 1...............
Fertilizer No. 2...............
Hardwood Ashes .............
H. G. Acid Phosphate.........
H. G. Tankage................
Fertilizer .....................
Cotton Seed Meal ..............
Fertilizer (Guano) ...........
Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer ...................


1568 8.92 116.71

1569 .... 5.76
1570 .... 4.93
1571 7.171 6.15

1572 .... ..
1573 ..
1574 5.601 ....
1575 8.54 8.381
1576 ....
1577 ....
1578 .... I ....
1579
1580 "
1581 .....
1582 ....1 !
1583 ..
1584 .... I .
1585 6.851 ....
1586 6.49 ....
1587 6.471 ....
1588 1.... 1 ....
1589 ... 116.58'
1590 .... I ...
1591 116.58 110.49
1592 I .... 1 ....
1593 .. 112.811
1594 19.131 ....
1595 117.70 9.961


.24 16.95 .... ....American Agricultural Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
1.86 7.62 6.12 2.71 E. McDonald Socrum, Fla.
.28 5.21 1.93 13.57 E. McDonald Socrum, Fla.
1.85 8.00 2.74 10.68 J. A. Saunders, Ozomna, Fla.

....29.10 2.98 Robert Rhoden, Stuart, Fla.
.... .... 7.51 .. J. M. Holding, Dania, Fla.
9.521 6.701 7.72 J. G. May, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
0.231 8.591 4.19110.14 C. W. Stevens, Tampa, Fla.
...... I 7.71 ... J. M. Holding. Dania, Fla.
.... 7.42 E. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville,
I Fla.
............ 0.47 Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
.... .... .... 0.08 Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
... .... 0.05 Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
.... ...... ... 3.10 Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
... ..0.60 Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
.... 48.56 A McRae, Monticello, Fla.
.... .... 16.36 .... P. Barmhill, Pine Level, Fla.
.... 1.951 5.5d 7.25 C. B. Bixley, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
.... 7.351 7.39 3.18 N. H. Parks Stuart, Fla.
.... 6.131 6.90 4.89 H. Parks* Stuart, Fla.
.. .... .... 1.69 Jacksonville Fert. Co., Jacksonville,Fla.
2.58 19.161 .... .... Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.... 3.76110.781 .... Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.12112.611 1.661 1.41 W. P. Johnson, Cobb, Fla.
.... .... 7.80 E.O. Painter Fert.Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.24115.05 19.52 1.28 T. H. Bell, Dunnedin, Fla.
.... 6.111 5.721 5.56 C. F. Olmstead, Ft. Pierce Fla.
1.20 11.16 .... 3.28 J. H. Stephens, Marianna,'Fla.









ANALYSES OF SPECIAL SAMPLES-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer No. 1 (Pineapple Mix-
ture ........................
Fertilizer No. 2 (Pineapple Mix-
ture ........................
Tankage No. .............
Fertilizer No. 2...............
Fertilizer (H. G.) .............
H. G. Acid Phosphate .........
H. G. Sulphate Potash........
Dried Blood ..................
Fertilizer .....................
Cotton Seed Meal..............


oa,o
I

0 a
Z


1596

1597
1598
1599
1600
1601
1602
1603
1604
1605


Phosphoric Acid.







10.48 .... .... 2.15 5.061

9.64 .... .... 1.94 5.11
.... .... .... 7.27 7.88
6.87 6.32 5.86 12.18 4.58
9.34 4.47 0.51 4.98 0.58
.... 19.22 1.40 20.62 ....
.... .... I .... .... ....
.. .... .... 17.25
0.42 9.4i 2.56 11.96 2.4a
.... .... .... .... 3.30


BY WHOM SENT.


d
N




8.96

4.01

8.69
8.51

47.40

1.63


i


Mrs. M. E. Goldsmith, Ft. Pierce, Fla.

Mrs. M. E. Goldsmith, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
J. Ed. RaulersonT,-Llly, Fla.
J. Ed. Raulerson, Lilly, Fla.
A. Anderson, Lakeland, Fla.
A. Anderson, Lakeland, Fla.
A. Anderson, Lakeland, Fla.
H. S. Thomas, Eldred Fla.
R. W. Storrs, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
W. J. McPhail, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE--DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS, 1908. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist, under Section 1, Act approved May 2, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.




Bradley Orange Tree.....


Bradley Florida Vegetable


Bradley Fruit and Vine..


Bradley Nursery Stock...

Mapes' Fruit and Vine Ma-
nure ..................

Mapes' Orange Tree Ma-
nure ..................


Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis..... 6.28

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis..... 9.37

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis..... 6.26

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis..... 7.63

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.....1 9.49

Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00
Official Analysis..... 11.26


Phosphoric Acid.


a


I F-5


6.00 1.00
7.48 1.50

6.00 1.00
7.65 1.28

5.50 3.00
6.48 1.07

8.00 1.00
8.93 1.24

5.00 2.00
5.29 2.64

6.00 2.00
5.89 3.74


8.98


8.93


7.55


10.17


7.93


9.93


3.50
3.50

4.00
3.85

2.25
2.26

4.50
4.68

2.00
2.82

4.00
4.63


5.00
5.43

5.00
5.08

10.00
10.86

3.00
3.94

10.00
11.21

3.00
3.55


BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.

Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Mapes Formula & Peruvi-
an Guano Co., New York

Mapes Formula & Peruvi-
an Guano Co., New York
47











ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. I





SOfficial Analysis.... 6.86

official Analysis..... 10.84


IZI
Wieiams & Clark Fruit and |



Ideal Vegetable Manure................ 118 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis..... 106.8694



Kainit ................ 1181 Guaranteed Analysis.' .0
Official Analysis..... ....
Nitrate of Soda .......... 1182 Guaranteed Analysis 8. 0
Official Analysis........94

Formula No. 44 .......... 1183 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis..... 9.32
Armour's Vegetable Fer-
tilizer ................. 1184 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis..... 8.56


M 3i
I


5.50 3.00
6.73 0.94 7.67

6.00 1.00.
9.58 0.83 10.41

6.00 1.00 ...
6.88 1.62 8.50


7.00
7.59

7.00
7.56


1.00
2.22

2.00
2.31


.. .. I
9.81


9.87


2.25
2.57

4.00
3.29

4.00
3.93




16.00
15.88

3.10
3.26

4.00
3.76


i i


4



0
SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.

0


10.00 Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
10.41 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
5.47 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
7.31 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.50 Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.,
12.60 Savannah, Ga.

.. rmour Fertilizer Works,
Jacksonville, Fla.

3.20 Va..Carolina Chemical Co.,
3.26 Savannah, Ga.

6.00 ]Armour Fertilizer Works,
5.39 1 Jacksonville, Fla.










A. L. Wilson Co.'s Ammo-1185 Guaranteed Analysis. 16.00 8.00 2.00
niated Guano........... Official Analysis..... [12.39 9.95 1.70

Vegetable Guano..........1186 Guaranteed Analysis. 5.00 ..........
Official Analysis..... 9.19.......

H. G. Vegetable Fertilizer.. 1187 Guaranteed Analysis. 110.00 5.00 2.00
Official Analysis... ..115.40 5.12 2.46

1. G. Vegetable Fertilizer.. 1188 Guaranteed Analysis...... ..... .....
Official Analysis. ... ..... .....

H. G. Vegetable Fertilizer.. 1189 Guaranteed Analysis. ... ..........
Official Analysis..... ... .... ...
H. G. Ground Ky. Tobacco
Stems ............... 190 Guaranteed Analysis.... .. .... ...
Official Analysis.... ... ....

Pulverized Steamed Bone.. 1191 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 .....
Official Analysis........ ....

Gem Pineapple Manure.. 1192'Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00........
Official Analysis.... 7.01 .....

Nitrate of Soda........... 1193 Guaranteed Analysis. 3.00 ..........
Official Analysis.... ..... .....

Ky. H. G. Tobacco Steams 1194Guaranteed Analysis. 5.00.......
S Official Analysis.... ..... ..........
H. (:. V. C. Champion Cit-I A
rus Compound.......... 1195'uaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00
S Official Analysis.... 5.16 5.58 1.83


..... 2.00 2.00
11.65 1.98 2.00

11.45 4.00 6.25
13.89 3.65 5.97

4.00 6.00
7.58 2.92 6.94


7.33 ..


