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 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Climate
 Fertilizers and feeding stuffs






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00008
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Report of condition and prospective yield
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
    Climate
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Climatological data
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
    Fertilizers and feeding stuffs
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Bureau of fertilizers
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Bureau of feedstuffs
            Page 61
        Analysis of feedstuffs
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
        Food and drug analyses
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
        Miscellaneous
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
Full Text






FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT



JULY 1, 1908


B. E. MMCLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AG RICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I-Crops


Part 2-Weather Report


Part 3-Fertilizers and Feed StuTf


Entered January 31,1903, at Tallhahassee. Florida, as -econd-class matter
under Act of Congress of June 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FREE T HOSE REQUESTING THEM

CAPITAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
State Printer.
Tallahassee, Florida.


VOLUME 18


NUMBER 3






COUNTY MAP OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA


/--- ;7"-. C-^- '\
-j 0E iT" ,i ? S-,' \ ,






M A









C I S T
W\ i, -,
c -1 ,. i









LEE

A.- -. (


i /"~' "* A --- '-i---'- .-~ '- -
ti ** S t *_______ :

















PART I.

CROPS















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-ll.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.


Northeastern Division
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia--9.


Southern Division.


Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborongh,
Lee,


Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.




































































































































































I













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.



CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.
By DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIVIS1IN.-The acreage of cotton in this
division is somewhat larger than that of 1907, and up to
this date very favorable weather conditions have ob-
tained, and where the crops were given average attention
and cultivation, they are in good condition. Corn, and,
in fact, all of the standard field crops, are in excellent
average condition. There was considerable failure in
some of the early vegetable crops, from ravages of insects.
The tobacco crop is reported by all sections as doing well.
and a profitable yield is expected; the quality of the
crop under the methods of cultivation practiced, it is
said, will average very high. and growers are now inves-
tigating the market possibilities and probabilities. If
no untoward accident occurs, the planters and farmers
of this district will attain profitable results. Live stock
is in fine average condition, no diseases prevailing.



WESTERN DrVISION.-The same weather conditions have
practically existed in this district as in the previous oin'.
Cotton is a little backward, but is in a healthy condition
and growing well where properly cultivated; the acreage
as in the previous district, being, to a small extent. in
excess of last year. The field crops are in good condition,
and indications are for good yields. In both of these
districts the lack of efficient labor is a serious nmpedi-
ment to any extended farm operations; its scarcity and
inefficiency positively prevents the expansion of fatrm
enterprise beyond present limits-in fact, it is becoming
exceedingly difficult to maintain the standard of opera-
tions as at present. Live stock, both on the farms and












ranges, is in fine condition: the favorable season having
kept up the pastures in excellent shape.



NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this district the crops are
in quite as good condition as in the first mentioned. Corn
and cotton both are doing well. The general average
condition of all crops in this section is very good. and
should favorable climatic conditions continue, there is
every reason to expect good yields. In some localities
the small fruits, and also early vegetables. were to some
extent sufferers from unfavorable weather conditions.
but.no serious loss has been reported from any portion
of the division. As a general thing, live stock of all
kinds is in a healthy condition, and the pastures are
good.


CENTRAL DIvISIoN.-This division, the greater part of
which suffered for many months from long-continued
drought, is getting into pretty good shape again, although
it will be another year before the people can recover from
the losses sustained. In some localities the crops are up
to the average in good seasons, and in some they are not
so good; but the average yield of crops will be fair. The
foregoing conditions have also had their effect on live
stock, and in some portions of the district it is in fine
condition, while in others it is in poor shape. Prospects
for the future, however, indicate a certain return to
normal conditions, both as to farm and orchard products
and live stock.


SOUTHERN DIVISION.-Pretty much the same conditions
exist in the southern district as in the central. The
effects of the long dry spell of weather were more disas-
trous to crops than in the southern district, but the
recovery is equally as rapid. and is progressing, so that
with a continuance of the favorable condition. which is
rather to be expected, the fruit trees, etc.. will in a short









9

time have regained their normal condition; in fact, both
the vegetable and fruit conditions have about reached
that stage at this date.. The cattle on the ranges are
doing well again, the rains having renewed the grasses
on the prairies and filled up the smaller lakes and ponds
with fresh water, which is so necessary to the health and
thrift of live stock.











REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD
OF CROPS, FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES FOR QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30, 1908, AS COMPARED WITH AN
AVERAGE DURING SAME PERIOD OF 1907.

C ,
CM NT- I p i I; 4
(_o I -

Co i- Co(li- l ll- li Co, Col li- omnli- Colndi- oI Olli- (Conli- Condi- Condi- mI 'il-i-
Northern Division. i ti onl tion. lion, tio.n. tion. tiol. lion. linn. tion lin. ti .
Gadsden ................ 100 100) 115 100 ...... 125 120 ...... ...... ...... 1201 1001... ......
HIamilton.............. ...... 75 75 75 50 50 0 ...... ..... ...... 75 601 6 ...
lefferson ................ 100 1001 90 100 90 100 100 ...... ............ 00 100 100..
Lafayette ............... ..... 85 9 95 75 100 100 .... ........ .. 100 100 100 ......
Leon ...............100 100 90 110 110............ 100 100 110 100 ......
Liberty ................ 100 ...... 125 100 100 100 75 ...... ......... .. 75 75! 100 .

Suwannee .............. ...... 80 90 80 70 80 80 50 40 ...... 90 75 80 ..
Taylor .................. 100 100 100 1100 ...... 10 100 ...... ............ 100 85 125 ..
Wakulla ................ 100 ...... 100 100 ............ .... 100 75 ......
Div. Av. per cent........ 921 S: 941 901 75 90l 881 b) 401 1001 911 83 88 ......
Western Division.
(Cllloun ................. 775 50 125 100 100 110 100 75 100 100 125 100 125 75
Escallbla ............... 50 ...... 125 1(00 100 125 75 100 100 75 100 110 125 100
IH olno cs ................. 75 ...... 95 100 90 100 00 0 ...... ..... ...... 00 75 100 ......
.Jackson ................ 70 75 75 90 100 80 1 0 ...... ...... .... .. 95 85 10 ......
Santa Itos; ............. 90 ...... 11) 10 100 100 100 .................. 100 80 100 ......
Walton ................. 8 ...... 100 100 100 100 90 .................. 105 95 100 ..
W\ ashingllh l ............ .0 '0 100 1 0) 100 100 100 95 ..... ...... ...... 100 110 0O ....
Div. Av. Ip r c'.t i ........ 1 7(;1 721 1 04 9 | 9 102) 941 87 1)1 71 0111 941 1071 87









Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ ...... 80 100 100 ...... 1001 100 .. .......... 100 100 901 100.
Baker .................. 0 75 100 90 ...... 90 65 .... .. ......... ... 90 8 I 100 ..
Bradford ................ ...... 100 90 110 ...... 100 100 ................. 100 9 90 .
Clay .................... ............ 80 100 100 1040 100 100 ............ 100 80 100
Columbia ............... .. 90 100 80 95 80 1 ...... ............ 100 80 ..
Div. Av. per cent........ I 601 861 941 961 971 941 931 1001 ...... 1001 981 841 971 .....


Central Division.
Citrus .................. ............ 110 125 .....
H ernando ............... ...... ..... 100 80 ......
Lake .................. ....... ..... 50 ... ........
Levy ................. ..... 85 80 ......
M arion ................. .. 50 100 50 ......
Orange ................. ............ 80 80 ......
Pasco ................... ......... .. 97 100 ......
Sum ter ................. .. .. 90 75 85 ......
V olusia ................. ............ 80 80 ......
Div. Av. per cent........ ...... 771 861 87 ......


115 100 ......
100 ............
40 ...... ......
1 p 100 ......
100 80 ......
60 50 40
ip0 100 100
90 75 85
75 9p0 80
871 851 76


...... 90




...... 100
.. ... 95
S 90

S..... 941


1o00 100 90 ......
..... 100 100 ......
...... 20 ..
100 90 90 ..
100 1010 100 .
. ... 100 100.
100 100 100 ..
100 85 90.
.. ... 90 0 .....
1001 961 87 ......


Southern Division.
Brevard ........................... 120 100 ...... 200 100 50 ............1 00 100 .
Dade .................... ...... ..... ...... 100 ...... 100 100 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 100 ..
DeSoto ................ ..... ...... 75 50 50 100 10 15 25 ............ 90 ..
HIillsborough ............... .. 100 150 100 100 100 110 ............ 100 90 75 .
Lee ..................... ............ 90 90 100 100 100 90 ...... ............ 100 100 ..
M anatee ................ .. ... 100 100 100 100 100 .... .................. ... .. 100 .
Osceola ................. ...... ...... 1 70 60 ...... 60 90 75 ...... 55 ...... 55 90 .
Polk ............................. 80 75 70 65 70 80 120 75.
.... ... .. .. 105 95 ...
St. Lucie ............... .. ................ 100 ...... 10.. ................ 105 95 .
Div. Av. per cent........ ...... ....... 89! 911 851 105! 951 671 421 501 93 951 921 ......
State Average ........... I 76[ 791 931 931 891 961 911 76! 611 861 771 821 941 87













CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


untiesTIES.

Northern Division.
Gadsden .........................
H am ilton ........................
Jefferson .......................
Lafayette .......................
L eon ..........................
Liberty .........................
M adison ........................
Suwannee ........................
T aylor ...........................
W akulla .........................
Division Average per cent.........

Western Division.

Calhoun ....................... .
Escam bia ........................
Ilolm es ..........................
Jackson ..........................
Sanata Rosa .....................
W alton ..........................
W ashington ......................
Division Averagoi pc ir cent ........

Northeastern Division.


GUAVAS. BANANAS. I RANGE TREES LEM I)N TREES.

(ondli- Prospec- (Cldi- Pris>t'- c ,oli- Prosper- (ol- Prosper-
tioi)n tive tion. tiv ti tiv lin ti
yield. y lild. tyiel Iiold..



........ ....... ....... ..... .....

.... .... . .. ... .. ....... 0 50 ...........
.. ... . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
... ... . .. .. ... .. .. .. .. 50 .. .. .... .... .
... .... ....... ....... ....... I .... F( ....... .......
.:::':. .::... ....... 10 100 .:::::::.. .
...... .. .. .. .. .. ... 7 1 7 .. .... .. .... .


. . .. . .

.. . . . .
. .. . . .
. . . . .


1,INIE TREES.

Condi- 1'i
tioi, tlie
yield.









..........
. .

* -


....... ....... 1 125 125 ....... ....... ....... I .. ....
S.. ....... ........ ... ....... ........ ......




......1 2 .. ....... ........
....... ......./ .......- ....... ....... .............. .. ....

. . . . .*.. . .
.......|....... 125 | 125 1....... I.......I....... .. ....


A la cli a ......................... .... ... ....... 100 1 ....... ....... .. .
B ak er ........................... ........ ....... ....... ....... 1 )00 [ 1o ....... ....... ....... ..










B radford ........................ ...... ..... .. 100 125 ....... ....... .... ....
Clay ............................. ...... ... ....... .... .. . .. 100 110 ...... .. ...... .....
Colum bia ....................... ..... . .. ......... .. ..
Division Average Ier cent........ ....... ....... .......... 1o00 1091 ...... ....... ..


Central Division.
C itrus ............ ..............
Hernando .......................
L ake ............... .. ......... .
Levy ........................ ..
M arion ........................
O range ........................
Pasco ...........................
Sum ter ..........................
Volusia ........................
Division Average per cent........
Southern Division.
B revard .........................
Dade ............................
DeSoto ......................................
H illsborough .....................
Lee ... ............ .. .. ..
M anatee .........................
O sceola ..........................
P olk ............................
St. L ucie .......................
Division Average per cent ........
State Average ....................


... .. 100 110 100
....... .. .. 100 50 .......
100 100 ....... ....... 80 100 80
S ...... .. .. .. 100 75 .......

100 9 100 100 100 100 80 .......
751 SO 80 801 75 95 .......
... .. 85 85 85
.... .. 90 75 .. ..
921 931 901 901 921 80 88|


110 100 110

90 ....... ......



85 ............

951 1001 110
CO


100| 150i 10O 150 1M00 100 l100 100 75 75
101 100 100 100|) 901 105 90| 95 100 100
........ .... ....... 1001 60 100 50 ....... ......
I .* 100 15o0 101 100 125 100 100 100
1001 1001 901 90 100 60 100 80 100 90
100 10 I 100 1 100 1001 100 100 101oo 100 10
100 li 50i 751 95 907 75 60 75 G0)
8o 751 SO| 751 90 5 00 40 ....... .
....... ....... 100 1001 100, 100 10 100 100 100
971 106 901 1051 971 77| 941 811 93I 89
861 991 901 97] 9, 931 911 881 961 99


I


I I ,










CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


SOUNTI I:S.

Northern Division.


Gadsden .........................
H am ilton ........................
Jefferson ........................
Lafayette ........................
L eon .............................
L iberty .........................
M adison .........................
Suwannee ........................
Taylor ..........................
W akulla ........................
Division Average per cent ........


\WATERM1E 0N. I'ANTALIIITFES. PINEAPPI'LS.


Ill II 0 is
I( .APES. | ill CAIVrlI, .


Pros. P rpdios- [ -
(' -1 1 '- Coml -(olldi-/ Deti i-
tion 'yi d tion t;1 I ion" o Y ield. tion. I 1 (ion1.
.100 110 100 100 ............... ...... ...... 120 125
75 75 50 50 ....... ....... 50 50 75 100
100 100 100 100 ....... ....... 100 100 90 100
100 100 .............. ... .... ...... ..100 100 100 105
110 120 110 125 ....... ....... 100 100 110 105
100 125 ................................ .... 100 100
.... ... ..... .. .. ..... .......... ... 50 50
100 115 100 110 .................... 100 100
100 100 100 100 ....... ....... .... ....... 100 100
0G 60 ....... ....... .... ...... ....... 75 60)
941 101 93| 981 ....... I ....... 88 881 921 5


Western Division.
Calhoun .......................... 125 125 1 1 100 ....... ... 85 90 125 00
Escrambia ........................ 75 00 100 10(* 100 .. . ..... .. 100 100
Holm es ............. ... ........ 100 10 95 95 ...... 0 50 90 100
.Ia;clison .......................... 90 75 .................... 95 lo00
Snn;l ia os .................... .. 100 100 ....... .......... ..... ........ ...... 5 90
\W alton ... ..................... 100 I00 ....... ....... .............. .... ... ........ 100 10(
W ashlington ...................... 50 75 50 75 ....... ....... ....... ....... 00 10
division A vera pir eilI... ..... 1 !(i 8( 9: ...... ........ ;7 701 101
Northeastern Division.
AI lihua ................ ............ 1011 1 ) '.10 101 .. .............. 1 )00 1 100 11)0
I al: er .............. .................. lo SO 100 100 ............... 100 l10 100 100
IhlI:llord .......... ................. 1 100 100 .............. 100 110 1)0 95


I








Clay ............................. 100 100 ..... I ....... : :...... .... 100 1001 1001 100
Columbia ............... 110 100 100 100 .. ....... ....... .. ... 1001 100
Division Average per cent........ 1021 941 971 1001 ....... ....... 1001 1051 1001 99
Central Division.
Citrus ........................... 98 98 90 90.............. 105 115 90 85
Hernando ....................... .80 100 ....... ........................... 100 100
Lake ........................... 80 100 100 100) ....... ....... ....... ....... 80 75
Levy ........................... 95 95 95 951 ............. 100 100 100 90
Marion .......................... 100 75 70 70 ....... ...... 100 100
Orange ........................... 70 60 50 50 100 100 ....... ....... 100 100
Pasco ............................ 60 50 75 75 ....... ... 85 85 95 100
Sumter .......................... 50 50 90 901 75 75 .. ..100 100
Volusia .......................... 50 50 80 80. ......... ...... ...... 90 90
Division Average per cent......... 761 751 811 811 871 871 97] 1001 951 93
Southern Division.
Brevard .......................... 1001 100 100 100 100 100 100 125 100 125 c'
Dade ............................ 100 100 ....... ...... 90 90 ............ .. .......
D eSoto .......................... 100 60 25 75 ....... ....... ....... ....... 100 100
Hillsborough ..................... I0O 100 100 100............ 100 100 100 90
Lee .............................. 100 100 ....... ..... 90 ....... ........ 1. 10 10
Manatee ......................... 25 25 25 25 50 50 100 100 100 50
Osceola .......................... 50 O 60 05 90 80 100 150 100 100
Polk ......... ................... 5 60 45 50 75 75 90 80 90 100
St. Lucie ........................ 100] 1001 ...... ....... 90 90 ..... .. 1001 100
Division Average per cent ......... 811 78] 59| 69| S41 821 98 1131 99| 98
State Average ................... 1 89 891 831 88| 851 851 901 951 971 100











CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


N;RA PI:FUIT TOIIACCO. TOMATOES.
TRFI:ES.
M I I NT11.:. T S. ES
Condi- I C nllli- I s- li- Pros-
tio n. tiou. tion.
Northern Division yill. il. yill.
G adsden ......................... ....... ....... 901 100 ....... ...... .
H am ilton ........................................... ... ..... .
Jefferson ......................... ........ ..... 95 100 100 100
Lafayette ........................ ...... .. ....... ..... ....... ..... ..
Leon ............................. ............... 98 364 90 95
Liberty .................................. .............. ...... 75 75
M adison ......................... .... ... ....... 100 100 ....... .......
Suwannee .......................... .......... ...... ...... ...................
T aylor ........................... .. ... ....... ....... ..............
W a k u lla, ......................... I. ....... ..... .. .. ....... .. ..
Division Average per cent............... .....'_ 9 1| 1;(; 88 901
Western Division.
Callhotuni .... ...................... 75 75 |..... ..... i 1251 1251
ca ia ....................... ....... 80 75 100| 100 (
l1ol ic s .......................... ........ ....... 100()1 10 1) 1001 100
Ja son .......................... ....... 80 7 ....... ......
Sa;ntI Itosa. ....................... ... ... ......... ...... ..... 100 100
W al l ( on .......................... ........ ....... ....... ....... ...... .. .
W;as i ingl on ...................... ........ ....... .... ....... .... .... ...
Division Avera;g r _cn, ......... 7l 87| 1 :: 1,M Io10;
Northeastern Division.
A la c hi u a .. . . . . . . l ololl 1 1)0 M . . .. .
I ia k e r .. . .. . . . . .. .. .. .. . .. . . . . .


