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 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Weather report
 Fertilizers and feeding stuffs
 Agricultural, horticultural and...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00007
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents by division
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Report of condition and prospective yield
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
    Weather report
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Climatological data for February 1908
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
    Fertilizers and feeding stuffs
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports, January 1908
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Composition of fertilizer materials
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Average composition of commercial feedstuffs
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Bureau of fertilizers
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
        Bureau of feedstuffs
            Page 56
        Analysis of feedstuffs
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Corn culture and fertilizing in Florida
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
    Agricultural, horticultural and general farm statistics, 1906
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
Full Text
Z i A RY FLRIDA AGRICU [ L TiZA A GCUT
EX PPE-RI MIENT STATION NO"


VOLUME 18


NUMBER


FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT



APRIL 1, 1908


B. E. McLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part 1-Crops Part 2-Weather Report
Part 3-Fertilizers and Feed Stuff
Part 4--Agricultural Statistics.


Entered January 31,1903, at Tallhahassee, Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

CAPITAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
State Printer.
Tallahassee, Florida.









COUNTY MAP OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,


















PART I.
CROPS















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-ll.



Southern Division.
Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns--9.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia--9.
















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

B. E. McLIN, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.



CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS
BY DIVISIONS.

NORTIIERN DivisIoN.-Planting began in this section
about ten to fifteen days earlier than with most crops.
except, perhaps, cotton, which varies usually very little
in planting dates. The weather has been generally favor-
able for farm work, though in some localities of this sec-
tion there has been a lack of rainfall. The acreage in
cotton shows about the same at this time as for 1907; the
acreage at present for this Divission is 87 per cent of a
full acreage, which includes both upland and Sea Island
cotton. There has been a considerable increase in acreage
planted to corn, but the greatest increase is shown in
tobacco, which is for the Division 160 per cent over 1907;
the figures for the several counties appear in the table;
for this crop the seasons have been quite favorable, the
timely rain enabling the planters to transplant earlier
than usual.
Other standard crops show about the same acreage as
for 1907. There is also a disposition among farmers to
adopt a more intensive system of farming than formerly,
and there has been a very considerable increase in the use
of both home and commercial manures. The condition of
the minor crops, which include vegetable and garden
products and fruit generally, is at present in this section
of the State very good, somewhat above the average con-
dition at this season of the year, when the weather is
generally dry.

WESTERN DIVISION.-As mentioned in the Northern Di-
vision, planting has also been earlier than in previous
years, corn to a greater extent than in the Northern Di:
vision; the seasons have been more propitious, and there
has been a general increase in all of the standard crops;
the stands of crops are unusually good and in the major-
ity of localities throughout the section the prospect is the
best for this time or date for several years; there is a












slight decrease in cotton acreage compared with last year
at this time, but it may be increased in the use of fertil-
izing materials, which also helps to account for a good
deal of the improved condition. The minor crops. vegeta-
bles, fruits, etc., are in good condition, and particularly
the fruit, which is said to show the best prospect for many
years. The lack of labor is the great drawback to prog-
ress in farming operations, there being barely enough to
enable farmers to keep up; and this is the true reason
why the acreage of crops are not increased more than they
are, they could not be cultivated if they were planted.

NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this district there is a very
general increase in the acreage of all products, except
Sea Island cotton, which at the present time shows a
slight falling off. In some localities the weather has been
too dry to continue planting, and consequently there is
at this date at least, a decrease in acreage. The general
average condition of crops growing in this district is good.
Vegetable and fruit crops are in fair shape, and the proba-
bilities are they will yield fairly well.

CENTRAL DIVISION.-A majority of the counties going to
make up this district have suffered for many months from
a prolonged and disastrous drought; in some localities
crops are in fairly good shape. while in others they are
failures. The average acreage planted in the usual field
and vegetable crops is about the same as last year: in
some parts of the district there is an increase in some or
all of the crops, and in other parts it is just the reverse.
In some sections of this district tobacco and peach grow-
ing are fast assuming important proportions, and in
some parts celery growing has reached a wonderful degree
of commercial importance, and has far surpassed the
expectations of the most sanguine growers.

SOUTHERN DIVISION.-In this Division the average acre-
age planted in crops is about the same as in 190)7: but for
the prolonged drought which is in numerous localities
quite as severe as last year, there would have been an
increase in the acreage of many crops.
The condition of the crops that are growing is in some
counties very good, while in some others they are a com-
plete failure; in some localities they are in medium to fair
condition. It is noticeable that near the coast line and










9

water courses the fruits and vegetables have done better
than where isolated, and the fruit has stood the drought
better than the vegetables; this is particularly true of the
coast sections, with one or two exceptions.
The general opinion of our correspondents seems to be
that the fruit crops will about hold their own, unless the
rains cease altogether, and that the vegetable crops, taken
as a whole, are sixty to seventy per cent short of an aver-
age crop.














REPORT Of CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD
Of CROPS, FRUITS and fRUIT TREES for Quarter Ending MARCH 31, 1908, as Compared With an
Average During Same Period of 1907.

COUNTIES. UPLAND SEA ISLAND rORN.
COTTON. C OTTON.

Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage
Franklin ........ .. ............................ 1111
Gadsden ......... 50 .......... ...I..
Hamilton ......... ............... 75 I'
Jefferson ......... 100 9" 1'
Lafayette ......... .............. 11'.
L eon ............ 100 ............. 110
Madison ......... 100 91 100
Suwannee ........ .............. SO '
Taylor ........... .............. 1. 00 11'
Div. Av. per cent. 88 S7 1,3
Western Division.
Calhoun .......... 80 75 100
Escam bia ........ 75 .............. 125
Jackson ......... 901 80S 90
Santa Rosa ....... 105 .............. 110
W alton .......... 90 .............. 1':,)
Washington ...... 80 70 100
Div. Av. per cent. 87 75 105
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .......... .............. 11.1 11
Baker ............ .............. 1(' 100
Bradford ......... .............. 110
Columbia ......... ... ..... 75 75
N assau ........... .............. ............. 10
St. Johns ......... .............. ........... 10
Div. Av. per cent.. .............. 94 100
Central Division.
Hernando ........ ............. .............. .1,0I
Lake .................. ............... 75
Levy ............. .............. 1 .00
M arion ........... .............. 10 90.
O range ........... ........ ............ .. 100
Pasco ............ ............ ...... ... ... 1l.
Div. Av. per cent. ............... 94
Southern Division.
B revard .......... ............... ..............
D ade ............. ........... ... .
Hillsborough ..... .............. ... ....................
L ee .............. .............. .............. 1"
Manatee .................. ............... i. ."
O sceola ........... .............. ............... 1I 0
St. Lucie ............................... ... .. ..... .......
Div Av. per cent. .................. ........... 1.
Gen. State Av. p. c. 88 S4 1":














Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES OATS. SUGAR PEANUTS. TOBACCO.
CANE. !


Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage.
Franklin ........... 100" 1- 1 0...................
Gadsden ........... 50 100 .......... 100
Ham ilton ........... 501 75j 75 ..........
Jefferson ...100. 110 100 200
Lafayette .......... 1001 1001 100 ..........
Leon ............... 11001 100j 100 240
Madison .......... 105 1001 100 500
Suwannee ......... 60 80 100 ......
Taylor ............ .......... 110 100 ..........
Div. Av. per. cent... 1 831 981 961 260
Western Division.
Calhoun ........... 100 100 100 .........
Escambia .......... 100 100 150 125
Jackson ............ 50 100 90 ....
Santa Rosa ......... 75 100 100 .........
W alton ............ 100 110 100 ..........
W ashington ........ 100 1001 100 ..........
Div. Av. per cent. .. 881 102 107 125
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............ 100 110 1100 .........
Baker ............. 100| 115 100 ..........
Bradford .......... 110 120 100
Columbia .......... 100 110i 100 .........
N assau ............. .......... 1001 100 ..........
St. Johns .......... .......... 100 .......... ..........
Div. Av. per cent... 1021 1101 1001.........
Central Division.
Hernando .......... 100 901 100, 100
Lake ................ 50 .......... ........ ..........
Levy .............. 90 100 100 ..........
Marion ............. 80 50 1001 ..........
Orange ...... ..... 100 100 ....................
Pasco .............. 110 105i 110' 120
Div. Av. per cent...! 881 89 102 110


Southern Division.
B revard ............ .......... 100 ... ..... ..........
D ade .............. ......... .......... .......... ..........
H illsborough ....... .......... 1501 501 .........
L ee ............... .......... 10 ...... ....
Manatee ........... 1001 100' 100 ..........
Osceola ............ I 100 100 l00o lo .........
St. L ucie ........... .......... 100 .......... .........
Div. Av. per cent. .. 1001 93 83 ..........
Gen. State Av. p. c. 921 98 98 165


I











13

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES.


RYE. RICE. SWEET
POTATOES


FIELD
PEAS.


Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. I Acreage. Acreage.
Franklin ........... ................ ............
Gadsden ........... I......... .......... 12" '25
Hamilton .......... 501. 5 .
Jeirerson ........... .......... ........... 1.I
Lafayette .......... .. ..........
Leon ............... 100 .......... 1. 1
Madison ........ 1 ...........
Suwannee ......... .......... 40 1
T aylor ... ... .. ... .......... .... 125
Div. Av. per cent. .. 831 57j 1)~2 1"0
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... .. ...... .... .. .......... 1"" i,
Escambia .......... 100 SO 15' 110
Jackson ............. ............... .... '
banta Rosa ........ .......... .. 105 10
Walton ................................ 1. 1
W ashington ....... ........... ......... 1. 1
Div. Av. per cent. 100, SO 1' 1, 1j
Northeastern Division. 1
A lachua ........... .......... I 100 11..........
B aker ............. .......... ".l). 110
Bradford .......... ... ....... 1101 1.0
Columbia .......... 100| 100 Inn' 1I0n
N assau ............. .......... ..... .. i 1.0
St. Johns ........... ................ 15n 10
Div. Av. per cent...! 100' 1001 12" 10
Central Division.
Hernando ......... 100 90 1) 10')
L ake ............. ......... .. ....... 5 ..........
Levy ........... 100 .......... 10i 1 0
M arion ......... ... .... ...... 80 100
Orange ............ .................... 100 100
Pasco ............. ......... 1001 100


Div. Av. per cent... 1001 85! 961
Southern Division.
Brevard ...................... 100 100
D ade .............. ......... .. 10
Hillsborough ....... 100 150 155
L ee ................ .......... .......... .n1 11
M anatee ............ .......... I 100! 1l
Osceola ...... ... I ........... .... .... I
St. L ucie .......... ........ ... ....... I .. ...
Div, Av. per cent.... 1001 117! 95I
Gen. State Av. p. c. 971 881 104


96









(I


Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.
VELVET
COUNTIES. CASSAVA. BEANS. CABBAGE.
Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage. Condition.
F franklin ......... .......... .. ........ .......... I ..........
Gadsden ........... .......... .......... 100 i00
Hamilton ........ 50 75 75
Jefferson .......... ............. ...... ... ..
Lafayette .......... 100......... 100 100
Leon .............. I.......... 1 1001 110 100
Madison ........... .................. .1 100 100
Suwannee ......... ......... | 100I 90 90
Taylor .............. .......... 100 ..... .... ....
Div. Av. per cent...| 1001 901 961 92
Western Division.
Calnoun ........ .. 110 125 ..... ........ ..
Escambia ......... .......... 125 100 100
Jackson ............ ......... ........ ........ ..
Santa Rosa ......... .......... 110 .......... ..........
Walton ...........| 75| 110 .....................
Washington ....... 751 125 ..................
Div. Av. per cent. .. 981 119 1001 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua..............110 110 100
B aker .............. .......... 100 .......... ......
B radford ........... .......... 100 .......... .....
Columbia ...........................................
N assau .... .. .. .......... ........ .. .. ......
St. Johns .......... .......... 100 .......... ...
Div. Av. per cent.. .......... 1021 110! 100
Central Division.
Hernando .................... 100 112 90
Lake ............... ....... 100 30 100
Levy .............. 90 100 110 100
Marion ....................... 100 100 100
Orange ............ 200 200 100 100
Pasco ............. 90 98 100 100
Div. Av. per cent...! 1271 1161 92; 98
Southern Division.
Brevard ............ 100 100 100 110
Dade ........................ 100 100 100
Hillsborough ....... 100 95 51 90
Lee ............... .......... 10 ..................
Manatee ........... .......... 100 1101 100
Osceola ............ 100 150 100 100
St. Lucie .......... .......... 100 75 100
Div. Av. per cent... 100l 941 95! 100
Gen. States Av. p. c. 1061 104 991 bo











14

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. IRISH POTATOES. TOMATOES.
Northern Division. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
Franklin ........................... .......... ..........
Gadsden ........... 100 85 ...................
H am ilton .......... .75, 75 .......... ..........
Jefferson .................. ....... ........
Lafayette ........ .. 100 100 10" 1'"
Leon .............. 110 100 1I0n 1"0
Madison ........... 100 100 1, 1.")
Suwannee .......... 100 100 10:I 1',l
Taylor ..... ............. ..........
Div Av. per cent. .. 983 93 1I00 1",
Western Division.
Calhoun ........... 100 100 .......... ..........
Escambia .......... 100 100 100 1"'1
Jackson ........... .......... .......... .......... ..........
Santa Rosa ........ 100 10, ....................
W alton ............ 100 1 00 .......... ..........
Washington ....... 100 100 ....................
Div. Av. per cent. .. 100 11)0 10 1iiI
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............. 1- 1 0 100 10T)
Baker ............. 110 100 .......... .........
Bradford ........... .......... ........................ ..
Columbia ........... 1101 100i ....................
Nassau ............ 100! 901 100 100
St. Johns .......... 105' 75 100) Inh
Div. Av. per cent. .. 107 93 100 1i,
Central Division.
Hernando .......... 105 95 110
Lake .............. 30 100 25 9'i
Levy .............. 100 101) 1,11 1.'
M arion ............ 100' 70 1',11)
Orange ............ I .......... .......... 111,11 !
Pasco .............. 951 90' 12" 1.,
Div. Av. per cent ...! 8' 91 91 2
Southern Division.
Brevard .......... 100 110 1o0 1,',
Dade .............. ..100 95' 100 1, i
Hillsborough ....... I 147! 100: 95 55
L ee ................ ........ I... ...... . 1i
M anatee ........... 110! 110 ) i 1.11
Osceola ........... 110' 1.00 120 9t
St. Lucie .......... 100' 100 15 1
Div. Av. per cent....' 111 101 9 54
Gen. State Av. p. 100' 97 97 9~











15

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. CUCUMBERS. ENGLISH PEAS.
Northern Division. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. iCondition.
Franklin .. ... ... .. ............ ...........
Gadsden ............. ........... .. .
H am ilton ........... .......... .........
Jefferson .......... .......... .... ..... ........... I .........
Lafayette .......... 1001 1001 100 100
Leon .............. 1001 100 100 100
M adison ........... .................. ......
Suwannee .......... .......... .......... 100 100
Taylor ............. .......... .......... .. .. ..........
Div. Av. per cent... 1001 1001 100 100
Western Division.
Calhoun ............ .......... ......... ..........
Escambia .......... 100% 1001 100 100
Jackson .......... .......... .......
Santa Rosa ........ .......... ......................
W alton ............ 90 85 .......... .
W ashington ........ 100 100 ....................
Div. Av. per cent. .. 97 951 1001 10')
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........... 1001 901 1001 90
Baker ............. ........... .......... .......... ........
Bradford ....................... .. .......... I ..........
Columbia ............................... ... ...........
Nassau .......... ...... ............. ......... ..........
S t Joh ns............. .......... ........ .. ..... ...
Div. Av. per cent. ..] 1001 901 100 90
Central Division.
Hernando .......... o100 80'...................
Lake .............. .......... I........ .i 40' 90
Levy .............. 120 1101 100' 100
Marion ............. 1001 801 801 70
Orange ............. 1 1001 200' 100! 100
Pasco .............. 140 1001 90 q0
Liv. Av. per cent. .. 1121 1141 821 .0
Southern Division.
Brevard ............. ....... .................... .. .......
Dade ............... .......... ......... ...... ..........
Hillsborough ....... I 90' 901 501 50
Lee ....... ....... 4 4 .......... .........
Manatee ........... 1001 1001 1001 i00
Osceola ............ 1001 901 100i 10
St. Lucie .......... 1251 951 .......... .. ......
Div. Av. per cent... 84! 761 831 83
Gen. State Av. p. c. I 991 951 931 93











16

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. CANTELOUPES. STRAWBERRIES.
Northern Division. Acreage. iCondition. Acreage. Condition.
Franklin ............ .................. 100 95
Gadsde .............................. ....................
Hamilton .......... 75 75 75 75
Jefferson .......... 100 90 lo0 9u
Lafayette .......... 100 100 ....................
Leon ............... 115 100 111i 1...'
M adison ........... .......... .......... ..... ..........
Suwannee .......... 100 90 ........ ..........
Taylor ............ .......... ....... ... ..... .........
Div. Av. per cent. 98 91 96 9
Western Division.
Calhoun ........... 1501 1U0 5o" 1
Escambia ......... 1501 100 95 101':'
Jackson ............ .......... ......... ........ ..........
Santa Rosa ........ .......... .......... ....................
W alton ............ 100 100 .................. .
Washington ........ 150 100 50, 95
Div. Av. per cent.... 137 1001 651 9S
Northeastern Division.
Alachua............ 110 100 ooI 1
Baker ... .................... .........
Bradford .......... ........................ 120 1'"'
Columbia .......... 100 95 ...................
Nassau ............ 110i 95 l(tu 1'I
St. Johns .......... 10000 00. ....................
Div. Av. per cent... 105- 9S 110 !,"'
Central Division.
Hernando .......... 100 100 10
Lake .............. 80 100i ...................
Levy ............... 100 100 100 1"0
M arion ............. 100 80 .......... ..........
Orange ............. 100 50 ...................
Pasco .............. 50s 501 98 11)
Div. Av. per cent....l 85 80' 99 100
Southern Division.
Breva.rd ............ .......... ........... 100-( 10
D ade ............... .......... .......... 1(00 100,
Hillsborough ....... 100' 100 S5 70
L ee ................ .......... I..... ..... ......... ........
Manatee ........... 50 100 10 11
Osceola .............. 1501 0S n1 0 S
St. Lucie ........... .......... .......... 100 75
Div. Av. per cent...l 100 93 97i -
Gen. State Av. p. c. 1051 92 93 95










c- 17

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. Orange Lemon Lime Grape Fruit
Trees Trees Trees Trees
Northeastern Divisicn. I Condition.! Condition. I Condition.) Condition.
Hamilton .............................. ...... ...........
Gadsden ................................. .... .........
Hamilton........... .......... ......... ......... .........
Jefferson .... .................... .......... ...... .
Lafayette ........... ...... .... ..... .
L eon .............. 95 .......... ......... 9
M adison ........... .......... .......... ...... ... ..........
Suw annee .......... .......... .......... .......... .....
Taylor. .............. ................................
Div. Av. per cent. .. 951 .......... .. 95
Western Division.
Calnoun ........... 1001 .......... ..... ........
E scam bia ............ .......... .......... .......... .......
Jackson. ...... .............. ........... ..........
Santa R osa.......... .......... ............. ... ...... .. ......
W alton .............. .......... .......... ....... ..
W ashington ......... ......... ......... ............ ......
Div. Av. per cent. .. 100 .......... .......... .........
Northeastern Division.
A lachua .............. .......... ......... ........
Baker ............ ... ..... .......... .......... ..........
B radford ........... 125 .......... .......... ..........
Colum bia .......... 110 .......... .......... ..........
Nassau .............. .............. ....................
St. Johns ......... 100 .......... .......... ..........
Div. Av. per cent. .. 1121 .......... .......... ..........
Central Division.
Hernando ......... 125 .......... ..........j 85
Lake .............. 100 100 .......... 80
Levy ............... 110 .......... .......... .........
M arion ............ 100 .......... .......... 100
Orange ............ 200 .......... ........... 200
Pasco .............. 110 .......... .......... 100
Div. Av. per cent 1241 100| ........... 113
Southern Division.
Brevard ............ 100 .......... .......... 100
Dade .............. 100 90 90 100
Hillsborough ....... 150 100 .......... 150
L ee ................ 20 .......... .......... 20
Manatee ........... 100 100 100 100
Osceola ............ 150 150 100 150
St Lucie ........... 155 150 .......... 105
Div. Av. per cent... 1111 1181 971 104
Gen. State Div. p. c. f 108] 1091 971 104