22.00
23.39

2.50
1.85





7.41.

7.41


Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Germofert Manufact'ng Co
Charleston, S. C.

Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville Fla.

Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.,
Savannah, Ga.














NAME. OR BRAND.

0
i



H. G. V. C. Fruit and Vine. 1196

H. G. V. C. Tip Top To-
mato Trucker .......... 1197


Simon Pure No. 2........ 1198


Gem Sweet Potato No. 1.. 1199

Mapes' Fruit and Vine Ma-
nure ................... 1200


Mapes' Vegetable Manure.. 1201

williams & Clark Orange
Tree ...................1202


ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 50

Phosphoric Acid.
0
4 BY WHOM AND WHERE
i o MANUFACTURED.

0 0
$ s ^ oo

Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 2.50 10.00 Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.,
Official Analysis... 4.87 7.06 1.09 8.15 3.68 11.15 Savannah, Ga.

Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 7.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Va.-Carolina Chemical Co,
Official Analysis.... 4.66 8.61 0.49 9.10 5.21 4.61 Savannah, Ga.

Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 4.00 6.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 7.25 7.32 2.48 9.80 5.47 6.88 Jacksonville, Fla.

Guaranteed Analysi .. .... ..... 4.00 4.00 6.50 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 6.50 5.34 0.07 5.41 4.20 7.72 Jacksonville, Fla.

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 5.00 2.00.....2.00 10.00 Mapes Formula & Peruvi-
Official Analysis..... 10.16 5.94 2.17 8.11 2.25 11.83 an Guano Co., New York

Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 5.00 4.00 Mapes Formula & Peruvi-
Official Analysis.... 13.61 6.29 3.03 9.32 5.30 5.22 an Guano Co., New York

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 3.50 5.00 Am. Agricul. Chemical Co.,
Official Analysis.... 7.27 7.48 0.99 8.47 3.69 5.99 Jacksonville, Fla










Amour's Sugar Cane...... 1203

Armour's Strawberry
Fruiter ................ 1204


Armour's Fruit and Vine.. 1205


Acid Phosphate 14 per cent 1206


Armour's Vegetable ...... 1207

Armour's Blood, Bone and
Potash ................. 1208

Armour's Watermellon
Special ................ 1209

Armour's Irish Potato
Special ............... 1210


Celery Grower ........... 1211


Amour's Lettuce Special.. 1212


Tomato Special .......... 1213


Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 6.59

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 5.78

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 8.15

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 12.46

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 9.02

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 9.91

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 5.64

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 4.62

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 6.40

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 10.48

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 4.62 |


6.00
6.82

5.00
5.76-

6.00
6.73

14.00
13.69

7.00
7.16

8.00
8.37

5.00
5.65

5.00
6.05

5.50
7.87

3.00
4.27

6.00
6.57


1.00 ... .
1.46 8.28

2.00 ...
0.74 6.50

1.00
1.14 7.87

1.00 ..
0.42 14.11

2.00 .. .
1.25 8.41

1.00 .....
1.85 10.22




1.31 7.36

1.00 ..
0.10 7.97

2.00 ..
0.63 4.90

1.00 ..
2.141 8.71


5.00
4.63

2.00
2.60

2.50
2.66



4.00
3.69

5.00
4.89

3.00
3.14

3.50
3.45

8.00
7.55

7.00
6.38

5.00
4.64


8.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.90 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

11.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.92 Jacksonville, Fla.

..... Armour Fertilizer Works,
..... Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
6.07 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.00 'Armour Fertilizer Works,
7.37 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.53 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.50 Armour Fertilizer Works,
9.95 ; acksonville, Fla.

4.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
4.67 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
4.46 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
7.87 1 Jacksonville, Fla.









ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.

a



Vegetable Fertilizer No. 1.11214 Guaranteed Analysis. 5.00
Official Analysis....' 8.44
Orange Tree Germicide
and Enricher .......... 1215 Guaranteed Analysis. 5.00
Official Analysis.... 3.64
Strawberry Fertilizer..... 1216IGuaranteed Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis.... 13.82
Orange Fruiter Special... 1217 Guaranteed Analysis.' 8.00
S Official Analysis.... 5.88
Fruit and Vine........... 1218 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00
lOfficial Analysis.... I. 6.80
Pineapple Manure .......1. 1219 Guaranteed Analysis.' 8.00
I Official Analysis .... 4.56
Favorite Blood, Bone andl I
Potash for Vegetables... |1220 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 7.85


Phosphoric Acid.


or

*a 0 -,
.

6.91 9.42

5.00
10.34 14.52

2.00
1.44 9.33

1.00
1.01 9.01

1.00 .. .
1.70 8.35

.. 10.00
2.57 7.80

1.00 ..
1.71 10.16


8.00
7.95

4.00
4.14

2.50
2.20

2.00
2.95

2.00
2.01

6.00
5.50

5.00
4.87


SBY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




5.00 Germofert Manufac'ng Co.
5.18 Charleston, S. C.

6.00 Germofert Manufac'ng Co.
5.33 Charleston, S. C.

8.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
7.12 Tampa, Fla.

16.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
12.37 Tampa, Fla.

12.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
12.04 Tampa, Fla.

8.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
8.26 Tampa, Fla.

7.00 Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
6.94 Jacksonville, Fla.


I










io. 1 .................... 1221 Guaranteed Analysis.!10.00 5.00 2.00
Official Analysis.... 5.37 6.74 0.44

Fruit and Vine.......... 1222 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 7.00 1.00
Official Analysis.... 6.10 8.83 0.56

Vegetable Fertilizer ...... 1223 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00 2.00
Official Analysis.... 9.02 7.28 1.30

No. 4 .................... 1224 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00 2.00
Official Analysis.... 8.71 6.98 0.32


7.18

S.. ...
8.89

. ...
I 8.58


6.66


5.00 4.00 |Southern Fertilizer Co.,
5.60 4.63 Orlando, Fla.

2.00 12.00 Southern Fertilizer Co..
2.48 10.49 Orlando, Fla.

5.00 6.00 iSouthern Fertilizer Co.,
5.04 5.37 Orlando, Fla.

3.00 10.00 |Southern Fertilizer Co.,
3.34 10.59 Orlando, Fla.
I I










R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. BUREAU OF FEEDSTUFFS. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, act approved May 24, 1905. (Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.


Purina Feed ......................
Grass Hay .......................
Shorts ..........................
Kudzu Vine Hay...................
Cotton Seed Meal...............

Pure Wheat Ship Stuff............
Pure Wheat Bran..................


70 7.4.515.01 50.79 4.68
71 29.62 11.98136.37 1.38
72 6.80 15.36 56.71 3.83
73 30.20 14.80 35.08 2.38
74 25.20 15.88 40.65 4.00

.75 4.20 16.90 58.83 4.45
76 9.05 14.70 54.25 3.28


FROM WHOM RECEIVED.


8.90 Martel Lumber Co., Martel Fla.
9.10 Robert Carlton, Nocatee, Fla.
5.35 C. Brown & Bros. Ocala, Fla.
7.95 C. E. Please, Chipley, Fla.
3.77 The McPhail Lumber Co., DeFuniak
SSprings, Fla.
4.10 Guy R. Champlain, Jacksonville, Fla. r
6.97 Guy R. Champlain, Jacksonville, Fla.


NOTICE.-The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9 of the laws providing for "Special Samples"
drawn by consumers are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the laws and the "Rules and Regulations governing
the taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feedstuffs and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report.
Also to compare the "official analysis" and the "market value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases the "market value," or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods-that in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guarantee tag on the bag with the table of "average composition of feedstuffs."
In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law and regulations, and
send in a tin box, sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guarantee tags" off the packages,
to compare with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.


--


I










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS, 1908.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Secti on 1. act approved May 24, 1905.


Pure


Pure


NAME, OR BRAND. S
0 0
on



Wheat Bran.............. 562


Wheat Bran.............. 5631


Bran .......................... 564


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 565


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 566


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 567


Pure Wheat Bran and Shorts.. 568


Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis......