EARS.


50
85
100
40
100


I'l" s-
yi) d.


I .....

1
1

1
r
i
.


PEACHES.

Condii- Pros-
tion. Peetive
S yield.


..I ...... ..... -
75 50 50
25 100 125
00 110 11.0
30 75 30
50| 125 150

100[ 110


9G1 941 1.5


75 751 75 75
50 50() 100 125
!0 90 951 100
...... ..... 100. 8 so





7r, :io )o ro
50 50 85100 5
G 6 65 90 loo
. . .. . . 10 ))
;5 Gf; 91 91

75 30 80 50
5 0O 100 100









B radford ............ ............ ....... .. ....... ....... I ...... ... .... ....... ....... ....... ....... ...
C lay ............................ ........ ....... ....... ....... 100 100 ....... ....... 80 SO
Column bia ........................ ........ ...... .. ..... .. ..... ....... ...... ....... ...... ...
Division Average per cent......... 100| 100|....... ....... 100! 100| 621 401 87! 77


Central Division.
C itrus .........................
H ernando ......................
L ak e ..........................
L evy ...........................
M arion .........................
O range ........................
P asco ..........................
Suniter ..........................
V olusia ........................
I division Average ncr cent ..........


Southern uDvicion.


1001 110 ....... .......I 100| 100 100 5| 3101 140
100 25 100 100 ..... .................... 100 110
75 80 ....... ....... 501 50 ....... ....... 70 90
100| 75 ..... ....... 901 90 ....... ....... 75 75
100 50 ............... 100 100 .............. 100 50
100[ 80 ....... ....... 80 70 ....... ...... 101) 100
80 751 100 100! 701 70 80 20 95 85
90 90o 85 85 90! 90 .. 40 40
90 75| ...... ....... 90o 90 70 50 80| 60
9,a 7 I3 951 951 84! 831 83| 251 861 8:
--1


B regard .......................... Jo | 25 ..
D ade ......... .. 100 ....... .......
D eSoto ......................... 0 ....... .......
Ilillsborongh .....................I 150 125 ..............
Lee .............................. 100 75 ....... .......
Manatee .......................... 100 100 ....... .......
Osceola ......................... 90 80so. .
Polk ............................. ....... .....
St. Lucie ................. ....... 100 1I I ....... ....
Division Average pl r cent........ 102[ 921 ....... .......
Slate .verag ................... 90 85[ 9:[ 1151


1001 1251 100 100 100| 125
....... ...... ..... ....... .... 1 ....
75 100 ....... ....... 75| 100
100 75 ...... ....... 100 75
......... .. ... .. .. ... ... .... ..
.. .. ... ... ....... 100| 50
55 55 45 45 85 90
80U 65 80| 70 90 60
*..... ..-11*111. .. .*' 1....... I .......
82[ 84] 751 72[ 92) 83
92! 931 721 601 901 95


2-Bul


--


I-~--


--











CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTI ES.


Northern Division.
C adsden .......... ...........
H am ilton ......................
Jefferson ......................
Lafayette .....................
Leon .........................
Liberty ........................
M adison .......................
Siwannee .....................
Taylor .........................
W akulla ......................
Division Average eor vent...... J
Western Division.
('alho in ........................
E scainbia ......................
H olm es ........... ............
.lackson ........................
S: natla 1Rosa ...................
\ Llll on .........................
W ashlinglon .....................
Division Average lI'er cent .. .....
Northeastern Division.
A l lic ua ........... .... .........


HIOGS. 81EEPI. 'O13Ac(CO- HONEY. WOL. AVOCADO PEAR,. M.ANI)IoS.


"niditioll. Co itio Pouds. oinds.. nitioni t' p Condition. t
)OllS ~ II:L.II I i~~ll I tl l\\ N h ( iold.11 i~~iel i


... 5,000,000 ........ ..............
75 ........ ..... 1,000 ........
L00 30,000 50,000 1,000 .......

100 500,000 5,000 5,000 .......
100 ........ 50,000 2 ,00 .......
50 ........ ...... ... ..... .....
95 ........ ....... ...... .......

75 ........ 30,000 :0 ......
8515,530,0001 135,0001 9,SO ...... I


75 100|......... 80,000 ...... ..
SO 75 ........ ........ ...... .. ... ... ..
19(r.1... o ... ..........

75 1 5,000 ,000 0,0 00, ........ ........ ........ ........
75 91 ...... 10,000 4 ......... ........ .

95 1 00 ... ..... .. ... ..... ........ ... ..|.
79 92 1 5,000 9s,0(0 100,00(1| ........ ... .. ....... .


10) 1 0 ........ : ....... 10, ....... ........ ..... ......


( I I I I I


c
ca









Bradford ................... .
C lay ...........................
Columbia ........................
Division Average per cent....... I


10 ................ ...... . ... .. ... .. ... .. .. ..
50 100 ....... .. .. .... ... ... ... ... .... ...... ...
90 100 ........ 10,000 2,000 ....... ...... ..... ... .....
881 100 ........ 10,0001 12,00 1 ........ ........ ........ .......


Central Division.
Citrus ........................
H ernando ......................
L ake ..........................
L evy ..........................
M arion .........................
Orange .........................
Pasco ..........................
Sum ter ........................
V olusia .........................
Division Average per cent........


Southern Division.
Brevard ............ ...........
Dade ...........................
D eSoto .......................
Hillsborough ..................
L ee ...........................
Manatee .......................
Osceola .........................
Polk ...........................
St. Lucie .......... ..............
Division Average per cent .......
State Average ..............


100 95
100 100
60 .......
100 100
100 100
100 ........
90 85
100 90
90 90
931 941


1,500





10,000
1,000

12,500


500 ........ ........
........ 5,000 .......

2,000 10,000 .......
S........ .. ... .. '


5,000 6,000 ........
200 2,000 .......
40,0001 24,000 .......
47,7001 47,000 ........


100 ......... ....... 5,000 ........ .......
... .. 100.. .. ..... .. ........ ... ..... ... 100
1 0 0 1 0 0 . . . . . .. . *
75 100 ........ ....... 15,000 ........
100 ........ ........ 1,000 ........ 80
100 100 ........ ........ ........ ........
90 85 ........ 2000 20,000 ..
701 85|........ 1,500 18,000
100 ........ ........ ........ ........ I........
921 941........ 9,5001 53,0001 901
891 9315,547,5001 300,2001 221.8001 901


100 100 100


75 ..............

.. ........

.... .. .. .
871 100 100
871 1001 100


III


I I I I



















PART II.














Weather Report


U. S. Department of Agriculture.

CLIMATOLOGICAL SERVICE
of the

WEATHER BUREAU

Central Office: Washington, D. C.
c----

FLORIDA SECTION,

A. J. Mitchell, Section Director.
Report for May, 1908.


GENERAL SUMMARY.

The mean temperatures of individual stations in most
cases varied less than a degree from the normal, and for
the section the departure amounted to only one-tenth of
a degree. The average rainfall was less than the usual
amount for May by more than an inch. In a few detached
localities, precipitation exceeded the normal; however, by
far the greater number of stations in each section reported
a deficiency. The feature of May, 1908, was the frost-
bearing cold wave that visited the northern border coun-
ties on the 1st and 2d.
The month opened cool throughout the State, the tem-
perature ranging from 6 degs. to 15 degs. below normal.
In the northern and western districts, it was unseason-
ably cool on the 1st and 2d, and frost formed in exposed
places in the n,,rthern tier of counties away from the
coast. Except in the lower peninsula, the minimum tem-
peratures for the month were generally recorded on one
of these dates. Rapidly rising temperatures followed
from the 4th to the 7th. Another cool spell prevailed from
the 8th to the 11th. and, although not so pronounced in
the northern half of the State. yet the monthly minimum
temperatures for the southern section were recorded dur-









24

ing its prevalence. From the 12th to the close of the
month, the temperature averaged aboua 2 degs. above the
normal, daily, the days being warm and followed by cool.
pleasant nights. The greatest heat was experienced during
the third decade.
The precipitation was largely the result of thundi-r-
storms; consequently, in amount it was unevenly distrib-
uted over the State. The first rainy period began on the
5th and 6th in the western district. Scattered showers
occurred until the Sth; then followed the only distinct dry
period of the month. Showery conditions prevailed again
on the 16th. and thereafter, until the close of the mnnrh.
daily rains were more or less general. varying in amounts
from a mere sprinkle to nearly five inches. The monthly
rainfall was greatest in the east coast section and in
detached portions of the western district: it was least
in the west coast counties of the peninsula. where the
ground had become dry and parched.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean atmospheric pressure for the month, reduced
to sea level, and determined from observations taken d:ilv
at 7 a. m. and 7 p. m.. 90th meridian time. at six Weather
Bureau stations, was 30.00 inches, or 0.01 of an inch
above the May normal. The highest pressure occurred at
Jacksonville, 30.23 inches. on the 23d. and ihe lowest.
29.76 inches, occurred at Pensacola and Tampa on thH
6th. giving a range for the State of 0.47 of an inch.

TEMPERATURE.

The mean temperature for May. 1908. determined from
the records of 58 stations, was 76.1 degs.. which is 0.1 deg.
above the normal. The mean maximum and the mean
minimum temperatures were 87.8 degs and 64.4 degs..
respectively. The highest monthly mean was 80.4 degs..
at Key West: the lowest monthly mean was 73.3. degs..
at Molino. The highest temperature recorded was 102
degs., at Huntington and Orange City on the 29th: the
lowest temperature recorded was 40 degs.. at Carwrabelle
on the 1st, and Johnstown on the 2d. The greatest monthly
range at any station was 57 degs.. at Johnstown. Monti-
cello, and Orange City; the least. 17 degs.. at Key West.
The greatest daily range was 46 degs., at Johnstown.














PRECIPITATION.

The average precipitation for the State, as determined
from the records of 58 stations, was 2.74 inches, which
is 1.12 inches below the normal. The greatest amount
recorded at any station for the month was 8.53 inches, at
Miami; and the least, 0.14 of an inch. at Manatee. Ex-
cessive rains (2.50 inches or more in 24 hours) occurred
as follows: Apalachicola, 3.21 inches, on the 6th; Madi-
son, 4.70 inches, on the Gth; Miami, 4.88 inches, on the
31st; and Monticello, 2.87 inches, on the 6th. The average
number of days on which 0.01 of an inch, or more, of
precipitation occurred was 6.




COMPARATIVE DATA FOR THE STATE, MAY.


TEMPERATURE.


YEAR.




1892 ......... .
1893 ........
1894 .........
1895 .........
1896 .........
1897 .........
1898 .........
1899 .........
1900 ...... ...
1901 .........
1902 .........
1903 .........
1904 .........
1905 .........
1906 .........
1907 .. ...
1908 ........


-0.7
+0.3
-1.4
-0.1
-1.3
-2.0
+0.4
+2.2
-0.5
-0.9
+1.7
-2.3
--1.1
+2.7
-0.8
+0.2
+0.1


98
101
98
97
100
99
102
101
96
98
101
101
100
101
99
99
102


PRECIPITATION.



-cC




2.19 --1.67
3.92 +0.06
2.51 -1.35
4.46 +0.60
2.73 -1.13
2.25 -1.61
1.60 -2.26
1.22 -2.64
3.83 -0.03
4.38 +0.52
2.45 -1.41
5.36 +1.50
2.51 -1.65
5.56 +1.70
6.96 +3.10
4.86 +1.00
2.74 -1.12


----~--












CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA-JUPITER, FLA.
(Continued from October, 1907.)
Mean Maximum Temperatures.



Year. .
I 1 8 5.21 S 1 S S "1 4

1888 .... 75.7 76.2175.2 80.0 82.0 85.2 88.1 88.4 85.2 82.47 76.5 7.3 S0.4
1889 .... 73.2 71.9 72.5 77.5 83.8 85.0 87.7 86.1 85.2 80.5 79.4 76.2 79.9
1890 ... 77.577.3 76.1[79.9 81.9 87.0 iS .S 86.3 S5.3 S2.9 7S.6 72.0 S1.0
1891 ... 70.5177.1 77.0 78.2182.2185.6 S6.3 S7.1 S4.7 79.9 77.1 7,.1 2 ''.2
1892 .... 72.2173.6 73.5 79.2 83.3 83.1 86.9 87.9 85.5 S,:.5 76.5 74.4 79.7

18J3 .... 68.5176.6 76.6 80.1 83.2 86.5 88.2 88.C S5.S 52.6 7S.0 73." 50.7
1894 .... 73.8 75.6 76.5 78.8181.6 83.2 85.6 87.1 85.2 S1.5 76.6 72.1 79.8
1895 .... 72.9 66.1 75.6 77.5 S2.5 85.687.9 87.3 85.7 S,.9 78.0 70.3 79.2
1896 .... 69.31 6.7 73.8 77.7 81.9184.4 85.2 88.0 S5.6 81.4 79.5 72.5 79.1
1897 .... 69.7 75.1 78.7 76.9 80.6 86.3 86.2 87.9 83.3 79.9 77.9 74.2 79.7

1898 .... 71.7 71.1 74.7i78.7 83.0196.5 87.1 86.2 6.5 81.2 77.5 72.7 79.7
1899 .... 73.6 73.4177.5 77.4 84.5186.1 86.9 88.1 86.6 81.6 77.6 72.7 80.5
1900 .... 69.7 70.6174.6178.3 81.8 81.8 86.8 89.0 86.a 83.5 78.7 75.1 79.9
1901 .... 72.2 72.5 75.2177.3 84.3184.3 86.2 85.8 85.9 82.4'74.4 71.8 79.4
1902 .... .70.5 70.2176.2179.5 84.6 85.6 87.8 89.2 87.6 85.0 79.5 75.4 '0.9

1903 .... 73.3 76.3 78.2 78.4 S1.7 85.2 SG.S 89.9 S5.4 51.4 7 .5 71.3 ,'.4
1904 .... .72.5 75.4!78.7 80.3 83.5'84.6 86.5 86.2 95.3 82.7 75.4 73.6 S".4
1905 .... 69.5 74.3 78.5 79.5 84.3 87.1'88.0 8.2 86.6 83.7 79.1 7 S3. S51.0
1906 .... 71.9 72.0 74.9177.8 83.8 84.8 87.0 85.8'86.6 82.3 77.5 72.9 79.8
1907 .... 76.0 73.8 80.5179.7183.8 86.3 88.6189.2 87.3 82.6 7S.6 74.3 S1.7

Means. 72.2173.4 76.2178.6 82.9185.2 87.0 87.6 85.8 81.9 77.7 7 3 35.2
I I I I I I











Mean Minimum Temperatures.