2-Bul









18

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. Bananas. Pineap'le Guavas Peaches Pears
Northern Division. Condit' n Condit' n Condit' n Condit' n ondit n
Franklin .......... ......... ........ ........ ........
Gadsden .......... ........ ........ ........ .............. .
H am ilton .......... ........ ...... ........ 71 ;
Jefferson ...... ........ .. .... .100 11-0
Lafayette .......... ..... .. .... .... .. 105 100
L eon .............. ... .... .. ......... ] 10 30
M adison .......... ........ ........ ............... .......
Suwannee ...... ...... .. ....... 1I .0
T aylor ............ ........ ....... ........ 125 .......
Div. Av. per cent... ....... ......- .. ......... 101 74
Western Division.
Calhoun .......... .......... ............ ........ .........
Escambia ......... ................ ... ... I 200, 100
Jackson ........... ............. ........
Santa Rosa......... ............ ........ ........... ......
Walton .......................... ........................
W ashington........ i........ ....... ........ .......... .. ....
Div. Av. per cent. .... .. ....... ........ 200 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........... ....... ..... .. .. 120 .......
B aker ............. ........ ...... .. 120 ........
Bradford ......... ........ ........ ........ ........ 100
Colum bia .......... ........ ....... .100 ........
N assau ............ I ........ ....... 101 100
St. Johns .......... ...... .... ....... 100 ......
Div. Av. per cent. .. ............. .... .. .... 10S lu,)
Central Division.
H ernando ...... ....: .... ....... ........ 112 S0
L ake .............. ........ ........ 20 50 ......
Levy .............. ....... .. ....... ...... 115 110
Marion .................... ........ .... 100' 100
O ran ge ........... .... ........ ........ ................
Pasco ............. 90 ........ 951 100 SO
Div. Av. per cent. .. 901 ....... 571 951 92
Southern Division.
Brevard ...........I 100 ........ 1 100| 100 .......
Dade ............. ........ 100d 100 ................
Hillsborough ....... 701 801 100! 150 90
Lee ............... ....... I 101 15 ...............
Manatee ........... I 1001 100 100 10 ........
Osceola ............ 1001 1201 150' 1 0 ,)
St. Lucie ......... 1251 1301 160' ......... ......
Div. Av. per cent. 991 901 104' 102 70
Gen. State Av. p. c. I 95! 90' 80 12












Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. BEAN4. LETTUCE.
Northern Division. I Acreage. Condition.I Acreage. Condition.
Franklin .................... ...........................
Gadsden ........... 100 10 .......... .. ..
H am ilton ........... .......... .......... .......... .........
Jefferson ............. ........ .. .......... ........ .... ....
Lafayette ......... 100 100 1001 100
Leon ............... 10 100 110[ 100
Madison ........... 100 100 ...................
Suwannee .......... 110 100 100 100
Taylor .......... ..... ............. ... ..... -. ..
Div. Av. per cent... 102[ 1001 103 100
Western Division.
Calhoun .... ....... 100 100 ... ......... ..
Escambia .......... 100 100 100 100
Jackson .................. ... .......... .......... ..........
Santa R osa ........ ......... ......... I ........ .........
Walton ............ 100 100 100 100
Washington ....... 100 100 100 100
Div. Av. per cent. ..11 1001 1001 1001 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........... 100 100 110 100
Baker ............. 100 10 .......... ..........
Bradford ........... 100 100 ....................
Colum bia........... 1001 100 .......... ..........
Nassau ............ 100 100 .......... ........
St. Johns .......... 100 100 100 100
Div. Av. per cent .. 1001 1001 105 105
Central Division.
Hernando ......... 801 60 112 100
Lake .............. 50 90 .................
Levy .............. 1 100 1200 100
Marion ............ 100 10 100 100
Orange ............ 100 10 200 200
Pasco ............. 95 100 1001 100
Div. Av. per cent... 881 92[ 1421 120
Southern Division.
Brevard ........... 100 100 1101 170
Dade .............. 100 100 100 luO
Iillsborough ...... 100 95 85 85
Lee ................ 6 6 ... ..... ........
Manatee ............ 100 100 110 100
Osceola .......... 150 100 50 100
St. Lucie .................... .......... ........ .......
.Div Av. per cent. .. 931 83| 891 99
Gen. States Av. p. c. 97[ 951 110! 105












Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. EGGPLANT. ELERY.
Northern Division. Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition
Franklin ........... ........... ..... .......... ..........
G adsden ............. .......... .......... .......... ..........
H am ilton ........... .. ....
Jefferson ............. ...... .... .......... .......... ....... .
Lafayette .......... .100 90. .......... ..........
Leon .............. 1001 100. ..................
Madison .......... .......... ..............................
Suwannee .......... ......................................
Taylor ............ .......................................
Div. Av. per cent... 100 95 .......... ........
Western Division.
Calhoun ..................... .......... ....................
Escam bia............ .. .
Jackson ......... .
Jackson............ ........ ..................... ...
Santa Rosa ........ .......... ..............................
W alton.....................................................
W ashington ........ .......... ............................
Liv. Av. per cent. ........ .......... ..... ... .. ........
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........... 100 100 10 ~ 1,c0
Baker .
Baker ............. .......... .......... ...................
Bradford.................... ... ..........................
Columbia......... .... ..................
Nassau ............. ......
St. Johns ......... .90 90 .......... ..........
Div. Av. per cent. .. 95 95 1 1in
Central Division.
Hernando .......... 60 60 ..............
Lake ............... .......... .. ....... ........ ... ...
Levy ........... .... 100 100 ...................
M arion ............ ........... ..........' ......
Orange ............ 100, 100 200 200
P asco .............. ........... ......... .. .. ..... .. ....
Div.v. per cent .. 87' 87 200 o(0
Southern Division.
Brevard .........' 100 100 100 1- 1
Lade .............. 10 100 100 1i0
Hillsborough ....... 501 75' 100 100
L ee .............. 10! 10 ........... ..........
Manatee ........... 501 100 120 100
Osceola ............ 801 100 160 120
St. Lucie ........... 100 75 150 1,)1
Liv. Av. per cent. .. 70 80 122 103
Gen. State Av. p. c. I 88' 141 13












21

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

COUNTIES. BEETS. WATERMELONS.
Northern Division. IAcreage. ICondition.| Acreage. i Condition.
F franklin ........... .......... .......... .......... ..........
Gadsden .............. ..... .... .. .. .......... ..........
Hamilton .......... 50 75 75 75
Jefferson ........... .......... .......... 100 90
Lafayette ........ .......... .......... 100 100
Leon ............... 100 100 llu 100
Madison ........... .......... .......... 75 75
Suwannee .......... ................ 100 90
Taylor ............. .......... .......... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 751 871 941 90
Western Division.
Calhoun ........... .......... .......... 1001 100
Escambia .......... 100 100 150 100
Jackson ............ ...... ..... ...... 90 100
Santa Rosa ........ .......... .. ..... 100 100
W alton ............ .......... .......... 110 100
W ashington ................ ....... .. 100 l0
Liv. Av. per cent. .. 1001 1001 1081 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ....... 90 85 110 100
Baker ............. .......... .......... 110 100
Bradford ........... ........ .......... .......... ...........
Columbia ... ..... ....................110 100
Nassau ........ ..................... 150 100
St. Johns .......... ........ ..........1001 100
Div. Av. per cent.. 901 851 1161 100


Central Division.
Hernando .......... 100 100
L ake .............. .......... ..........
Levy ............... 110 100
M arion ............. .......... ..........
Orange ................................
P asco ...... ........ .......... .........
Liv. Av. per cent... I 1051 1001
Southern Division.
Brevard ............. 100 100
D ade ............... .......... ..........
Hillsborough ....... 100 100
L ee ................ ......... ..........
Manatee ............ 100 100
Osceola ............. 150 140
St. Lucie .......... ........ ..... ...
Div. Av. per cent... 1131 1101
Gen.State Av. 1) c 97 96|


200 100
80 100
110 100
100 80

110 90
1201 94

1001 100
100 100
125 100
101 10
1201 100
200 80
100 100
1081 84
1091 94






















PART II.
Weather Report
















U. S. Department of Agriculture.


CLIMATOLOGICAL SERVICE
of the

WEATHER BUREAU

Central Office: Washington, D. C.
--*---

FLORIDA SECTION,

A. J. Mitchell, Section Director.
Report for February, 1908.


GENERAL SUMMARY.

The weather for the month was generally cold with less
than the usual amount of precipitation; there was a high
percentage of sunshine. The prevailing winds were from
the northwest; no dangerously high velocities were noted.
The severest cold waves of record for Florida occurred
during February, although the month, as a rule, is not
the one of lowest mean temperature. Thirteen of the last
seventeen Februarys averaged warmer than the current
month. The lowest temperature ever recorded during this
month was 2 degrees below zero in 1899. Normal precipi-
tation for February is comparatively light, and since 1892
the rainfall has been more frequently below than above
normal. Only four of the last seventeen Februarys were
drier than the current one.
The mean temperature for the State ranged from 51
degrees in the extreme western counties to about 67 de-
grees in the southern portion of the State. The average
was 3.6 deg. below normal. The warm weather that
obtained during the last of January continued until the
night of the 1st, when a sharp cold wave swept over the
western and some of the northern counties. The cold spell
continued over most of the State until the 4th, when the
weather gradually moderated. A warm period prevailed
over the eastern portion from the 9th to 15th, and on sev-













eral days the excess in temperature ranged from 10 degrees
to 12 degrees. A second cold period set in over the west-
ern portion on the 16th, and, except on two or three days,
when warm, southerly winds occurred, the cold weather,
with frequent frosts, continued until the close of the
month. Frost was heavy in low places in the southern
counties on the 17th; from the 21st to 23d; and on the 2Sth
and 29th. Although the month averaged colder rhnn
usual, there were no extremely low temperatures.
The month's precipitation ranged from less than an inch
at several Southern stations to about six inches in the
extreme western portion of the State. Franklin and Mon-
roe were the only counties wherein a slight excess of rain
was recorded. The average precipitation was 1.50 inches
below normal. The bulk of the rain fell as light showers.
and very little occurred until the 9th. except on the 1st.
when the distribution was general, and on the 5th. when
it was confined mostly to the western counties. Showers
were well distributed from the 10th to 15th. inclusive, and
on the 19th and 26th, with some good rains in the western
counties on the 18th and 25th. There were six days with-
out rain, and only seven stations recorded amounts in
excess of 4 inches.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean atmospheric pressure for the for the month,
reduced to sea level, and determined from observations
taken daily at 7 a. m. and 7 p. m., 90th meridian time. at
six Weather Bureau stations, was 30.15 inches. or 0.09 of
an inch above the February normal. The highest pressure
occurred at Pensacola, 30.52 inches, on the 2d. and the
lowest, 29.71 inches, occurred at Pensacola. on the 14th.
and at Jacksonville on the 15th, giving a range for the
State of 0.81 of an inch.

TEMPERATURE.

The mean temperature for February, 1908. was 56.4 deg.,
which is 3.6 deg. below the normal. The mean maximum
and mean minimum temperatures were 67.4 degs. and
45.5 degs., respectively. The highest monthly mean
was 67.0 degs. at Sand Key; the lowest mean was
50.8 degs., at Wausau. The highest temperature recorded
was 87 degs., at Brooksville on the 13th; the lowest tem-














perature recorded was 20 degs., at Wausau on the 2d,
and at DeFuniak Springs and Mount Pleasant on the 3d.
The greatest monthly range was 59 degs., at DeFuniak
Springs and Mount Pleasant; the least, 27 degs., at Sand
Key. The greatest daily range was 50 degs., at Middle-
burg on the 3d.

PRECIPITATION.

The average precipitation for the State, as determined
from the records of 54 stations, was 2.36 inches, which
is 1.50 inches below the normal. The greatest amount
recorded at any station for the month was 6.11 inches, at
DeFuniak Springs; and the least, 0.70 of an inch, at
Molino and Sand Key. No excessive rain occurred. The
average number of days on which 0.01 of an inch, or
more, of precipitation occurred, was 6.

COMPARATIVE DATA FOR THE STATE, FEBRUARY.

| Percipi-
Temperature station.
Year. Monthly High- Date Low- Date Monthly
Average est est Average
1892 ............... 61.9 89 7 27 13 1.56
1893 ............... 64.9 88 27 34 28 3.92
1904 ............... 62.6 86 14* 28 6* 2.03
1895 ............... 52.1 85 2 11 8 3.19
1896 ............... 59.0 85 5* 24 18 3.06
1897 ............... 63.0 90 21 27 27 6.57
1898 ............... 57.5 89 19 20 1 2.04
1899 ...............i 58.0 87 26 -2 13 5.69
1900 ............... 58.5 88 10* 16 18 4.42
1901 ............... 55.8 88 9 20 24 4.44
1902 ............... 54.4 87 2 21 10 4.88
1u03 ............... 62.7 90 16* 20 18 5.67
1904 ............... 60.8 89 19* 23 2 3.03
1905 ............... 58.1 89 12* 10 14 3.45
1906 ................ 58.8 85 26 23 1 2.78
1907 ............... 60.2 90 28 25 9 1.45
1908 ............... 56.4 87 13 20 2* 2.36
*Also on other dates.









CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR FEBRUARY, 1908

Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. Precipitation, in inches. Sky.
ai I a .


STATIONS. Counties



NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer ............ Alachua ....... 92 25 ..... ... ... ....
Cedar Keys........Lf,ev v......... 101111b5G.2 -4.5 e79|12 :121 2 1.98-0.90 1 .0[ S 25 1 3 nw
Federal Point. .... Putnam ........ 51151 5(;. S! -0.3 8313 4 4I 2.09-1.8G 0.64 8 19 4 n
1Fernandina ........Nassau ......... I10 11 8,: 0.4 7:14- 271 ; :11 2.26 3.23 1.03 12 14 10 5 .
(iainesville ........ Alachua .. .... 17622 2.4 791: 271 : | 2.95--0.C 0.94.1 8... .... nw
Huntington ........ I'itnanii 5 i .9 -:.2 aS 11 1b27 :35 2.1 1- 1.61 0.3 8... ...
Jacksonville ...... iival ......... 43,8 53.2 3.7 76 1 2 ,' 3 (;2l 2.98 -0.45 0.89 10 17 5 7 nw
Jasper ............ ITar il on ...... 152 10i 52.8 .s 801i 21 l : .17-1 .44 0.8 7 20 4| 5 nw
.lohnstown ........ 11 a ford ........12512 52.3 .7 7 ;i22 :19 1 .10 -3.98 1.10 1...
Lake City .......... (loliinhia ...... 51 1!1 53.( -2. S1 O 25 1 3.17 1.36 0.80 8 13 8 8 nw
Livl Oaik .. :a ........ ...... n ... .. ... ... .. .... .... .... .. .. ... ..''
Maccllinny ........ Hak] r ......... 125 1:: 5:.:1 2.:: 78 :1 22 10 2.6(5 1.34 0.86 8 19 3 7 w
iddle rg .........( l: ..... I 10 80 I55.2 |0. 79 1 3 5 2. : .8 0.80 (; ... .. .. .
St. Aiustiin ..... St. Johns I..... 10 5S 51.5 41.2 7 1:1 28 X 3:2 2.48 1. 1 0.80 8 20 1 8 1 w
Swile.rlian ....... .St. ... li .....nS. I lOl3 :,51 .2 .G SI 27 38 1 .8:: 1.86s 0.54 .........
Swl .. I l ll o. l 1,s i .s0 .s61 o.54 ... .. .












CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow ............
B ooksville ........
Clermont ..........
De Land ..........
Eustis ............
Fort Meade ...
Fort Pierce (near).
'Grasmere .........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee ........
Malabar ..........
Merritts Island ....
New Smyrna (near)
Ocala .............
Orange City .......
Orlando ...........
Panasoffkee .......
Plant City .........
Rockwell ..........
St Leo ............
Tampa ..........
Tarpon Springs ....
Titusville ..........


Polk ..........
Hernando .....
Lake ..........
Volusia ........
Lake ..........
Polk ..........
St. Lucie .....
Orange ........
Citrus .........
Osceola ........
Brevard .......
Brevard .......
Volusia ........
Marion ........
Volusia ........
Orange ........
Sumter ........
Hillsborough ...
Marion ........
Pasco ..........
Hillshorough ...
Hillsborough ...
Brevard .......


115
12615
105 15
27 7
5618
125 24
6 17
17511
43 7
65 16
24 9
20 27
9 20
98 21
39 17
111 18

12116
10 8
Id 8
140 13
2018
2024
6116


a59.4 -2.6 a83 14 a30 21* 42 1.40-2.38 0.57 ... 15 4 10
d59.0 -0.3 e8713 d28 3 41 1.511 2.45| 0.511 4 .... ...
.. .. ....... .. .. 0.921- 3.07 0.90 2 13 14 2
58.2 -0.6 8112 28 3* 45 ..... ........... 17 9 3
57.8 -3.3 8111* 29 3 38 2.34-1.17 0.80 6 22 6 1
b9.0 -3.0 82 6 30 3*43 1.591-1.06 0.75 5 17 8 4
61.6 -2.6 84 1* 381 3*31 1.281-2.70 0.48 61 12 61 11
57.4 -3.5 79 11 31 3 32 .... .............. 19 9 1
54.2 -2.1 80114 27 4 38 1.61-2.75 0.50 5 16 13 0
59.71 -1.4 80 6* 32 3 36 1.46-3.04 0.80 9 19 3 7
a61.6 -1.9 a83 1*a3429 38 0.70-2.84 0.36 4 ......