Cs ADDRESS OF
Sa d MANUFACTURERS.
(95 n ') 0 icjU)


7.49 16.09 53.58 4.68 ...Acme Mills and Elevator
7.32 16.10 55.73 4.00 5.70 Co., Hopklnsvile, Ky.

7.49 16.09 53.58 4.68 .... Acme Mills and Elevator
6.20 15.32 57.46 4.00 4.87 Co., Hopkinsville, Ky. g

9.50 14.50 54.00 3.75 .....H. C. Cole Milling Co.,
9.20 15.53 52.57 4.43 6.75 Chester, Ill.

9.50 14.50 50.00 4.00 .... ICumberland Mills,
9.01 14.57 54.02 4.38 7.27 Nashville, Tenn.

9.49 14.60 57.23 4.06 ...The Dunlap Milling Co.,
9.00 14.52 55.08 3.80 6.501 Clarksville, Tenn.

9.50 14.50 54.00 5.00..... Tennessee Milling Co.,
7.77 14.74 56.16 3.33 6.00 Estill Springs, Tenn.

7.64 14.94 58.28 4.46 4.68 Barnett, Denton & Lynn
6.42 14.60 57.91 4.10 5.00 Co., Dalton, Ga.


]










ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-- Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


M iddlings .....................


Shorts .......................


Pure Wheat Shorts.............


"Ship Stuff" .................


Corno Hen Feed...............


Corno Horse and Mule Feed....


Gonzalez Cow Feed............


Grainfalfa Feed ...............


o .





Official Analysis..... 3.50

570 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.25
Official Analysis..... 5.80

571 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.00
Official Analysis..... 5.52

572 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.00
Official Analysis..... 7.21

573 Guaranteed Analysis. 2.30
Official Analysis..... 2.22

574 Guaranteed Analysis ......
Official Analysis..... 13.47

575 Guaranteed Analysis......
Official Analysis..... 8.37

576 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.00
Official Analysis..... 11.80


:J








20.45 52.73

16.00 48.00
16.20 58.76

13.00 60.00
13.60 59.10

10.*00 70.00
10.50 69.53

10.00 58.50
10.00 57.49

16.50 51.40
16.15 55.43

12.00 58.00
11.41 57.07


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


.... H. C. Cole Milling Co.,
3.45 Chester, Ill.

..... Wm. T. Kemper Elevator
5.20 Co., Kansas City, Mo.

..... Liberty Mills,
4.67 Nashville, Tenn.

..... Mountain City Mills Co.,
3.81 Chattanooga, Tenn.

..... The Corno Mills Co.,
1.55 East St. Louis, Ill.

..... The Corno Mills Co.,
4.32 East St. Louis, Ill.

.....M. F. Gonzalez & Co.,
3.35 Pensacola, Fla.

.The Great Western Cereal
4.65 Co., Chicago, Ill.









"Molasco" .................... 577


Protena Alfalfa Feed........... 578


Purina Feed ................ 579


Cotton Seed Meal.............. 580


Cotton Seed Meal, medium grade 581


Cotton Seed Meal.............. 582


Cotton Seed Meal, Star Brand.. 583


Cotton Seed Meal.............. 584


Pure Wheat Middlings......... 585


Mixed (Bran) Feed............ 586


Mixed (Middlings) Feed....... 587


Cuaranteed Analysis. 8.00 12.23 56.801
Official Analysis.....117.52 15.93143.9u

Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 12.30 56.00
Official Analysis..... 10.65 12.95 56.38

Guaranteed Analysis. [ 7.9014.00 60.00
Official Analysis.... 9.45113.69 58.04

Guaranteed Analysis.l..... 38.62 ..
Official Analysis..... 110.55 38.00 29.35

Guaranteed Analysis.... 38.62 ...
Official Analysis..... 10.60139.31 29.66,

Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 38.621.....
Official Analysis..... 10.20 38.65128.15

Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 38.62 24.00
Official Analysis..... 110.32 40.19 29.49

Guaranteed Analysis ..... 125.00 .....
Official Analysis..... 18.7u123.30 37.10

Guaranteed Analysis. 4.5S 16.04 62.48
Official Analysis..... 4.95 16.15 57.85

Guaranteed Analysis. 11.24113.42 .. ..1
Official Analysis..... 19.17 8.90 54.63 .

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.90 14.26 ..
Official Analysis..... 12.87 11.23 59.15


3.27 ..... The Molasco Co.,
2.80 9.85 East St. Louis, Ill.

4.00 ..... Ralston Purina Co.,
3.60 4.67 St. Louis, Mo.

4.50 .... Ralston Purina Co.,
3.80 4.45 St. Louis, Mo.

........ Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
7.45 5.40 Jacksonville, Fla.


6.28


..... People's Cotton Oil Co.,
5.85 Selma, Ala.

..... Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
5.85 Savannah, Ga.

.... J. Lindsay Wells Co.,
6.35 Memphis, Tenn.

5.00 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
5.00 Tallahassee, Fla.

.... The Dunlap Milling Co.,
4.15 Clarksville, Tenn.

..... Capital Grain and Mill Co.,
4.40 Nashville, Tenn.

... Capital Grain and Mill Co.,
3.601 Nashville, Tenn.














NAME, OR BRAND. a



Mixed Shorts ................. 588


Alfacorn Feed ................ 589


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 590


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 591


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 592


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 593


Lillie Bran" .............. 594


Pure Wheat Bran.............. 596


ALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS -Continued.


,: I '






Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 10.00 55.00 3.50
Official Analysis..... 16.00 9.96 55.70 2.88 4.82

Guaranteed Analysis. 7.49 16.09 53.58 4.68 .. .
Official Analysis..... 7.40 15.97 54.53 3.98 5.70

SGuaranteed Analysis. 9.50 14.509 0.00 4.00 ..64
Official Analysis..... 8.27 14.83 54.30 ..50 64.7
Guaranteed Analysis. 9.50 14.50 50.00 4.00 ...
Official Analysis..... 8.53 15.36 56.31 3.20 6.50

Guaranteed Analysis. 9.50 14.50 50.00 4.00 ..
Official Analysis..... 8.07 16.0654.49 3.6 6.30
Guaranteed Analysis. 8.50 15.00 56.50 4.00 ...

Official Analysis..... 7.2515.97 55.8 4.13 5.821
Guaranteed Analysis. ..0. 15.00 54.00 3.00 ...

Official Analysis..... 8.97 15.75 52.98 4.081 6.65


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


Hardy Grain Co.,
Union City, Tenn.

Capital Grain and Mill Co.,
Nashville, Tenn.

Acme Mills and Elevator
Co., Hopkinsvile, Ky.

Alabama Corn Mills Co.,
Mobile, Ala.

Liberty Mills,
Nashville, Tenn.

Liberty Mills,
Nashville, Tenn.

Lillie Mill Co.,
Franklin, Tenn.

Geo. P. Plant Milling Co.,
St. Louis, Mo.








Bran and Ship Stuff............ 596


Pure Wheat Bran and Shorts... 597


Albatross Middlings .......... 598


White Middlings ............... 599


Pure Wheat Shorts............ 600


Pure Wheat Shorts............ 601


"Ship Stuff" ................. 602


"Ship Stuff" .................. 603


Delta Feed .................... 604


Cooked Horse Feed............. 605


Grainfalfa Feed ............... 606


Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....


11 nnl


13.78 62.35
15.75 62.35

14.94 58.28
15.45 59.35

14.00 63.00
16.10 64.68

17.39 55.10
14.57 68.27

16.00 48.00
18.16 55.89

17.31 .. .
16.58 57.60

13.00 60.00
13.74 60.54

13.00 60.00
15.58 57.28

7.00 58.00
8.34 62.01

11.50 60.75
11.90 60.28
192 n 8 nn


9.57 11.98 57.95i


3.00 .... Blackford Milling Co.,
3.00 3.53 Blackford, Ky.

4.46 4.68 Barrett, Denton & Lynn
3.30 4.751 Co., Dalton, Ga.

3.50 ..... John F. Meyer & Sons,
3.10 2.30 Milling Co., St. Louis.

3.26 ..... Acme Mills & Elevator Co.,
2.20 1.82 Hopkinsville, Ky.

4.00 ..... Southern Mills,
4.45 5.30 Nashville, Tenn.