Year. M z i


1888 .... 61.8661661.766.0 70.1 73.1 74.8 75.8 73.7 71.1 65.0 56.4 67.6
1889 .... 60.2 57.6i57.0i 63.6 66.9 72.5 75.2 73.7174.5 67.1167.1164.8166.7
1890 .... 66.8 63.2 59.5 66.6170.0 73.7174.7174.4 72.8 68.4168.8157.4168.0
1891 .... 54.7166.0 62.1163.3 66.5 72.3174.3 74.0 73.2 67.3 64.3165.0;66.9
1892 .... 54.5 58.3'56.9 66.4 68.4 71.7 74.0 73.5173.2 69.2161.8159.1165.6
1893 .... 51.5 63.7159.7 67.8169.5 72.9 74.4 73. 73 .9 72.0 67.0 62.2167.4
1894 .... 62.1161.4 63.7 65.0168.9 72.2 74.1 74.6 75.0 70.5 65.5160.0167.8
1895 ... i57.9 50.7 61.8 63.1170.5 73.3 74.3175.5 73.6 70.7165.9158.6 66.3
1896 .... 55.3 56.5 61.3 66.2170.5 74.0174.7176.3 75.5 70.5171.5159.5 67.6
1897 ... .55.5 63.6;67.8i66.1 68.8175.7 75.1175.5 72.3 69.3168.8163.3168.5
1898 .... 58.0 57.0 65.0,64.9 68.6 72.2 75.0175.5 76.1172.3 68.3 59.8167.7
1899 ... .61.9160.1163.2163.8171.2173.5 74.9 75.4 73.9 72.0 67.1 61.2168.2
1900 .... 57.9157.5162.6 66.6 71.6171.6 75.61 76.677.3 76.6 3.566.462.8168.6
1901 .... 157.5155.0160.2 60.6 67.3'67.3 76.3 74.1 75.3 72.5158.9157.6 65.8
1902 .... 55.1153.7163.1164.9171.1 75.3 75.3 76.0 74.8 73.269.1162.7 67.9
1903 .... .59.964.9169.2165.2170.3173.8 74.7 75.9 73.9 69.4 62.7153.8167.8
1904 .... '56.1161.6165.5 166.4171.1 72.1173.6173.8174.7171.3 62.2 57.6167.2
1905 .... 52.0160.8165.366.4173.21 i3.7 75.5175.0175.2173.2 66.2160.7168.1
1906 .... 159.4!57.8 60.8 67.0171.1174.6174.5174.9|75.9170.5 67.2!58.4167.7
1907 ....164.0156.4 64.5f62.0171.4172.0 74.7 75.6174.6 70.2 66.9 60.3 67.7
I I I 1 1 Ii I I
Means.. 158.1159.4;62.5| 5.1!69.8 72.9 74.8 75.0174.4170.716b.0160.1167.4
11 I 1 1 1 1 1 11I I I











CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1908.


STATIONS.





Northern Section.

Archer.............
Cedar Keys.........
Federal Point.......
Fernandina.........
Gainesville .........
Huntington ........
Jacksonville ........
Jasper ..............
Johnstown...........
Lake City.........
Ijive Oak...........
Macclenny..........
Middlelburg ........
St.. August in ......
Saltsunia I l iglhts..
Switzerland .........


,(OINTIES.


2 c





Alilehua ....... 2 25
'ovy ......... 10 11
I '111r,1111....... 5 15
Nassau........ 10 II
AlacImhua....... 17(; 22
I'n, llin ....... .. 1 II
D)iuval ......... 4I 31
Ila niilton..... 152 10
I trln d '( l n l...... 125 12
(C lilllim ia ..... I | 1!
S Iw j ..... ... .
I ilaIr........ 125 Il
Clay. ......... 10) S
SI. Joh nls ..... 10 SN
I'. l In 1. l .... !IS ..
Sl.. Jolini. ..... I 10 I I


I I








76.41 1.1 97 *27 4, 2
71 .S 1.61 92 22 49 1
7i1.0 1 .81 97 21 45 2
7:.S -0.21 92 29 4S 1.
75.9 0.01 99 *28 417 1
,7 ;.,I 0 6O.1102 291ol18 *1
75.2 | O-1.0 92| 20 IS 1
71 .9 0.01 97122 .15 *I
7:'.0 -1 .41 97|*22 *101 2
71 .9|- 1 .0[ 9 281, 4 *1

:17 .2 1.21: 71 21 12 2
(171.2 1.0[I 9 22 il:1 2
7-. .; 0. 29 17 *I
75. ..... 9 28 48 2
71 .9 0.1 *1 1f 411 2


1.97 -1.8 0.81 5 17 11
1.72 -0.6010.85r : 28 :I
2.:, 1.7:1 1.071 0 1| 10
2.56 -2.39 1.071 II 21 6
1 .78 1.39 0.41 7 26 1
0.>:.-. 2.2,510.201 5 20 | 8
:!.07 -1 .1.f0.7 5[ N 11 1 I0
:. ;l 0.6;9 1.171 2: (
I .7:1 1.81 I .7170 : ... ...
2.1::1 I.8 1.70 ( 11 I 1
. . .. . . .
: '5 : I. I 2 .00 ... ...


S :: 5 .. 1 1. 7 5 .
I:: :' 1.81 0..17 7 2 : 7

'.8 1.21 ''I


' 11

2-







3 e
0 nw
2 f
1 s0
4 e


Temp'lll aturle, in dl groes Falhl'iiln i. Precipitatiol, ill ielles.


i;
Ir
k ~

i


% %










Central Section.

Bartow .......... .. Polk.......... 115 1 77.5 0.2 100 29 46
Brooksville......... Iernando .... 12Ifi 15 77.61- 0.8 1001 221 49
Clermont ........... .Lake ......... 1( 15 78.61 0.21 9!91 301 53
De Land............ Volusia........ 27 1 7 77.61 -0.9 9)61 281 501
Eustis. .............. Lake ........... (; 18 I 77.0 -0.51 9(61i 171 49
Fort Meade......... Polk.......... 125 I24 76.8 | 1.0 100 181 47
Fort Pierce (near).. St. Lucie..... 6 17 76.61 0.01 96 291 53:1
(rasmnere........... Orange....... 175 11 78.71+1 .8 100 51 50
Inverness .. .... .. Citrus........ 1:l 7 76.2 0.0 96 221 47
Kissimn lee.......... Osceola....... 5 16 77.2 0.3 97 29! 521
Malabar............ lrnvard......... 24 9 176. S|- 0.1 lb97 281b50
Merritts Island ..... Brevard...... i 2 227 .... ........ ... .. .
New Sllyrina (nolr) Volusia ...... 9 20 74.11--0.6! 96 281 49
(cala............... Marion...... 9NS 211 77.41+ 2.01 981 281 48
Orange City........ Volnsia....... 39 17 I 77.014-0.11102 291 45(
Orlando............ Orange.. 111 18 78.01-|-1.2 100 29| 53|
Panasoffkee ............. Sumon r........ ... 1)76.01 ..... 96 22 c43
PlantL City.......... Hillsborough. 121 16 c76.0 -0.4 c98 31 c50
Rockwell ........... Marion........ 10 S (77.91- 0.61e9R8 23! e50
St. Leo............. :Pasco......... 14011: 1 76.71- 1.01 94 *41 49
Tampa ............. l illIboro1 h. 2)0 I18 77.21+1.7 93 171 54
Tarpon Springs..... lii1rmrh 20 24 74.91-0.61 931 23| 48
T itusville ........... I varl .......I 6 16 .. .. | .. .. ..


0.36
0.57
2.05

2.17
2.09
2.44

.1.42
3.08
5.46

3.09
2.03
2.10
5.50
2.38
0.32
1.74
2.20
1.81
0.73
....


-3.68 0.13 5 ...
-2.9310.161 5 118
-1.3810.60 5 17
. .. ...I.... 1 2 1
-1.07|10.92 5 28 |
-2.4811.00 6 18
-1.5910.761 9 131
.. .. ... .. 30

-0.41 2.28 7 ...
+41 .2912.01 8 ..

0.00 1.00 7 ...
1-1.4310.51 7 12
--1.1710.88! 5 19
1+1.8011.70 6 17
...... 11.18 10 ...
I- 3.94 ).82 1 ...
I-- .8410.R86 6 ...
1-1.6510.81 7 14
1--1.1111.39 5117
-1.9710.63 2 28


S12
12
IS
2
10
6
1
23




I.
12
S12


15
13
2










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1908-Continued.


STATIONS.






Southern Section.

Arcadia............
Avon Park.........
Filaminigo...........
I lypoluxo..........
Jupiter............
Key W est..........
M anl) l e ............
M iam i ..............
M yors ..............
Sand Key ..........

Western Section.

Apo:lachlicola ........
Illh i isto .wn ........
I nil'ay .............


(4 )I1Nnl.:s


De Soto.......
De Soo. .......
Monlro .......
Dade.........
Dade.........
NMonroo.......
Manalte ......
Dade.........
Lee. ..........
Monroc ......


Fr1 anli nln1l ..... 2 1
( llll n ....... ....
I Holm(1 ........ IIl I


Telmpirjatur in degreesFalrenheit P reelitation in inhe i s.






0 C






11 77.8 0.6 97 *18 52 11 38 :.01 -1.42 1.48 6




24 76.; (.51 95 *23 54 *2 4 0.14 .01 .09 2
12 79.111 0.71 94 27! 58 10 30 X.5 5 -2.7814.88 121
24 76.8 0.71 941 221 55 11 34 1.25 0.9511.54 8
4 79.1 .2 91 :10 67 4 15 1 I :1 .20 0.981 5
a.4 s :













4 75.0 0.0 91 28 49 1 25 65 1.57 3.21 .
... ..... .. I|. .. 50 .
720 a71 .50 0.(i 92 28 68 101 26 :.o 2. -12.05 4


Sky.














" .' . .
21 8 2 w
20 9 2 so

16 131 2 se
10 18 3 ge
16 14 1 e
21 9 1 nw
11 17 3 se
3 so





24 (; I s
27 3 I 0
8 13 10 s









Carrabelle ..........
De Funiak Springs..
Fenholloway ........
G ait ................
M adison ............
Marianna..........
Molino .............
Monticello..........
Mount Pleasant ....
Newport ......... ..
Pensacola ..........
St. Andrew..........
Tallahassee..........
W ansau............

Late Report.

Apalachicola, April,
1908..............


Franklin ...... 10
Walton....... 193
Taylor........ 70
Santa Rosa... 91
Madison...... 200
.ackson....... 80
Escambia. .... 49
Jefferson...... 207
Gadsden...... 260
Wakulla.........
Escambia..... 56
Washington... 14
Leon.......... 192
Washington... 250




. .. ... .


12 74.2 -3.3
11 .... ...
2 I 75.6 ....

2 76.2 +0.7
8 73.6-0.51
6 73.3 +0.61
3 74.8 +0.41
2 74.8 .

29 74.2 0.61
10 74.2 0.31
23 74.7 +0.2!
10 76.2 +0.7|


.. .


921 28


88! 221 ..


40 1 32

50 10 38

44 1 36
43 *1137
42 1 34
42 1 31
41 1 35

48 1 22
43 1 33
44 1 31
44 1 35


2.84

3.36

7.30
3.25
6.99
4.54
1.46
2.11
2.42
4.27
4.50
3.72|


+0.23 1.95 3 23 5

...... 2.40 4 8 22

+3.12 4.70 5 11 14
-1.89 1.75 5 22 8
-0.85 1.751 5 25 6
-1.27 2.871 6 21 7
- 3.21 0.701 4 ... ...
-1.05 2.10 2... .
-0.26 1.29 6 13 15
+0.1211.85 4 27 3
0.90 2.35 4 21 7
-1.78 2.10 2 17 14


3 1...


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature and percipita-
tion are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
The letters a, b, c, etc., indicate number of days missing from report. *More than one day.


--~--
























PART III.




Fertilizers and
Feeding Stuffs


3-Bul















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.



SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILI1
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary deter-
minations, and to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for two months from date of cer-
tificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ; fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and
address must also be on the package, this rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.












INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each
package of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have.
securely attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed
analysis required by law, and the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the inspector's fee. This provis ion of the law-
Section 3 of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 ,of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.


INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment
of the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee
tag and stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence
of the guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manu-
facturer or dealer has not complied with the law. Without
the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the goods
are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse
against the manufacturer or dealer. Such goods are sold
illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of little
value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers now
comply strictly with the law and regulations by placing
the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.


INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws. defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-


IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA
JANUARY, 1908.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia ..........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
m onia ...................
Dried Blood 15 per cent Am-
m onia ...................


SEA PORTS,


Less than 5 to 10
5 tons. tons.


10 tons
& over.


$60.00 $59.50 $59.00

74.00 73.50 73.00

60.00 59.50 59.00

54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per
cent. Potash (K20) ......
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per
cent. Potash (K20) (90 per
cent. Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Ams., 42
Potash (K20) ...........
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash...


50.00 49.50 49.00


30.00

46.00


110.00

84.00
13.00


29.50

45.50


29.00

44.00


83.50 83.00
12.50 12.00


17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent Ammonia .....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
6 per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.
Raw Bone 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid .............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00











Ammoniates.
Ammonia and Phosphoric Ac
Ground Castor Pomace, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid....
Bright Cottonseed Meal, S
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations .............
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ..............


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.
id.


S $25.00 $24.50 241.00


S 31.00 29.50 29.00


S 24.00 23.50 23.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00 14.50 14.50

14.00 13.50 13.00

24.00 23.50 23.00
25.00 24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stems .............. ..
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
(K20) Potash ...........
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per
cent. Ammonia, 1 per
cent Potash ..............
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks......


25.00 24.50

16.00 15.50


23.00 22.50 22.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


18.50
14.50)
10.25


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are -1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.


24.00

15.00


s18.00
14.01
10.00











STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1908.

Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia ( or its equivalent in nitrogen) 16 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash. K20)........5j cents a pound

If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid................20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)..$3.30 per unit
Potash .................................$1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent, in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid. .6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid...1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.30- 11.28
Potash .................. .. .7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging ..........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. $27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.06
Potash .....................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging .......................... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. $18.30

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida sea ports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.










If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:

Available Phosphoric Acid............90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ......................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen).$2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertiliers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia.
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one. five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1908 deducted
therefrom.











41


COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Phosphoric
Ammonia Acid Potash


Nitrate of Soda..........
Sulphate of Ammonia ...
Dried Blood...............
Concentrated Tankage....
Bone Tankage ..........I
Dried Fish Scrap........
Cotton Seed Meal.........
Hoof Meal .............


17 to
21 to
12 to
12 to
6 to
8 to
7 to
13 to


19 ............
17 ............
17 ............
15 1 to 2
9 10 to 15
11 6 to 8
10 2 to 3
17 li to 2


......... .
... .
... .
............
1j to 2
... .


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid Phosphoric
Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate ........................ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ............ ............ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.. ............ 14 to 19 1 to 35
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 61 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED


Muriate of Potash.......
Sulphate of Potash......
Carbonate of Potash ....
Nitrate of Potash......
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag
K ainit .................
Sylvinit ...............
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes..
Wood Ashes, unleached..
Wood Ashes. leached....
Tobacco Stems... .....
Cow Manure (fresh)....
Horse Manure (fresh)..
Sheep Manure (fresh)..
Hog Manure (fresh)....
Hen Dung (fresh)......
Mixed Stable Manure....


Actual .Phosphoric
Potash Ammonia Aid i Lime

50 ........ .
48 to 52 ......... .................
55 to 30 ......... .........
40 to 44 12 to 16 ..................
26 to 30 ......... ..................
12 to 12 ......... ......... ........
16 to 20 ...........
15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2 ....
1 to 2 ......... 1 to 1135 to 40
5 to 8 2 to 4 ......... 31
0.40 0 to 41 0.16 0.31
0.53 0 to 60 0.28 0.31
0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein by...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 16.47
Nitrogen into protein, by ............. ...... 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 1'.t;32
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by.... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.('81
Actual potash into carbonate of potash,multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want o know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.6S1, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).




COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEED
LAWS.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.

COPIES OF THE PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law. rules and
regulations, standards, blanks, etc., can be obtained from
the Commissioner of Agriculture.










SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fetilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods pur-
chased analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of
the law-without charge-the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and manu-
facturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection,
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
sea port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at and exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and sending of special
samples-on another page.









44

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.


NAME OF FEED




Bright Cotton Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meal

Linseed Meal .........

Wheat Bran ..........

M iddlings ............

Mixed Feed (wheat)..

Corn Meal ...........

Corn (grain) .........

Corn Cobs ...........

Corn and Cob Meal....

Corn & Oats, eq'l p'ts..

W heat ...............

O ats .................

Soja Beans ...........

Velvet Beans & Hulls..

Rice Hulls ...........

Gluten Meal ..........

Gluten Feed .........


7.05



8.76

8.39

6.36

7.80

1.64

2.10

30.10

6.601

5.80s

1.80

9.50

4.80

9.20

35.70

1.231
! 7.311


38.83!

21.43d

34.70

15.10

17.23!

16.86

8.73

10.50

2.40

8.50

9.601

11.90

11.80

34.00

19.70'

3.60

37.06


27.57;

36.56

35.911

57.28'

56.70

54.44

71.321

69.60

54.90

64.80

66.10

71.991

59.701

28.00:

51.30

3S.60'

46.52'


. .,<

9.22 6.60

5.45'......