57.8 -2.8 84112 26 3 1391 2.581-0.851 0.92: 5I 16 7;
56.81 -3.3 85114 27 23 47 1.581-1.68 0.60 41 I 131 2;
57.21 -0.91 80114 31 2* 36 1.46-1.76 0.72 41...... ....
59.21 -0.2 8111 32 3 39 1.56-1.50 0.45 6 16 5 8


e57.71 +0.91 e80 14 e26 3 38 2.44-1.35 1.60 6 ..
57.81 -3.2 80112* 291 3 371 1.291-3.27 0.34 8 17 6 6
58.7 -2.2 80]11 331 3 29! 1.10-2.17 0.33 71 20 7 2]
57.71 -4.11 8512 2821 43 .46--2.07 0.55 71 20 5 4
..... ...... 811 6 ... .. .... .... ..... ... ..


ne

e
nw
nw

W
ne
nw
n
n

n
nw c'

se



w
ne
n-nw








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR FEBRUARY, 1908.- (Continued.)


STATIONS.




SOUTHERN SECTION.

Arcadia ...........
Avon Park ........
Flamingo .........
1-ypoluxo .........
Jupiter ............
Key West .........
Manatee ..........
M iami ............
Myers ............
Sand Key .........

WESTERN SECTION.

Apalachicola ......
Illountstown .......
tonifay ..........


Counties


De Soto .........
De Soto ....... 50
Monroe ........ 4
Dade .......... 4
Dade .......... 28
Monroe ........ 22
Manatee .......
Dade ......... 5
Lee ............ 12
Monroo ........| 25



Pranklii ....... 24
[allit iin ....... ...
Frolnes ........ 111


TenmpLrature, in degrees Faihrelnhit Precipitation, ky.







60.5 85 3 8* 42 148 ...... 0.50 19 5 5 e-nw
no .2 -o W








20 1 40 21 26 1.96 -1.09 1.07 11 1 4 5
66.0 -4.2 8014 5121 117 1.73 -0.09 0.99 1 14 2I
60. -1.8 86512 3328* 42 1.48 1.63 0.650 17 719 5 enw

6.0 -4.91 86 14 40 28 3 1.817 1.2377 0.60 623 11 1 4 n
62.0 -4.3 82 1 40121 26 1.96-1.09 1.07 11 10 14 5 nw
66.C -4.2[ 80114 51|21 1171 1.73 +0.09 0.99 9 13 14 2 ne
60.0 1.8 8612 3329 12 1.4S-1.63 0.65 6 17 7[ 5 ]W
65.3', 2.1 86 14 40128 0.971 1.77 0.67 311 ]4i ne
60.81 -3.S 82110* 3 23 36 0.941 -2.29 0.451 3 211 6[ 2 s
67 ....| 81 6 54 21 1: 0.70 ... 0.22 10 16 8 5 ne



52. 1 1.2 72 II 29 1 2; 2.91 (.75 0.92 4 201 3 so

51.4 .4 76 13 | 22) 3 I37| 5.74| 1.52 1.80 J 6 12 6| l nw-s


I









Carrabelle ......... franklin ....... 10 12........... .. ... .. ... ......... ..... .. .. .
De Funiak Springs. Walton ........19311 51.2 -1.2 7915 2 3 39 6.111.02 1.75 16 7 6 n
Fenholloway ...... Taylor ......... 70 2 52.9 ...... 82 13 29 4 40 2.77 ...... 1.25 4 5 22 2 sw
Gait ...............Santa Rosa .... 91.. 51.2! ...... 71 13* 21 3 39 4.70 ...... 1.40 7 15 7 7 n-s
Madson .adison ........ adison20 5 52.21 -3.4 82113 24 3 38 3.74-1.76 1.17 7 10 12 7 nw
M arianna ......... Jackson ........ 80 8 ..... I ...... .... ... ... ... .. ..... .. .... .... .. .. ...
Molino ............ Escambia 49 6 61.61 -4.01 74129 I 23 3 401 4.911-3.80 1.85 5 15 2 n
Monticello ......... Jefferson ...... 207 3 52.2 -3.1 7613 25 3 33 3.82--0.05 1.48 7 14 11 4 w
Mount Pleasant .... Gadsden ... s... 260 2a52.0 ...... a79 12 a20 3 42 5.06 ...... 2.00 7 ... ...
New Port ......... Wakulla ...... .... .. 2621 1.45 ...... 0.90 2 18 0 11 nw
Pensacola ..........Escambia ...... 5629 51.6 -3.9 70 14 29 3 26 3.96 -1.53 1.741 9 11 4 14 nw
St. Andrews ....... Washington ... 1410 51.01 -1.2 73113 22 3 39 4.34 -0.30 1.54 81 221 4 3 sw
Tallahasee .......Leon .......... 192123 53.01 -1.8 76114 I24 3 133 4.53 0.29 1.501 5 17 61 6 w
Wausau ........... Washington .... 25010 50.8 --1.4 78125 1 20 2 142 3.39--2.20 1.12 7| 181 5 61 s
..... 1111I 1
All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature and percipita-
tion are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
The letters a, b, c, etc., indicate number of days missing from report. *More than one day.
























PART III.
Fertilizers and
Feeding Stuffs


3-- 'll















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.



SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILLI
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary deter-
minations, and to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for two months from date of cer-
tificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ; fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound., in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to th7
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name and
address must also be on the package, this rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.












INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each
package of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have.
securely attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed
analysis required by law, and the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the inspector's fee. This provis ion of the law-
Section 3 of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6 ,of both laws. Tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.


INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment
of the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee
tag and stamp are irregular and fraudulent; the absence
of the guarantee and stamp being evidence that the manu-
facturer or dealer has not complied with the law. Without
the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the goods
are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no recourse
against the manufacturer or dealer. Such goods are sold
illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of little
value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers now
comply strictly with the law and regulations by placing
the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.


INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of Sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.
B. E. McLIN.
Commissioner of Agriculture.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTIL-
IZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA PORTS,
JANUARY, 1908.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia ..........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
m onia ...................
Dried Blood 15 per cent Am-
monia ...................


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.

$60.00 $59.50 $59.00

74.00 73.50 73.00

60.00 59.50 59.00


54.00


53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per
cent. Potash (K20) ......
Carbonate of Potash, 60 per
cent. Potash (K20) (90 per
cent. Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Ams., 42
Potash (K20) ...........
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash...


50.00 49.50 49.00

30.00 29.50 29.00


46.00 45.50


44.00


110.00

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent Ammonia.....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
61 per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent. Phosphoric Acid.
Raw Bone 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid .............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00












Le
Ammoniates.
Ammonia and Phosphoric Acid.
Ground Castor Pomace, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid .....
Bright Cottonseed Meal, S
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ...............
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6
per cent. Ammonia. market
quotations ...............


ss than 5 to 10
tons. tons.


10 tons
& over.


825.))0 824.50() 24.00


31.00 29.510 29.00


24.00 2i.5) 23.110


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00 14.50) 14.50

14.)00 12.50 13.00

24.00 28.50 23.00
25.1111 24.50 24.10


MISCELLAN!E( )i-S


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stems .............. ..
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, 10 per cent.
(K20) Potash ...........
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per
cent. Ammonia, 11 per
cent Potash ...........
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks ......


25.00 24.50 24.00

16.00 15.5) 15.00


2:.00 22.50 22.00


15.)110
101.50)


1 .51,
14.5(1
1(1.25


1s.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are 81.53( per ton
in excess of above prices.












STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1908.

Available Phosphoric Acid..............5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia ( or its equivalent in nitrogen)161 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash. K20)........51 cents a pound

If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid................20 c. per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)..$3.30 per unit
Potash ...............................$1.10 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent, in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid. .6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid...1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.30- 11.28
Potash .................. 7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging ......................... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. $27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ..................... 2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.06
Potash ......................2 per. cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging ..........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. $18.30

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida sea ports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.












If purchased in carload lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:

Available Phosphoric Acid............90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) .....................99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen).$2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertiliers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the seasonn."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia.
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets." loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1908 deducted
therefrom.











41

COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Phosphoric
Ammonia PAhocid :Potash

Nitrate of Soda.... ... 17 to 19 .......................
Sulphate of Ammonia 21 to 24 .......................
Dried Blood.............. 12 to 17 ..................
Concentrated Tankage.... 12 to 15 1 to 2...........
Bone Tankage ........... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........l 8 to 11 6 to 8...........
Cotton Seed Meal......... 7 to 10 2 to 3 1V to 2
Hoof Meal ............. 13 to 171 1I to 2 ............

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Avilable Insoluble
Ammoni i Phos. Acid Phophoric
I Acid


Florida Pebble Phosphate. ....................
Florida Rock Phosphate.. .............. ....... ....
Florida Super Phosphate.. ............ 14 to 19
Ground Bone ............1 3 to 61 5 to 8 1
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 1
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
POUNDS PER HUNDRED


26 to 32
13 to 35
1 to 35
15 to 17
0L to 20
2 to 3


Actual n Phosphoric i
Potash Ammoni Acid Limo


Muriate of Potash.......
Sulphate of Potash...... 48
Carbonate of Potash .... 55
Nitrate of Potash...... .40
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag 26
K ainit ................. 12
Sylvinit ............... 16
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15
Wood Ashes, unleached.. 2
Wood Ashes. leached.... 1
Tobacco Stems... ..... 5
Cow Manure (fresh)....
Horse Manure (fresh)..
Sheep Manure (fresh)..
Hog Manure (fresh) ....
Hen Dung (fresh)......
Mixed Stable Manure....!


50 .... .......
to 52 ......... ......... ........
to 30 ......... .........
to 44 12 to 16 .................
to 30 ......... ......... .........
to 121 ......... ......... .........
to 20 ......... ..................
to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
to 8 ......... 1 to 2 ........
to 2......... to 1 35 to 40
to 8 2 to 4 ......... 31
0.40 0 to 41 0.16 0.31
0.53 0 to 60 0.28 0.31
0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70












FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein by...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by......... 16.47
Nitrogen into protein, by ..................... 6..25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.4.S
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.1S4
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by .32;:2
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.53:
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1 .;
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by .... ..1:9
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by ".i;l
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.400
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want o know how much nitrogen is in it. multiply '95
per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen:
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.6S1. equals G1.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).




COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEED
LAWS.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending fur
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.

COPIES OF THE PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law. rules and
regulations, standards, blanks. etc., can be obtained from
the Commissioner of Agriculture.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fetilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have
any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on
the goods furnished them, should not hesitate to send in
samples for an analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods pur-
chased analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of
the law-without charge-the inspection fees covering the
cost of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had
a direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and manu-
facturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection,
demanded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are
imported direct by factories and dealers located at our
sea port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at and exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the
"guarantee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and sending of special
samples-on another page.









44

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.



NAME OF FEED i



Bright Cotton Seed Meal 7.05 38.83 27.57i 9.22 6.60

Dark Cotton Seed Meal ...... 21.43 36.56 5.45....

Linseed Meal ......... .8.76 34.701 35.91 5.34 6.12

Wheat Bran .......... 8.39 15.101 57.28' 3.65 .33

Middlings ............ 6.36 17.23 56.70 4.42 4.30

Mixed Feed (wheat).. 7.80 16.86 54.44! 4.79 5.30

Corn Meal ........... 1.64 .73 71.32 3.14 1.20

Corn (grain) ......... 2.1 110.50 69.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Cobs ........... 30.10 2.40 54.90 0.50 1.40

Corn and Cob Meal.... 6.60 8.50 64.80 3.501 1.50

Corn & Oats, eq'l p'ts.. 5.80 9.60 66.10 4.40 2.20

W heat ............... 1.80 11.90 71.99 2.10 1.80

Oats ............... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.09

Soja Beans ........... 4.80 34.00 28.00I 16.50 5.40

Velvet Beans & Hulls.. 9.20 19.70 51.30 4.50i 3.30

Rice Hulls ........... 35.70 3.60 38.60 0.701 13.20

Gluten Meal .......... 1.251 37.061 46.52' 3.27 0.68

Gluten Feed ........ 7.31 24.17 54.30 3.44' 1.80












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)




NAME OF FEED. o



Hominy Feed ......... 4.05 10.49 65.27 7.85 2.54

Rye Products (bran).. 4.53 15.57 61.28 3.02 3.80

Barley Sprouts ...... 10.94 27.20 42.66 1.56 6.34

Distillers' Grains .... 12.90 32.23 33.34 12.09 1.86

Oat Feed ............... 20.57 7.91 54.58 3.26 5.34

Provender ............ 3.91 10.62 67.34 4.03 1.83

Ship Stuff ........... ...... 16.30 58.14 4.28 ... ..

Victor Feed .......... 10.63 8.83 62.46 4.02 3.64

XXX Corn & Oat Feeds 9.94 9.66 64.66 5.09 3.24

Corn & Oat Feeds..... 12.09 8.73 61.73 3.73 3.22

Proprietary Horse F'ds 9.57 12.48 60.54 4.27 2.83

Molasses Feeds ....... 8.49 16.34 51.72 1.79 6.18

Poultry Feeds ........ 4.62 15.89 60.27 5.321 27.63

Beef Scrap ........... ....... 44.70 3.28 14.75 29.20

Quaker Dairy Feed.... 15.53 14.42 52.12 4.05 5.31

Creamery Feed ......... 10.07 20.06 51.00 5.38 3.57

Purina Feed .......... 12.60 15.10 56.50 4.10 4.65











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED-
STUFF 1908.

For the season of 1908, the following "State values'
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn ,to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef. etc.:

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFFS FOR 190S.

Protein, 65c per unit of 20 lbs.............. 3.25c per lb.
Starch and Sugar, 30c per unit of 20 lbs. .... 1.50c per lb.
Fats, 65c per unit of 20 lbs .............. ... 3.25c per lb.

Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO. 1
HOMINY FEED-
Protein ........................ .. 10.49 x 65c. 8 6.l1
Starch and Sugar................ 5.27 x 30c. 19.58
Fats ............................ 7.85 x G5c. 5.10

State value per ton ........................ .$31.49

EXAMPLE NO. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-
Protein ........................ 9.66 x 65c. 8 6.27
Starch and Sugar ........... .. ...62.46 x 30c. 1S.73
Fats ............................ 5.09 x 65c 3.30

State value per ton .......... .. .......... $28.30
R. E. ROSE.
State Chemist.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analyses of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by Purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND. '

09


Fertilizer .................... 1322
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 1323
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 1324
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 1325
Acid Phosphate ............. 1326
Orange Tree Special No. 1 .... 1327
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1328
Fertilizer No. 3 .............. 1329
Premium Guano .... ........ 1330
L. G. Sulph. Potash .......... 1331
"Unidentified" (impure Muriate
Potash) .................... 1332
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1333
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 1334
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 1335
Fertilizer No. 3 .............. 1336
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1337


8.36
7.23
7.55

14.45


12.83
21.16




9.56
9.94
8.68


Phosphoric Acid.





> o I

8.26 .16 8.42
5.86 1.72 7.58
6.00 2.05 8.05

.... 2.25 2.00.
8.09 1.07 9.16

6.78 1.07 7.85
10.81 5.32 16.13
.... .... I ....


6.14
5.24
4.96
.... I


. I

2.12
2.22
1.74


8.26
7.46
6.70


0
13BY WHOM SENT.




2.66 14.59 J. W. Perkins, De Land, Fla.
3.15 10.18 J. R. Galloway, Okahumpka, Fla.
4.45 5.95 J. R. Galloway, Okahumpka, Fla.
4.21 .... John High, Bakers Hill, Fla.
.... .... IF. B. Carpenter, Richmond, Va.
3.12 10.49 W. G. Norsworth, McIntosh, Fla.
6.79 .... Robert Carlton, Nocatee, Fla.
3.08 9.45 II. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
3.77 2.77 L. W. Tilden, Oakland, Fla.
.... 29.92 L. W. Tilden, Oakland, Fla.

0.73 43.68 L. W. Tilden, Oakland, Fla.
7.53 .... C. B. Gwynn, Tallahassee, Fla.
3.55 9.37 T. J. Peters, Perrine, Fla.
3.70 7.77 T. J. Peters, Perrine, Fla.
4.23 8.67 T J. Peters, Perrine, Fla.
6.42 .... IDuval Bros., Tallahassee, Fla.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.
t- F



Dried Blood ................. 133
Special Mixture No. 2 ........ 133
Fertilizer .................... 134
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 134
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 134
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 134;
Nitrate of Potash ............ 134
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 134.
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 134.
Ground Tobacco Stems ....... 134
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 134
Fertilizer .................... 134
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 135
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 135
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 135
Special M mixture ............. 135
Special Mixture ............. 1:35
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 135
IF rtilizer .................. 135
Colton S odl Meal ............ 135
lF rtilize.r ................... 135
Ferlllizer (P'olash M.lxture) ... 135


I-





8.45

14.58

5.47
8.89
9.96


5.70
8.07
8.1 ;


8.59

8.1

14.92


Phosphoric Acid.





E
< '
I I -


8.76
8.79
6.93
6.60


5.97
6.46


5.27
7.71
9.1 4

7.01
9.14

6.46
5.. 5
4.33


9.81
8.91
7.91
6.98


8.02
8.49


13.99
7.89
9.53

15.42
9.40

8.8 O

7.01
13.85


0
SBY WHOM SENT.

0 ^
a o


15.17 .... IF. L. Hamer, Ankona, Fla.
0.70 13.22 IW. G. Norsworth, McIntosh, Fla.
3.94 9.85 .T. P. Cowburn, Crescent City, Fla.
5.27 7.85 E. C. Thornhil, Wauchula, Fla.
4.271 9.27 E. C. Thornhil, Wauchula, Fla.
8.531 .... Barlow & Son, Quincy, Fla.
11.86 143.12 E.O.Painter Fcrtz.Co., Jacksonville,Fla. C
4.85 4.7: J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
4.97 4.44 J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
2.74 7.39 .Tohn H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
7.84 .... 10. C. Collins, Tallahassee, Fla.
. .55 7.43 IW. H. Platt, Lilly, Fla.
5.22 7.19 \V. Cliff., Croscent City, Fla.
5.79 8.55 W. Cliff,, Crescent City, Fla.
8.26 .... .T.E. lardeo Co., MW lison, Fla.
0.90 25.72 III Betholl, T'allahassee. Fla.
1.21 9.02 T. W. 1lincheliff(e, Crescint City, Fla.
,S.25 .... 1. W Knightl, l'lor;ld City. Fla.
5.::33 5.60 .Il ies McKa;y, lloynlon. Fla.
8.2: .... V. C. Browe'r, Qullncy, Fla.
2.96 4.79 T. F. (lnns, Sainfor(d, Fla.
1.56 20.44 Elimi Silher, Sawdust, Fla.