4.85 ..... Washburn Crosby Milling
4.30 4.95 Co., Louisville, Ky.

5.50 ..... Mountain City Mill Co.,
5.20 3.20 Chattanooga, Tenn.

5.50 ..... Mountain City Mill Co.,
5.40 4.20 Chattanooga, Tenn.

4.00 ..... The Valley Milling Co.,
3.70 3.85 St. Louis, Mo.

5.48 ..... American Steam Feed Co.,
3.33 4.95 Nashville, Tenn.

4.00 ..... The Great Western Cereal
4.40 4.45 Co., Chicago, Ill.


I













ow


NAME, OR BRAND.



Cotton Seed Meal...............


Cotton Seed Meal................


Cotton Seed Meal............... 609


Cotton Seed Meal............... 610


Dairy and Stock Feed.......... 611


Daisy Dairy Feed.............. 612


Banner Feed ................. 613


Banner Feed .................. 614


qALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS--Continued.








Guaranteed Analysis.... 38.62 ..... .....
Official Analysis..... 9.20 40.75 27.081 8.35

Guaranteed Analysis..... 38.62.... .....
Official Analysis..... 9.15 40.75 27.08 8.3005

Guaranteed Analysis. ...38.62 ..... .....
Official Analysis..... 9.21540.75 27.20 8.00

Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 25.00 15.00 5.00
Official Analysis..... 23.50 19.44 39.51 4.45

Guaranteed Analysis. 9.50 18.00 48.00 4.00
Official Analysis..... 7.50 24.92 46.43 5.10

Guaranteed Analysis. 9.00 14.00 58.00 3.00
Official Analysis..... 10.47 14.54154.73 1.77

'Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.50 62.00 3.50
Official Analysis..... 8.80 9.13 65.70 3.13

Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.50 62.00 3.50
Official Analysis..... 7.62 9.39 66.99 2.90


ADDRESS OF
. MANUFACTURERS.
CO |X~~jt


5.77


6.05


4.30


1 5.'35


7.26


2.82


1 2.80


Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
Augusta, Ga.

Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Macon County Oil Co.,
Tuskegee, Ala.

J. Lindsay Wells Co.,
Memphis, Tenn.

Atlanta Milling Co.,
Atlanta, Ga.

The Great Western Cereal
Co., Chicago, Ill.

The Quaker Oats Co.,
Chicago, Ill.

The Quaker Oats Co.,
Chicago, Ill.








Purina reed ..................


Sucren- Dairy Feed ............


Sucrene Horse, Mule & Ox Feed


Victor Feed ...................


Pure Wheat Bran..............


Pure Wheat Bran.............


Pure Wheat Middlings.........


Brown Shorts ...............


Fancy Shorts .................


Forest City Feed Meal..........


Cotton Seed Meal..............


15; Glaranteed Analysis.1 7.90
Official Analysis..... 8.80

616 Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00
Official Analysis..... 11.15

617 Guaranteed Analysis. 13.50
Official Analysis..... 9.00

618 Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00
Official Analysis..... 12.85

619 Guaranteed Analysis. .....
Official Analysis..... 9.72

620 Guaranteed Analysis. 9.50
Official Analysis.....I 8.97


L-11Guaranteed Analysis. 4.58 16.04
Official Analysis..... 5.30 18.60

622 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.00 15.U0
Official Analysis..... 5.45 16.32

623 Guaranteed Analysis. 3.90 16.36
Official Analysis..... 5.30 16.45

624 Guaranteed Analysis...... 23.00
Official Analysis..... 118.75 23.69

625 Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 36.05
SOfficial Analysis.....110.15 40.75


I160.0)
S61.66

S48.541
147.18

) 52.451
359.49

62.00
63.34

51.20
53.91

50.00
53.90

62.58
56.45

60.83
58.68

62.66
59.70

30.00
35.76


27.50


4.50 ..... Ralston Purina Co.,
2.98 3.35 St. Louis, Mo.

3.50 ..... American Milling Co.,
5.00 7.20 Philadelphia, Pa.

3.00 ..... American Milling Co.,
3.13 5.80 Philadelphia, Pa.

3.00 ..... The Quaker Oats Co.,
2.55 4.10 Chicago, Ill.

4.84 ..... Ingleheart Bros.,
4.05 5.90 Evansville, Ind.

4.00 .... Liberty Mills,
3.85 6.80 Nashville, Tenn.

4.17..... The Dunlap Milling Co.,
5.35 4.50 Clarksville, Tenn.

4.00 .....Atlanta Milling Co.,
4.55 4.75 Atlanta, Ga.

4.50 3.15 Akin-Eiskine Milling Co.,
4.38 4.15 Evansville, Ind.

4.50 .... The Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
7.85 5.20 Savannah, Ga.

......... Johnston Cotton Oil Co.,
7.73 5.90 Johnston, S. C.











ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS -Continued.

5 .

4,z d


Globe Gluten Feed............. 626 Guaranteed Analysis..... 26.00 ..... 2.50 .....
Official Analysis..... 7.22 26.2 47 25 4.48 4.95

Feed Stuff .................... 627 Guaranteed Analysis. 15.46 12.00 55 .23 3.30 .....
Official Analysis..... 7.00 13.1658. 2.471 7.50


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


Corn Products Refining Co.,
New York, N. Y.

Cornelia Mills,
Jacksonville, Fla.


SPECIAL NOTICE.-The attention of dealers and consumers is called to the table of "Average Composition of
Feedstuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feedstuffs sold t
throughout the country. Any material variation from these averages is presumptive evidence of impurity or
adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee
of the manufacturer should not vary materially from this table of averages, while the "official analysis" should
show practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers are requested, in all cases of
suspected Inferiority or adulteration, asnd a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.


NAME OF BRAND.











R. E. ROSE State Chen:


S Name or Brand.


148 Red Heart Mead....


149 Pabst Mead .......


150 Schiltz Fizz ........


151 Pabst Mead .......


153 "Malt Extract, No. 2"


154 Schlitz Fizz ........


155 Schlitz Fizz ........


157 "Meth" ..........


SPECIALFOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.
-Samples sent in by citizens


Manfuacturer.


Jung Brewing Co., Cincin-
nati, Ohio ............
1 | i1 1 |1 Pabst Brewing Co., Mil-
waukee, Wis. .........

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis .....

Pabst Brewing Co., Mil-
waukee, Wis. ........

...... ...................


Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis. ......

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis. ......

Wm. J. Lemp Brewing Co.,
St. Louis, Mo. ........


Retail Dealer.





.. ......... .... ... ..


I' 63
B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.
8i

S By Whom Sent.



2.00 S. Demetre, Tallahassee,
Fla.

2.00 S. Demetre, Tallahassee,
Fla.

2.00 A. D. Stanton, Sheriff,
Madison County.

2.70 A. D. Stanton, Sheriff,
Madison County.
5.65 J. Gordon Pearce, Alton,
Fla.


2.00 Schlitz Brewing Co., Mil-
waukee, Wis.

2.00 Schlitz Brewing Co., Mil-
waukee, Wis.

2.70 Deeb Bros., Tallahassee,
Fla.


I I










SPECIAL FOOD AND DRUG
d
Name or Branc. Manufacturer.


158 White Top ........ Capital Brewing Co.,
Montgomery, Ala ........

159 Maltine ............ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
I I con, Ga ............. ...
161Schlitz Fizz ........ Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis. ..... I ....
I I
1621Schlitz Fizz ....... Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.,
] I Milwaukee, Wis ..........
I


ANALYSES--Con


Retail Dealer.


tinued. 64


Je By Whom Sent.


2.70 P. W. Williams, Havana,
Fla.

.. ..... P. W. Williams, Havana,
Fla.

.2.00 Schlitz Brewing Co., Mil-
waukee, Wis.

2.25 Schlitz Brewing Co., Mil-
1waukee, Wis.










SPECIAL MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.


IDENTIFIED AS-


A mixture of:
Bone Phosphate of Lime ................... 44.16 per cent..
Sodium Hyposulphite ....................... 34.44 per cent..


Apple Cider: Extract...........................
Ash ..
A sh .. ..........................
Alcohol........................
Paris Green:
Arsenious oxide......... ...................
Copper oxide ..............................