5.34 6.12

3.65 5.33

4.42 4.30

4.79 5.30

3.141 1.20

5.40 1.50

0.501 1.40

3.50 1.50

4.40 2.20

2.10 1.80

5.00 3.09

16.5(1 5.40

4.50 3.30

0.70 13.20

3.27 '.6S


24.17 54.30 3.44 1.80












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)



NAME OF FEED. &



Hominy Feed ......... 4.05 10.49 65.27 7.85 2.54

Rye Products (bran).. 4.53 15.57 61.28 3.02 3.80

Barley Sprouts ...... 10.94 27.20 42.66 1.56 6.34

Distillers' Grains .... 12.90 32.23 33.34 12.09 1.86

Oat Feed ............. 20.57 7.91 54.58 3.26 5.34

Provender ............ 3.91 10.62 67.34 4.03 1.83

Ship Stuff ........... ...... 16.30 58.14 4.28 ......

Victor Feed .......... 10.63 8.83 62.46 4.02 3.64

XXX Corn & Oat Feeds 9.94 9.66 64.66 5.09 3.24

Corn & Oat Feeds..... 12.09 8.73 61.73 3.73 3.22

Proprietary Horse F'dsl 9.57 12.48 60.54 4.27 2.83

Molasses Feeds ....... 8.49 16.34 51.72 1.79 6.18

Poultry Feeds ........ 4.62 15.89 60.27 5.32 27.63

Beef Scrap ................. 44.70 3.28 14.75 29.20

Quaker Dairy Feed.... 15.53 14.42 52.12 4.051 5.31

Creamery Feed ........ 10.07 20.06 51.00 5.38 3.57

Purina Feed .......... 12.60 15.10 56.50 4.10 4.65










46

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED-
STUFF 1908.

For the season of 1908, the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn ,to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef. etc.:

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 190S.

Protein, 3' cents per pound..........f5 cents per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1J cents per pound..30 cents per unir
Fats, 3- cents per pound.............. 6. cents per unit
A unit being 20 pounds (10 per cent) of a ton.

Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1
HOMINY FEED-
Protein ..........................10.49 x 65c, 6.81
Starch and Sugar................. 65.27 x 30c, 19.58
Fats ............................ 7.85 x 65c, 5.10

State value per ton ............ ... ........ $31.49

EXAMPLE No. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-
Protein .......................... 9.66 x 65c, $ 6.27
Starch and Sugar ................62.46 x 30c. 18.73
Fats ............................ 5.09 x 65c 3.30

State value per ton .......................... $28.30


R. E. ROSE.
State chemistt.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by Purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.




Cotton Seed Meal .............
Fertilizer ....................
Acid Phosphate .............
Fertilizer No. 1................
Fertilizer No. 2...............
Fertilizer No. 1...............
Fertilizer No. 2...............
Fertilizer No. 3...............
Cotlon Seed Meal ...........
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer No. 1 ..............
Fertilizer No. 2 .............
Fertilizer No. 3 .............
Fertilizer No. 4 .............
Fertilizer No. 5 .............
Fertilizer No. 6 (bone meal)...


, 0



1440
1441
1442
1443
1444
1445
1446
1447
1448
1449
1450
1451
1452
1453
1454
1455


Phosphoric Acid.


C5



.... .~:i .. 1 .
7.93 2.16 10.09
.... 14.41 2.52 16.93
15.32 10.29 2.16 12.45
19.64 8.34 1.87 10.21
12.02 9.18 2.09 11.27
14.74 10.49 1.96 12.45
14.331 9.08 1.27 10.35

.... 6.271 0.97 7.27
... 6.77 0.27 7.04
... 7.02 0.28 7.30
.. 7.11 0.02 7.13
.... 3 0.03 6.41
6 .12 2.26 8.38
.... 5.04 15.55 20.559


BY WHOM SENT.


0
CM

0 2

7.84
2.18 2.56

3.46 2.07
2.46 2.17
2.33 1.07
3.62 3.08
2.82 3.12
S.7 ..
3.01 10.30
4.11 11.13
5.62 9.77
2.60 13.15
4.28 13.05
5.39 7.14
4.62 ....


W. 11. Moseley, Quincy, Fla.
A. L. \Villson Co., Quincy, Fla.
A. L. Willson Co., Quincy, Fla.
R. E. Whittle, Milton, Fla.
R. E. Whittle, Milton, Fla.
E Murphy, Milton, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
E. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
T. S MeDrrmir, Tallahassee, Fla.
M. C. Hardee, Dania, Fla.
L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
1,. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
I,. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
L. It. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
I1. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Nitrate of Soda .............
Fertilizer No. 3 .............
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Cotton Seed Meal ............
K ainit No. 1 .................
Acid Phosphate No. 2.........
Fertilizer No. 3 .............
Fertilizer No. 4 ..............
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Cotton Seed Meal ............
(otton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
FIertilizer ....................
('olion Seed Meal ............
Fertilizer ...................
A she's .......................
Fertilizer ....................


*0
..0Z
on


1456
1457
1458
1459
1460
1461
1462
1463
1464
1465
1466
1467
1468
1469
1470
1471
1472
1473
1474
1475
1476


Phosphoric




a 0 0



.... .... ....
7.29 0.69
... .. ...
.. .. .. ..
... .. ... .

.... 17.97 0.35
8.94 8.40 0.13
10.67 6.71 0.30





.... ... ....

.... .... ....i

11. 55 1. 8.4

4.30 4.63 8.94


Acid.

O
C<


SBY WHOM SENT.


1


.... 117.74 .... D. W. Brown, Arcadia. Fla.
7.98 3.44 11.50 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh, Fla.
.... 7.89 .... Rocky Comfort Tob. Co., Quincy,
.... 8.40 .... .. S. Howell, Chumuckla, Fla.
.... 7.59 .... I R. Olmstead, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
....... 12.82 F. M. Henderson, Madison, Fla.
18.32 .... .... F. M. Henderson, Madison, Fla.
8.53 2.07 3.39 F. M. Henderson, Madison, Fla.
7.01 3.01 4.46 F. M. Henderson, Madison, Fla.
.... 7.54 .... .. T1. Gray, Concord, Fla.
.... 7.56 .... W. C. Lambert, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.29 .... I\. T. Owens, Quincy. Fla.
.... 7.56 .... W. C. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.59 .. V. 1. Dykes, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.71 .... 11. L. Reeves, Hinson, Fla.
7.413 .. I. M. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
11.61 2.27 1.241 I\V. C. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.s80 .... .I. 1,. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
12.9S 1 .49 0.79 W. C. LaImln ert, Qlliin y, 1la,.
S 3.45 .1. W. Watson, Miami. Fla.
113.57 5.73 8.74 l. J. Knight, Safety Ilarbor, Fla.


--- ------- ------










.P Bone Black No. 1 ............
I Hone Black No. 2 ...........
W Fertilizer ..................
- Fertilizer No. 1 .............
Fertilizer No. 2 ..............
Fertilizer No. 3 .............
Fertilizer No. 4 ..............
Fertilizer No. 5 ............
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Fertilizer No. 1 .............
Fertilizer No. 2 .............
Fertilizer No. 1 .............
Fertilizer No. 2 .............
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ...................
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1 ......
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2 ......
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Fertilizer ..................
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Fertilizer No. 1 .............
Fertilizer No. 2 ..............
Fertilizer No. 3 ..............
Acid Phosphate ............. .
Tobacco Stems No. 1 .........
Tobacco Stems No. 2 .........
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Fertilizer ....................
Cotlon Seed Meal ............
Potash Mixture .............


1477 .... 18.13 0.05 18.18
1478 .... 18.22 0.33 15.55
1479 .... 10.46 2.30 12.76
1480 (;.98 4.89[ 1.86 6.75
1481 7.32 7.65 1.52 9.17
1482 3.42 7.60 0.39 7.99
1483 4.57 7.53 1.69 9.22
1484 .... 9.97 0.97 10.94
1485 .. .. .... ...
1486 . .
1487 .... 1.20 5.20 6.40
1488 .... 6.25 9.75116.00
1489 .... 2.80 3.80 6.60
1490 .... 1.40 2.00 3.40
1491 .... 5.00 0.40 5.40
1492 .... 1.65 6.95 8.601
1493 .... 7.17 0.35 7.52
1494
1495 .
1496 . . . ....
1497 .... 9.35 2.04 11.39
1498 ... .. .... I ....
1499 111.15 7.56 1.96' 9.52
1500 114.58| 8.051 1.181 9.23
1501 14.85 110.75 1.52112.271
1502 .... 115.65! 0.19 115.851
1503 1.. .. .. .. .
1504 .... .... ....
1505 . . .
1506 .... 6.97 10.80 17.77
1507 1 .... I ... .... ...
1508 114.38 12.60 9.07 121.671


J. H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
J. H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
3.64 2.66 IS. J. Stewart & Bro., Milton, Fla.
3.49 10.28 Joseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.
4.00 9.69 Joseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.
2.69 7.43 Joseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.
4.05 5.97 Joseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.
1.86 4.85 IJoseph Crews, Wauchula, Fla.
7.13 .... N. W. Nicholson, Pine Barren, Fla.
7.07 .... Sun Tob. Co., Quincy, Fla.
2.11 17.22 L. B. Edwards, Chattahoochee, Fla.
1.15 .... L. B. Edwards, Chattahoochee, Fla.
3.96 3.41 L. L. Payne, Orlando, Fla.
3.52| 1.71 L. L. Payne, Orlando, Fla.
1.51 2.89 Len Adams, Glendale, Fla.
1.82 14.88 P. B. Lowell, Quincy, Fla.
3.041 9.19 J. E. Cailey, Chipley, Fla.
7.11 .... L. B. Fleming, Milton, Fla.
7.52 .... Il. B. Fleming, Milton, Fla.
7.36 .... ID. C. Butler, River Junction, Fla.
2.18 2.40 W'. W. Richards, Cobb, Fla.
7.23 .... W. H. Mosley, Quincy, Fla.
.... 3.97 Mark Woodell, Kynesville, Fla.
2.171 3.04 IMark Woodell, Kynesville, Fla.
1.841 2.13 IMark Woodell. Kynesville, Fla.
.... [ .... IW. B. Anderson, Gretna, Fla.
1.531 6.82 J. C. Mann, Orlando, Fla.
1.27! 4.44 J. C. Mann, Orlando, Fla.
7.761 .... Gus Garrison, Milton, Fla.
2.02 13.54 A. McRae, Monticello, Fla.
7.56 .... Wells-Kahn Co., Pensacola, Fla.
0.85 13.38 IL. M. Owens, Quincy, Fla.










IHUlEAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.




F'r tilizer ..................
Acid Phos hat .............
"'erlilizer .................
F rtil]izer .......... ... .....
Acid Phosphate ..............
Fertilizer ......... .........
F ', ilhzer .......... ........
Cotton Seed Meal ............
F 'ertilzer ........ ............
(Colon Seed Mea;l ............
Acid Phosphate ..............
Fertilizer .......... .........
' rtl ilize r ..................
C(ol l on Seed Meale ............
I' 'rl ilize r t ..................
Slird \Vood Asw :; ...........
V' rl iliz r ... .... ..........
P (rtiliz ,r N o. I ..............
V ,,rliliz, r N o. ..............
o ll ize r ......... ........ .
F', r !i :. (ir N o. I ..............


loo




1510
1511
1512
1513
1514
1515
1516
1517
1518
1519
1520
1521
1522
1523
1524
15,25
1526

1527
15238
1 528
1525


Phosphoric Acid.





~ ~ -

1i 0i 10.5S 0.91 11.49
.... 19.10 0.28 19.38
'i.9(0 10.68 0.70 11.80
10.28 1.57 11.85
19.00 0.27 19.27
9.85 1.13 10.98
... 8.85 0.63 9.48

9.90 1.80 11.70


12.9!5 !.9: 0.72 10. 65
11.18 10.H20 1.85 11.55

S . . I .
7.961 8 .;::' 0.11 8.77

G.27 1.76; X .3
8..O 8. 12 2. 19 10. 11 1
10.5 1 7. 9SX 0.29 8.:!7
115. 1(; l.S : II. 1 .29 112.10
S.... I1 0.: 1 .:! I 1 (;5


.d BY WHOM SENT.
0
o


2.(3 2.1L V. T. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
.... .... L. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
2.06 2.17 J. L. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
2.71 1.:0 \V. C. Lambert, Quincy, Fla.
.... .... M. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
2.15 1.74 L. M. Owens, Quincy, Fla.
1.55 2.09 T. M. Smith, Quincy, Fla.
7.5S .... T. M. Smith, Quincy, Fla.
1.85 2.25 P. L. McCall, Quincy, Fla.
7.20 .... F. McCall, Quincy, Fla.
.... ... (us Garrison. Million. Flia.
I.i2 :".01 (:iis Garrison, Milton, Fla.
2.13 I .:,S (I Lambert, Quincy, 'Ila
7.87 .... Il. 13. Penton, Chniiiucla., Fla.
2.S8 15.3 2 .1. I. Cowlurn, ('res lent Ci(ly, Fla.
.... 0.97 'hase & Co., Saniiord, Fla.
.(;5 5.:1 ... 'I. M oran, (lillett, Phi.
1.02 9.87 \\:iller Cliff, Creoserl Cily, Fla.
1.::,S L'. 1; \Waller C(lif, Cresce t (. Cily. Fla.
I.1. : 2 2., \.' \V. \\il(kerson, (hlendail e, Fll.
2.::Gi 1.30 I: 11. Shelfer, Quincy, Fla.










Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 1530
Fertilizer No. 3 .............. 1531
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1532
Cotion Seod Meal No. 1 ....... 1533
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2 ...... 1534


.... 7.55 2.00 9.55 6.56 1.80 JE B. Shelfer, Quincy, Fla.
15.24 11.19 1.93 13.12 2.21 2.97 R. E. Whittle, Milton, Fla.
S ... .... .... .... 7.89 .... ISumatra Tob. Co., Quincy Fla.
.... .. .... 7.75 Florida Tob. Co., Quincy, Fla.
.... .. .... 8.06 .... |Florida Tob. Co., Quincy, Fla.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS, 1908. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by the State Chemist Under Section 1, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosph


NAME, OR BRAND.
0.


Cd-


Orange Tree Manure.....I I' l iii. .I Analysis.
Official Analysis ....

Irish Potato Manure...... 1095 (luranteed Analysis.
Ollicial Analysis ....

Iruiter Manure.......... i09( iaaranteed AnalysisI
Official Analysis ....

Siml(on Pure Tomanto ...... 10971(iaranied Analysis
IOfficial Analysis ... .

(iom Vegetable........... 109S (iiaraniied Analysis
|OIl'cial Analyvsis ....

Sionl 1'ure Sp hclal No 2. 1 (): ,[!]iu :ti i .lr u;l Analysis
| Ollicial Analysis ....


0


.00
9.30 7.18

. 5.50
8.491 5.20


(;.51 8.24

2.00 4.00
8.95 5.:8

8.00, 5.00
,8.93 5. 21

s.oo c. oof
7 .57 (;.::(; I


loric Acid.






4 1
. 0

2.78 9. 96


2.;6 7.561


.18 8.42

3.00 ...
2. X9 S. 27

3.00 ....
::.49 8. 70


0








4.00 7.89

4.00 12.00
3.57 12.51

5.00 9.00
5.29 9. 69

4.00 1) .00
4.900 6.77

4. 00 6. 00
5. (;1 G. 13


BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.





Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E.O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

.).: Painter Fertllizer Co.
.lacksonville, Fla.

I.4). Pin;ll ter l'Feril iz. r Co.,
Jacklsonville, Fla.










Simon Pure Special No. 1.11100Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
lOfficial Analysis .... 7.34 5.71

Simon Pure Garden...... 1101Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 4.00
S Official Analysis .... 8.28 6.57

Simon Pure No. 1........ 1102 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
S Official Analysis .... 7.52 5.83

Paris Celery Special..... 1103 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 5.00
Official Analysis .... 7.93 5.60

Nitrate of Soda.......... 11104 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 ....
Official Analysis .... .... ....