,Cocoanut Meal (Special Feed-
I ing Stuff No. 64) ..........
MK ainit ......................
&Fertilizer No. 2 .............
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1 .....
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2 .......
Cotton Seed Meal, Mo. P. No.
37026 ......................
Cotton Seed Meal, A.C.L. 22054
Cotton Seed Meal, A.C.L. 26370
Cotton Seed Meal, S.A.L. 25421
Cotton Seed Meal, Ga. 6178....
Bone M eal .................. .
Carbonate of Potash ..........
Cotton Seed Meal ............
K ainit .......................
Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer .............. ...
Fertilizer (Tobacco Mixture)..
Fertilizer ("Majestic") ........
Fertilizer ("Monarch") .......
Cotton Seed Meal, S.A.L.24176.
Cotton Seed Meal, S.A.L. 18074.
Cotton Seed Meal, A.C.L 21575.1
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal...........
Cotton Seed Moal (marked "M")l
Cotton Seed Meal (marked "T")|
Fertilizer-Bird Excrement ...
Fertilizer ............... ....


1360
1361
1362
1363
1364
1365
1366

1367
1368
1369
1370
1371
1372
1373
1374
1375
1376
1377
1378
1379
1380
1381
1382
1383
1384
1385
1386
1387
1388
1389


9.08

10.53













7.13
12.14

12.65
17.20






34.20
5.511


.... .... 1.04 .... | 2.26 Fla. Refining Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

8.36 .17 8.53 5.66 9.07 J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City, Fla.
S.. .... .... 8.27 .... Covington & Southerland, Quincy, Fla.
... .. .... .. 7.98 .... W Scott, Quincy, Fla.
.. .. .... 7.26 ... S. M. Tucker, Tallahassee, Fla.
.. .... 7.40 .... S. M. Tucker, Tallahassee, Fla.

.. .... .... 7.45 ... John L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.35 .... ohn L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
.. ... 7.61 .... John L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
.. .... 7.68 .... John L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
.... 7.75 .... John L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
16.34 13.12 29.46 1.861 .... John L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
S. .. ... .... 66.00 IJchn L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
.... ... 8.38 .... A. J. Key, Quincy, Fla.
.... .... .... I .... 12.78 J. W Carol, New River, Fla,
5.95 2.35 8.30 2.98 11.30 IChas. Sellmer, Zellwood, Fla.
8.761 1.76 10.52 2.89[ 3.45 IE. L. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
6.88112.31 19.19 2.60 111.16 IJ. E. Hardee Co., Madison. Fla.
4.231 .601 4.83 6.14 11.60 K. R. Murrell, Sanford, Fla.
6.61 1.36 7.971 4.291 3.96 K. R. Murrell, Sanford. Fla.
.... .. 7.53 .... W. T. Doss, Hinson, Fla.
S .. 7.86 .... IW. T. Doss, Hinson, Fla.
.... I .... I 7.62 .... IW. T. Doss, Hinson, Fla.
...... .... 7.71 ... The Lewis Bear Co., Pensacola, Fla.
S.... .... 7.501 .... A. Brown & Son, Ocala, Fla.
8.. .... ... .05 .... El Provedo Cigar Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
S..... 8.00 I .... TEl Provedo Cigar Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
.. .. 3.75] 7.351 1.06 IE. D. Schafer, Gainesville, Fla.
5.88 .70 6.58 4.30 9.27 IE. V. Lundberg, Crescent City, Fla.










BUREAU OF FPtTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.




Fertilizer ...................
Muriate of Potash ...........
Fertilizer ....................
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Fertilizer No. 1 ..............
Fertilizer No. 2 ............. .
Foerilizer No. 3 ..............
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer, "Special Mixture A".
Fertilizer, 'ISpecial Mixture B".
"C uano" Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer No. 1 ...............
Fertilizer N o. 2 ..............
(olt on Seed Meal ............
Colton Seed1 Meal ............
Special Mixture .............
Acid P'hoIlsphI t ..............
Kl ainit .......................
(Colon Seed M(eal .............
I'o lsh, Bone Meal Mixlmte....
olnsh, li. one Meal Mixtllre....


o
'-3-

1390
1391
1392
1393
1394
1395
1396
1197
1398
1399
1400
1401
1402
1403
1404
1405
1406
1407
1408
1409
1110
1411


Phosphoric Acid.


| d BY WHOM SENT.

I-
o 1 a '

110.411 8.141 2.18 10.33 2.97 3.30 1. I. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
.... .... .... 51.10 E I. Murphy, Milton, Fla.
.... 6.94- 1.95 8.89 2.07 2.52 J. Z. Rudd, Oclocknee, Fla.
.... .... 7.90 .... ('lts. W Avirett, Quincy. Fla.
S. 5.37 1.38 6.75 5.94 6.98 iN. 1. (Colson, Belk, Fla.
.... 8.00 2.37 110.37 4.82 8.14 N. I. Colson, Belk, Fla.
.... 92 1 9S 8.90 2.49 3.90 IN. 1. Colson. Belk. Fla.
7.43 3.94 2.16 6.10 5.73 6.42 HIlrry Leland, Miami, Fla.
9.51 6.04 .()S 6.12 4.62 8.53 ll. A. Perry, Pomona. Fla.
.... 7.1 2.521 9.68 6.531 2.50 S. C. Mayo, Reddick, Fla.
.... 7.6S 1.30 9.16 6.38 8.74 IS C. Mayo, Reddick, Fla.
16.26 10.26 .89 11.15 1.25 2.77 1). t. Moore, Laurel Hill. Fla.
4.95 5.92 |12.0: 17.95 2.16 20.48 .1. M. Diason. Gretna, Fla.
5.64 6.13 111.00 17.13 2.17 20.70 I1. M. 1)eiason, Gretna, Fla.
.. .. .... 7.87 .... .'I N. Dorsey, Concord, Fla.
. 7.90 .... V. I. Ilnl m Tallhaliss,,, Fla.
... .51 5.02 2.14 18.62 IV. l. laleomn. Tallahassoo, Fla.
S ... 1 .:1; .3 .1 16.67 .. .\ 1 .. \\hite Oak Hiill, Fla.
... ... ... ... 13.48 1 \l I. l al1rwell, F l W hlile, Fla.
.. 7.57 .... 1]M inning & T' ck r, wallahh .i se 1Fla.
.. .78 110.89 15.671 2.11 117.96 |Ml: inilil & 'l',cker, '&ralhl.iassee, I''la
1 4.77 5.47 112.30 117.771 1 .66 123.0(0 IC. It. (,wynn, 'Tallahli;sse Fla.








Fertilizer ................... 1412
Fertilizer .................... 1413
Fertilizer .................... 1414
Potash Salts No. 1 ........... 1415
Potash Salts No. 2 ........... 1416
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1417
Acid Phosphate (No. 1) ...... 1418
Acid Phosphate (No. 2) ....... 1419
Cotton Seed Meal (Bright) .... 1420
Cotton Seed Meal (Dark) ..... 1421
Fertilizer (Complete) ........ 1422
"Kainit" (not Kainit, but Muri-
ate of Potash) .............. 1423
Fertilizer No. 1 .............. 1424
Fertilizer No. 2 .............. 1425
Fertz. No. 3 (Peruvian Guano) 1426
Cotton Seed Meal ........... 1427
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1428
Ashes ....................... 1429
Fertilizer .................... 1430
Fertz. (H. G. Spec. Tob. Mixt.) 1431
Fertz. (H. G. Spec. Tob. Mixt.). 1432
Fertilizer .................... 1433
Fertz. No. 1 (Special Mixture). 1434
Fertz. No. 2 (Barker's Nassaul
Guano) ....................! 1435
Cotton Seed Meal ........... 1436
H. G. Spec. Tob. Mixture (dam-
aged by rain) ............... 1437
H. G. Spec. Tob. Mixture ...... 1438
Cotton Seed Meal ............ 1439


9.85
8.00







12.84







3.63
3.79
2.35
8.07


6.54
7.58
8.66



12.36
14.86


9.00


6.30
11.17
7.72



8.32
4.96
4.66
5.19
7.58

9.07


1.49 8.03
1.28 8.86
2.02 10.68



3.18 15.54
2.35 17.21


2.28 11.28


11.79 18.09
1.57 12.74
2.52 10.24



10.39 18.71
11.79 16.75
12.58 117.24
1.57 6.76
.541 8.12

1.62 110.69
.... ... ..

... 14.97
.... ,14.44
. I .


3.99 5.18 jR. Y. Bun, Perrine, Fla.
3.17 9.11 C. W. Stephens, Tampa, Fla.
2.24 2.46 Geo. B. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.
.... 47.56 C. Upton, Boynton, Fla.
.... 45.60 C. Upton, Boynton, Fla.
8.30 .... Sample & Godfrey, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
.... .... G. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.
.... .... G. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.
7.78 ... G. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.
6.58 .... G. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.
2.32 1.96 G. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.

.... 50.60 I. L. Metts, Milton, Fla.
2.09 12.88 Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.
2.76 9.75 Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.
6.85 2.11 Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.
7.64 .... Quincy Sumatra Co., Quincy, Fla.
7.84 .... Howard Gamble, Tallahassee, Fla.
.... 2.91 J. W. Watson, Miami, Fla.
2.07 16.64 ]Geo. B. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.
2.36 18.88 lGeo. B. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.
2.10 18.88 W. A. Hodges, Tallahassee, Fla.
3.82 7.98 IS. P. Shephar, Winter Park, Fla.
.... 5.03 IJ. M. Barton, Holland, Fla.

1.96 2.42 IJ. M. Barton, Holland, Fla.
8.26 .... IC. W. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.

1.89 18.88 C. W. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.
2.20 20.10 lGeo. B. Perkins, Tallahassee, Fla.
7.84 .... (Havana Loaf Tobacco Co., Havana,Fla.
I













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1907. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.


Samples Taken by the State Chemist Under Section 1, Act Approved May

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. a
0a Gu I i
1^ ;I I^ o r


Armour's Vegetable....... 10OC0Guaranteed Analysis.10.00 7.00 2.00 ...
iOfficial Analysi ..... 10.20 7.88 .94 8.S2
Armour's Blood, Bone and I
Polash ................ 1061 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 8.00 1.00 ....
lOficial Analysis ..,. 10.75 8.83 .71 9.57

Cotton Seed Meal ......... 10(2|Guaranteed Analysis. 7.5 .... .... 2.25 1
i Official Analysis .. .. .... .. .. ... .

('ollin Seed Meal ........ 1062O arantle d Analy is. .... 2.. 50
officiall Analysis .... .. ... ... ....

Special Mixture No. 1 .... 10;.1 ( aranteed Analysis. .00 (.00 1.00 ...
I ()fl lnl Analysis .2 1 5.S .9 1.95 7 .81

II. (,. Acid Phosphate..... (10 ;r.( araniite d Analysis 12.00 1;.00 .... ....
O lllcal Analysis .... 13.S 141.71 2 .57 118.31 1


22, 190




.11
'd








00
4.80



8.11
.5001




7...
5. 21
... '*' '


)1.



O
BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.
Ui

0

,.00O Armour Fertilizer Works,
6.09 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
6.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

.... ntral Oil and Fertilizer
.. Co., Cordelo, Ga.
I
1.50 MMcCaw Mrfg. Co., Macon,
.... I Ga.

5.0o0 W\ilson & 'rTootir Fertz.
5. 10 I Co., JacksoLiivill,. Fla.
I
.... \\'ilson & 'I'oonier Feriz.
.... ] Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.







Special Strawberry Fertz.. 1066 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis ..,.. 7.66 6.64

Seminole Tree Guano ... 1067 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 9.21 6.48

Ideal Fertilizer ..........1068 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 5.00
Official Analysis .... 7.07 4.56
Ideal Fruit and Vine Man-
ure ....................1069 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 7.48 5.62
Special Fruit and Vine
Manure ............... 1070 Guaranteed Analysis. 10.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 6.02 5.64
Cumberland Bone (Super-
phosphate of Lime).... 1071 Guaranteed Analysis. 15.00 9.00
Official Analysis ..,.. 12.94 9.24

Cotton Seed Meal ..... .... 1072Guaranteed Analysis ........
IOfficial Analysis .... .... ....

Cotton Seed Meal ... ...... 1073 Guaranteed Analysis .... ....
Official Analysis .... .... ....

Gem Fruit and Vine...... 1074 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 8.74 7.07

Simon Pure No. 1 ....... 1075Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis .... 7.10 6.28

Simon Pure Special No. 1. 1076 Guaranteed Analysis. 8.00 6.00
Official Analysis ..... 6.84 6.47


.... .... 3.50 3.00 Wilson & Toomer Ferts.
1.88 8.52 4.02 4.40 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

.... .... 4.00 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
1.33 7.18 4.10 7.41 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 .... 4.00 6.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
1.96 6.52 3.99 6.71 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

.... .... 3.00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
1.50 7.12 3.41 10.34 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 .... 4.00 13.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
.64 6.28 4.67 13.13 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 .... 2.00 1.00 Cumberland Bone Phos.
1.46 10.70 2.14 1.49 Co., Portland, Me.

.... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Cuthbert Oil Co., Cuth-
.... .... 7.88 .... bert, Ga.

.... ... 7.56 ... J. Lindsey Wells Co., Mem-
.... 7.41 ... phis, Tenn.

1.001.... 3.00)10.00 'E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
1.08 8.15 3.54] 9.44 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 .... 4.00 11.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
.16 6.44 5.15 12.62 1 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 .... 2.00 16.00 !E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
.11 6.58 2.98 15.18 1 Jacksonville, Fla.











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. .


...... ^ P ,0. i i
0 =
'.0


Simon Pure Tomato .....1077!Guaranteed Analysis. 12.00 4.00 3.00 .... 5.00
Official Analysis .....I 7.47 (;.30 3.71 10.011 5.70

H. G. Dried Blood ........ 1078 Guaranteed Analysis ..... .... ... 16.00
8 Official Analysis ..,.. .. .... .... 16.86

1. (G. )issolved Bone Black 1079 Cuaranteed Analysis. ... '1.00 .....
lOfficial Analysis .... .. 17.31 .08 17.39 ....

Bright Cotton Seed Meal.. 10C80 Guaranteed Analysis. ...... .... 2.25 8.00
official Analysis ...... .... .. .. 8.26

Cot Ion Seed Meal ........ 108 1 ,I G nranteed Analysis. 7.;5 .... 2. 7.50
Official Analysis ... .. .. .... 7.92

(Cottonl Scod Meal ......... 1082 Guaran:eed Analysis. 7 .. 2.40, 7.50
Official Analysis '. .... ........ 8. 22

I'ir i lly lorila Veget al)e 10 S::(;:anl r: teed Analyssis. 1' .00 0.0 1.00 .. 4..00
S lOfIlelal Analysis .... 7.92[ 7.11 2.021 9.13 1.14 1


BY WHOM AND WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


9.00 |E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
9.97 Jacksonville, Fla.

.... E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
.Jacksonville, Fla.

.... O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
.... Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
..... Jacksonvillo, Fla.
1.71; Georgia Cotton Oil Co.,
.... Macon, Ga.
1.7(; (oorgla Cotton Oil Co.,
.... Mancon. Ga.

5.00 Alnirlcan Agrl. Clihonllea
41 .93 1 Co., lJacksonville, Fla.










Mapes Vegetable Manure. 1084 Guaranteed Analysis.12.00 6.00 2.00
S Official Analysis .... 12.00 5.95 3.07
Mapes Fruit and Vine
Manure ............... i085lGuaranteed Analysis. 10.00 5.00 2.00
lOfficial Analysis .... 8.84 3.81 i 4.29
Mapes Orange Tree Man- I
ure ....................1086 Guaranteed Analysis.ll2.00 6.00 2.00
IOfficial Analysis .... 9.49 4.65 6.20

apes Pineappuc Manure. 1087 Guaranteed Analysis 10.00 4.001 2.00
lOfficial Analysis .... 1,7.071 4.71 3.24

Cotton Seed Meal .......... 10SSIGuaranteed Analysis. 7.651 ........
Official Analysis .... .... ... ...

Non-Ammoniated Special.. 1089 Guaranteed Analysis. .. ...
I Official Analysis .... 9.41 10.79 1.03

B.'an Special ........... 1090 Guaranteed Analysis. .. 6.00 .
] Official Analysis .... 8.351 5.35 .99

Strawberry Special ......11091 Guaranteed Analysis .... 6.00 ....
I Official Analysis .... 1 4.76 4.55 3.781

Tomato Special l1092lGuaranteed Analysis. .... 7.00 ....
S Official Analysis ... 8.75 6.821 1.841

Favorite Early Trucker... 10931CGurantced Analysis.110.00 6.00 2.00
I Official Analysis .... ( 7.691 5.071 2.431
I I I I I


9.02

8.10

10.85

7.95

2.40

10.001
11.82

6.34

8.33 1

8.661

....
7.501
1


5.00 4.00 IMapes F. & P. G. Co., New
5.38 5.86 I York.

2.00 10.00 Mapes F. & P. G. Co., New
2.50 11.13 York.
4.00 3.00 1Mapes F. & P. G. Co., New
4.46 3.45 York.

5.00 5.00 Mapes F. & P. G. Co., New
5.26 5.451 York.

7.501 1.76 IGeorgia Cotton Oil Co.,
7.59 .... I Macon, Ga.
.... 11.00 Sanders r'ertilizer Co.,
.... 110.18 1 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 6.00 Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
3.77] 7.14 Jacksonville, Fla.
2.00 112.00 ISanders Fertilizer Co.,
2.59111.54 1 Jacksonville. Fla.
5.001 9.00 1Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
5.981 7.77 I Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 110.00 1Sanders Fertilizer Co.,
3.05 11.21 Jacksonville, Fla.
1 55









BUREAU OF FEEDSTUFFS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistan
Analyses of Special Samples Under Sec. 9, Act Approved May 24, 1905. (Sanples taken by purchaser.)


NAME, OR BRAND.



Dried Beet Pulp .............

Shorts .....................

Coca Nut Meal ..............

Stafolife .....................


0
d,0




62 20.00 9.40

63 10.62 17.11

64 10.10 18.00

65 12.10 10.40


n



57.89 0.25 3.21

50.45 2.70 6.97

38.05 11.68 5.12

52.29 6.40 8.77


By Whom Sent.



Wambolt & Moore, Jacksonville, Fla.

Mrs. S. T. Ambrose, Waldo, Fla.

Florida Refining Co., Jacksonville,Fla. V

Consolidated Grocery Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.


NOTICE.-The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9 of the laws providing for "Special Samples"
drawn by consumers are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the laws and the "Rules and Regulations governing
the taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feedstuffs and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report.
Also to compare the "official analysis" and the markett value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will he found that in a number of cases 1he "market value." or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods-that in several instances the highest "market value" is plicId( oln the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guaranty t he uante thle bag with the table of "average composition of foodstuffs."
In case of doullt as to the truthfulness of the giuarani(e draw a sample, accordlind to law and regulali ons, and send
in a tin box, sealed, to the "Commissioner of Aigriculture." Preserve tile "gua;ranlle tags" off the packages, to com-
pare wlll the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.


t Chemist.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE- DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFF, 1907.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Section 1, Act Approved Ma y24, 1905.