Milk: Fat.......................... .......... .


4.61 per cent..
0.28 per cent..
4.85 per cent..


Joseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.


Liberty Fruit Products Co. Jackson-
ville, Fla.


58.61 per cent.
26.70 per cent. Hardee-Smith Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
CA


5.1 per cent...


M ilk: Fat...................................... 4,9 per cent..

Milk: Fat ...................................... 5.4 per cent..

Raw Linseed Oil:
Specific gravity................. 0.89
Iodine value .................... 105.90 adulterated
Ash ............................ 0. 24 per cent
Boiled Linseed Oil:
Specific gravity ................ 0.885
Iodine value .................. .. 99.95 adulterated
Moisture ...................... 3.07 per cent


Mrs. O. C. Van Brunt, Tallahassee,
Fla.
Mrs. O. C. Van Brunt, Tallahassee,
Fla.
E. H. Sellards, Tallahassee, Fla.



J. L. McDaniel, Jennings, Fla.



J. L. McDaniel, Jennings, Fla.


Labora-
tory
Number|


159


FROM-


I


k











R. E. ROSE, State Chemist FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES. B. BRIDGES Assistant Chemist.
Official shiipies drawn by State Inspector, under Chapter 5662, Acts of 1907.
RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF VINEGARS.


0 Manufacturer Indications are
Name or Brand or Wholesaler. Retail Dealer. o 0 Lead acetate. that this is-


o IApple Vinegar. Semmes-Boord Co., West-Gadsden Trad- I
Washington, D. C. ing Co., Greens-
boro, Fla ........ 4.29 2.29 0.37|Precipitate .. Dark|Apple Vinegar.
69 Distilled Vine- R. M. Hughes & Co., J. P. Smith, Quincy,
gar ......... Louisville, Ky.... Fla. .............. 3.89 0.34,0.08INo precipitate Distilled Vinegar.
71 Apple Vinegar. R. M. Hughes & Co., E. B. Shelfer Co.,e
Louisville, Ky.... Quincy, Fla. ..... 4.402.23 0.20 Precipitat DarkApple Vinegar.
87 Apple Vinegar. Prince Lucas .Cider H. Muller, Pensa- I
Vinegar Co....... cola. Fla. ........ 4.37 2.16 0.38 Precipitate ..DarkAple Vinegar.
89 Cane Sugar Dodson Brown Mfg. J. E. Dubuisson, en-
Vinegar .... Co., St. Louis, Mo.. sacola. Fla. ...... 4.76 0.45 0.08ITrace precip- ... .Fermented Cane
90 Distilled Vine- R. M. Hughes & Co., J. E. Dubuisson, Pen- j itate........ I Sugar Vinegar.
gar ........ Louisville, Ky.... sacola, Fla....... 8.07 0.22i0.041No precipitate ..... Distilled Vinegar.
95 Apple Cider H. J. Heinz Co., Randolph & Finn,
Vinegar .... Pittsburg, Pa..... Tallahassee, Fla.. 4.67 2.52 0.33 Precipitate ... Dark Apple Vinegar.
96 Distilled Vine- H. J. Heinz & Co.. Randolph & Finn.,
gar ......... Pittsburg, Pa..... Tallahassee, Fla.. 5.66 0.15 0.02 Trace precp- ..... Distilled Vinegar.
971Distilled Vine-,H. J. Heinz & Co. T. B. Byrd & Co., itate........
gar ...... Pittsburg, Pa..... Tallahassee, Fla.. 51.3010.181 02 No precipitate. ..... Distilled Vinegar.
98 Apple Vinegar. iH. J. Heinz & Co., T. B. Byrd & Co.,
Pittsburg, Pa.... Tallahassee. Fla.. 4.7011.7410.401Precipitate.... Dark Apple Vinegar.







RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF CONDENSED MILKS.
Labora- Per cent
tory No. Name or Brand. Manufacturer or Wholesaler. Retail Dealer. cent


37 Dime Brand................. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New Bittjemann & Heims, Jack-
York ............................. sonville, Fla............. 7.5
38 Blue Ribbon ................. Hire's Condensed Mi.k Co., Philadel- Bittjemann & Heims, Jack-I
phia, Pa......................... sonville, Fla .............. 9.0
40 Challenge Brand............. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New Bittjemann & Helms, Jack-1
York .................... ...... .. sonville, Fla.............. 7.8
41 Jersey Brand................. Mohawk Condensed Milk Co., Roch- Bittejemann & Heims, Jack
ester, N. Y....................... sonville, Fla.............. 8.4
43 Peerless Brand................. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New King Bee Grocery Co.,
York .......................... ... Jacksonville, Fla......... 7.5
45 Red Cross Brand............ Mohawk Condensed Milk Co., Roches- David Brothers, Jackson-
ter, N. Y......................... ville, Fla ................. 9.0
46 St. Charles................. St. Charles Milk Co., St. Charles, Wilkerson & Spiller, Jack-
Ill. ....................... .......| sonville, Fla.............. 7.8
47 Peerless Brand.............. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New J. P. Lovett, Apalachicola,
York ..................... .. Fla ..................... 7.8
48 Magnolia Brand ............ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New J. P. Lovett, Apalachicola,
York ............................. Fla. .................. .. 8.4
49 Dime Brand ................ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New J. P. Lovett, Apalachicola,
York .................... .... Fla. .................. 7.9
51 Challenge Brand .......... Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New R. Collins, Apalachicola,
York ................... .... Fla. ............... 8.7
52 Eagle Brand ............. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New R. Collins, Apalachicola,
York ............................ Fla ..................... 9.0
53 Van Camp ................. IVan Camp Packing Co., Indianapolis, ICity Bakery, Apalachicola,
SInd. Fla. ................... 7.8











RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF CONDENSED MILK-Continued.

tLabor. Name or Brand. Manufacturer or Wholesaler. Retail Dealer. er cent
tory Nc Fat.
54 Pet Brand ................. Helvetia Milk Co., Highland, Ill. J. B. Hickey, Apalachicola, -
I ia. .................... 7.8
57 Peerless Brand ............. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., NewlE. B. Woodberry, Quincy,
York ........................... Fla. ..................... 8.4
58 Dime Brand ................ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New E. B. Woodberry, Quincy,
N ork ......................... .. Fla. ..................... 8.4
60 Challenge Brand ............Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New Love & Hearin, Quincy
York ................... | Fla. ......... Fla............... 7.8
61 Dime Brand ................ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., NewlH. L. Gregory, Tallahassee,
York ........... .............. I ..Fla. ..................... 9.3
52 Peerless Brand.............. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New R. B. Carpenter, Tallahas
York ........................ see, Fla.................. 8.1 o
63 Square Brand (skimmed)... Hire's Condensed Milk Co., Philadei. Randolph & Finn, Tallahas-
phia, Pa. .......................| see, Fla. ................ 0.0
64 Eagle Brand ................ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., NewT. B. Byrd, Tallahassee,
SYork ............................. Fla. .................. 8.4
65(a) Dime Brand ................ Borden's Condensed Milk Co., NewP. T. Mickler, Tallahassee,
SYork ... ............ ............ Fla ................... 7.8













MISCELLANEOUS



SHALL RUDIMENTARY SCIENCE, AGRICULTURE,
AND THE KINDRED SCIENCES BE TAUGHT IN
THE COMMON SCHOOLS?
(Address by R. E. Rose, State Chemist, before the Florida
State Horticultural Society at Gainesville, Fla., May
15, 1908.)
The question, Shall we teach rudimentary science in the
common schools-physics, chemistry, biology and kindred
sciences relating to agriculture and domestic science, bet-
ter known as nature studies-is now occupying the atten-
tion of many thinkers. The question is discussed from
many points of view, by persons of divers professions, the
scientist, the editor, the professors of our colleges, both
literary colleges and scientific schools; the political econ-
omist and the layman.
The fact that the discussion is universal among think-
ers shows its importance. No one at this day will deny
the value of education; no one would dare suggest the
abolishment of the common schools.
The question is, therefore, What is the purpose of
public education The reply would certainly be, To im-
prove the man; to make of him an active, useful member
of society; to teach him the principles of the calling he is
to pursue; to broaden his conception of the laws under-
lying his chosen profession; to give him the benefit of
knowledge accumulated from the experience of others
without the care, toil, research and time necessary to be
given in the personal experimenting and study of the
subject, in gaining the'information as to the facts, laws
and reasons underlying the work he is to perform; inci-
dentally to improve his reasoning powers, broaden his
mind, and develop his intellect.
The common school has greatly broadened its scope, in
the last three decades-much useless matter has been
eliminated and better methods adopted.