Special Mixture......... 1105 Guaranteed Analysis. .... 7.50
Official Analysis .... 5.76 7.01
DeSoto Arand Orange TreeI
Grower ............... 1106Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 8.44 6.60
V. C. Tip Top Tomato I
Trucker .............. 1107Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 7.00
IOfficial Analysis .... 5.851 6.88
DeSoto Brand Fruit and I
Vine Manure .......... 1108Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00
IOfficial Analysis .... 6.48 7.17
Georgia State Standard
Ammoniated superphos. 1109 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00
Official Analysis .... 13.88 7.68

No. 4 .................. 111 Guaranteed Analysis.j10.00 6.00
S Official Analysis .... 6.11 6.96


1.00
.08

3.00
1.76

1.00
.08


.95





.83


.47

1.00
1.10


.651

1.00
1.97

2.00
.45


.... 2.00
5.79 3.30

5.00
8.33 6.75

4.00
5.91 5.38

. 6.00
6.55 6.86

.... 17.00
.... 18.21

.... 4.00
7.84 4.18

.... 5.00
7.07 3.57

4.00
7.98 4.57

.... 4.00
7.82 4.05

. 2.00
9.65 2.20

3.00
7.41 3.19


16.00
16.83

6.50
6.28

11.00
13.07

5.00
4.63


E.O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. 0. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. 0. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Sanrlr3 Feartiliepr (n


.... Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 American Agl. Chem. Co.,
8.86 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.50 Virginia- Carolina Chem.
6.71 Co., Savannah, Ga.

5.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
4.69 Co., Savannah, Ga.

12.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
11.75 Co., Savannah, Ga.

2.00 Virginia Carolina Chem.
2.33 Co., Savannah, Ga.

10.00 Southern Fertilizer Co.,
9.09 Orlando, Fla. 53









ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. .




Carey's Spec. for Fruit... illGuaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 5.99
No. 1 ...................1112 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 7.53
Fruit and Vine.......... 1113 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 6.15
Ideal Potato Manure..... 1114 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis .... 6.77
Ideal Vegetable Manure. 1115 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00
1 Official Analysis .... 7.57
Special Mixture No. 1... 1116GuarIntced Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis .... 6.75
The Ideal FI',rlllizc r...... G1117 I ar tllc lel Analysis. 8.00
10111cial A alysis .. 6.05


Pitosphoric Acid.





$- I I

6.00 1.00 .... 4.00
6.92 .51 7.43 3.84

5.00 2.00 .... 5.00
7.45 1.11 8.56 5.21

7.00 1.00 .... 2.00
7.38 .91 8.29 2.10

6.00 1.00 .... 4.00
5.69 2.21 7.90 4.01

6.00 1.00 .... 4.00
7.35 .A( 8.31 3.39

6.00) 1.00 .... 5.00
6.87 2.(64 7.51 4.8:1

5.00 .00 .... 4 .00
4.77 1.741 6.51 :1.84


54




BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




12.00 Southern Fertilizer Co.,
11.21 Orlando, Fla.

4.00 Southern Fertilizer Co.,
3.63 Orlando, Fla.

12.00 Southern Fertilizer Co.,
11.46 Orlando, Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertill-
8.34 zor Co., Jacksonville,Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertill-
10.06 zer Co., Jacksonville,Fla.

5.00 \Vllson & Toomer Fertili
5.00 zer Co., .lacklsonville,lla.

6.00 \Wilsi & Toomer Feorlli
7.12 zer Co., .ack(sonvllle,Fla.









Genuine Peruvian Guano. 11118 Guaranteed Analysis.13.00
I Official Analysis .... 9.96

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 1119 Guaranteed Analysis ....
Official Analysis........

Ga. State Grange Fertz... 1120 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 12.89

Cotton Boll Guano....... 1121IGuaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 14.22

Goulding's Bond Compound 1122 Guaranteed Analysis.110.00
I Official Analysis .... 10.19
Samson's Ammoniated
Bone .............. .... 11123 Guaranteed Analysis. 16.00
Official Analysis .... 10.26
Goulding's 4 per cent Pot- I
ash Acid ............. 1124 Guaranteed Analysis.116.00
Official Analysis .... 9.12

HIinson's Potash Mixture.. 1125 Guaranteed Analysis.16.00
Official Analysis .... 7.96

Goulding's Bone Compound'1126 Guaranteed Analysis.l16.00
IOfficial Analysis .... 11.31

Kainit .................. 1127Guaranteed Analysis. 20.00
I Official Analysis .... ....

Goulding's Bone Compound 1128 Guaranteed Analysis.116.00
IOfficial Analysis ....11.10


.... .... 16.00
8.36 8.38 16.74

... .... 2.50


8.001 2.00 ...
10.21 2.01 12.22

8.00 2.00 ....
8.86 1.65 10.51

8.00 2.00 ....
8.72 1.81 10.53

8.00 2.00 ...
8.84 1.91110.75

8.00, 2.00o ....
9.09 2.30 11.39

8.00 2.00 ....
7.481 1.85 9.33

8.001 1.00 ....
9.471 1.95 111.42

. .. .. .. ..

8.001 2.00 ....
8.83 1 2.47 11.30


3.50
3.59

7.50
7.98

2.00
2.23

2.00
1.95

2.00
2.02

2.00
2.20







2.00
2.43




2.00
2.01


2.00
2.70

1.50


2.00
1.88

2.00
2.21

2.00
1.14

2.00
1.76

4.00
3.67

3.00
4.25

2.00
1.96

12.00
13.86


Wilson & Toomer Fertili-
zer Co., Jacksonville,Fla.

McCaw Mfg. Co., Macon,
Ga.

Virginia- Carolina Chem.
Co., Montgomely, Ala.

Virginia Carolina Chem.
Co., Montgomery. Ala.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Goulding Fertilizer C .,
Pensacola, Fla.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Bighee Fert ilizer Co., Mont-
gomery, Ala.


2.00 IGoulding Fertilizer Co.,
1.53 I' Pensacola, Fla. 55











ANALYSES ()W ERTILIZERS-Continued


z

NAME, OR BRAND. 0




Jiiguees Id.. .Eng. Acid|
Phosphate .............1129 Guaranteed Analysirs 16.00
Official Analysis .... ....

Fla. State Standard Fertz.. 1130 Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00
Official Analysis .... 14.53

Meal Mixture ........... 1131 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 11.37

Acid Phosphate ............ l112Guaranteed Analysis. ....
Official Analysis .... ....

Kainit ................... 1133 Guaranteed Analysis ..
M n lom Mix Official Analysis ......
Mnaianna Home Mixed
Iano ................. .11:4Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 12.22

('otlon Seed Meal ........ I 1:5 GIl ranIil('d Analysis .
Oflfcial Analysis .... .


Phosphoric Acid.


5 ad | BY WHOM AND WHERE
S3 MANUFACTURED.

SCB S


14.00 2.00 .... .... .... Bigbee Fertilizer Co.,Mont-
15.44 1.33 16.77 .... .... gomery, Ala.

8.00 2.00 .... 2.00 2.00 Bigbee Fertilizer Co,. Mont-
9.19 1.86 111.05 1.84 2.44 gomery, Ala.

8.00 2.00 .... 2.00 2.00 Georgia Chemical Works,
7.39 1.09 8.-18 2.19 2.44 Augusta, Ga.

14.00 .... .. .... .... Marianna Mfg. Co., Mari-
14.69 .... .. .. anna, Fla.

.. .. .. .. .. 112.00 IMarianna Mfg. Co., Mari-
.... .... ... 59 : anna!: Fla.

8.00 2.00 .... 2.00 2.00 Mariannrl Mfg. Co., Mari-
6. 1.90 8.7 2 .: : .. 8 :i 1 nna, Fla.

... .. 7 . M larlai MfNIg. Co., Marl-
.... .5 .... anna, Fla.









Standard Cotton Fertilizer 11361Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00
S Official Analysis .... 13.79 9.26

H. G. Acid Phosphate..... 11371Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 14.00
Official Analysis .... .... 13.79

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 1138Guaranteed Analysis ........
Official Analysis .... .... ....

Liberty Bell Guano ...... 1139,Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00
Official Analysis .... 13.71 9.15

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 1140 Guaranteed Analysis ....
Official Analysis .... .... ....
V.-C. Champion Citrus I
Compound ..............1141 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00
S Official Analysis .... 6.50 7.95
V.-C. Fla. Fruit-Growers'
Form .................1142 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 7.00
S official Analysis .... 6.05 8.83
V.-C. Old Dominion Potato
Manure ............... 11431Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 7.00
S Official Analysis .... 6.28 8.64
V.-C. Tip Top Tomato I
Trucker ...............11441Guarantecd Analysis. 8.00 7.00
Official Analysis .... 7.65 8.04

V.-C. Fruit and Vine...... 11451Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 5.62 7.31

Castor Pomace ..........11146 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 ....
Official Analysis .... .... ....


2.00 .... 2.00 2.00

2.00
2.10 11.36 1.99 2.21

2.00 .... .... .
2.70 16.49 .. .

.... 2.50 7.50 1.50
.. .... 7.77 .

2.00 .... 2.00 2.00
1.09 10.24 2.15 2.46

2.00 4.75 1.50
.. .... 4.88 .

1.00 .... 3.00 114.00
.41 8.36 3.04 13.15

1.00 .... 3.50 4.00
.49 9.32 3.76 4.42

1.00 .... 5.00 8.00
.68 9.32 4.44 7.77

1.00 .... 4.00 5.00
.93 8.97 4.19 4.27

1.00 .... 2.50 10.00
1.01 8.32 3.36 10.12

.... 1.50 6.50 1.00
.. .... 6.491 ....


Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Pensacola, Fla.

Ala. Chemical Co., Mont-
gomery, Ala.

Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Talla-
hassee, Fla.

Virginia- Carolina Chem.
Co., Savannah, Ga.

Virginia Carolina Chem.
Co., Savannah, Ga.

Virginia- Carolina Chem.
Co., Savannah, Ga.

Virginia Carolina Chem.
Co., Savannah, Ga.

Virginia- Carolina Chem.
Co., Savannah, Ga.

Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
SJacksonville, Fla. 57










ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

!Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Bradley Fruit and Vine... 1147 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis .... 7.70
Special Mixture ......... 1149 Guarantecd Analysis. ....
IOfficial Analysis .... 7.69
(,ni Pineapple Manure. ... SI150Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00
Special PineOl Fej Official Analysis .... G.79
Fla. Special Pineapple Fer-1
:I lizer ......... ... .1151 Guaranteed Analysis. (.00
Official Analysis .... 5.39

Ideal Vegetable Manure... 1152G(luaranteed Analysis. 8.00
[Oflicial An:lysis .... 9.77
P'uro (Irouid Stleanmed
Imon. ................. .I153 (ui'ramitea d Analysis 10.00
()llicial Analysis .......

II. (1. sihlplhint or I'olr sh.iI l (llirGlll io l Analysi ....
|O icial Analysis .... ....


I BY WHOM AND WHERE
-MANUFACTURED.


PLO

2.25 10.00 American Agl. Chem. Co.,
2.85 9.19 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 7.00 E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co.,
5.02 7.76 Jackisonville, Fla.

5.00 6.00 E. O. 'Painter Forillzer Co.,
5.71 7.21 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 7.00 \\'ilson & Tooiner Fertili-
4.06 7.56 zcr Co., .J;ic sonville,Fla.

4.00 8.00 Wilson & Toolner Fertili-
4.24 7. 19 zor Co.( Ja(lisonville,Fla.

3t.00 .... Wilson & Toonior Fortili-
3.67 .... r (o., .l;ilcksoiivll ,Fla

.... 49.00 Wil on & T'ooim r Fortill-
.... 50.80 zer Co., Jl:clksonvillo,Fla.









Kainit ...................1155 Guaranteed Analysis. .... ......... .... 12.50 Wilson & Toomer Fertill-
Official Analysis .... ..... .... .... 12.66 zer Co., Jacksonville,Fla.

Nitrate of Soda .......... 1156 Guaranteed Analysis. 3.00 ...... .... 17.00 .... Wilson & Toomer Fertill-
Official Analysis.... .... .... .... .... 17.30 .... zer Co., Jacksonville,Fla.

Kainit ................... 1157Guaranteed Analysis. .... .... ... ..... 12.50 Wilson & Toomer Fertill-
I Official Analysis ...... .... ... .... .... 13.05 zer Co., Jacksonville,Fla.
Mapes Fruit and Vine I
Manure ............. 1158Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 5.00 2.00 .... 2.00 10.00 Mapes Formula & Per. G.
IOfficial Analysis .... 10.12 4.90 2.86 7.76 2.45 12.33 Co., New York, N. Y.
Mapes Orange Tree Man-
ure ................... 11591Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 6.00 2.00 .... 4.00 3.00 Mapes Formula & Per. G.
Official Analysis .... 10.81 9.99 1.18 11.17 4.33 4.11 Co., New York, N. Y.

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 1160Guaranteed Analysis. 7.65 .... 2.40 7.50 1.76 Ga. Cotton Oil Co., Ma-
Official Analysis .... .... .... .... .... 8.26 ... con, Ga.

Kainit ................... 1161Guaranteed Analysis. .... ..... ... .... ....12.00 Jacksonville Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis .... .... .... .... .... ... 13.92 Jacksonville,Fla.

H. G. Acid Phosphate .... 1162 Guaranteed Analysis.12.00 16.00 ............ .... Jacksonville Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis .. .... 15.05 3.20 18.25 .... .... Jacksonville, Fla.

Seminole Fertilizer ...... 1163Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 4.00 3.00 .... 5.0010.00 Jacksonville Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis .... 5.26 7.14 1.41 8.551 3.18 12.64 Jacksonville. Fla.

Mobile Standard Guano.. .1164 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00 2.00 ....2.00 2.00 Virginia-Carolina Chem.
I official Analysis .... 14.65 8.22 1.78 10.00 1.84 2.46 Co.,Montgomery,Ala.
Victor H. G. Meal Fertil-
izer ................... 1165Guaranteed Analysis .16.00 10.00 2.00 ... 2.00 2.00 IBigbee Fertilizer Co..Mont-
I Official Analysis ....|14.971 9.24 .93 10.17 2.28 2.70 I gomery, Ala. 59

















NAME, OR BRAND.





Truck Farmers' Special... 1166

Edisto Extra H. G. Super
Acid Phosphate ....... 1167


11 per cent Acid Phos..... 1168

Goulding's Special Com-
Ipoiind ................. 116


1 per cent Potash Acid... 1170


I11 per cent Acid Phos..... 1171


ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.




a d I C
oE-


[Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 10.00 2.00 .... 4.
|Official Analysis .... 9.2S 10.64 1.21 11.85 3.

ICuaranteed Analysis. 12.00 1.00 2.00
Official Analysis .... .... 15.65 1.90 17.55

Guaranteed Analysis. .......... ..14.00
Official Analysis .... .... 14.56 2.21 16.77

Guaranteed Analysis. 16.00 8.00 2.00 .... 2.1
Official Analysis .... 11.15 9.03 1 .7 10.76 1.'

Guaranteed Analysis. 16.00 8.00 2.00 ....
Official Analysis .... 11. 15 8. 19 1.19 9.38
I 1
i:irant l Analysis. ;.00 14.00 2.00 ...
( liciall Analysis .... ..... 1 .11 2.12 1 .; 2 .


BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




4.00 Virginia.- Carolina Chem.
4.65 j Co., Montgomery, Ala.

.... Virginia Carolilna Chem.
.... Co., Montgomery, Ala.

.... Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
.... Pensacola, Fla.

2.00 Coulding Feri llizer Co.,
1.71 Pensacola, Fla.

4.00 Coulding I'rt ilizer Co.,
4. 52 CP' nsa (fol a, Fla.
.... Goulding Fer ilizer Co.,
I 1'fif cola, ha.









BUREAU OF FEEDSTUFFS.


Analyses of Special Samples Under Sec. 9, Act Approved May 24, 1905. (Samples taken by purchaser.)


CS,0
NAME, OR BRAND.



Larcenaria Tenifolia ........... 66

Kudzu Vine Hay............... 67

"Lillie Bran," Lillie Mills Co.... 68

Extracted Camphor Leaves and
Tw igs ....................... 69


21.85

28.42

9.20


26.50


0



5.69

17.60

14.95


9.44


9i
gO



53.75

34.33

54.72


44.97


By Whom Sent.
4i


3.06 5.65 R. E. Rose, Tallahassee, Fla.

1.58 8.82 C. E. Pleas, Chipley, Fla.

3.13 6.65 G. A. Dreka & Co., DeLand, Fla.


5.35 4.54 Frances Dickinson, Orange City,
Fla.


NOTICE.-The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9 of the laws providing for "Special Samples"
drawn by consumers are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the laws and the "Rules and Regulations governing
the taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feedstuffs and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report.
Also to compare the "official analysis" and the "market value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases the "market value," or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods-that in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guarantee tag on the bag with the table of "average composition of feedstuffs."
In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law and regulations, and send
in a tin box, sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guarantee tags" off the packages, to com-
pare with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.


R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE- DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS, 1908.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Section 1, Act approved May 24, 1905.

oa
NAME, OR BRAND. | MADD RESS OF
SM MANUFACTURERS
Z 0


Victor Feed ................... 487Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 7.50 62.00 3.00..... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
Official Analysis.... 12.40 7.8163.89 2.831 3.301 Ill.