NAME, OR BRAND. MANUFACTURERS



Creamo Brand Cotton Seed Meal. 441 Guaranteed Analysis..... 22.0030.00 5.00 .... Tennessee Fiber Co., Mem-
Official Analysis...... 19.40 21.95134.00 5.48 9.07 phis, Tenn.
Creamo Brand Cotton Seed Meal. 442 Guaranteed Analysis.. 28.00 22.00 5.00 ...Tennessee Fiber Co, Mem-
Official Analysis.......21.87 19.15 37.09| 4.55 7.42 phis, Tenn.
Imperial Brand Cotton Seed Meal 443 Guaranteed Analysis....... 25.75 ............Grant Bros. Co.
Official Analysis..... 21.6022.10 37.62 4.48 3.8
Sunny South Brand Cotton Seed
Meal ... ..................... 444 Guaranteed Analysis. ..... 25.0015.00 5.00 J. Lindsey Wells Co., Mem-
Official Analysis..... 19.67 36.55 38.78 4.78 4.42 phis, Tenn.
Macon's Mill Cotton Seed Meal... 445 Guaranteed Analysis.. ....38.62 G..............eorgia Cotton Oil Co, Ma-
Official Analysis....... 11.75 36.55 30.25 6.83 5.25 con, Ga.
Pure Wheat Bran............... 446 Guaranteed Analysis.. 7.49 16.09 53.58 4.68 .... .Acme Mills and Elevator Co.
Offivial Analysis ...... 7.7515.5555.76 3.25 5.52 Hopkinsville, Ky.
Pure Wheat Bran............... 447 Guaranteed Analysis.. 9.49 14.6057.23 3.82 .... Dunlop Milling Co., Clarks-
Official Analysis...... 9.10 14.30 55.76 2.451 6.27 ffiville, Tenn.


-I















NAME, OR BRAND.



Blair's Bran .................. ...


Lillie Bran ............ ....... .


B ran ............................


Pure Wheat Bran ..............


Dried Beet Pulp.................


Dried Bee I Pulp.................


IDried HelIt Pulp... ..............


ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


0 S ADDRESS OF
o MANUFACTURERS



448Guaranteed Analysis.. 9.5014.00 54.00 3.50...Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
S Official Analysis...... 9.40 16.35 52.45 2.98 6.97 Kan.

449 Guaranteed Analysis.. 8.50 15.00 56.50 4.00 .... Lillie Mill Co, Franklin,
Official Analysis...... 8.32 14.85 56.51 3.60 5.22 Tenn.

450,Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 96923.92 7.18 .... Mountain City Mill Co.,
IOfficial Analysis. ..... 8.50 14.25 55.90] 2.60 6.50 Chattanooga, Tenn.

451 Guaranteed Analysis.. 9.00 15.50 52.00 4.50....J. Allen Smith & Co., Knox-
JOfficial Analysis...... 10.77 13.90 53.13] 3.051 7.301 ville, Tenn.

452 Guaranteed Analysis.. 20.00 8.5060.00 0.051 ..... German American Sugar Co.,
Official Analysis...... .20.05 9.85 58.73 0.05 3.77 West Bay City, Mich.

453 Guaranteed Analysis..19.86 8.97 58.90 0.55.....
Official Analysis..... 119.80 9.15157.95 0.281 3.05 Bay City, Mich.

454lRluarantte(l Analysis.. 20.00 8.50160.00 0.05 ..... (ermn;n American Sugar Co.,
OfIici;il Analysis ...... 1.921 9.3058.401 0.08( : 3.41 West Bay City, Mich.

455(lG uir; d AnAllysis.. 8.00 12.2 56.80 3.27 ..... .lMol;isco Co., East St. Louis,
Ofllclal Analysis...... 16.42113.25 49.33 2.28] 9.521 Ill.











Peck's Mule Feed...............

Protena Alfalfa Feed ............

Purina Feed .................. .

Purina Feed .................. .

Banner Feed ...................

Banner Feed ...................

Pure Winter Wheat Middlings...

Pure Wheat Shorts..............

Crescent Mixed Feed............

Diamond C Corn and Oat Chops..

Excelsior Chop Feed ...........


4561Guaranteed Analysis.. 11.90 10.00159.20
Official Analysis...... 10.30 12.50 59.90
457 Guaranteed Analysis.. 14.90 10.00 56.00
Official Analysis...... 10.82111.95159.211
458 Guaranteed Analysis.. 7.90 14.00 60.00I
Official Analysis...... 6.9712.00161.101

459|Guaranteed Analysis.. 7.90 14.00160.00|
lOfficial Analysis...... 9.32113.05157.591

460jGuiaranteed Analysis.. 10.001 8.00n62.001
lOfficial Analysis....r.. 9.751 9.00163.771

461lGuaranteed Analysis.. 10.00 8.00 62.00
lOfficial Analysis...... 10.321 8.75165.001
I I I I
462|Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 16.00156.001
lOfficial Analysis...... 5.55118.60155.951

463 Guaranteed Analysis....... 7.31 .....
Official Analysis ..... 6.12116.80i57.36

4641Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 12.29 61.92
}Official Analysis...... 11.47110.62160.381

465 Guaranteed Analysis.. 12.00110.00!58.50
lOfficial Analysis...... 113.501 9.88157.211

466IGnaranteed Analysis.. 10.001 9.00160.00
IOfficial Analysis .,..... R.95i 8.90164.211


3.80 ... Illinois Feed Mills, St. Louis,
3.40 3.35 Mo.

4.00 .... Ralston Purina Co., St.
3.03 3.721 Louis, Mo.

4.50 .. Ralston Purina Co., St.
3.68 3.00 Louis, Mo.

4.50 .... Ralston Purina C o., St.
2.801 3.971 Louis, Mo.

3.501 .... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
2.63' 3.051 Ill.

3.50..... lQuaker Oats Co., Chicago,
2.131 3.031 Ill.

4.00. .... Hunter Bros. Milling Co., St.
4.331 4.251 Louis, Mo.

4.85.... Hennepin Mill Co., Louis-
3.701 4.651 ville, Ky.

3.28 ..... City Grain and Feed Co.,
2.391 2.571 Columbia, Tenn.

3.50.... ICorno Mills Co., East St.
3.001 4.431 Louis, I11.

4.201.....IGreat Western Cereal Co.,
4.651 3.971 Chicago, Ill.









ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. d .


Corn and Oats.......... 467Guaranteed Analysis.. 5.80 10.75165.00,
|Official Analysis...... 4.57 9.55 66.991
vn Mixed Feed ............ 468 Guaranteed Analysis.. 13.45 8.31 60.35
Official Analysis. ..... 5.32110.00 65.181

mixed Feed ............... 469 Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 11.53 53.97
Official Analysis ..... 18.52 9.05 53.76

lorse and Mule Feed .... 470OGuaranteed Analysis.. 12.00l10.00 8.503
[Official Analysis...... 12.17 9.83 59.23

Peed ................. ... 471 Guaranteed Analysis.. 12.001 7.50 62.00
Official Analysis ...... 9.421 8.30 65.73

Feed .................... 472 Guaranteed Analysis.. 4.50 11.00 .....
Official Analysis...... 5.87 12.50:61.10

uff ..................... 473 Guaranteed Analysis ..... 13.00116.71
Official Analysis G.12I 2:.1 (; 61.981

Feed .................. 474ICnar;ile,(d Analysis.. .2.8 9.52 17.,89
j[Offlleii A analysis .... 3.05110.71165.961


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS


5.15 .....'Baker & Holmes Co., Jack-
3.34 2.02 sonville, Fla.

3.2 ..... Baker & Holmes Co., Jack-
3.08 3.921 sonville, Fla.

2.62 ..... City Grain and Feed Co., Co-
1.90 3.92 lumbia. Tenn.
o
2.50 .... .Corno Mills Co., East St.
2.001 3.671 Louis, Ill.

:,.00 .... .Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
3.23 3.00 Ill.

2.00 ..... City Mills Co., Columbus,Ga.
:.5:! 1.95

;.99 ..... 1.Mountain Cily Mills Co.,,
1.201 :.10|) Chattanooga, Tenn.

9.12 ..... Ami rican Tlominy Co., Indl-
8.78 2.,80 ana: polls, Ind.


Ground


Our Ov


Star Mi


Corn, I


Victor ]


Fancy


Ship St


Ilo oco










Hominy Feed, or Feed Meal..... 4751Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 8.70 65.75 7.
Official Analysis.....6.75 9.4065.87 6.

Cotton Seed Meal ................ 476 Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 38.62 .... ..
Official Analysis...... 8.70 46.7029.13 7.
Macon Mills Brand Cotton Seed
Meal ......................... 477 Guaranteed Analysis....... 38.62 ... ..
Official Analysis ...... 10.15139.00 30.51 6.
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 478 Guaranteed Analysis.. ..... 38.52... ..
Official Analysis...... 9.52139.40,30.28 7.
Durham Brand Sea Island Cotton
Seed Meal ........... ...... 479 Guaranteed Analysis.. ..... 25.75 ... ..
Sunny South Brand Cotton Seed Official Analysis...... 18.70 24.10 37.05 5.
Sunny South Brand Cotton Seed
Meal .................. ....... 480 Guaranteed Analysis.. .... 25.00 15.00 5.
Official Analysis ...... 19.70[22.25!39.04 5.

Ship Stuff Feed Meal ........... 481 Guaranteed Analysis.. 7.00 13.00 60.00 5.
lair' SoOfficial Analysis .... 5.5713.90 58.51 5.
ir's Short. .. ............... 4 2 Guarant od Analysis. 9 00n l4.50 56,001 3.
Official Analysis...... 5.97117.70 55.09J 4.
Pure Wheat Middlings ............ 483Guaranted Analysis.. .... 15.70 60.30 4.
Official Analysis ...... I 5.45117.46 56.37! 5.

Banner Feed ...... ............. 484 Guaranteed Analysis.. 10.00 8.00 62.00( 3.
Official Analysis ...... 4.951 9.10 70.60 2.
Boss Corn and Oat Feed ........ 485 Guaranteed Analysis.. 11.00 9.0062.00 4.
Official Analysis. ..... | 7.20 9.60164.801 5.


25 ....I. F. H. Burch Co., Little Rock,
38 6.38 Rock, Ark.

.. .... Ocilla Oil and Fertz. Co.,
28 5.95] Ocilla, Ga.

........ Georgia Cotton Oil Co., Ma-
82 5.30 con, Ga.

S. ..... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
631 5.05 sonville, Fla.

. .... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
801 4.50 sonville, Fla.

00 ..... J. Lindsay Wells Co., Mem-
23 4.651 phis, Tenn.

50 ..... Mountain City Mill Co.,Chat-
68 3.87 tanooga, Tenn.

50/ .... Blnair Milling Co, Atchison,
501 4.87 Kan.

30 3.701C. Becker Milling Co., Red
20 4.30 Bird, Ind.

50 ..... Quaker Oats Co., Chicago,
55 2.80 Ill.

001.....Great Western Cereal Co.,
281 4.05| Chicago, Ill.








ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS-Continued.


Cd 1
NAME OF BRAND. .


Mixed (Bran) Feed ............. 486[Guaranteed Analysis..]11.24[13.42156.001
Official Analysis...... 10.60114.10 55.31
I 1 1 l


ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.
e
3.80[..... Capital Grain and Mill Co.,
3.651 4.471 Nashville, Tenn.
I I


SPECIAL NOTICE.-The attention of dealers and consumers is called to the table of "Average Composition of
Feedstuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feedstuffs sold
throughout the country. Any material variation from these averages is presumptive evidence of impurity or
adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee t,
of the manufacturer should not vary materially from this table of averages, while the "official analysis" should
show practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers are requested, in all cases of
suspected inferiority or adulteration, to send a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.











R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.

Under Chapter 5662, Acts of 1907.


63
B. H. Bridges, Assistant Chemist.


n Name or Brand



103 Blackberry Mash....

104 Grape Mash........

105 Crescent Ale .......


110 Liquid .............


111 M alt ...............

112 Blue Ribbon Cider..



113 Will Argroth.......

1 4 Beer ...............

115 W ine ..............


Manufacturer.



Walker Mfg. Co., N. k...

Walker Mfg. Co., N. Y...

Burr Mfg. Co., Richmond,
V a. ................

...................


Columbia Drug Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga. ..........
0. Gregory Vinegar Co..
Richmond, Va.........






...... i ............. .....


Retail Dealer.


A. Christomidhes, Gaines-
ville Fla...............



George Ladson, Brooks-
ville, Fla..............
George Ladson, Brooks-
ville, Fla...............


a (D

go



3.35

4.10


4.10

7.90


3.35


7.15

5.89

5.48

7.80


By Whom Sent.




A. D. Stanton, Sheriff, Mad-
ison, Fla.
A. D. Stanton, Sheriff, Mad-
ison, Fla.

A. D. Stanton, Sheriff, Mad-
ison, Fla.
Mrs. W. S. McQuaid, Hast-
ings, Fla.




A. Christomidhes, Gaines-
ville, Fla.
W. E. Law, Sheriff, Her-
nando, Fla.
W. E. Law, Sheriff, Her-
nando, Fla.
W. E. Law, Sheriff, Her-
nando, Fla.










FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSIS-ContInued.


S Name or Brand. Manufacturer. Retail Dealer.


116 Cider ............. ......................... Will Argreet, Brooks-
ville, Fla.............. .
117 Acme Brew ........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
con G a .............. ......................
118 Acme Brew ........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
con, G a............... ......................
119 Acme Brew ........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
con, G a............... ............
120 Acme Brew ........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
con, Ga............... ......................

121 Phosphate or Wine.......................... ....................

122 Crabapple Cider. ........................ .....................

123 Golden Russet Apple .. ....................................

124 Cider No. 1......... ............................

12,> Cider No. 2.......... .................
126 Acme Brew........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
con, Ga............ .......................
127 Acmi Brew ........ Acme Brewing Co., Ma-
c n( (la ............... ....... .... ...
1 28, | M i,; 'tdl ..............C. l'; i); ,. -ll.r-w i (..o., M il
| w; uil e i .. ........ ... .. ..


i


4.45

2.70

2.00

2.00

2.45

2.00

7.15

7.15

6.:5

7.15

. 00

:t. 00

2.0(1


By Whom Sent.



W. E. Law, Sheriff, Her-
nando, Fla.
Levy Bros., Tallahassee,
Fla.
Levy Bros., Tallahassee,
Fla.
Levy Bros., Tallahassee,
Fla.
Levy Bros., Tallahassee,
Fla.
A. D. Stanton, Sheriff, Mad-
son. Fla.
E. C.Welch.Cottondale, Fla.

E. C.Welch,Cottondale, Fla.

T)Deb Bros., Tallahassee.
Fla.
I)Dob Bros, Tallahasseo.
Fla.
I,rwis TLindy, Tallahassee,
Fla.
Iwiis Iilldy, Tnlla.l assee,
IPla.
II. I,evy, T:'llahl: ssee, Fla.








MISCELLANEOUS FOOD AND DRUG ANALYSES.


FROM


lahbora-
lory No.

101

102(a)

102(1))

106

107

108

109


F. D. Saunders, Marshal, Pensacola,
Fla.
Dr. J. C. Wingo, Milton, Fla.

Dr. J. C. Wingo, Miltcn, Fla.

M. M. Sauls, Tallahassee, Fla.

Jno. M. Hughey. Bradentown, Fla.

Jno. M. Hughey. Bradentown, Fla.

W. R. Moses. West Palm Beach. Fla.


5-But


Cocaine H ydrochloride ..................................... .

Blue Mass (metallic mercury and conserve of roses)............

Blue Mass (metallic mercury and conserve of roses).............

Butter Substitute (butter mixed with tallow) ...................

Renovated Butter (colored with annmtto) ............ .........

R ancid Butter ................................................

Process Butter (butter mixed with tallow) .....................

















MISCELLANEOUS.




CORN CULTURE AND FERTILIZING IN FLORIDA
By R. E. ROSE.

The frequent requests for information as to the best
variety of corn to plant in Florida, the best fertilizers to
use, and best methods of culture, show a desire for a bet-
ter system of "cropping," or general farming by our citi-
zens. The ordinary "cotton goods" ("guano", "8-2-2"),
so universally used in the South, evidently, is not satis-
fying the more progressive farmers of the State.
The "Experiment Station", the "Farmers' Institute",
the Agricultural Press, the Agricultural Bulletins of the
various States and the United States Department of Agri-
culture are gradually educating our farmers to demand
fertilizers better adapted to the needs of their various
crops.
To apply a "cotton goods" designed 1o produce fiber, to
corn, potatoes, or cane, where the object is to produce
sugar, or starch, is, to say the least, wasteful.
As generally admitted, the principal elements in a fer-
tilzer, Nitrogen (ammonia), Phosphoric Acid, and Potash
perform different functions in plant production; each of
these materials are necessary, but depending on the mate-
rial to be produced, are required in different proportions.
Nitrogen (ammonia), is the predominating material
for foliage production-cabbage, lettuce, celery, tobacco,
etc., cultivated for their leaves-hence all special fertil-
izers for such plants have unusual percentages of am-
monia. This is well illustrated by the large quantities of
cotton seed meal, blood and bone, tankage, etc., used by
the tobacco growers, and celery and lettuce growers.
Phosphoric Acid, is the predominating material for
fiber production-cotton, hemp, etc., and to produce ma-
ture wood in fruit trees.
Potash is the predominating material required in all
starch, and sugar plants-fruits, strawberries, melons,
etc.. hence, all "Fruit and Vine" formulas contain large
percentages of potash.











Corn, being composed largely of starch, demands ron-
mlderable Potash, with comparatively less Ammonia. and
Phosphoric Acid, though both these latter materials are
necessary in a well balanced fertilizer.
The usual "vegetable fertilizers" "4-7-6." "*3-6-7." -4-5-6."
etc., are generally well balanced for general lmpurpses.
The average of all fertilizers sold in the State is practi-
tically, 4-7-7; that is. Ammonia 4 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid 7 per cent. and Potash 7 per cent. For gen-
eral use this would doubtless be a good formula, one easil-
made, and would not require a "filler." Numbers ,f su.h
formulas are published in the annual reports of tlii:
Division of the Department of Agriculture.
Corn, however, is a special crop, and should have sliecii
treatment and fertilizer, particularly so on the sandy
lands of Florida, where the soil is generally lacking in
all of the elements of fertility.
The following article by Mr. C. K. MIcQuarie. a pra',tical
Florida Farmer, is so comprehensive and to the point. that
it is reproduced in full; his formula. .3-5-7, is a ,good one.
and if used in the quantities, with the treatment he pro-
poses, will yield good results. Any reliable Florida manu-
facturer will furnish this formula at "State Valuations."
for $27.50 F. O. B. factory, for cash-made from the ma-
terials mentioned by Mr. McQuarie.
R. E. ROSE.
State Chemist.


CORN CULTURE.

By C. K. McQuarie.