SCIENCE OF TEACHING.

The science of teaching has been recognized-teachers
are trained. Pedagogy is now recognized as a science,
and taught as such. To become a teacher, one must study
the science and art of teaching. Most of us can remember
when the teacher in the common schools was generally an
untrained workman, knowing little of the teacher's pro-
fession, having more or less knowledge of the "three R's"
and little if any capacity or inclination to impart what
little he did know.
The demand for training, or education, has grown won-
derfully in the past thirty years, particularly for training
along special lines. In all walks of life the specialist is
now recognized-in law, medicine, the sciences, teaching,
agriculture, chemistry, physics; in none is the specialist
more evident than in the teachers' profession.
Agriculture, "the .oldest art, the youngest science," occu-
pies by far the greater number of our people, while the
trades and other productive occupations, manufacture
and transportation, the next larger part of the popula-
tion of this and other countries. The proper fitting or
training of this vast majority of our citizens for their
future occupations, becomes a question of the utmost
importance to the State.
In a recent address delivered in this city by an eminent
authority, Dr. Andrew Sledd, president of the Florida
University, he said:
'For some years the public schools of the United States
have not been fully meeting their obligation to the general
public. According to the census of 1900, of the 29,000,000
persons over ten years of age engaged in gainful occupa-
tions, 10,400,000 were following agricultural pursuits, or
35.7 per cent.; 24.4 per cent were-employed in manufac-
turing and kindred labor; domestic and personal occupa-
tions claimed 19.2 per cent, trade 16.4 per cent, and the
professions only 4.3 per cent. In Florida the percentage
of farmers is even greater, or 44 per cent., and of men
engaged in the professions, smaller, or 3.5 per cent.
A public school system, established for the greatest












good of the greatest number, would, if free from preju-
dice and from traditional influences, base its educational
policy along the line of bulks of population. The curricu-
lum would be made to prepare the major part of the youth
for their life work, instead of those preparing to follow
some profession. Until recent times the major part has
been ignored.
STRUGGLE WITH TRADITION.
The present situation gives promise of what is to be,
although the struggle with tradition is still going on.
Modern education is for the masses. Practical education
is coming to the front. The cultural and humanizing sub-
jecis are not to be ignored, yet the practical should asser.
its rights.
Washington, in his first message to Congress, advocated
the fostering of agriculture. The first organization of
farmers in the United States was founded in 1785 at
Philadelphia. Of this society Washington and Benjamin
Franklin were members. Among the committees appoint-
ed was one to promote agricultural education. This com-
mittee advocated the founding of professorships of agri-
culture in the colleges already established, and the giving
of courses of agriculture in the high schools. The first
professorship of agriculture was established, at Columbia
in 1792. The First State Agricultural College was found-
ed in Michigan in 1855; although private schools, some
of college rank, were in existence before this date, and
a few of these had State aid.
The Federal Government early manifested its interest,
the first action being taken even in the time of Washing-
ton. In comparatively recent times this interest in the
practical education-in the education for agriculture and
the mechanical arts-has grown greatly. Various acts
have been passed and several are now pending in Con-
gress for the fostering of education in agriculture and
the mechanical arts.
In these acts the Federal Government seeks solely to
promote instruction, in agricultural and mechanical arts.












It believes that the masses need instruction where their
work lies. There are several acts still pending.

FEDERAL AID.
In its aid the Federal Government seeks to throw em-
phasis where it is most needed to help the masses, to ena-
ble the man who toils in the sweat of his brow to do his
work more efficiently. It seeks to uplift the mass of work-
ing people. Schools founded for this purpose should keep
it in mind; they should strive to serve most of the people
in the best way."
I have taken the liberty to quote Dr. Sledd liberally;
his position as an educator, his knowledge of the subject,
gives his opinion and statement weight and authority.
I desire to call your attention, however, to the fact
that the effort to teach agriculture and its kindred sci-
ences, has been to establish colleges and schools of higher
learning-a very necessary course perhaps In the early
days, when trained agriculturists and scientists were few,
when the science of agriculture was practically unknown,
when text books on the subject were few, and not adapted
to the school room; in fact, only of value to the trained
scientist, and so cumbered with scientific terms, that the
ordinary teacher, to say nothing of the school children,
failed to grasp their meaning or understand their truths,
which were frequently, simply assumptions, and not yet
demonstrated facts. There were doubtless reasons for
beginning the structure at the roof and building down to
the foundation. As Secretary of Agriculture Wilson has
aptly said: "Place a faculty of agricultural professors
in the top story of a building without a stairway, and
say to the boys and girls of the country, jump up here,
and we will teach you scientific agriculture."
When we remember that of the many millions of school
children, only 1 per cent or less graduate from the high
school (of which 80 per cent are females), that by far the
greatest number never enter the high school, but have to
begin their life work, with but a few years' (or months')
training in the common schools, we realize how few of our












boys and girls destined to be farmers, and farmers' wives,
of the country, ever receive in school any practical or
scientific knowledge of the subject which will be the prin
cipal, if not the only, pursuit of their lives.
I will not indulge in the usual platitudes, "The farm
the basis of wealth, the mudsill, or foundation of the
nation's prosperity." The object of my talk is to stimulate
a demand for teaching those things that will be of the most
value to the greatest number of the future men and
women of the country, that will elevate them to excel in
its pursuit.
Ninety per cent of our boys and girls, particularly in
the rural districts, "quit school" before reaching what is
known as seventh grade of the common schools; very few
enter the high schools, and still fewer graduate; therefrom.
By far the larger part of our people begin their life's
work without finishing the course in the coramon schools,
with a smattering of "reading, writing and rithmetic," with
no effort to teach them any of the facts, or laws, underly-
ing the profession they are to pursue. It would be folly
for for me to decry the value of the necessary preliminary
studies, arithmetic, spelling, reading and writing, and
such fundamental branches. I do contend, however, that
the rudimentary principles of physics, biology and other
natural science, "nature studies," should be substituted
for the ordinary "reader"-with its fables and glittering
generalities, elocutionary gymnastics and singsong poetry.
Our reading exercises could be made useful and entertain-
ing, and impart knowledge at the same time; language
equally as pure taught, and correct ideas as to natural
science imparted at the same time.
Equally as interesting stories, inculcating facts, can be
substituted for the fables and stories of the present read-
ing lesson.

AGRICULTURAL TEXTBOOKS.

Many of the text books on agriculture-now abundant-
are interesting to a degree to the youthful mind-always












hungry for information. That child once taught the first
law of physics, expressed in simple language-that "force
and reaction are the same and in opposite directions,"
will not in future life spend years in the futile effort to
create perpetual motion.
That child taught a, few lessons in physiology, or ani-
mal structure, will never be guilty of removing an ani-
mal's inner eyelids to cure the "hooks," nor bore a cow's
horn for "hollow horn."
When taught a few of the fundamental laws of agricul-
tural chemistry he will not buy a ton of "guano" because
it is cheaper than another ton; nor will he be persuaded
to buy fertilizer or feeds on account of a name or brand,
and pay more for an inferior material with a catchy name.
No lesson is more quickly absorbed, nor more easily
taken in, by the average child than physical geography,
simply because it deals in facts as to productions and
conditions of various countries, strange animals, plants,
peoples and customs.
A boy or a girl may not know what is the definition of
.a continent, peninsula, island or isthmus; he knows, how-
ever, that oranges and alligators are found in Florida,
that "Uncle Sam" is cutting a big ditch at Panama; that
monkeys, coffee, jaguars and india rubber come from
South America.

CHILDREN WANT FACTS.