Pure Wheat Bran ............. 488 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.49 16.09 53.58 4.S ..... Acme Mills & Elevator Co,
Official Analysis..... 7.40 16.06 55.22 4.37 5.70 Hopkinsville, Ky.
Puro Wheat Bran ............. 489 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.49 16.09 53.58 4.GS ..... Acme Mills & Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis..... 7.86 15.45 56.08 4.48 5.67 I opkinsville, Ky.
Whleat Bran ................... 490 Gunranteed Analysis. 13.50 14.5050.40 5. ..... Wim. T. KempeEr Elevator
Official Analysis..... 7.4517.5054.15 4.10 5.50 Co., Kansas Cily, Mo.
"Mllle Bran"..................... 14!1 uaranted Analysis. 8.50 15.00 56.50 4.00... Llle Mill Co, ranln,
Official Analysis ..... 7.65115.45155.35 4.43 5.40 Tenn.
"Lilli lran"......... ........... 192 ;uIli tc d Analysis... 8.50 15.00 56.50 4.00 ... Illl Mill Co., Franklin,
O1fliein;i A analysis. 6.60 15.07 57.99 1.25 5.2 Tenn.
C('(1ll ,) d Mc1. l .. ........... 493. 1 C. uiranlet. A.l.is. ... :5.!.. :.0.00 1. 0 F. W \V lride & Co., Mo, -
Ofliclal Analysis .... 13.12:15.2S 129.81 7.101 (5.071 phis, Tenn.








Cotton Seed Meal .............


Forest City Feed Meal .........


Cotton Seed Meal .............


Cotton Seed Meal .............


Cotton Seed Meal ............


Ballard's Bran .................


Pure W heat Bran .............


W hite Middlings ..............


Puro WVheat Middlings ........


Brown Shorts .................


Blir's Shorts ..................
1


494 Guaranteed Analysis.
official Analysis.....

495 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

496 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

497 C uaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

498 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

499 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

500 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

501 guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

502 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

503 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

504 Guaranteed Analysis.
Official Analysis.....


..... 41.12 ... ..... Lathrop Cotton Oil Co.,
7.52'42.80 29.49 G.90 6.12 Hawkinsville, Ga.

.... 23.00 30.00 4.50 ....Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
18.83 24.00 36.56 6.25 4.65 Savannah, Ga.

... 38.52 ..... ..... .. Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
8.52 40.80 27.49 9.90 5.82 Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 38.62 ..... ...... .... Piedmont Oil and Refining
6.75 42.10 25.82 9.321 6.78 Co., Faunsdale, Ala.

..38.62 ..... ... .... Montezuma Mfg. Co., Mon-
8.92 40.10 29.11 8.28 6.15 tezuma, Ga.

8.40 15.25 38.59 4.43 ..... Ballard & Ballard Co., Lou-
8.77116.41 53.35 3.631 6.251 isville, Ky.

9.49114.60157.23 382 ..... Dunlop Milling Co., Clarks-
9.4214.48 55.27 3.281 6.15 ville, Tenn.
I I
.....17.39155.10| 3.26. .... 1Acme Mills & Elevator Co.,
3.40 16.32 62.43 3.92 2.651 Hopkinsvillle, Ky.

..... 15.93 56.09 4.89 .... Dunlop Milling Co., Clarks-
4.60 15.97 60.42 4.751 3.701 ville, Tenn.

6.00 15.0060.83 4.00 .. Atlanta Milling Co., At-
5.87115.85 59.76 4.35 3.621 lanta, Ga.

9.00 14.50 56.00 3.50 ...... Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
5.05 19.13 57.10 4.73 4.25| Kan.










ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


S-C ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR BRAND. MANUFACTURERS
0 m
I00 I II0 ens Mli o E

Pure Wheat Ship Stuff ......... SO li.rantced Analysis. (;00 16.00 56.00 1.00.....ennessee Milling Co., Es-
Of(icial Analysis.... .25 16.50i59.19 5.01 :..S82 till Springs, Tcnn.

Ship Stuff ................... 50;(i rai teed Analysis. 5.80 16.8056.50 5.10 4.4 Swet Springs Milling Co.,
Official Analysis ..... I 5.1519.20 51.81; 5.37 1.12 Sweet Springs, Mo.

Cotton Se Meal ............. 507 guarantee Analysis ..... 25.00 .... ... .... lorida Cotton Oil Co., Tal
oOflicial Analysis..... 18.27 25.01 35.20 7.11 4.89! lahassee, Fla.

Sland Cotton Seed Meal .iart Analysi. .... .....2. ........ .Valdlosta Oil Co., Valdosta,
Of)licial Analysi. 11.97: 7.03 29.33 7.95 5.691 Ca.

licc Ilran ................... 509) (i:uair; eenlcd Analevsis....... ... ....... .... ... M. Cobb.
Oflicial Analysis ..... 8.57111.85 47.68, 11.30J 8.58S

I)ri' l H el Pu'lp ............... 510( ;rantl('Od Analysls. 20.(00 8.50 0.00 0 051...... Cer an-Americal n SugarCo.
)llicial Analysis ..... 19.12 10.5:1 57.25 0.0 1 :;.s5 \W est Itay City, Mich.

(orn Hllorse anld Mule l''ed.... 1 5Illu(:11: 1 1ara (' An:aly is. 12. 1. 00l.0 58.50 ::.50 ..... 'orno Mills Co., East St.
I )lli iil Anal \ is .... 1 .25 1:.10 58.47 2.NSI l.101 Lou s, 111.
I I I I |I ,,.,
('C 'ailo I ilrvl' Ic.Ved ............I M 21 (i :: r;inl .' Id An17 ly sis. 17.!, I :00|50.0 :. o n Mills Co., E;ast Sl.
,()lliviall Aialy is ..... 15.25112.11155.781 ::., 1I 4.07 Louis, 111.










V Protena Alfalfa Feed ..........


Purina Feed .................


Purina Feed .................


Boss Corn and Oat Feed........


Banner Feed .................


Banner Feed ..................


Good Luck Feed ...............


Peck's Mule Feed .............


Peck's Mule Feed ............ .


Victor Feed ...................


I'M olan co" .....................


5131Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 12.30 56.00
jOfivial Analysis..... 9.05 13.16 58.08

514 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.90 14.00 60.00!
Official Analysis..... 8.3014.2559.901

515 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.90 14.00 60.001
Official Analysis..... 8.6513.95f58.631

516 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.00 9.00 62.00
Official Analysis..... 9.75 9.13 62.87

517 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00 62.00
Official Analysis..... 9.2510.30 3.56


Official Analysis..... 9.0510.12 65.35

519 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 10.00 59.20
Official Analysis..... 10.55 14.75 57.001

520 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 10.00 59.20
Official Analysis ..... 14.30111.70 56.21!

521 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90110.00 59.20?
Official Analysis..... 6.00111.50 64.811

522 Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 7.5062.00
Official Analysis..... 9.80 8.95165.57

5231 Ga.ranteed Analysis. 8.00112.23156.801
Official Analysis..... 117.62114.55143.961


4.00 ..... Ralston Purina Co., St.
3.07 4.22 Louis, Mo.

4.50 ... Ralston Purina Co., St.
3.75 3.20 Louis, Mo.

4.50 ..... Ralston Purina Co., St.
3.82 3.90 Louis, Mo.

4.00 .....Great Western Cereal Co.,
4.78 3.77 Chicago, Ill.

3.50 .... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
3.25 2.92 Ill.

:1.50 .... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
2.63 2.80 Ill.

3.80 ..... Good Luck Mills, St. Louis,
3.68 4.65 Mo.

3.80 ..... Illinois Feed Mills, St.
1.50 6.87 Louis, Mo.

3.801. ... Illinois Feed Mills, St.
3.921 3.25 Louis, Mo.

3.00...... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
2.681 3.00 Ill.

3.27 ..... Molasco Co., East St. Louis,
2.361 9.611 Ill.














NAME, OR BRAND.



Fceed Stuff .................... 524


Danco Feed ................... 525


D nnco Feed ................... 526


Cornon TTn Feed ............... 527


lrown Shorts .................. 528


P iiina Feed ................... 529


I'lriia P1 iullry Foe .'d ........... 530


Si 'r, I I ll :lic r I' e lo d ........... 53: 1


ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Contin







guaranteed Analysis. 5.4 (12.00 55.23
official l Analysis ..... 6.02 11.50161.54

-uaranteed Analysis. 3.28 9.52 67.891
Official Analysis ..... 4.77 13.25161.161
1 I 1
) o0 sai






Guaranteed Analysis. 3.216 .005265.89
officiall Analysis..... 6.0511.50 61.54

Guaranteed Analysis. 3.280 9.20067.00
)fflcial Analysis ..... 4.77 1.25161.16
I I I .


nluaranteed Analysis. 3.280 .5200 6.839
officiall Analysis..... 5.215.210 7 65.70
guaranteedd Analysis. 2.',0 11.00 60.00]
)flicial Analysis..... 2.201 11.14 68.5 6

Wloaraneled Analysis. 6.00 11.00 60.83
Official Analysis..... 5.42 15.20 60.98|

(!iniancil Analysis. 7.!90 14 00 60.00:


*;i]; c]leul<'( Auilvsis. 4.00 1 1 .00l65.00
lllciial Aln lysis ... I2.80 11.41 68.09

liarancil nd Anall ysis. 11 1.75 1G.50 48.51
(flicial Analysis ..... 10.0! 17.05 48.67


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS



3.30 ..... Cornelia Mills, Jacksonville,
2.85| 8.07 Fla.

9.42 ..... Dahnke-Walker Milling Co.,
7.78j 2.37 Union City, Tenn.

9.42 ..... Dahnke-Walker Milling Co.,
6.63 2.20 Union City, Tenn.

3.70 ..... Corno Mills Co., East St.
2.63 1.50 Louis, Ill.

4.001..... Atlanta Milling Co., At-
3.9s 3.40 lanta, Ga.

4.50 ..... Ralston 1uirina Co., St.
3.85 3.27 l ouis, Mo.

9:.60 ..... Itiilst on 'uriina Co., St.
3..10 2.0()1 I.oiis, Mo.

:.50 .... Ai ri cin M killing Co.. l'il-
4.5: 7.l(1 ndelphi;, Pa.










Sucrene -Horse, Mule and Ox
F eed .......................


Victor Feed ..................


Pure Wheat Bran .............


Pure Wheat Bran .............


Shorts .......................


Pure Wheat Shorts...........


Durbam Corn and Oat Fed ....


Protrna Alfalfa Feed .........


Cotton Seed Meal .............


Col ton Seed Meal .............


rI. I I I
5 32 Guaranteed Analysis. 13.5010.0052.45 3.00 ..... merican Milling Co., Phil-
Official Analysis..... 10.02 12.45 54.65 3.86 6.46 adelphia, Pa.

S533 Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 7.50 62.00 3.00 ..... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
Official Analysis..... 12.20 8.25 63.03 2.40 3.30 Ill.

. 534 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.49 16.09 53.58 4.68 ....A. cme Mills & Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis..... 6.87 15.27 57.471 3.65 5.62 Hopkinsville, Ky.

S535 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.49 16.0953.58 4.68 ..... Acme Mills & Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis..... 7.32915.7156.62 3.68 5.80 HTopkinsville, Ky.

. 536 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.25115.5061.25 5.251..... Wm. T Kemper Elevator
Official Analysis..... 6.37 20.00 53.19 4.30 5.77! Co., Kansas City, Mo.

S537 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.0016.0048.00 4.00 ... Liberty Mills, Nashville,
Official Analysis..... 5.50 15.92 59.81 3.68 4.27! Tenn.

538 Guaranteed Analysis.10.00 9.00 60.00 4.20 ..... Great Western Cereal Co.,
Official Analysis ..... 9.30 9.21164.92 3.20 3.10| Chicago, Ill.

539 guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 12.30!56.00 4.001..... Ralston Purina Co., St.
Official Analysis ..... 10.17112.29 61.47 4.30 4.42 Louis, Mo.
I I1 1
540Guaranteed Analysis. |.... 25.00 ......... .... Florida Cotton Oil Co, Tal-
Official Analysis .....117.65123.9236.08 6.95 4.85 lahassee, Fla.

541 Guaranteed Analysis.! 7.00143.00124.00 9.00.0000 Marianna Mfg. Co., Mari
I Official Analysis.....I 4.97144.54|25.07 9.951 6.851 anna Fla.
II I .___I I I _


-~1








ANALYSES OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.

o
NAME, OR RAND ADDRESS OF
OR R MANUFACTURERS.
C) U i C i

Cotton Seed Meal .............. 5421Guarateel Analysis 8.62 McCaw Mfg. Co., Macon,
Official Analysis .... 8.35 40.10 28.05] 8.93. 5.70 Ga.
Col tton Seed Meal (imc(dium r
rad ) ....................... 543Gu ranteed Analysis 38.6 .......... ... Peoples Cotton Oil Co.,
Official Analysis..... 10.62i 40.07' 29.92 5.93 6.15 Selma, Ala.
('otton Seed Meal, Prime B1rand.. 544 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 38.50 24.00 8.00 ..... 'J. T. Walker, Broker. Motr-
Official Analysis ..... 12.45 137.82 29.08 6.651 5.90 ) his, Tenn.
I I I
Colon Seed Meal, Prime Brand.. 545 Guaranteed Analvyiis. 10.0013,.;.50 24.00: 8.00 ..... J. T. Walker, Broker, Mem-
Official Analysis ..... 12.00 :18.8:i 29.22 5..S:I 6.02 phis, Tenn.
Colon Seed Meal, Creanio Brand 546 ClranIt Analysis. ..... 2.00 ..... ..Tennessee Fibler Co., Men-
Official Analsis. .... 20.0 2:.9 |3i;.1 5.20I 1.02 phis, Tenn.
(Cottio Seed Meal, Creanio Brand 5171( :iraitneed Analvysi. ..... 122.0(l:0. 00 .... Tennessee Fiber Co., Mem-
|Oflicial Analysis .... 22.05121.(;7 17.89 4 (;2 1.45: phis, Tenn.
('il(iin Seil MeIal, (Crlealo lrand:l] 5.118|(l araIIled Anla 1ialysis.I ........ 'enn ssee Fitber Co.., Men-
I()llici:il Ai:lysi ..... .122 '.( 21 .10: 211 1 .7 1.20' p)hisi Tenn.

Daisy Ilairy Flo .............. 5 irr n;ii le d( ,\nilysi; s 9.00 1 )1 58.001 :.0.oo ... flrenl W western Cereal Co..
IOllicin Ai al.ysis .... 11 10 10 )5150 ;.11; 1.791 7.001 Chicago, 111.











Peerless Feed, Pure Wheat Bran


"Lilly Bran". ..................


Brown Shorts ..................


Pure Wheat Shorts ............


M iddlings ....................


Invincible Feed ..............


Dried Beet Pulp ...............


Peck's Mule Feed .............


Purina. Feed ...................


Ship Stuff ....................


Cotton Seed Meal ..............


550IGuaranteed Analysis ... 14.66 63.58 4.3 ..... Crescent Milling Co., Hop-
iOfficial Analysis..... 7.07 15.88 55.85 5.05 5.35 kinsville, Ky.

551 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.50 15.00 56.50 4.00 .....Lillie Mill Co., Franklin,
Official Analysis..... 7.47 15.40 56.01 5.03 5.32 Tenn.

552 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.00 15.00 60.83! 4.00 ..... Atlanta Milling Co., At-
Official Analysis..... 3.5014.70 63.97 3.83 2.85 lanta, Ga.

553 Guaranteed Analysis. 6.00 16.00 56.00| 4.00 .... Tennessee Mill Co., Estill
Official Analysis..... 3.80 16.58 58.941 5.28 3.501 Springs, Tenn.

554 Guaranteed Analysis. 5.50 16.00 57.00 4.50 .... H. C. Cole Milling Co.,Ches-
Official Analysis..... 3.5217.29 59.86 4.93 3.65 ter, Ill.

555 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 14.64 63.54 4.301..... Climax Milling Co., Hop-
Official Analysis..... 7.07 14.88158.081 4.551 5.251 kinsville, Ky.

556 Guaranteed Analysis. 20.00 8 50160.00 0.05..... Gernmta-American Sugar-Co.
Official Analysis ..... 18.221 9.52 57.89 0.73; 4.021 West Bay City, Mich.
I 1
557 Guaranteed Analysis. 11.90 10.00 59.201 3.801..... Illinois Feed Mills, St.
Official Analysis..... 12.35111.67 55.76i 4.60[ 4.07 Louis, Mo.

558 Guaranteed Analysis. 7.9014.0060.00 4.50! .... Ralston Purina Co., St.
Official Analysis..... 9.85113.16158.51] 4.231 3.701 Louis, Mo.

559 Guaranteed Analysis. 9.50 13.00 58.62 4.00..... Atlanta Milling Co., At-
Official Analysis..... 5.7513.7860.85 4.58 4.02 lanta, Ga.

560 Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 38.62 ..... ..... The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.
Official Analysis..... 8.52 41.03127.701 7.65! 5.90! Macon, Ga.