The corn crop is one of the most valuable of all the
crops produced by the American farmer today. and yet
this crop could be increased 300 or 400 per cent. were the
farmer to put the same intelligence into its production
that the chemist and manufacturer put into their partic-
ular lines of work. The farmer today, in the majority -if
cases, plants corn the same way as his father. grandfather
and all the fathers before hiim have done for the last lirn-
dred or more years. hence tlhe reason of the low aver..rae
return per acre of the most valuable of all crops.
There are some sections of our country in whihll rTl-
farmers are waking up to a sense of the great possibili s-












that lie right to their hands in increasing the production
per acre of this crop, and aided by the experimental sta-
tions of their States are getting some wonderful results
by using improved methods of culture, selecting and grad-
ing seed, as well as studying the proper fertilizer to use
on the crop.
The farmer of the Southern States is, however, very far
behind in the race so far, not because soil and climate are
unsuitable, but because he does not take the interest in
increased production that the times demand. After
eighteen years' observation of and practical experience
with, this crop, the writer would like to make a few sug-
gestions along the line of increasing tihe production of
same.
One of the first, if not the very first, is deep plowing,
preparatory to planting. The usual depth of four to six
inches will never give satisfactory results. All lands
intended for corn should be plowed twelve to sixteen
inches deep. In plowing this depth we are storing a
supply of water in the soil that is necessary to give us a
large yield, for Incking water we cannot expect much of
a crop. We must remember there are two systems of water
in all soils: the drainage water that runs off, and the
film water that adheres to every individual grain of soil.
It is this film water that we increase by deep plowing
and thorough pulverization of the soil before planting,
and we can easily see that sixteen inches of soil will con-
tain four times as much water as four inches. This film
water is what the small rootlets feed from during the
period of the crop's growth.
Experiments have demonstrated the fact that a corn
crop can be made from a rainfall of only two inches
during the time of its growth, providing the soil is plowed
at least twelve inches deep, and soil plowed four inches
deep required twelve inches of a rainfall to make any
kind of a crop, and even with that amount the results
were unsatisfactory.
The next stage in this crop that I want to discuss is
the fertilization of same. Farmers in the Northern
States do not require to study this phase of it as thor-
oughly as we do, as their soils are naturally richer in
plant food than our soils of the South, but with us here
that is the all important question, and yet how often
we find it entirely neglected. The fertilizer manufacturers
are mostly to blame for the low grade of goods commonly












found in the market-they want to give the farmer a large
quantity for a nominal figure. and those low grade fer-
tilizers are the most expensive of all in the long run.
because none of them contain a well balanced ration of
plant food for any crop that grows.
Take the most commonly used grade, what is known as
8-2-2, and it does not suit any crop that the farmer makes.
It is excessive in phosphoric acid and deficient in both
potash and nitrogen, which really are the most important.
An excess of phosphoric acid on corn tends to unduly
early ripening, a large cob and tall, coarse stalk with
small leaves. Deficiency in nitrogen curtails the vitality
of the plant at the start, and a deficiency in potash retards
the formation and transference of the starch which is so
necessary in the full development of the grain. A brand
analyzing 5 per cent. phosphoric acid, 3 per cent. nitrogen
and 7 per cent. potash would be an ideal fertilizer for the
most of our sandy lands of the South. From 600 to SOO
pounds net per acre of this should be broadcast on the
land a couple of weeks before planting the crop. and it
should be mixed with the soil by running over it with
cultivator, weeder or harrow. One cannot buy this brand
except from a manufacturer catering to the trucking
trade, but why a trucker should demand and get a higher
grade of fertilizer than a general farmer is what some
cannot understand. The reason is that the trucker studies
his crops and their food as no general farmer ever does.
If, however, the farmer is situated so that he cannot secure
this formula for his corn crop he can make it up for him-
self by buying the raw material and doing his own mixing.
By using 800 pounds of 14 per cent. phosphate. 900 pounds
of 7 per cent cottonseed meal and 300 pounds of muriate
of potash, lie will come near enough to what is wanted.
The potash should be in the form of muriate for this
crop, kainit being too bulky and sulphate more expensive.
I have always used muriate and never failed to get good
results, and for the after crop of grass that follows the
corn crop and is cut for hay the muriate increases the
yield and quality many fold. None of our farmers appear
to appreciate the part that potash intelligently applied
plays in successful Southern farming; without it in the
proper quantities for the individual crops results are very
disappointing.
While on this crop I should like to say something on
seed selection and seed breeding, a branch of farming that











is totally neglected inthe South. but at this time space
forbids. At some future time I shall take this up, but here
let me say incidentally to show the great importance of
seed breeding and seed selection that the State of Illinois
added 38,000,000 bushels to its corn yield last year by
improved methods of seed breeding and seed selecting.
C. K. McQUARIE.
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.




CORN FACTS AND FIGURES.

Forty-nine Per Cent of the Feeding Value of Corn Is in
the Stover (Stalks, Blades and Shucks), and the
Way to Get Its Worth Is by Shredding or Silage.
Fodder Pulling Is an Utter Waste of Time.

As the corn crop is grown for food purposes only, we
should study its food value and harvest it so as to obtain
the most from it. Taking the whole corn plant-
Forty-six per cent is ear (grain and cob).
Fifty-four per cent is stover (stalk, blades and shucks).
But the animals are able to use as feed a larger percent-
age of the grain than of the stover, hence the feeding
value of the corn plant is:
Ear 51 per cent.
Stover 49 per cent.
The greatest food value will be obtained from the plant
when it is put into a silo and fed as silage.
When harvested for the grain or ears the whole plant
should be cut and the stover used as feed for live stock.

PULLING CORN FODDER Is EXPENSIVE, WASTEFUL AND DOES
NOT PAY.

In experiments made to test the effect of pulling fodder
on the yield of weighed and shelled corn per acre the fol-
lowing results have been obtained:
Georgia-Pulled. 23.9 bushels per acre; untouched, 27.3
bushels per acre. Loss 3.4 bushels per acre.
Florida-Pulled, 28.2 bushels per acre; untouched, 31.1
bushels per acre. Loss 2.9 bushels per acre.
Mississippi-Stripped, 35.5 bushels per acre; loss, S









72

bushels per acre. Topped, 29 bushels per acre; loss. 14.5
bushels per acre. Untouched, 43.5 bushels per acre.
Alabama (two trials)-Loss. 4 bushels per acre.
Average loss, G bushels per acre.

FODDER OBTAINED.

Georgia-270 pounds per acre.
Florida-580 pounds per acre.
Mississippi-936 pounds per acre (tops included i.
Average-595 pounds per acre.
These figures indicate that on an average G bushels of
shelled corn per acre were sacrificed for 395 pounds of
fodder, and the labor and cost thrown in.
The feeding value of six bushels of corn is nearly as
great as 595 pounds of fodder, therefore the man wiho pulls
fodder pays for this fodder obtained in loss of (c.rn and
has the pleasure lie gets out of the delightful task of pull-
ing fodder as his sole reward.
One acre of corn, yielding twenty-five bushels of shl led
corn, will give an average of over one ton of stover stalks.
leaves and shucks). To harvest an acre and shuck the
corn and shred the fodder costs from $3. to 83.50. A ton
of stover is worth as much for feeding as 1.5(1(1 pounds of
timothy hay bought from the North for S25. This stover
costs $3 a ton to secure with the harvesting of the corn
crop thrown in, and if fed to steers they will pay -5 a ton
for it. At leest they have paid me that much for it for
the last three years.
Thousands of tons of this valuable feed is allowed to
waste in the South each year, while you buy thousands
of tons of hay and pay from $20 to $25 a ton for it.-
From an address by Dr. Tait Butler, before Pendleton.
S. C., Farmers' Society.



HOW TO DOUBLE THE SOUTH'S CORN CROP.

All over the South, says the Southern Farm Gazette.
corn raising is having more attention, and in some coun-
ties corn conventions have aroused no less enthusiasm
than political rallies in the olden days. And this is well.
And it is well, too, that we are beginning to recognize












a half dozen reforms in our manner of handling the corn
crop in the South.
In the first place, there is the matter of seed. A care-
fully bred and carefully selected variety will undoubtedly
make 33 1-3 per cent more than common scrub seed. In
other words, with the same labor, foresight, fertilizer
expense, machinery expense, land rent expense and tax
expense, you can make 33 1-3 per cent more bushels by
growing the variety best adopted to your soil and section,
and you are throwing away just this much corn by plant-
ing poorly selected seed from scrub varieties.
And, having found the best variety, the seed must be
selected from the field, for while crib selection is better
than none. it is impossible to tell in the crib which ears
are from stalks growing only one ear and which from
stalks growing two or more ears. (1) The best variety
of corn and (2) field selection to keep up its quality must
be. therefore, a primary consideration.
Then we need better preparation of the land for corn
(and for all other crops, for that matter). "Deeper prepa-
ration, shallower cultivation;" this is a good motto for
most farmers, and to this should be added. "Get rid of
hand-hoeing." In growing corn there is small reason why
we should not use the same labor-saving implement by
which corn is made so cheaply in the great West.
Then, having cultivated the crop with small expense,
do not follow the suicidal policy of tearing up the corn
roots when the crop is laid by. It is by its roots that the
corn plant gets the food by which it grows, and aside
from thefrom the cruelity of it, it would be no less foolish
to knock out half the teeth of your grazing cow and expect
her to do as well than it is to cut half the roots of your
growing corn and expect the yield not to be decreased.
Last of all comes the stover, and here it is that after
working half the year to make the crop, our farmers throw
away about a fourth of its value. Only 51 per cent of
the feeding value of the corn plant is in the ear and the
other 49 per cent must be had through silage or shredding.
Fodder pulling is folly. This phase of the corn question,
however, will be discussed at greater length in later issues
of our paper, and for the present we leave the messages
in this issue with our readers, emphasizing as they do-
Better preparation and shallower cultivation; better
varieties and better selection of seed; doing away with











hand hoeing; the folly of cutting corn roots; and the
saving of the stover.
With a proper regard for these principles it is not one
whit too much to claim that the value of the South's corn
crop to the farmer may be doubled without extra cost-
and this would mean millions to the South.
As grain crops go, corn is a comparatively new one;
and hence offers correspondingly great opportunity for
improvement under careful methods as well as for rapid
deterioration under careless methods.

BREED GOOD SEED OR BUY IT.

The best and most practical method of breeding it up
is systematically to plant seed from. a single ear in a single
row, to plant other rows the same way, and then weigh
th yield from each row separately; then keep a record of
each row, selece the best for next year, and so on from
year to year, to the end that the seed corn may have a
pedigree that is definite and a true guide. From the few
rows so planted, seed will be selected for the increase plat
that is to supply seed for the larger fields. THOSE WHO
WANT TO PURSUE THIS KIND OF BREEDING WILL BE ABLE TO
GET FROM THEIR STATE EXPERIMENT STATIONS OR THE DE-
PARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AT WASHINGTON BULLETINS
THAT EXPLAIN THE PLAN IN DETAIL.. The next best plan is
to select seed ears in the field, and to observe whether the
stalks that bore extra large ears had choice locations, rich
spots, much room, etc., which might make a large ear
when the tendency for a good yield was not really in the
seed the ears came from. If we wait till the corn is in
the crib, we cannot do more than select good ears, irre-
spective of whether they grew on specially favored stalks.
But even such selection as this will be better than none.
If one does not have corn from which really good seed
can be selected, a strain that is a good yielder, he ought
to buy good seed. He ought also to test his seed before
planting to learn whether it is going to sprout well and
grow with vigor. Much will sprout well and not have vigor
to grow well. Skips in the row cost just as much to culti-
vate as a like space in which corn is growing, and Iprodll'e
nothing. The unshaded soil may even be injured by being
exposed unnecessarily to the sun.











PREPARATORY BREAKING AND HARROWING.

Much is said and written about deep breaking for corn.
It is one of those questions that will never be settled, for
the reason that some types of land need one treatment
and some need another. It is rare that deeper than six-
inch plowing will pay; and sometimes it will be detri-
mental. If land is plowed much deeper than formerly,
plow in the fall. Loose soils and bottom lands can be
plowed deeper than black prairie soils. Never go off to
dinner or to the house for the night before all the land
that has been plowed that half day is harrowed. Later,
the use of the disc will put the seedbed in better condition.
but do not abuse the land by turning it up to the air and
sun to dry out before it is harrowed. The seedbed is
more important than is usually supposed. Make it fine
and mellow. It does not take much work, as harrows and
discs cover much ground at a time.

SOME HINTS ON PLANTING.

Planting should not be too deep in early spring, when
the soil is cold and much moisture is in the ground. At
that time the warm soil is the layer next to the surface.
Deep plantings is also bad when the seedbed has not been
well prepared. Some sort of drill or mechanical planter
should be used, since all seed will be put in the ground
approximately the same distance. Then there is either a
stand or not a stand. The grower will not be in doubt as
to whether he should replant; but he may be in doubt if
the seed is dropped by hand and some are deep and some
are shallow, so that a part meet favorable weather condi-
tions and come up, while the rest do not come up. Watch
the drill carefully for some time, and dig out enough hills
to know how deep the planting is being done. It will be
a costly corn crop if labor-saving implements are not
used for cultivation; and they can be used with greater
success when the rows are straight, so that the cultivators
can run so close to the young stalks that very little uncul-
tivated earth will remain in the drill.

CULTIVATE EARLY AND OFTEN.

Many neglect corn for two or three weeks after the seed
is planted. Meanwhile grass and weeds get well started.












Harrows or weeders, or both, should, in most cases. be
run over the corn before the young plants get out if the
ground, and even later-just as long as the corn is not
injured too much by such working. The young grass and
weeds will be easily killed and a crust is not allowed to
land. In the hands of a careless workman a team of
munles and a harrow (can do much damage ti corn after it
is out of the ground. Suppose a thoughtless w(orkmian
permits cornstalks o caltch in the harrow and drha oiut
the young corn row after row. Such a thing has been done
more than once, but such a laborer is not fit for the work.
The writer knows of one good farmer who thinks it pays
him to plant corn considerably Thicker than he w-ants 't
to grow, so tlhat he can hlrrow- it over and over as i)frkn
as he likes, uprooting part of lihe young crop. hbut leaving
enough for a good stand. While his plan has ils idaw-
backs, it also has its giiod points.

SHALLOW ('CLTIVATION (oo() FOn ('( R .AND TrEAM.

Corn is a very shallow-rooted plant. Most of its feeding
roots are near the surface of the soil. Roots also feed only
at their ends; and when they are cut off they cannot nour-
ish the plant much till new feeding hair-like roots put out
to gather the food. These facts show that deep cultivation
during the early life of the crop may not he injurious,
while deep cultivation later, when the roots have spread
across from row to row near the surface of the soil. cut
off the roots just at the time the crop needs to be fed
well. Do not make the work stock do unnecessarily hard
work by running the cultivating implement deeper than
is necessary to keep the ground clean. Some growers act
as though they thought they would lay by the corn well
if they run the cultivating implements deep, and this
means that they are laying by the crop. cutting its roots
off. Yet, cultivation must be deep enough to kill grass
and weeds, even if the corn roots are pruned off.

LEARN A PROPER ROTATION.

Corn should not be raised on the same land year after
year, for several reasons. It is a rank feeder, and the
land should have raised some grass crop. or a crop of
clover or peas, to put it in the condition for making a
large yield of corn. It is rare, indeed, that those who do











not rotate their crops think it pays them to raise corn.
The question goes further than to supply the corn with
plant food. When corn is raised on the same land year
after year, insect enemies get to making heir homes in the
land; and they are there to destroy the next crop as far
as they can. Depredations from insects are accepted by
the average farmer in much the same way that rains and
drouths are, on the supposition that these things are sent
by nature and that man can do nothing about them. But
the farmer can rest assured that if he raises corn on the
same land year after year he is turning his field into a
hatchery of enemies that will devour his crop; and this
injury is far more serious than generally supposed. If
the crop does not do well, the matter is dismissed with the
supposition that the weather or the soil was unfavorable.
The corn grower should certainly be a grower of clover
or peas, and one of these crops should be grown on the
land the first year preceding the corn.

Is COTrTO As GOOD A MONEY CROP?

There are many years when cotton farmers make no
money; but who can point to a year when corn raised by
rational methods did not pay a reasonable profit? There
is always a market for it. and bears do not manipulate
the market to the loss of the grower. The market is found
right on one's own farm and on the surrounding farms.
Bears cannot mix up with it. When the stover is saved
by rational methods-not by pulling the leaves-the stover
has as much feed value as the grain; and the South is slow
to realize this. If that idea is made one of the working
rules of farm management, it will not he difficult to see
how a corn crop will yield more net profit than a cotton
crop. More net profit, mind you; we do not care for the
gross profit. It is the money that a farmer can lay away
that he should be interested in. A cotton crop nakes a big
income, but the big outgo is right there beside the big
income. With corn under good management, there is rela-
tively more profit left behind; so much profit that, while
corn will not replace cotton as the great Southern crop. it
ought to be a close second and help to make cotton raising
more gainful. At least, there will be none to dispute that
the raising of more cotton bodes ill for the South, while
the raising of more corn gives bright promise of a more
prosperous South and more thrifty farmers. Ihome-raised










78

corn will keep money at home, that now goes to enrich
other sections; it will keep money right on the farm
where the corn is raised in the South.


















PART IV.



Agricultural, Horticultural and General
Farm Statistics, 1906.















81

STATISTICS OF FARM, GARDEN, ORCHARD AND LIVE-
STOCK PRODUCTS OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR 1906.


ALACHUA COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 1,283 Square Miles; Population, 34,007;
County Seat, Gainesville; Population, 5,413.

SUnit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity

Total for the State . 961,360 $ 42,907,115

Total for County............ ...... 32,611.......$1,084,896


Field Crops-

Upland Cotton ............... Bales.. 137 67 1,695
Sea Island Cotton .............. Bales.... 9,055 2,584 185,708
Corn ......................... Bushels. 13,9261140,279 115,248
Oats ......................... Bushels. 1,389 16,581 13,443
Sweet Potatoes ............... Bushels. 477 57,778 29,880
Sugar Cane (syrup).......... Barrels. 166 1,453 15,885
Field Peas .................... Bushels. 54 524 640
Hay (native grasses).......... Tons.... 499 915 7,550
Peanuts ...................... Bushels. 4,214 97,460 50,146
Velvet Beans ................. Bushels. 1,242 19,070 19,020

Vegetable and Garden Products:

Lettuce ...................... Crates... 131 29,590 30,932
Celery ....................... Crates.. ...... 25 25
Pepper ....................... Crates.. 2 275 275
Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels. 48 2,170 2,095
Cabbage ...................... Crates... 180 16,002 10,020
Tomatoes .................... Crates.. 62 775 575
Squashes ..................... Crates.. 5 500 549
Eggplants .................... Crates.. 13 1,900 1,600
Cucumbers ................... Crates.. 50 10,752 7,565
English Peas ................. [Crates.. 118 5,750 4,600
Beets ........................ [Crates.. 11 1,199 2,615
Beans ........................ Crates.. 220 22,174 27,303
Strawberries .................. Quarts.. 1 1,864 270
Watermelons ................. ICarloads 436 130 8,710
Cantaloupes .................. Crates.. 175 7,042 7,360

Fruit Crops- Trees

Orange Trees bearing, number. Boxes... 2,755 23,8731 29,327
Orange Trees non-bearing, No......... 119,0311 ....... .........
6-Bul














FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
ALACHUA COUNTY-Continued.