We do not appreciate the capacity of our children for
facts. They care little for the reasons, but want facts.
These should be given as fully as possible. Rules mean
but little to children; facts much.
How many of you remember the old Murray's grammar,
with its pages of rules, which we "learned by heart" and
did not understand (and don't yet)? The old Davies' or
Todds' arithmetic, with its rules and terms-all Greek to
us then, and to most of us now.
We did know (when the teacher or our parents told
us) that certain constructions of sentences or certain












words were not correct. We learned good language from
hearing it spoken.
We now teach grammar and arithmetic almost uncon-
sciously, by absorption, we might say.
The same may be said of science or "applied common
sensee" The facts which experience and experiment have
proved to be facts, governed by natural laws.
How many of us members of the Horticultural Society
would have avoided serious mistakes, expensive in time
and money, had we, as children, been taught a few facts
as to the composition and use of fertilizers; why they
were necessary, and for what purpose applied; the func-
tions of nitrogen, phosphates and potash in the plant
economy ?
How many of us have had to learn by experience, more
or less expensive, the facts well known to the scientist
of the day, though 'forty years ago he knew little more
than the average pupil of the common school knows now?
There is little chance to teach agricultural science (and
art) to the adult farmer. Barring the Farmers' Institute,
there is no efficient method of reaching him. However,
teach these facts to the children, furnish them with
authentic and trustworthy text books, and very soon the
parent will himself absorb a very considerable part of
the sciences.

BEGIN WITH THE CRADLE.

It has been said "The education of the child should
begin in the cradle." No greater truth was ever spoken.
"The child is father to the man," and on his early train-
ing depends the future citizenship of the country, while
teaching the child, the common school pupil, the rudi-
mentary truths, facts and laws of science--"nature study"
-by simple statements of facts, with little discussion,
rules or reasons, put before him in an interesting manner
in the shape of narratives or stories, illustrating the sub-
ject, together with simple experiments and illustrations,
we unconsciously, but none the less certainly, teach the












parent many truths and broaden his conception of his
calling. For rest assured, that whatever deeply interests
the child at school is discussed at home, commented on
and digested to a degree not generally understood nor
allowed for.
Why have our children's imagination excited, their
faith in the wisdom or truthfulness of their teacher and
text books lessened by such tales as the Adventures of
Sinbad the Sailor, Gulliver's Travels, Don Quixote, inter-
esting and exciting to the imaginative and credulous
mind of the child, and other equally useless, in fact, inju-
rious matter, used in the school room, when equally choice
and interesting reading matter, describing wonderful oc-
currences, beautiful processes and surprising results-all
inculcating truths that will be of value in the succeeding
years-can be given them; equally as interesting and ex-
citing to their imaginations, making lasting impressions
on their plastic minds? Truths told in simple language,
free from scientific jargon, comprehensible to the youth-
ful mind, or to the ordinary adult, who has had no scien-
tific training, of which the mass of our people are com-
posed.
Among scientific literature, written in plain, simple
language that should be found in every school room and
read by every teacher or pupil of our common schools, 's
the little monthly publication of our State Board of
Health, called Health Notes. It deals with common things,
common diseases, their cause and effects, in such simple,
though forceful language as can be readily understood
by anyone, child or adult, who can read. As a pattern for
a children's or adults' primary scientific text book, it is
commendable and should be found in every household :n
the State.
I am pleased to say that this subject is now attracting
the attention of school officers and educators everywhere.

SUMMER SCHOOLS.
I note that our next summer schools for teachers will
have the benefit of twelve lectures on agricultural sub-











jects by such men as Dr. Sledd, Prof. Rolfs, Prof. Floyd
and Prof. Fawcett of the University of Florida and the
Florida Experiment Station. Lectures that will doubt-
less go far towards instructing the teachers of the S'ate
as to the importance of acquiring a knowledge of the rudi-
mentary principles of agriculture, that they may be better
fitted to successfully prepare the children of the Sta.e
for a broader view and more comprehensive knowledge of
their future callings; that they may be able to dignify
the farmer's profession by teaching that it is truly a sci-
ence, as well as an art, requiring more knowledge of all
the sciences than does that of any of the learned profes-
sions, to master its details and successfully practice it.
I believe the place to begin the teaching of agriculture
is in the common school, just where we begin the teach-
ing of literature and the science of numbers and language.
That the farm, the school, the experiment station and
agricultural college should be linked together and prop-
erly co-ordinated; that we should begin at the f Punda-
tion-the child-and build upward toward the complete
edifice, the college, and not from the college downwu d.











UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

FARMERS' BULLETINS.

The following is a list of the Farmers' Bulletins avail-
able for distribution, showing the number, title, and size
in pages of each. Copies will be sent free to any address
in the United States on application to the Secretary of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. Numbers omitted have
been discontinued, being superseded by later bulletins.
22. The Feeding of Farm Animals. Pp. 40.
24. Hog Cholera and Swine Plague. Pp. 16.
25. Peanuts: Culture and Uses. Pp. 24.
27. Flax Seed and Fiber. Pp. 16.
28. Weeds and How To Kill Them. Pp. 30.
29. Souring and Other Changes in Milk. Pp. 22.
30. Grape Diseases on the Pacific Coast. Pp. 15.
32. Silos and Silage. Pp. 30.
33. Peach Growing for Market. Pp. 24.
34. Meats: Composition and Cooking. Pp. 31.
35. Potato Culture. Pp. 24.
36. Cotton Seed and Its Products. Pp. 16.
39. Onion Culture. Pp. 30.
41. Fowls: Care and Feeding. Pp. 24.
42. Facts about Milk. Pp. 32.
44. Commecial Fertilizers. Pp. 38.
46. Irrigation in Humid Climates. Pp. 27.
47. Insects Affecting the Cotton Plant. Pp. 32.
48. The Manuring of Cotton. Pp. 16.
49. Sheep Feeding. Pp. 24.
51. Standard Varietties of Chickens. Pp. 48.
52. The Sugar Beet. Pp. 48.
54. Some Common Birds. Pp. 48.
55. The Dairy Herd. Pp. 30.
56. Experiment Station Work.-I. Pp. 30.
58. The Soy Bean as a Forage Crop. Pp. 24.
59. Bee Keeping. Pp. 48.
60. Methods of Curing Tobacco. Pp. 24.
61. Asparagus Culture. Pp. 40.
62. Marketing Farm Produce. Pp. 31.
63. Care of Milk on the Farm. Pp. 40.
64. Ducks and Geese. Pp. 55.
65. Experiment Station Work-IT. Pp. 32.
66. Meadows and Pastures. Pp. 30.











68. The Black Rot of the Cabbage. Pp. 22.
69. Experiment Station Work-III. Pp. 32.
70. Insect Enemies of the Grape. Pp. 23.
71. Essentials in Beef Production. Pp. 24.
72. Cattle Ranges of the Southwest. Pp. 32.
73. Experiment Station Work-IV. Pp. 32.
74. Milk as Food. Pp. 39.
77. The Liming of Soils. Pp. 24.
78. Experiment Station Work-V. Pp. 32.
79. Experiment Station Work-VI. Pp. 27.
80. The Peach Twig-borer. Pp. 16.
81. Corn Culture in the South. Pp. 24.
82. The Culture of Tobacco. Pp. 22.
83. Tobacco Soils. Pp. 23.
84. Experiment Station Work-VII. Pp. 32.
85. Fish as Food. Pp. 32.
86. Thirty Poisonous Plants. Pp. 32.
87. Experiment Station Work-VIII. Pp. 32.
88. Alkali Lands. Pp. 23.
91. Potato Diseases and Treatment. Pp. 15.
92. Experiment Station Work-IX. Pp. 30.
93. Sugar as Food. Pp. 31.
95. Good Roads for Farmers. Pp. 46.
96. Raising Sheep for Mutton. Pp. 48.
97. Experiment Station Work-X. Pp. 32.
98. Suggestions to Southern Farmers. Pp. 48.
99. Insect Enemies of Shade Trees. Pp. 30.
100. Hog Raising in the South. Pp. 40.
101. Millets. Pp. 30.
102. Southern Forage Plants. Pp. 48.
103. Experiment Station Wor-XI. Pp. 30.
104. Notes on Frost. Pp. 24.
105. Experiment Station Work-XII. Pp. 32.
106. Breeds of Dairy Cattle. Pp. 48.
107. Experiment Station Work-XIII. Pp. 32.
108. Saltbushes. Pp. 20.
109. Farmers' Reading Courses. Pp. 20.
110. Rice Culture in the United States. Pp. 28.
111. Farmers' Interest in Good Seed. Pp. 24.
112. Bread and Brkead Making. Pp. 40.
113. The Apple and How to Grow It. Pp. 32.
114. Experiment Station Work-XV. Pp. 28.
115. Hop Culture in California. Pp. 28.
116. Irrigation in Fruit Growing. Pp.48.
118. Grape Growing in the South. Pp. 32.