___ _








ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.



-NAME OF BRAD. ADDRESS OF
NAME OF BRAND. S MANUFACTURERS.



Cotton Seed Meal .............. 561 guaranteed Analysis. .... 38.62 ..... .... Sparta Oil Mill, Sparta, Ga.
Official Analysis..... 8.42 39.80 27.35 10.58 6.05


SPECIAL NOTICE.-The attention of dealers and consumers is called to the table of "Average Composition of
Feedstuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feedstuffs sold
throughout the country. Any material variation from these averages is presumptive evidence of impurity or -I
adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee
of the manufacturer should not vary materially from this table of averages, while the "official analysis" should
show practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers are requested, in all cases of
suspected inferiority or adulteration, to send a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.











FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.
OFFICIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY STATE INSPECTOR.-Under Chapter 5662, Acts of 1907.
RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF VINEGARS.


Name Manufacturer
Cd or or Retail Dealer.
Brand. Wholesaler.



1 Apple Vinegar... S. R. & J. C. MottSolCohn, Pensacola,
N. Y. Fla.

10 Apple Vinegar... H. J. Heinz Co., N.Y P. H. Boyer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

16 Apple Vinegar... Atlantic StatesVine-Armstrong Gro. Co.,I
gar Co, Richmond, Jacksonville, Fla.
Va.

17 Apple Vinegar... H. J. Heinz Co., N.Y. Wilkerson & Spiller,
I Jacksonville, Fla.
25 Distilled Colored R. M. Hughes & Co., W. H. Minton, Pa-
Vinegar ...... Louisville, Ky latka, Fla.


o ad





4.78 3.33}0.401 Precipitate.
Eii







4.96 2.59 0.341 Precipitate.

4.65 2.35 0.30 Precpitate.


4.80 2.430.26 Precipitate.
+ I) 0 Ic I











4.89 0.2 0.04 No preecipi
I tate
I tate
4. 290 04'^No preecip-


The indications
are that this is-


Dark.


Dark.


Dark.



Dark.


Apple Cider Vine-
gar.

Apple Cider Vine-
gar.

Apple Cider Vine-
gar.


Apple Cider Vine-
gar.

Distilled Spirit
Vinegar, all color
due to caramel.


~_ _~__








RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF BAKING POWDERS.


SName Manufacturer
or or Retail Dealer. Class. Remarks.
Brand. Wholesaler.

"0 1__ I .. I__

2!Campbell's Bak- Kenton Baking Pow- Sol Cohn, Pensa- 15.6 Alum Powder. Properly labeled.
ing Powder. der Co., Cincin- cola, Fla.
nati, O.
3 Success Baking Sea Gull Specialty H. Miller Pensacola, 15 Alum Powder. I'operly labeled.
Powder. Co., Baltimore and Fla.
New Orleans.
4 Good Luck Bak- The Southern Mfg. Will L. Moyer, Pen- 11.7 Alum Powder. I'ioperly Inbeled.
ing Powder. Co., Richmond,Va. sacola, Fla.

5 Royal Baking Royal Baking Pow- The Harkesheimer 11.5 Cream of Tartar. Properly labeled.
Powder. der Co., N.Y. Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
61Ruinford's Baklnu IlRinford Chemical The I arkeshelmer 1i1.4 IPhosphate. I)'rpl(rly lablled.
Powder. Wks., Providence,1 Co., Jacksonville,
R. I. F'al.

1 Sodarine. The Sen (Cil1 Spe- Jones & Delro. c,| 1;.5 Alumn. l'ureriv lall)ed.
cially Co., Ilalli- Jacksonlle, Fl:.
inore, Md.








12,Horsford's Self- Rumford Chem. Co., Jones & DeLoach,
Raising Bread Providence, R. I. Jacksonville, Fla.
Preparation.


13 Good Luck Bak- The Southern Mfg. Jones & DeLoach,J
ing Powder. Co., Richmond,Va. Jacksonville, Fla.

15 Donnell's Pure Donnell Mfg. Co., St. Armstrong Gro. Co.,
Phosphate Bak- Louis, Mo. Jacksonville, Fla.
ing Powder.

22 Rough Rider. Southern Mfg. Co., Gay Bros., Palatka,
Richmond, Va. Fla.

23 Sodarlne. The Sea Gull Spe- Gay Bros., Palatka,
cialty Co., Balti-I Fla.
more and N. O.

24 Rumford's Bak Rumford Chemical W. H. Minton, Pa-
ing Powder. Wks., Providence, latka, Fla.
R. I.,

26 Good Luck Bak- The Southern Mfg. I. T. George, Palat-
| ing Powder. Co., Richmond,Va. ka, Fla.

28 Sodarine. The Sea Gull Spe- H. Hill, San-
cialty Co., Balti- ford, Fla.
more and N. O.


The bicarbonate oflMisbranded-D o e s not
so(a and acid are state form of acid salt.
in separate pack-
ages.

16.50 Alum. Properly labeled.


9.3 Phosphate. Properly labeled.


12.9 Alum.


16.1 Alum.



11.S |Phosphate.



15.6 1Alum.


14.03'Alium


Properly labeled.


Properly labeled.



Properly labeled.



Properly labeled.


Properly labeled.
















Name
or
Brand.



' Chariot Brand Roasted
Coffee.


I Our Own Coffee.


) ak e r's Barington
Hall Coffee.

SRuby Brand Coffee.


SGCem of Boston.


I ) -taln-ated.


Mi Mxwell 1House Blend
I 111g0h (rade Coffee.


RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF COFFEES.



Manufacturer
or Retail Dealer. Remarks.
Wholesaler.



Blei ded for the H a r k Harkisheimer Co., Jack- No adulterants found-properly
sheimer Co., Jackson- sonville, Fla. labeled.
ville, Fla.

Packed for P. H. Boyer, P. H. Boyer, Jacksonville, No adulterants found--properly
Jacksonville, Fla. Fla. labeled.

Baker & Co., New York. P. H. Boyer, Jacksonville, No adulterants found--properly
Fla. labeled.

Edward D. Depew & Co.,Jones & DeLoach, Jack- No adulterants found properly
New York. sonville, Fla. labeled.

Clark, Cogglns & Johnson G(oo. J. Jeffries, Jackson- No adulterants found -properly
Co., Boston, Mass. ville, Fla. labeled.

C(ark, Coggins & Johnson Coo. .. Jeffries, Jackson- C(inlms are fra.ldiulet- t-contains
Co., Boston, Mass. ville, Fla. Tannin.

Cli hk Neal Coffee Co., W. Dorsey & Co., Jack-No adiilleranls found properly
Nashville, Tenn. soville, Fla. I labeled.








21 Luzianne Coffee and
Chicory.

27 Lnzianne Coffee and
Chicory.

29 Blended Coffee.


Riley-Taylor, New 0 r- J. V. Fairhead, Jackson-No Chickory found.
leans, La. ville, Fla.

Riley-Taylor, New Or -Chas. H. Evans, Sanford, No Chickory found.
leans, La. Fla.

Howard W. Spurr, Boston, Sanford Grocery Co., San- No adulterants found properly
Mass. ford, Fla. labeled.


___ ~__ _














R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


SPECIAL FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.
Samples Sent in y Citizens. B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.


Ci

Name
d Ior
Brand.



130 Cider.


131 "Janni."


135 Beer.

126 Ga. Home Beer.


:1;7 IlVer.




1I 1agh'Ir ITrow.

Ill Mall I';xlrnet.


Manufacturer.


Retail Dealer.


....................... 1B. H Groves.


Savannah Brewing Co.,
Savannah, Ga.






Afri -Kola Co.. All;inla, Gia.

. . . .


0o d
o >



9.65


4.2


4.1






2.7


0 (00

,1. f10


By Whom Sent.


W. M. Lagnston. Sheriff,
Tallahassee, Fla.

James Holland, Sopchoppy,
Fla.

.T. F. Griffin, Quincy, Fla.

.T. F. Griflin, Quincy, Fla.


.1. P. r'Taylor', (h'einvlle, Fla.

Mr. MNI'<'Iu., TaIlll a has8'e,


A. M llorii, (uiii y, l la.

.1. (o i'nl I P':' ce,''. Allim) i,
l''la.








142 Beer.


143 Larcenaria.

144 Schlitz Fizz.


145 White Top.


146 White Top.
I _


Jos. Schlitz Brewwing Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis.

Capital Brewing and Ice
Co., Montgomery, Ala.

Capital Brewing and Ice
Co., Montgomery, Ala.


4.10


3.40

2.00


2.00


3.40


A. L. Barineau, Tallahassee.
Fla.

R. E. Rose, Tallahassee. Fla.

W. S. Preston, Bartow, Fla.


C. L. Wilson, Marianna, Fla.


J. T. Johnson, Tallahassee,
Fla.


I ---~


. . . . .. . .

. .. . . . .


.. .. . . .












SPECIAL MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.


IDENTIFIED AS


Mustard-Ash 6.49 per cent; no adulterants.......................

Cider-Alcohol 7.15 per cent, Extract 10.1 per cent, Ash 0.14 per
cent; contains added water and sugar. .........................

Paris Green-Arsenous Oxide 54.80 per cent, Copper Oxide 30.93
per cent.................................................

Paris Green-Arsenous Oxide 56.15 per cent, Copper Oxide, 30.46
per cent ......................................................

Tree Fluid-Paris Green and Caustic Soda dissolved in water, Caus-
tic Soda 50 per cent, Arsenous Oxide 1.34 per cent, with residue
of Copper Oxide in bottle ..................... .............

Ground Corn which contains 32.5 per cent Salt..................


FROM


R. B. Bell, Tallahassee, Fla.


Moses Ktite, Tallahassee, Fla.


H. L. Bethel, Tallahassee, Fla.


H. L. Bethel, Tallahassee, Fla.



.1. W. Hollinson, Lakeland, Fla.

\Villlim lHow(,(ll, Pinetta, Fla.


Labora-
tory
Number













MISCELLANEOUS.




The following paper. "Fertilizer and its Value, by a
Beginner," read by Mrs. Nettie M. G. Prange, at the meet-
ing of the Florida Horticultural Society, at Gainesville,
May 12th to 15th, 1908, so clearly expresses what the
ordinary purchaser of fertilizers should know on the sub-
ject; how to obtain the information; the proper interpre-
tation of the "Guarantee tag," what it "says" and what
it means to the buyer; the clear statements of how to
calculate "State values." together with suggestions as
to lines of study best adapted to the user of fertilizers, in
order to get and pay for what he needs, and not to buy
and pay for what he doesn't require, what the "special
sample" is for, and how to draw it; justifies its printing
in the "Fertilizer Bulletin."
I hope this paper will be carefully read and its sugges-
tions followed; particularly the suggestion to write for
bulletins published by the U. S. Agricultural Department,
at Washington, D. C., and the State Agricultural Expert-
ment Station at Gainesville. These bulletins answer many
questions, not only as to fertilizers, but also upon many
other subjects-Cotton Growing; Feeding and Dairy
Work; Poultry, Gardening, Draining, Floriculture, Fruit
Growing, Household Economies, Diseases of Livestock,
Insects, Fungus Diseases, Insecticides, Fungicides, and
hundreds of other subjects.
The Farmers' Bulletin. published by the U. S. Agricul-
tural Department at Washington, now numbering some
325 distinct bulletins, on different subjects of interest to
the farmer, can be had for the asking. A list of the differ-
ent bulletins is published with each Farmers' Bulletin,
any of which can be had free of cost by requesting them
of the Secretary of Agriculture, at Washington, D. C.
R. E. ROSE. State Chemist.










FERTILIZER AND ITS VALUE-"BY A BEGINNER."

MRS. NETTIE M. G. RANGE.

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:
I am assured it is the wish of the Society to have a plain
talk on fertilizer and its value, by a beginner, to those
even newer to the work, so I will make no excuses, but
gladly relate my humble experience.
When I decided to make a grove, I wrote to several
prominent orange growers to ascertain which was. in their
opinion, the best nursery in the State. In the spring I
engaged the best trees in that nursery, to be delivered the
next fall. My land lay beside a flourishing grove. so I
thought, after securing my trees properly. I had settled
all vexing questions, for, of course, all good groves were
made with "Smith's" fertilizer.
A valued correspondent wrote: -'Though 'Smith's' fer-
tilizer is good, he asks more per unit of plant food lhan
'Brown' does." About all I understood of this sentence
was that there might be a chance to save some monev;
and you know that idea appeals to any of us. But. xwas
"Brown's" fertilizer as good? I felt the need of being
able to judge for myself. My first step was to take 1ries
from a list of agricultural chemicals, and get cost of ,.,n-
tents in the two formulae under discussion. I struck all
the averages, finding price per pound of each ingrelicnt.
and worked it all out in regular schoolma'am fashion.
The figures showed my correspondent to be right. but
for further information I submitted the work to a persnUi
experienced in that line. I do not begrudge his qui-t
smile, for he wrote me the kindest of letters, telling me
the easy way to reckon fertilizer values, and many other
things of interest and importance. Neither do I begrudge
the work I did. Try it yourselves and you will see it is
just what one needs to make him realize that fertilizer is
not-- js.t fertilizer!
When one sees it is a combination of plant foods. mixed
in stated proportions; that three of these nutrients, am-
monia. phosphoric acid and potash. have a market value.
and onl!/ these three; and that the name of Smith. Brown
or .Jnnes has nothing to do with it beyond his r li:ibility
as to (work and materials, and that. as we shall s-e. later
on. we do not have to trust him very far even in this : one
next wonders which of the numerous f',oriulP1 resented











is best suited to his purpose. This calls for a knowledge
of the different plant foods.
There are many good books on this subject for sale, but
I will speak only of those to be had for the asking, though
I am to append a list of the others I have found useful.
Peruse carefully the pamphlets from all the fertilizer
firms. There is something to be learned in every one. To
be sure, one must always bear in mind the firms issue
these books to sell their goods, and while all presented
may be facts, yet each emphasizes that fact which is to its
own interest; also remember no law controls these state-
ments, and if a company wants to misrepresent its goods
in the pamphlets, it can do so. It is the tag on the fertil-
izer that has to tell the truth.
Write to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D.
C., for a list of Farmers' Bulletins, and ask to have your
name put on the monthly mailing list. Also to the Experi-
ment Station, Gainesville, Fla., for a list of the publica-
tions issued from there, and to the Commissioner of Agri-
culture, Tallahassee, Fla., for the Quarterly Bulletins sent
out from that office. I secured a copy of every available
bulletin, circular and press notice pertaining to this sub-
ject and have learned from each one.
From our State Bulletins, Nos. 22 and 43, both by A..
A. Persons, we gain a very good knowledge of plant food,
its sources and effect on different soils. But their were
written years ago and the proportions given were based
on chemical analyses of the soil and the crop desired; so
it was a pleasure to find in U. S. Farmers' Bulletin No.
238, by our Prof. Rolfs. statements of the effect the differ-
ent foods have on trees and fruit, and other necessary
knowledge. In fact, it is a description of the citrus indus-
try in a nut shell. While in Farmers' Institute Bulletin
No. 2, which will be sent from our Experiment Station on
receipt of postage, I marked on page 23, in the interesting
address by Chemist Rose. his statement of the need of
"Nitrogen to produce foliage, succulent leaves,
and immature wood.
"Phosphoric Acid to produce mature wood in
fruit trees.
"Potash to assist in formation of starch and sugar .'
Later I learned further that while nitrogen is most
essential, it has to be used with the greatest of care, for
too luxuriant -a growth means weakened tissues, and
6-Bul










weakened tissues are prey oo insects and diseases. organic
nitrogen being especially likely to produce bad ettects on
the citrus family.
Too much phos)phoric acid may bring about abnormal con-
ditions, such as profuse bloom, or an over-supply of seeds.
and thus be detrimental to the general health of the trees;
while too much potash may retard growth somewhat by
hardening the fibers too soon; but the worst effect of an
excess of either phosphoric acid or potash is on the pocket-
book. When we pay for more than we need we are out
just so much money.
The discourses by Brother Painter in Farmers' Insti-
tute Bulletin No. 1, and hv Brother Wilson in our Annual
Report. 1906. are instructive, especially the latter. Study
carefully U. S. Farmers' Bulletin No. 44. by Dr. Voorhees.
It is a thorough discussion of commercial fertilizers. I
could name many more free helps, but time is passing.
Without cost one c(an lay a good foundation upon which
to build the real knowledge which comes only by crpe-
rience.
When needing help on any point, write to our advanced
brothers. They show unfailing patience and kindness in
helping the weaker ones. Up to the point I have taken
the study of plant foods in this talk, all authorities are
practically agreed. Beyond, there is a great diversity of
opinions of those seemingly equally well posted, as to
proper formulee and methods of cultivation. It seems
to me that this is caused by different situations, and that
we must each adapt the general principles to his own
need.
But we all have to pay for our fertilizer. Now we
How are we to know we get ?what wce order, and ihic-h
formula gives us best value for our n,..,., .' .'
The State protects us in this if we avail ourselves of
the privileges given. Our worthy Commissioner of Agri-
culture at Tallahassee will send you copies of the fertilizer
law and bulletins containing just what we are Iooking for.
The law allows us to have the fertilizer analyzed free of
cost. so we need never be in doubt of what is sent us: but
read instructions carefully and send samples for analysis
just as they direct. Florida is the only State in the Union
that gives this chance for free analysis. The out-of-Star;e
fertilizer companies have striven hard to have the Legisla-
lure strike out this clause. We. as horticulturists. ouliht











to see that the law remains as it is. The inspection costs
us an exceedingly small amount. I say "costs us," for
since the fertilizer companies add the inspection fees to
their expense accounts, we, who use the fertilizer, pay the
bills, so why should a company object unless it wants to
hide the true content of its product? The honest manu-
facturer is protected as well as the consumer.
If the statements on the tag are proven untrue there
is trouble ahead. Studyl the tag and believe exactly what
it says. Don't think 'animal matter" on the tag has to
mean what is described in the pamphlet. It means "ani-
mal matter" and probably the cheapest animal matter
ohtninable cr the description would be more explicit.
,, I,1,, the tag for all these points and doubt any obscurity,
for trade does not "hide its light under a bushel."
Well, if the materials are all right, let us see about the
formula. It reads:

"Moisture, 8 to 10 per cent."
"Ah ha!" says our neighbor, "Jones' fertilizer has only
5 to 8 per cent moisure. You must like to buy water!"
We tell him with a superior air that one pays only for
actual plant food when he buys fertilizer-and never 'let
on" that a few weeks ago we made the very same mistake
ourselves. Next comes:
"Ammonia, 4 to 5 per cent,"

and we remember that ammonia is sort of an inflated
nitrogen. Sounds like they give us more for our money,
when they call it "Ammonia."