IUnit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Prod't! Value
tity I__

Grapefruit Trees............... Crates.. 831i 740 S95
Bananas ...................... Bunches ..... 20 20
Pecan Trees, number.......... IBushels.' 257 111' 351
Pear Trees, number.......... Barrels.! 750 156i 255
Peach Trees, number.......... Bushels. 1,2281 489' 472

Live Stock-

Horses .................. ..... Number. 1,775 .......' 143.3311
M ules ......................... iNum ber. 89 ....... 124,820
Asses ........................ IN um ber. 1 .......' 100
Work Oxen (yoke)............ Number.I 8 .... ..' 150
Stock Cattle, native breeds, all]
ages ...................... I Number. 10.474 ....... 106.147
Thoroughbred Cattle, including! I
4 grades and upward: I
Short Horn and Grades........ Number. 102 ....... 1.750
Devon and Grades............ Number. 107'....... 3.070
Jersey and Grades ............. Number. 147' ....... 3.60
Cows kept for milking only. .... 'Number. 126 .... 2.45
Cattle purchased ............. Number. 753 ...... 7.492
Cattle sold living............. Number.| 1.555 ....... 13.009
Cattle slaughtered ............ Number.' 1,052'. 11.82
Cattle died of disease ......... Number.! 482' ........ 4.226
Cat'le died of expos'r to weather Number.' 85 ....... 630
Hogs, all ages on hand...... INumber. 8,4951 ....... 18.98S
Hogs slaughtered ............ Number.! 7,726 .......I 50,08S
Hogs sold living............ Number.j 3281 ................
Hogs died of disease.......... iNumber.I 808'. ..... 410
Sheep and Lambs purchased... Number. 174 ....... 410
Sheep killed by dogs.......... Number. 2 ..... 4
Sheep on hand ............... Number. 40' ....... 100
Goats, all ages ............... INumber.! 293'. ... .

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common ............ Number. 15,376 ..... 7.639
Poultry, all other. ............ Number.| 392' ...... 133
Eggs ...................... Dozen.. ...... 28,438' 6,491

Dairy Products- I

Milk sold and used ............ .Gallons. ...... 7.530 2.506
Butter sold and used.......... Pounds '. 90' 234












83

FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
BAKER COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 585 Square Miles; Population, 3380; County
Seat, Macclenny; Population. 370.


PRODUCTS.


Unit
of quan-
tity


Total for County............(........


Field Crops-

Upland Cotton ................
Sea Island Cotton..............
Corn .........................
O ats .........................
Sweet Potatoes ..............
Sugar Cane (Syrup)...........
Sugar ........................
Field Peas ...................
Hay (native grasses)..........
Peanuts ......................
Velvet Beans ................
Strawberries .................

Fruit Crops-


Bales ....
Bales...
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Barrels.
Pounds.
Bushels.
Tons ...
Bushels.
Bushels.
Quarts..


Oranges, bearing trees........ Boxes...
Oranges, non-bearing trees.... ........
Lemons, non-bearing trees..... ........
Grapefruit trees ..............Crates..
Pecan trees ................. Bushels.
Pear trees .................... Barrels.
Peach Trees .................. Bushels.
Grapes ....................... Pounds.
W ines ....................... Gallons.

Live Stuck-

Horses ....................... Number.
M ules ........................ Number.
Stock Cattle, native breeds..... Number.j
Cows kept for milk only....... Number.
Cattle sold living ............. Number. I
Cattle slaughtered ........... Number.
Cattle died of disease .......... Number.?
Cattle died of exposure to|
weather .................... .Number.
Hogs, all ages, on hand........ Number.!
Hogs slaughtered ............ INumber.
Hogs sold living .............. [Number.?
FHos died of disease........... Number.


Acres Prod't Value


12,047 ....... $ 231,501




33 10 355
3,430 610 52,709
5,358 33,101 31,520
280 1,590 830
256 34,378 15.075
80 344 3,695
.. 2,750 137
291 1,019 1,510
37 24 430
2,1251 10,752 14,380
156 890 1,665
1 200 50

Trees

5,023 1,067 3,084
14,016 ....... ........
2,000 ....... .....
7001 100 500
5,1461 64 109
1,8781 213 519
5,610 2,245 2,219
518 8,518 362
...... 7051 635.



332 .. ... 16,88(0
236 ...... 15,790
7,025 ....... 33,150
4071 ....... 3,758
294 ....... 4.289
2051 ... ... I 1.768
1571 ....... 745

10, .. ... 1,035
3,363 ...... 3,372
2,648| .... .. 13.733
200! ....... ........
1,2161 ....... .. . .














FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
BAKER COUNTY-Continued.


I Unit I
PRODUCTS. of quan-
tity

Sheep, all ages, on hand...... Number.
Sheep slaughtered ............ Number.
Sheep died of disease.......... Number.
(nonts nll n s on hand INTnmhpr


Prod't
I I


Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard.... Number. 260. ..
Poultry, all other............ Number. 3,475
Eggs ......................... Dozen.. ...... 9,850

Dairy Products-

Milk sold and used............ Gallons ......, 9.820
Butter sold and used.......... Pounds........ 1,191

Miscellaneous Products-
IStan's
Honey .......................Pounds. 14S 2.350
Beeswax ..................... Pounds. ...... 75'
I -I I I


Value


400
5
20
257



66
853
2,008



3,12'
2i9



154
25


BRADFORD COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 552 Square Miles, Population, 12,943; County
Seat, Starke; Population, 1,103.


PRODUCTS.


Total for County.........


Unit |
of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity

........ 39,685 ....... $1,214,770


Field Crops-

Sea Island Cotton ............ Bales....
Corn ......................... Bushels.
Oats ......................... Bushels.
Sweet Potatoes .............. Bushels.
Sugar Cane (Syrup).......... Barrels.
Field Peas .................... Bushels.
Hay (native grasses) .......... Tons....
Peanuts ...................... Bushels.
Velvet Beans ................. Bushels.
Rye .......................... Bushels.


I



9,591 3.028 281,251
16,384 183,6091 135,971
1,650 16,820 14,427
565 99,375! 49,366
1941 2,007 19,491
5151 2,912 5,738
833 1,907! 18,244
7,917 66,271 63,174
1,970 15,836! 27,238
15 150' 300










85

FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
BRADFORD COUNTY-Continued.

Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't
tity

Vegetable and Garden Products.l

Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels. 12 930
Cabbage ...................... Crates.. 1 40
Cucumbers ................... Crates.. 9 530
Beans ........................ Crates.. 3 20
Watermelons ................. Carloads 24 10
Cantaloupes .................. Crates.. 2 80

Fruit Crops- Trees

Orange trees, bearing.......... Boxes.. 10 10
Orange trees, non-bearing...... 1........ 100 .......
Peaches, trees ................ [Bushels. 1,145 1,570


Value




900
60
720
40
617
100



20

2,170


Pecans, trees .................. Bushels. 154 128 384

Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number. 1,185 ....... 157,807
M ules ........................ Number. 643 ....... 101,030
Work Oxen (yoke)............ Number. 28 ....... 910
Stock Cattle, native breeds.... Number. 12,152 ....... 121,790
Thoroughbred Cattle, including
j grades and upward, all ages:
Hereford ..................... Number. 102 .... .. 4,120
Short Horn .................. Number. 23 ....... 800
Devon ........................ Number. 5 ....... 170
Aberdeen Angus .............. Number. I ...... 40
Cows kept for milking only ... Number. 2663....... 12,875
Jersey ....................... Number. 149 .......1 7,280
Cattle movement this year:
Cattle Purchased ............ Number. 57 ....... 374
Cattle sold living............. Number. 1,561 ..... 19,525
Cattle slaughtered .......... Number. 96 ....... 1,121
Cattle died of disease......... Number. 13 ....... 35
Cattle died of exposure to
weather .................... Number. 10 ....... 137
Hogs, all ages, on hand........ Number.14,433 ....... 30,002
Hogs, slaughtered ............ Number.l11,1221 ....... 97,988
Hogs sold living ............. Number.1 1,6931 ....... ........
Hogs died of disease........... Number. 889 ................
Goats, all ages .............. Number. 2,211 ....... 984

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard.... Number. 33,102 ....... 10.818
Poultry, all other ............. Number. I 511'........ 292
Eres sold and used............ Dozen...l...... 34.4961 5,844













FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
BRADFORD COUNTY-Continued.
Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Prod't
tity

Dairy Products-

Milk sold and used............ Gallons. ...... 45.593
Butter, sold and used.......... Pounds. ...... 13.4S2

Miscellaneous Products-

Honey, stands of Bees........ Pounds. 7 40
Beeswax ..................... Pounds. .


Value


17.233
3,317


5
2


BREVARD COUNTY.

Census 1905-Area, 1,156 Square Miles; Population, 4.348; Ccunty
Seat, Titusville; Population, 94S.


Unit I
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
T tity

Totals for County.......... ........ 146 ....... $ 666,7_
S. _


.4


Field Crops-

Corn ......................... Bushels.
Sweet Potatoes ............... Bushels.


203 22 0
2,9 S5 2.460


Sugar Cane (Syrup)........... Barrels.. 9 28

Vegetable and Garden Products:

Lettuce ....................... Crates.. 2 695
Celery ....................... Crates.. 51 1,360
Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels. 171 1,905'
Cabbage ...................... Crates.. 41 365'
Tomatoes .................... Crates.. 81 2,370'
Beans .................... Crates.. 651 12.250
Strawberries ................. Quarts..! 2 3,000

Fruit Crops- Trees

Oranges, trees bearing......... Boxes.. 174765 213.947
Oranges, trees non-bearing..... ........ 93,18S .......
Lemons, bearing trees......... IBoxes... 581 65
Lemons, non-bearing trees..... ......... 15 ....
Grapefruit, trees .............. Crates.. 113,805' 20.829
Pineapples ................... Crates....... .. 2.337
Bananas ...................... Bunches'......' 1.870


2.755
2,S850
475
3.430
19,7S3
750



441.56,

14.


3.620
1,24-


770


I I

















PRO1


Guavas ......
Peaches ......
Grapes (wine)

Live Stock-

Horses .......
Mules .......
Work Oxen (y
Stock Cattle, r
ages .......
Jersey, I grad
Hogs, all ages,

Poultry and Pr

Poultry, comm
Eggs ........

Miscellaneous

Honey, stands


87

FARM STATISTICS-Continued.
BREVARD COUNTY-Continued.
Unit
)UCTS. I of quan- Acres Prod't: Value
tity

. ............... Crates.. ...... 182 558
................ Bushels. 830 50 200
................ Gallons. 100 100



.............. Num ber. 3701....... 42,900
................. Num ber. 74 ....... 5,02.5
oke) ............ Number. 21 455
native breeds, all [
................ Number. 5,758 ....... 69.220
es and upwards.. Number. 911....... 2,230-
on hand........ Number. 2,1891....... 6,567

oducts-

on barnyard.... ....... 7,661 .. 3.867
................. .Dozen....... 15,1841 3,989
I I
Products-

of bees......... Pounds.. 295] 22,4001 947


CALHOUN COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 1,067 Square Miles; Population, 5,796; County
Seat, Blountstown; Population 295.


Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan-
tity

Total for County............ .......


Field Crops-

Upland Cotton ................Bales...
Sea Island Cotton............ Bales...
Corn ......................... Bushels.
Oats ....:.................... Bushels.
Sweet Potatoes .............. Bushels.
Sugar Cane (Syrup).......... Barrels.
Rice ......................... Bushels.
Field Peas ................... Bushels.
Hay, native grasses. .......... Tons....
Millet ............... ..... .Tons....


Acres


8,146|.




2,082
322
4,272
169
146
96
6
28
301
71


Prod't I Value


...... $ 230,961


635
76
48,910
1,385
11,470
925
78
120
125
84


29,199
5,456
38,930
1,064
6,242
6,995
80
140
650
160


~












FARM STATISTICS-Continued.

CALHOUN COUNTY-Continued.

Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity
I I
Peanuts ...................... Bushels. 977 12,837 16,616
Velvet Beans ................. Bushels. 7 110 410
Cassava ...................... Tons.... 2 1 20

Vegetable and Garden Products:

Cabbages ..................... Crates.. 1 160 60
Watermelons ................. Carloads 1 2 40

Fruit Crops- Trees

Oranges, trees bearing......... Number. 6 8 24
Pears, trees bearing.......... Number. 25 10 10
Peaches, trees bearing........ Number. 190 300 290

Live Stock-

Horses ........................ Number. 448 ...... 38,545
M ules ......................... Num ber. 182 ....... 15,930
Asses ........................ Num ber. 1 .......' 30
Work Oxen (yoke)............. Number.! 110 ...... 1,920
Stock Cattle, native breeds, all
ages ....................... Number.? 3,338 ....... 18,658
Jersey, i grades and up........ Number. 6 ....... 110
Cattle purchased .............. Number. 2S0 ....... 2,757
Cattle sold living ............. Number. 250. ......' 2.568
Cattle slaughtered ........... INumber.[ 276 ....... 2.912
Cattle died of disease......... Number.! 65 .......' 388
Cattle died of exposure to I
weather .................... Number. 25 ....... 193
Cows kept for milking only... Number. 26 ..... 343
Hogs, all ages, on hand........ Number. 7,587 ....... 9,944
Hogs slaughtered ............. Number. 2,904 ....... 18,769
Hogs sold living .............. Number. 456 ...... ........
Hogs died of disease .......... Number. 529 ...............
Sheep, all ages ............... Number. 667'........ 1,009
Sheep purchased ............. Number. 70' ......' 279
Sheep sold living .............. Number. 16'. 32
Sheep slaughtered ............ Number. 26 ...... 102
Sheep died of disease ........ Number.! 157 .......' 289
Sheep killed by dogs.......... INumber. 1 In. ....... 15
Goats ........................ IN um ber. 1,057 ......' 5S6

Poultry and Products- -

Poultry, common barnyard .... Number. 13,520 ....... 3.112
Poultry, all other............... Number.! 11 3 .......] 46
Eggs ......................... Dozen.. I .....' 13.2001 2.228










89

FARM STATISTICS-Continued.

CALHOUN COUNTY-Continued.


PRODUCTS.


Dairy Products-

Milk sold and used............
Butter sold and used..........

Miscellaneous Products-

W ool (fleeces) ................
Honey, stands of bees........
Beeswax .....................


Unit |
of quan- Prod't
tity |



Gallons .... 1,0401
Pounds.. ...... 4511



Pounds.. 600 2,385
Pounds. 664 36,639
Pounds. ...... 425


CITRUS COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area 612 Square Miles; Population, 7,543; County
Seat, Inverness; Population Not Given Because not
Incorporated.


PRODUCTS.


Unit
of quan-
tity


Total for County........................


Field Crops-


1
1


1


Corn ......................... Bushels. 1
Oats ....................... ... Bushels.
Sweet Potatoes ................ Bushels.
Sugar Cane (syrup)........... Barrels..
Field Peas ................... Bushels.
Hay, native grasses ........... Tons. ...
Peanuts ...................... Bushels.
Velvet Beans .................. Bushels.

Vegetable and Garden Products: I

Lettuce ....................... Crates. .
Irish Potatoes .................. Bushels.
Cabbage .................... .. Crates..
Tomatoes ................... Crates..
Squashes .................. .. Crates..
Egg Plants .................... Crates..
Cucumbers ............... Crates..
English Peas ................. Crates..
B eets ......................... Crates..
Beans ........................ Crates..


Acres Prod't


6,279 ..... .




1,962 36,488
806 8,790
327 59,110
143' 1,410
4431 11,350
1481 181
875 4,600
720 11,900


350
7,040
9,770
3,050
2,870
1,595
10,380,
1301
4,840I
14,830!


Value


675,825




36,750
6,768
36,740
31,250
21,160
3,720
9,200
33,100



480
11,930
13,330
4,250
3,330
2,260
16,420
965
5,415
19,540


Value




314
128



608
2,634
106


----------- --------












FARM STATISTICS-Continued.

CITRUS COUNTY-Continued.
Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't
tity

Watermelons ................. Car L'ds 231, 263
Cantaloupes ................... Crates. 51, 9,250,
Strawberries .................. Quarts.. 1 3 1,9uu

Fruit Crops- Trees

Oranges, trees bearing......... Crates. S.lS00 6,506
Oranges, trees non-bearing.... ......... 9,940 .......
Grapefruit .................... Crates.. 592 1,085
Pears ........................ Barrels.. 1,381 1,370
Peaches ....................... Bushels. 13,324 2,420
Grapes ........................ Pounds. ...... 17,000

Live Stock-

Horses, on hand Juy 1st....... Number. 680.......
Mules, on hand July 1st....... Number. 577.......
Work Oxen (yoke) on hand
July 1st..................... Num ber. 10 .......
Stock Cattle, native breeds, all i
ages, on hand July 1st....... Number. 11,008.......
Jersey, 3-4 grades and up. ..... Number. 200 .......
Cows, kept for milk only...... Number. 890 .......
Hogs, all ages, on hand July 1st. Number. 14,6901 .......
Hogs, slaughtered this year.... Number. 3,650 .......
Hogs, died of disease.......... Number. 1,866.......
Sheep, all ages on hand July 1st'Number. 1,100
Goats, all ages, on hand July 1st Number. 2,920 .......

Poultry and Products-
'
Poultry, all ages, common barn-
yard ........................ Number. 19,185!.......
Poultry, all other ............ Number.f 5601.......
Eggs, sold and used ..........Dozen... ...... 21,0501

Dairy Products-

Milk, sold and used .......... Gallon... ...... 62,750'
Butter, sold and used ......... Pounds.! ...... 40,090


Yalue


12,,.jli

5d )



10.21,.

1.54,.
2,710
4.';
1.7'0,




114'."."



75,15;
1,0t0
10.9'')
23.11'
36,3,0


3.S70




6,055
1.870
6,6S4



11,5.1
11.1.2










91

FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
CLAY COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 622 Square Miles; Population, 5,484; County
Seat, Green Cove Springs; Population, 1,077.


Unit
of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity

........ 3,343 ...... $ 306,348




Bales... 24 11 1,848
Bushels. 2,348 24,185 17,239
Bushels. 172 2,840 1,880
Bushels. 232 20,380 15,690
Barrels. 41 207 4,640
Bushels. 5 60 100
Bushels. 55 585 920
Tons.... 210 179 3.520
Bushels. 122 2,660 2,370


PRODUCTS.


Total for County...........


Field Crops-

Sea Island Cotton .........
Corn .......................
O ats ........................
Sweet Potatoes ........ ...
Sugar Cane (Syrup)...........
R ice .........................
Field Peas ...................
Hay, native grasses ..........
Velvet Beans .................

Vegetable and Garden Products:


Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels.
Strawberries ................. Quarts..

Fruit Crops-


Oranges, trees bearing........ Boxes....
Oranges, non-bearing trees.... .......
Grapefruit trees .............. Crates..
Pecans, trees ................. Bushels.
Peaches, trees ................ Bushels.
Pears, trees ................. Barrels.
Grapes ....................... Pounds.
Wines ........................ Gallons.

Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number.
M ules ........................ Number.
Work Oxen (yoke)............ Number.
Stock Cattle, all ages ......... Number.
Cattle, Jersey, I grades and up. Number.
Cattle sold living ............. Number.
Cattle slaughtered .......... Number.
Cattle died of disease......... Number.
Cattle died of exposure tol
weather .................... Number.
Hogs, all ages, on hand ........ Number.
Hogs slaughtered ............. Number. I


78 8,290
56 89,600

Trees

255 282
550 .......
10 20
130 45
6,087 2,632
590 247
.. 9,4001
. 3,810T



580 ... ..
191 .......
251 . ..
9,244 .. ..
148 ...
1731.......
34 .......
24 .......

42 1 .......
9,430& ....... .
7541.......


6,425
10,520



492

60
135
4,160
717
234
3,810



54,800
25,610
9,610
79.715
3,210
1,690
340
240

370
14.077
1.515












FARM STATISTICS-Continued.
CLAY COUNTY-Continued.

Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- 'Prod- Value
tity

Hogs sold living............... umber. 20 ...............
Hogs died of disease......... Number. 50 .. ..
Sheep, all ages, on hand....... Number. 885 ....... 1,770
Sheep purchased............. Number. 40 ....... 40
Sheep died of disease........ Number. 40 ....... 40
Goats, all ages ................ Number. 186 ....... 200

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard..... Number. 25,600 ....... 9.211
Eggs ......................... Dozen.. .. .... .400 29,150

COLUMBIA COUNTY.

Census 1905-Area, 792 Square Miles; Population. 19,913; County
Seat, Lake City; Potulation, 6,509.


PRODUCTS.


Unit
of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity


Total for Coun ........... ........ ....... 6,1


Field Crops-

Upland Cotton ............... Bales .. 10 2
Sea Island Cotton.............. Bales 16,88 2,58G
Corn ......................... Bushels 22,522 195,385
Oats .................... Bushels 3,319[ 28,839
Sweet Potatoes ............... 1Bushrls 447' 50.982:
Sugar Cane (Syrup)........... Barrels. 2451 1,619
Sugar ........................ Pounds. ....... 400
Field Peas .................... Bushels. 284! 2,579'
Hay, native grasses ........... Tons... 514! 250'
Peanuts ...................... Bushels 6,693' 87,494
Velvet Beans ................. Bushels 239 3,100
Watermelon ............... .. ICar L'ds 11 1

Fruit Crops- ITrees

Pecans, trees .... ........... Number 167! 511
Peaches, trees ................ Number 1.1511 1,104'
Grapes, trees ................. Pounds. ......I 16,330
W ine ............ ............. Gallons ....... 420'
I I 1


101)
257,S4S
107,931)
16.552
25.145
19,541
25
3,065
3,S36
18,852
4,520
50



1G1
997
847
2, 0











93

FARM STATISTICS-Continued,
COLUMBIA COUNTY-Continued.

Unit j
PRODUCTS. of quan- Prod't Value
tity

Live Stock-

Horss s ..... .................. Number 1,065 ....... 93,760
Mules ........................ Number 902 .. 106,417
Asses ......................... Number 4 ....... 325
Oxen (yoke) ................... Number 21 ....... 185
Stock Cattle, native breeds..... Number 7,904 ....... 60,700
Thoroughbred Cattle, including
3 grades and upward, all ages:
Hereford ..................... Number ....... 255
Devon ........................ Number 1 ....... 25
Aberdeen Angus .............. Number 5 ....... 100
Jersey ........................ Number 45 ....... 1,080
Cows kept for milk only........ Number 2,135 ...... 17,363
Cattle purchased .............. Number 1,381 ....... 9,046
Cattle sold living ............. Number 469 ....... 5,105
Cattle slaughtered ........... Number 307 ....... 4,223
Cattle died of disease ......... Number 136 ....... 896
Cattle died of exposure to|
weather .................... INumber 68 ....... 657
Hogs, all ages on hand......... Number 13,421 ....... 26,676
Hogs slaughtered .............. Number 11,620 ....... 66,845
Hogs sold living .............. Number 952 ....... .......
Hogs died of disease........... Number 2,348 ....... ........
Sheep, all ages on hand......... Number 158 ...... 162
Sheep purchased .............. Number 170 ....... 170
Sheep, slaughtered ............ Number 33 ....... 86
Sheep died of disease .......... Number 8 ....... 8
Sheep killed by dogs .......... Number 36 ....... 36
Goats all ages on hand....... Number 361 ....... 180

Poultry and Products--

Poultry, all ages, common barn-6
yard ........................ Number 60,149 ....... 17,980
Eggs, sold and used ........... Dozen ........ 96,0971 19,723

Dairy Products-

Milk, sold and used ........... Gallon ....... 65,057 19,739
Butter, sold and used......... Pounds ......16,085 3,945

Miscellaneous Products- I I

Honey, stands of Bees ........ Pounds 2481 5,3751 445














FARM STATISTICS-Continued.

DADE COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 4,424 Square Miles; Populaticn, 12,089;
County Seat, Miami; Population, 4,733.

Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity
Total for County ..................... 2,6241....... ,$1,231,033

Vegetable and Garden Products: i

Sweet Potatoes ............... Bushels. 9 1,417 1,267
Pepper ........................ Crates 28 14,325 20,995
Irish Potatoes ................. Bushels 21 2.990 4,645
Cabbage ...................... Clates 2 400 500
Tomatoes .............. ..... Crates 2,411 475.97 CS5.1:1
Squashes ..................... Crates 3 670 S49
Egg Plants .................. Creates 21 7.453 9,944
Cucumbeis .................... crates 21 4,709 8,55
English Peas ............. .... Crates 1' 75 3:.0
Beans ....................... .rates 108 14,953 29,360

Fruit Crops-- Trees

Oranges, trees bearing ........ Boxes ..115,043 6,485 37.'-,
Oranges, trees non-bearing...... ....... 40,903 .................
Lemon, trees bearing .......... Number 195'..............
Lemon, trees non-bearing...... Number 580 .................
Limes, trees ................... Boxes .. 2,597 C 0
Grapefruit, trees .............. Crates 130.940 11,..1 2. .2
Sugar Apples, trees ............ ........ 162...............
Avocado Pears, trees .......... Crates 12,670 215
Mangoes, trees ................ Crates 6,800 1,222 1.533
Sapodillos, trees ............. ........ 66 ......... ..
Pineapples .................... .Crates ......:103.933 149.720
Bananas ...................... Bunches ...... 505' 2 3
Guavas ............ ........ Crates 4,901 4.52.
Cocoanuts, trees .............. ...... 553 ..........

Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number 717 ....... 95.175
M ules ........................ Num ber I 351 .. .... 49.995-
A sses .......................... Num ber 2 ....... 15 '
Work Oxen (yoke) ............. Number 4 .......' 250
Stock Cattle, native breeds all I
ages ........................ Number 15 ...... 413
Jersey, 3-4 grades and up...... Number 1 51.......' 210
Cows, kept for milk only...... INumber 3741 ....... 19.629
Hogs, all ages on hand......... Number 194 .......' 1,10
Hogs, slaughtered ........... Number 45' .......' 35














FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
DADE COUNTY-Continued.
Unit
PRODUCTS. ofquan- P1
tity

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard.... Number 27,556
Poultry, all others ......... Number 1,214
Eggs ....... ... .. ........ Dozen ..... 8.


Dairy Products-

Milk, sold and used ............

Miscellaneous Products-


Gallons.


Honey, Stand of Bees ......... Pounds

DESOTO COUNTY.


5701 12,2501


Census 1905-Area, 3,755 Square Miles; Population,
County Seat, Arcadia; Population, 1,557.


Value




14,021
1,028
27,252



39,118


1,621


12,446;


I Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
Stity. .

Total for County............ ..... .. 10,516 ....... $2,450.173


Field Crops- .

Corn .......................... Bushels 4,870 63,295 63,v5o
Oats ........................... Bushels 34 710 504
Sweet Potatoes ............... Bushels 873 155,830 78,098
Sugar Cane (syrup)........... Barrels 361 2,833 42,625
Rice ....... ................. Bushels 228 9,280 9,280
Field Peas .................... Bushels 466 4,930 9,860
Hay, native grasses ........... Tons ... 1,362 1,567 31,340
Velvet Beans .................. Bushels 432 4,895 9,790
Cassava .................. .... Tons ... 63 522 2,640

Vegetable and Garden Products:

Lettuce ....................... rates 4 750 700
Celery ........................Crates 1 600 1,000
Pepper ................. ...... Crate 1 940 1,880
Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels 511 5,800 11,400
Cabbage ................... ....Crates 301 5520 6,380
Tomatoes ...................... Crates .1 6311118,835 121,490












96

FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued )
DE SOTO COUNTY-Continued.


PRODUCTS.


SUnit I
of quan- Acres Prod't
tity


I
Squashes ..................... Crates
Egg Plants ....... ........... Crates .
Cucumbers ................... Crates
Beets ......................... Crates
B eans ........................ Crates..
Watermelon ................... Car L'ds
Strawberries .................. Quarts

Fruit Crops-

Oranges, bearing trees.......... NNumber.
Oranges, non-bearing trees..... !Number
Lemons ...................... [Number
Limes ................... ... 'Number
Grapefruit ..................... Number
Pineapples ................... Crates
Bananas ...................... Bunches
Guavas ........................ Crates .
Cocoanuts .................... Number
Peaches, trees ................ Number
rapes ............. ........ Pounds
Figs ......................... Crates .


57 10,275!
361 9.170,
94 20,6701
1 200
606 121,585
314 355
11 2,0001

Trees

126669 593700
153,795 ......
10 20;
80 190
13,550 74,375
.. 13,170
.. 7301
...... 8,370
9 300
395 655
.. 5001
...... 301


Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number 1,906 ... ..
M ules ......................... Num ber 334 .......
Asses ......................... INum ber 2 .. ..
Work Oxen (yoke) ............ Number 20 .....
Stock Cattle, native breeds..... Number 57,105 ....
Jersey, 3-4 grades and up...... Number 102 .......
Cows, kept for milk only...... !Number 1,352 ....
xogs, all ages ................. Number 8,501 .......
Sneep, all ages ................I ........ 6151 ..
Goats, all ages ................ Number 791 .......

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard.... Number 53,475 .......
Poultry, all other .............. Number 3,740 ....... I
Eggs ..........................Dozen ...... 83,180'

Dairy Products- I
I 1 I '
Milk, sold and used ........... Gallons ....204,670
B utter ........................ rounds. ......I 31,070
S I I


Value


9,030
10,570
23,800
150
122,960
45,36)
21,0



593,700

20
1J "
148,755
19,74 I
255
S,37i
:0
1,31"
1"0)
-,)



259,495
61,645
4)
660
572,23
4,79.
21,070
17,002
1,229
161



15,076
3.590
21,747



S2.1 0
8.401













FARM STATISTICS-Continued.
DE SOTO COUNTY-Continued.
Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Prod't Value
tity

Miscellaneous Products-

Wool, Fleeces ................ Pounds. 400 800 200
Honey, Stands of Bees......... Pounds 1,288 58,450 5,845

DUVAL COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 822 Square Miles; Population, 47,912; County
Seat, Jacksonville; Population, 25,301.
Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres Prod't Value
tity

Total for County............. ...... 3,502....... $ 357,866
I I 1

Field Crops- .

Sea island Cotton.............. lBales... 42 3 67
Corn ......................... Bushels. 1,617 22,656 15,08
Oats .......................... Bushels. 31 625 320
Sweet Potatoes ............... Bushels. 509 53,774 28,778
Sugar Cane (sylup)........... Barrels. 539 924 9,782
Sugar ........................ Pounds.. ...... 300] 15
Rice ................. ....... Bushels. 7 1751 264
Field Peas .................... Bushels. 50 299 4104
Hay, native grasses ........... Tons... 184 363 5,272
M illet ........................ Tons.... 1 10 100
Velvet Beans ................. Bushels. 40 377 380


Vegetable and Garden Products:

Lettuce ....................... Crates. .
celery ........................ Crates..
Pepper ........................ Crates..
Irish Potatoes ................. Bushels.
Cabbage ...................... Crates..
Tomatoes ..................... Crates. .
Squashes .... ................. .Crates..
Egg Plants ............ ... .. Crates..
Cucumbers .................... Crates..
Engish Peas .................. Crates..
Beans ........................ Crates..
Wa'ermelons .................. Car L'ds
Cantaloup s ......... ........ Crates.
Strawberries .................. Ouarts..1
7-Bul


1,207
43
58
10,526
5,140
7,678
733
670
580
181
9411
1461
3751
20,8161


714
172
80
7,387
6,298
5,746
673
660
577
15
956
4,67,
455
2,106













FARM STATISTICS.-(Continued.)
DUVAL COUNTY-Continued.
SUnit
PRODUCTS. of quan- P1
tity

Fruit Crops- Trees;

Orange trees, bearing........... Number. 4,721
Orange trees, non- bearing ..... Number. 8,388 ..
u.rapefruit ................... .Number. 319
-ecan trees ................. .. Number. 711I
rear trees..................... Number.' 3,910
Peach trees ................... INumber. 13,786
Grapes .................... .. Pounds.. .. .. 3
W ine ......................... Gallons.....
F igs .......................... 'C rates .. .....
| I


rod't Value


1,015

176
12
2,2SS
2,509
1,030
2,445
62


Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number. 481 ..
Mules ........................ Number. 92 .......

Work Oxen (yoke) ............. INumber. 127 .......
Stock Cattle, native breeds.... .Number. 6,911 .......
Jersey Cattle, 3-4 gi ades and up Number. 562 .......
Cows, kept for milk only....... Number. 287 .......
Hogs, all ages ............... Number. 5,190 .......
Sheep, all ages ................ 'Number. 1,160 .......
Goats, all ages ............... Number. 1241......

Poultry and Products-

Poultry, common barnyard......Number. 16,651.......i
Poultry, all other.............. ........ 661 ..... .
Eggs, sold ani used .......... Dozen.........I 67,333

Dairy Products-

Milk, sold and used ........... Gallons. ......169,450
Butter, sold and used........... Pounds. ...... I 6901

Miscellaneous Products-

W ool, fleeces ................. Pounds. 715! 2,533
Honey, stands of bees......... Pounds. 55' 510


2,014

22,

3.735
3,1171
1.334
2.170
113



42,915
10,4.5
150
4.915
69.1 ;7
22,, 0
12.37
14.,37'
2,22'
125



S,S39
350
16,121



47,675
179



722
151












FARM STATISTICS-Continued.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY.
Census 1905-Area, 668 Square Miles; Population, 32,383; County
Seat, Pensacola; Population, 21,505.

I Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Acres I Prod't Value
S tity _

Total for County .............. ... ... 10,263....... $1,115,163
I I 1__________

Field Crops-

Upand Cotton ................ Bales... 2,404 1,199 59,950
Corn ..........................iBushels. 3,333 70,470 52,844
Oats ......................... Bushels. 293 8,675 4,335
Sweet Potatoes................ Bushels. 726 79,540 39,770
Sugar Cane (syrup)............ Barrels.. 185 817 17,400
Rice ......................... Bushels. 42 1,070 1,070
Field Peas ..................... Bushels. 818 4,105 4,105
Hay, native grasses ........... Tons.... 2,0921 2,2081 33,120

Vegetable and Garden Products:

Lettuce ....................... Crates.. 1 90 90
Pepper ....................... Crates.. 11 91 135
Irish Potatoes ................ Bushels. 391 3,6701 3,670
Cabbage ...................... Crates. 521 5,700 11,250
Tomatoes ................... Crates.. 8 1,595 2,500
Squashes ..................... Crates.. 1 275 275
Egg Plants .................... Crates.. 1 145 290
Cucumbers ................... Crates.. 1 150 275
Engish Peas .................. Crates.. 1 100 100
Beets ............. .... ...... Crates.. 3 720 1,200
Beans ........................ Crates.. 3 1,000 1,050
Watermeons ................... cIar L'ds. 2S5 187 18,475
Cantaloupes ................... Crates.. 14 2,1901 3,850
Strawberries ................... Quarts.. 101 25,3001 2,530

Fruit Crops- I Trees I

Pecan trees ................... Bushels. 2,435 315 1,575
Pear trees ..................... Bushels. 1,480 1,700 1,650
Peach trees ................... Bushels.1 1,190 1,685 2,875

Live Stock-

Horses ....................... Number. 1,632 ....... 195,855
Mues ......................... Number. 790 ....... 114,800
Work Oxen (yoke)............. .Number.l 9631....... 75,315
Stock Cattle, native breeds .... Number.|11,6691....... 116,690












FARM STATISTICS.--(Continued.)
ESCAMBIA COUNTY-Continued.

Unit
PRODUCTS. of quan- Prodt Value
_tity

Thoroughbred Cattle, including
j grades and upward, all ages:
Hereford ..................... Number. 20 ..400
Shortho.n ...................... Number. 166 ....... 3,31o
Devon ........................ Num ber. 20 ... 4,j)
Aberdeen Angus .............. Number. 1 ....... 00
Jersey ........................ Number. 132 .. .... 1,560
Cows, kept for milk only....... Number. 374 ....... 13,b65
Cattle movement: 0
Cattle purchased ............. Number. 5,080'....... 60,800
Cattle sold living .............. Number. 779 .. 9,995
Cattle slaughtered ............. Number. 3,964 ....... 42,415
Cattle, died of disease ........ Number. 19 ....... I 140
Cattle died of exposure ......... Number. 178 ..... 1,640
Hogs, all ages on hand ......... Number. 7,773 ....... 16,498
Hogs, slaughtered ............ Number. 5,501 ....... 35,335
Hogs, sold living ............... Number. 178 ...............
Hogs, died of disease .......... Number. 45S..............
Sheep, all ages on hand ...... Number. 7,195 ....... 21.5
Sheep, purchased ............ Number.I 400 ...... 1. '2
Sheep, sold living ............. Number. 465..... 1,445
Sheep, slaughtered ............ Number.I 517 ....... 1.50S
Sheep, died of disease ........ Number.l 60 ....... 60
Sheep, killed by dogs ......... Number.i 60 ....... 75
Sheep, died otexposure ........ Number.I 75.. 60
Goats, all ages ............... lNumber.! 3,063 ...... 1,532

Poultry and Products-

koulTry, common barnyard...... Number. 125,650 ...... 37,695
Poultry, all other............. 'Number. 3,730 ....... 1 2.065
Eggs ......................... Dozen... ..... 1188,800 37.760

Dairy Products-

miilk, sold and used ........... Gallons. ...... 1153,5001 42,720
Butter, sold and used........... Pounds.. ..I 23,800, 5,580

Miscellaneous Products-

W ool, fleeces .................. IPounds..' 7,095' 21.285 6.385
Honey, stands of bees ......... I Pounds.. 657 19.740 1.974
Beeswax ..................... Pounds..'...... 150 45




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