119. Experiment Station Work-XV. Pp. 30.
120. Insects Affecting Tobacco. Pp. 32.
121. Beans, Peas, and other Legumes as Food. Pp. 38.
122. Experiment Station Work-XVI. Pp. 32.
124. Experiment Station Work-XVII. Pp. 32.
125. Protection of Food Products from Injurious Tem-
peratures. Pp. 24.
126. Practical Suggestions for Farm Buildings. Pp. 48.
127. Important Insecticides. Pp. 46.
128. Eggs and Their Uses as Food. Pp. 40.
129. Sweet Potatoes. Pp. 40.
131. Household Tests for Detection of Oleomargarine and
Renovated Butter. Pp. 10.
132. Insect Enemies of Growing Wheat. Pp. 38.
133. Experiment Station Work-XVIII. Pp. 32.
134. Tree Planting in Rural School Grounds. Pp. 32.
135. Sorghum Sirup Manufacture. Pp. 40.
136. Earth Roads. Pp. 24.
137. The Angora Goat. Pp. 48.
138. Irrigation in Field and Garden. Pp. 40.
139. Emmer: A Grain for the Semiarid Regions. Pp. 16.
140. Pineapple Growing. Pp. 48.
141. Poultry Raising on the Farm. Pp. 16.
142. Principles of Nutrittion and Nutritive Value of Food.
Pp. 48.
143. Conformation of Beef and Dairy Cattle. Pp. 44.
144. Experiment Station Work-XIX. Pp. 32.
145. Cabon Bisulphid as an Insecticide. Pp. 28.
146. Insecticides and Fungicides. Pp. 16.
147. Winter Forage Crops for the South. Pp. 40.
149. Experiment Station Work-XX. Pp. 32.
150. Clearing New Land. Pp. 24.
151. Dairying in the South. Pp. 48.
152' Scabies in Cattle. Pp. 32.
153. Orchard Enemies in the Pacific Northwest. Pp. 39.
154. The Home Fruit Garden: Preparation and Care.
Pp. 16.
155. How Insects Affect Health in Rural Districts. Pp. 19.
156. The Home Vineyard. Pp. 22.
157. The Propagation of Plants. Pp. 24.
158. How to Build Small Irrigation Ditches. Pp. 28.
159. Scab in Sheep. Pp. 48.
161. Practical Suggestions for Fruit Growers. Pp. 30.
162. Experiment Station Work-XXI. Pp. 32.
164. Rape as a Forage Crop. Pp. 16.










165 Silkworm Culture. Pp. 32.
166. Cheese Making on the Farm. Pp. 16.
167. Cassava. Pp. 32.
168. Pearl Millet. Pp. 16.
169. Experiment Station Work.-XXII. Pp. 32.
170. Principles of Horse Feeding. Pp. 44.
172. Scale Insects and Mites on Citrus Trees. Pp. 43.
173. Primer of Forestry. Pp. 48.
174. Broom Corn. Pp. 30.
175. Home Manufacture and Use of Unfermented Grape
Juice. Pp. 16.
176. Cranberry Culture. Pp. 20.
177. Squab Raising. Pp. 32.
178. Insects Injurious in Cranberry Culture. Pp. 32.
179. Horseshoeing. Pp. 30.
181. Pruning. Pp. 39.
182. Poultry as Food. Pp. 40.
183. Meat on the Farm: Butchering, and Keeping. Pp. 37.
184. Marketing Live Stock. Pp. 40.
185. Beautifying the Home Grounds. Pp. 24.
186. Experiment Station Work-XXIII. Pp. 32.
187. Drainage of Farm Lands. Pp. 38.
188. Weeds used in Medicine. Pp. 45.
190. Experiment Station Work-XXIV. Pp. 32.
192. Barnyard Manure. Pp. 32.
193. Experiment Station Work-XXV. Pp. 32.
194. Alfalfa Seed. Pp. 14.
195. Annual Flowering Plants. Pp. 48.
196. Usefulness of the American Toad. Pp. 16.
197. Importation of Game Birds and Eggs for Propaga-
tion. Pp. 30.
198. Strawberries. Pp. 24.
199. Corn Growing. Pp. 32.
200. Turkeys. Pp. 32.
201. Cream Separator on Western Farms. Pp. 23.
202. Experiment Station Work-XXVI. Pp. 32.
203. Canned Fruits, Preserves, and Jellies. Pp. 32.
204. The Cultivation of Mushrooms. Pp. 24.
205. Pig Management. Pp. 40.
6 Bul











206. Milk Fever and Its Treatment. Pp. 16.
208. Varieties of Fruits Recommended for Planting.
Pp. 48.
209. Controlling the Boll Weevil in Cotton Seed and at
Ginneries. Pp. 32.
210. Experiment Station Work-XXVII. Pp. 32.
211. The Use of Paris Green in Controlling the Cotton
Boll Weevil. Pp. 23.
213. Raspberries. Pp. 38.
215. Alfalfa Groiwing. Pp. 40.
216. The Control of the Boll Weevil. Pp. 32.
217. Essential Steps in Securing an Early Crop of Cot-
ton. Pp. 16.
218. The School Garden. Pp. 40.
219. Lessons from the Grain Rust Epidemic of 1904,
Pp. 24.
220. Tomatoes. Pp. 32.
221. Fungous Diseases of the Cranberry. Pp. 16.
222. Experiment Station Work-XXVTT. Pp. 32.
223. Miscellaneous Cotton Insects in Texas. Pp. 24.
224. Canadian Field Peas. Pp. 16.
225. Experiment Station Work-XXIX. Pp. 32.
226. Relation of Coyotes to Stock Raising in the West.
Pp. 24.
227. Experiment Station Work-XXX. Pp. 32.
228. Forest Planting and Farm Management. Pp. 22.
229. The Production of Good Seed Corn. Pp. 24.
231. Spraying for Cucumber and Melon Diseases. Pp. 24.
232. Okra: Its Culture and Uses. Pp. 16.
233. Experiment Station Work-XXI. Pp. 32.
234. The Guinea Fowl. Pp. 24.
235. Preparation of Cement Concrete. Pp. 32.
236. Incubation and Incubators. Pp. 32.
237. Experiment Station Work-XXXII. Pn. 32.
238. Citrus Fruit Growing in the Gulf States. Pp. 48.
239. The Corrosion of Fence Wire. Pp. 32.
240. Inoculation of Legumes. Pp. 8.
241. Butter Making on the Farm. Pp. 32.
242. An Example of Model Farming. Pp. 16.












243. Fungicides and Their Use in Preventing Diseases of
Fruits. Pp. 32.
244. Experiment Station Work-XXXII. Pp. 32.
245. Renovation of Worn-out Soils. Pp. 16.
246. Saccharine Sorghums for Forage. Pp. 37.
247. The Control of the Codling Moth and Apple Scab.
Pp. 21.
248. The Lawn. Pp. 20.
249. Cereal Breakfast Foods. Pp. 36.
250. The Prevention of Wheat Smut and Loose Smut of
Oats. Pp. 16.
251. Experiment Station Work-XXXIV. Pp. 32.
252. Maple Sugar and Sirup. Pp. 36.
253. The Germination of Seed Corn. Pp. 16.
254. Cucumbers. Pp. 30.
255. The Home Vegetable Garden. Pp. 47.
256. Preparation of Vegetables for the Table. Pp. 48.
257. Soil Fertility. Pp. 39.
258. Texas or Tick Fever and Its Prevention. Pp. 45.
259. Experiment Station Work-XXXV. Pp. 32.
260. Seed of Red Clover and Its Impuritios. Pp. 21.




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