"Available Phosphoric Acid, 6 to 7 per cent."
That's the phosphoric acid we get.
"Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1 to 2 per cent."

That's the phosphoric acid, we don't know sure whether
we get or not.
"Potash, Actual K20, 5 to 6 per cent."

H'm! this has it all in "Potash, Actual K20." Another
calls it "Potash Actual," and another "Potash K20;" but
we have found out it's all the same.
Those scientific fellows would have a good laugh could











they look into our minds and read our "translation" of the
formula; but so long as we understand the meaning, our
crude expression doesn't matter.
Now, let us see what this ton of fertilizer is worth.
We have learned to use the smallest per cent given-- to
5 per cent doesn't guarantee a bit better content than a
plain 4 per cent, so our formula is:

Ammonia ..................... 4 per cent
Available Phosphoric Acid ..... 6 per cent
Insoluble ......................1 per cent
Potash ....................... 5 per (-ent

Perhaps we "hate to figure." but any of us can turn to
the State Chemist's work and read: "A unit is 20 lbs..
or 1 per cent in a ton," and find prices he gives per unit.

Ammonia ................... $3.30 per unit
Available Phosphoric Acid... 1.00 per unit
Insoluble ................... .20 per unit
Potash ...................... 1.10 per unit

Therefore:

4 units of Ammonia are worth ............ $13.20
6 units Available Phosphoric Acid ........ 6.00
1 unit Insoluble ....................... .20
5 units Potash ......................... 5.50

The least plant food that can be in this ton of fertilizer.
legally, is worth at seaboard Jacksonville. 824.90: and we
take this value in comparing with other formuhe. But
when comparing with the catalogue price, we must remem-
ber the analysis runs above the lowest figure. really, and
every ounce of plant food has cost the manufacturer and
is worth money to us. Then, there are thp handling. ctor-
age, mixing and bagging, the inspection fees, the general
ups and downs in trade, and so forth. Don't for a min-
ute think the manufacturer can sell the fertilizer at this
price, still he must not ask too much, for now we know
when he claims too big a profit-and save many a dollar
by that knowledge.
But the financial saving is the lesser gain from our
study, after all; for as one learns he looks more and more









85

to the hows and whys, and his whole life is broadened by
the study of Nature's wondrous ways.

LIST OF BOOKS.

Voorhees' "Fertilizers," MacMillan Co., New York.
Snyder's "Soils and Fertilzers," Chemical Pub. Co.,
Easton, Pa.
Hume's "Citrus Fruits and Their Culture," Prof. H. H.
Hume, H. & W. B. Drew Co., Jacksonville.
Clarke & Dennis' "Elementary Chemistry," American
Book Co., Atlanta, Ga.
While's "Outline of Chemical Theory," American Book
Co., Atlanta, Ga.
Gray's "How Plants Grow," American Book Co., At-
lanta, Ga.
Gray's "Lessons in Botany," American Book Co., At-
lanta, Ga.
Bailey's "Principles of Agriculture," MacMillan Co.,
New York.











UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE, WASHINGTON. D. C.

FARMERS' BULLETINS.

The following is a list of the Farmers' Bulletins avail-
able for distribution, showing the number, title, and size
in pages of each. Copies will be sent free to any address
in the United States on application to the Secretary of
Agriculture, Washington, 1). C. Numbers omitted have
been discontinued, being superseded by later bulletins.
22. The Feeding of Farm Animals. Pp. 40.
24. Hog Cholera and Swine Plague. Pp. 16.
25. Peanuts: Culture and Uses. Pp. 24.
27. Flax Seed and Fiber. Pp. 16.
28. Weeds and How To Kill Them. Pp. 30.
29. Souring and Other Changes in Milk. Pp. 22.
30. Grape Diseases on the Pacific Coast. i'l. 15.
32. Silos and Silage. Pp. 30.
33. Peach Growing for Market. Pp. 24.
34. Meats: Composition and Cooking. Pp. :1.
35. Potato Culture. Pp. 24.
36. Cotton Seed and Its Products. Pp. 10.
39. Onion Culture. Pp. 30.
41. Fowls: Care and Feeding. Pp. 24.
42. Facts about Milk. Pp. 32.
44. Commercial Fertilizers. Pp. 38.
46. Irrigation in Humid (limates. FpI. 27.
47. Insects Affecting the ('oton Plant. Pp. 32.
48. The Manuring of Cotton. Pp. 16.
49. Sheep Feeding. Pp. 24.
51. Standard Varietties of Chickens. Pp. 48.
52. The Sugar Beet. Pp. 48.
54. Some Common Birds. Pp. 48.
55. The Dairy Herd. Pp. 30.
56. Experiment Station Work.-I. 1P'. 0.
58. The Soy Bean as a Forage Crop. 'p. 24.
59. Bee Keeping. Pp. 48.
60. Methods of Curing Tobacco. Pj. 24.
61. Asparagus Culture. Pp. 40.
62. Marketing Farm Produce. Pp. 31.
63. Care of Milk on the Farm. Pp. 40.
64. Ducks and Geese. Pp. 55.
65. Experiment Station Work-II. Pp. 32.
66. Meadows and Pastures. Pp. 30.











68. The Black Rot of the Cabbage. Pp. 22.
69. Experiment Station Work-III. Pp. 32.
70. Insect Enemies of the Grape. Pp. 23.
71. Essentials in Beef Production. Pp. 24.
72. Cattle Ranges of the Southwest. Pp. 32.
73. Experiment Station Work-IV. Pp. 32.
74. Milk as Food. Pp. 39.
77. The Liming of Soils. Pp. 24.
78. Experiment Station Work-V. Pp. 32.
79. Experiment Station Work-VI. Pp. 27.
80. The Peach Twig-borer. Pp. 16.
81. Corn Culture in the South. Pp. 24.
82. The Culture of Tobacco. Pp. 22.
83. Tobacco Soils. Pp. 23.
84. Experiment Station Work-VII. Pp. 32.
85. Fish as Food. Pp. 32.
86. Thirty Poisonous Plants. Pp. 32.
87. Experiment Station Work-VIII. Pp. 32.
88. Alkali Lands. Pp. 23.
91. Potato Diseases and Treatment. Pp. 15.
92. Experiment Station Work-IX. Pp. 30.
93. Sugar as Food. Pp. 31.
95. Good Roads for Farmers. Pp. 46.
96. Raising Sheep for Mutton. Pp. 48.
97. Experiment Station Work-X. Pp. 32.
98. Suggestions to Southern Farmers. Pp. 48.
99. Insect Enemies of Shade Trees. Pp. 30.
100. Hog Raising in the South. Pp. 40.
101. Millets. Pp. 30.
102. Southern Forage Plants. Pp. 48.
103. Experiment Station Wor-XI. Pp. 30.
104. Notes on Frost. Pp. 24.
105. Experiment Station Work-XII. Pp. 32.
106. Breeds of Dairy Cattle. Pp. 48.
107. Experiment Station Work-XIII. Pp. 32.
108. Saltbushes. Pp. 20.
109. Farmers' Reading Courses. Pp. 20.
110. Rice Culture in the United States. Pp. 28.
111. Farmers' Interest in Good Seed. Pp. 24.
112. Bread and Brkead Making. Pp. 40.
113. The Apple and How to Grow It. Pp. 32.
114. Experiment Station.Work-XV. Pp. 28.
115. Hop Culture in California. Pp. 28.
116. Irrigation in Fruit Growing. Pp. 48.
118. Grape Growing in the South. Pp. 32.











119. Experiment Station Work-XV. Pp. 30.
120. Insects Affecting Tobacco. Pp. 32.
121. Beans, Peas, and other Legumes as Food. Pp. 38.
122. Experiment Station Work-XVI. Pp. 32.
124. Experiment Station Work-XVII. Pp. 32.
125. Protection of Food Products from Injurious Tem-
peratures. Pp. 24.
126. Practical Suggestions for Farm Buildings. Pp. 4S.
127. Important Insecticides. Pp. 46.
128. Eggs and Their Uses as Food. Pp. 40.
129. Sweet Potatoes. Pp. 40.
131. Household Tests for Detection of Oleomargarine and
Renovated Butter. Pp. 10.
132. Insect Enemies of Growing Wheat. Pp. 38.
133. Experiment Station Work-XVIII. Pp. 32.
134. Tree Planting in Rural School Grounds. Pp. 32.
135. Sorghum Sirup Manufacture. Pp. 40.
136. Earth Roads. Pp. 21.
137. The Angora Goat. Pp. 48.
138. Irrigation in Field and Garden. Pp. 40.
139. Emmer: A Grain for the Semiarid Regions. Pp. 16.
140. Pineapple Growing. Pp. 48.
141. Poultry Raising on the Farm. Pp. 16.
142. Principles of Nutrittion and Nutritive Value of Food.
Pp. 48.
143. Conformation of Beef and Dairy Cattle. Pp. 44.
144. Experiment Station Work--IX. Pp. 32.
145. Cabon Bisulphid as an Insecticide. Pp. 28.
146. Insecticides and Fungicides. Pp. 16.
147. Winter Forage Crops for the South. Pp. 40.
149. Experiment Station Work-XX. Pp. 32.
150. Clearing New Land. Pp. 24.
151. Dairying in the South. Pp. 48.
1522 Scabies in Cattle. Pp. 32.
153. Orchard Enemies in the Pacific Northwest. Pp. 39.
154. The Home Fruit Garden: Preparation and Care.
Pp. 16.
155. How Insects Affect Health in Rural Districts. Pp. 19.
156. The Home Vineyard. Pp. 22.
157. The Propagation of Plants. Pp. 24.
158. How to Build Small Irrigation Ditches. Pp. 28.
159. Scab in Sheep. Pp. 48.
161. Practical Suggestions for Fruit Growers. Pp. 30.
162. Experiment Station Work-XXI. Pp. 32.
164. Rape as a Forage Crop. Pp. 16.











165. Silkworm Culture. Pp. 32.
166. Cheese Making on the Farm. Pp. 16.
167. Cassava. Pp. 32.
168. Pearl Millet. Pp. 16.
169. Experiment Station Work.-XXII. Pp. 32.
170. Principles of Horse Feeding. Pp. 44.
172. Scale Insects and Mites on Citrus Trees. Pp. 43.
173. Primer of Forestry. Pp. 48.
174. Broom Corn. Pp. 30.
175. Home Manufacture and Use of Unfermented Grape
Juice. Pp. 16.
176. Cranberry Culture. Pp. 20.
177. Squab Raising. Pp. 32.
178. Insects Injurious in Cranberry Culture. Pp. 32.
179. Horseshoeing. Pp. 30.
181. Pruning. Pp. 39.
182. Poultry as Food. Pp. 40.
183. Meat on the Farm: Butchering, and Keeping. Pp. 37.
184. Marketing Live Stock. Pp. 40.
185. Beautifying the Home Grounds. Pp. 24.
186. Experiment Station Work-XXIII. Pp. 32.
187. Drainage of Farm Lands. Pp. 38.
188. Weeds used in Medicine. Pp. 45.
190. Experiment Station Work-XXIV. Pp. 32.
192. Barnyard Manure. Pp. 32.
193. Experiment Station Work-XXV. Pp. 32.
194. Alfanfa Seed. Pp. 14.
195. Annual Flowering Plants. Pp. 48.
196. Usefulness of the American Toad. Pp. 16.
197. Importation of Game Birds and Eggs for Propaga-
tion. Pp. 30.
198. Strawberries. Pp. 24.
199. Corn Growing. Pp. 32.
200. Turkeys. Pp. 32.
201. Cream Separator on Western Farms. Pp. 23.
202. Experiment Station Work-XXVI. Pp. 32.
203. Canned Fruits, Preserves, and Jellies. Pp. 32.
204. The Cultivation of Mushrooms. Pp. 24.
205. Pig Management. Pp. 40.
206. Milk Fever and Its Treatment. Pp. 16.
208. Varieties of Fruits Recommended for Planting.
Pp. 48.
209. Controlling the Boll Weevil in Cotton Seed and at
Ginneries. Pp. 32.
210. Experiment Station Work-XXVII. Pp. 32.











211. The Use of Paris Green in 'ontrolling the Cotton
Boll Weevil. Pp. 23.
213. Raspberries. Pp. 38.
215. Afallfa Growing. Pp. 40.
216. The Control of the Boll Weevil. Pp. 22.
217. Essential Steps in Securing an Early ('roi, : '' Ct-
ton. Pp. 16.
218. The School Garden. Pp. 40.
219. Lessons from the Grain Rust Epidemic uf lI04.
Pp. 24.
220. Tomatoes. Pp. 32.
221. Fungous Diseases of the Cranberry. Pp. 1i.
222. Experiment Station Work-XXVIII. Pp. 32.
223. Miscellaneous Cotton Insects in Texas. I'l. 24.
224. Canadian Field Peas. Pp. 16.
225. Experiment Station Work-XXIX. Pp. 32.
226. Relation of Coyotes to Stock Raising in hie West.
Pp. 24.
227. Experiment Station Work-XXX. Pp. 32.
228. Forest Planting and Farm Management. 'Pp. 22.
229. The Production of Good Seed 'orn. Pp. 24.
231. Spraying for Cucumber and Melon Diseases. 1',. 24.
232. Okra: Its Culture and Uses. Pp. 16.
233. Experiment Station Work-XXI. Pp. 32.
234. The Giunea Fowl. Pp. 24.
235. Preparation of Cement Concrete. Pp. 32.
236. Incubation and Incubators. Pp. 32.
237. Experiment Station Work-XXXII. Pp. 32.
238. Citrus Fruit Growing in the Gulf States. Pp. 4S.
239. The Corrosion of Fence WTire. Pp. 32.
240. Inoculation of Legumes. Pp. 8.
241. Butter Making on the Farm. Pp. 32.
242. An Example of Model Farming. Pp. 16.
243. Fungicides and Their Use in Preventing Diseases of
Fruits. Pp. 32.
244. Experiment Station Work-XXXIII. Pp. 32.
245. Renovation of Worn-out Soils. Pp. 16.
246. Saccharine Sorghums for Forage. Pp. 37.
247. The Control of the Codling Moth and Apple Snb.
Pp. 21.
248. The Lawn. Pp. 20.
249. Cereal Breakfast Foods. Pp. 36.
250. The Prevention of Wheat Smut and Loose Smut of
Oats. Pp. 16.
251. Experiment Station Work-XXXIV. Pp. 32.








91

252. Maple Sugar and Sirup. Pp. 36.
253. The Germination of Seed Corn. Pp. 16.
254. Cucumbers. Py. 30.
255. The Home Vegetable Garden. Pp. 47.
256. Preparatio nof Vegetables for the Table. Pp. 48.
257. Soil Fertility. Pp. 39.
258. Texas or Tick Fever and Its Preventtion. Pp. 45.
259. Experiment Sation Work-XXXV. Pp. 32.
260. Sed of Red Clover and Its Impurities. Pp. 24.




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