• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 State chemist's report, 1907
 Regulations governing the taking...
 Market prices of chemicals and...
 New York wholesale price current,...
 Composition of fertilizer...
 State valuations
 State values
 Special samples
 Feedstuff division
 Insecticides--fungicides
 Bureau of fertilizers
 Analysis of fertilizers
 Bureau of feedstuffs
 Analysis of feed stuff
 Miscellaneous analyses and examinations,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00006
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    State chemist's report, 1907
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports, January 1908
        Page 27
        Page 28
    New York wholesale price current, Jan. 1, 1908--fertilizer materials
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Composition of fertilizer materials
        Page 31
        Page 32
    State valuations
        Page 33
    State values
        Page 34
    Special samples
        Page 35
    Feedstuff division
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Insecticides--fungicides
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Bureau of fertilizers
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Analysis of fertilizers
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Bureau of feedstuffs
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Analysis of feed stuff
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Miscellaneous analyses and examinations, 1907
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
Full Text
VOLUME 18 NUMBER 1

FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


JANUARY 1, 1908


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


B. E. McLIN
COMMISSIONER OF A(RIcITULTLRE


REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION


R. E. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST

Analyses of Fertilizers, Feed Stuff, Foods and Drugs
Rules and Regulations, Chemical Department

Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class matter, under
Act of Congress, of June, 1900.

These Bulletins are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them


CAPITAL PULBLISHING Co., STATE PRINTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA






\N













STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT, 1907.

To His Excellency,
N. B. Broward, Governor,
Tallahassee, Fla.:
SIR-I have the.honor to submit the following report of
the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department of
the State of Florida for the year 1907.
The usual inspections of the various sections of the
State have been made by the State Chemist, Assistant
State Chemists and Inspectors. The chemical force having
been materially increased, the inspection of the various
manufactories, depots, warehouses and fields of the State
has been more general and frequent during the year 1907
than in previous years. A larger number of dealers and
consumers have been visited, and the workings of the law
more generally explained to the citizens of the State. The
result of this work is very evident in the increased reve-
nues of the division, and most strikingly illustrated in the
much greater average value of fertilizers and feedstuff
sold throughout the State, shown in detail under proper
heads.
The records of the Agricultural Department show the
sale of inspection stamps covering 124,606.20 tons of fer-
tilizers and cottonseed meal, and 49,536.64 tons of commer-
cial feeding stuff, a total revenue of $43,535.70. There
was an increase of 27,623.56 tons in fertilizers and cotton-
seed meal sold; a decrease of 3,641.48 tons in commercial
ieedstuffs. This decrease was doubtless due to the
withdrawal from the State of certain low grade feeds,
formerly sold without guarantee.
The expenses of the Chemical Division for salaries of
Chemists and Inspectors; for traveling expenses of In-
spectors and Chemists inspecting Foods, Feeds and Fer-
tilizers; for laboratory expenses-chemicals and appara-
tus-and for building addition to the State Laboratory
was $11,541.44.
In addition to the expenses of the Chemical Division
proper there are chargeable to the revenue derived from
Fertilizer and Stock Feed Laws, the expenses of the
Agricultural Department for stamps, postage and express


I ..












thereon, blanks, salary of clerk of Fertilizer and Feed
Department, and the printing of the Chemiral portion of
the quarterly Agricultural bulletin and postage thereon.
The value of the laws-Fertilizer, Feedstnff and Food
Laws-has been pIraetically and personally brought to the
attention of the dealer and consumer, by the various
officers of the division. The economy and profitableness
of requiring fertilizers, feeds and foods to be properly
guaranteed and kept up to standard is now being generally
conceded by dealers and consumers.
Inferior fertilizers, feeds and foods, cheap substitutes
for standard articles, are seldom now found on the
market.
Florida fertilizers, particularly those manufactured in
the State, have for years been noted for their high grades
and fair prices-attributable largely to the publicity given
by the Agricultural Department to the analysis of the
various fertilizers, with a fair valuation fixed by the State
as a guide to purchasers.
Our commercial feedstuff has very materially increased
in average value, while numerous low grade or inferior
feeds not up to guarantee have either been withdrawn
from the State or have had their value increased by the
elimination of worthless fillers. There is now no excuse
for dealers or consumers to accept inferior feeds, as feeds
of the best quality can now be secured in the State from
reputable and responsible manufacturers. This is a vast
change in conditions as they prevailed prior to the enact-
ment of the Commercial Feedstuff Law. Prior to its
enactment, a sample of pure feed, bran, middlings, shorts
or mixed feed was seldom found in the State. The con-
trary is now the case. Much et remains to be done; con-
stant vigilance on the part of the dealer and consumer is
required to prevent the offering of inferior feeds for sale.
while the vigorous enforcement of the laws and regulations
by the Stale officials and Sheriffs is demanded to prevent
the importation and sale of inferior material.
The "special sample" drawn by tle pmurclmiasr and sent
to the Agricultural Department for analysis, to discover if
the feed or fertilizer be as represented, is peculiar to our
law, and in the case of feeds should be more frequently
taken advantage of by the consumer. There can lie no
excuse for a consumer to accept. and pay for. iisi'repre-
sented commercial feeds or fertilizers. No State but










Florida provides that a 'special sample" may be drawn
by the purchaser (under proper rules and regulations)
and submitted for examination free of charge. It is, in
my opinion, one of the best features of the law, and the
greatest safeguard to the consumer and dealer.
I quote from former reports on the subject of the
"Special Sample," which applies both to the fertilizer and
feed law, as follows:

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

"It is shown by the number of 'Special Samples' (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers) that the
law is becoming more generally understood by the farmer,
fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have any
reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on the
goods furnished them, do not hesitate to send in samples
for analysis.
"This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of the law
-without charge-the inspection fees covering the cost
of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had a di-
rect influence upon the increased quality of the goods sold
in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, witnessed
and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved a safe-
guard to the customer, legitimate dealer, and manufac-
turer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or fraud-
ulent vendor or manufacturer.
"It furnishes the consumer with the same protection de-
manded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials only
upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to an-
alysis."
The Financial Report shows that 49,536 tons of commer-
cial feedstuff were consumed in Florida in 1907. When
we consider that all this material, costing our people, at
$32.(00 per ton, some 1,585,152, was produced in other
States, at a profit, and freighted at large expense into
Florida-a State second to none in capacity to produce all
her own feeds and grow a surplus for export-efforts
should be made by our people to save this vast sum annu-
ally sent out of the State for feedstuff.
No State can produce the "legumes"-cowpeas, velvet
beans, beggarweed-at less cost than can Florida. These
furnish the choicest "proteins," or "flesh formers" equal










to bran or middlings when properly cured. Among the
fat former (carbohydrates, starches and sugars), there
are none superior to sweet potatoes. cassava. rice. sorghum
and Japanese sugar cane. The latter produces immense
quantities of the lest feed at a nominal cost for culture.
In I 'orida, Japanese sugar cane is practically a peren-
nial; once planted, it will continue to produce, with little
care, for years. Its culture should be more universal. It
is palatable, and furnishes feed the year round, and par-
ticularly during the winter months, when most needed.
Its harvest for winter use is simple and inexpensive; to
the dairyman it furnishes succulent feed in the winter,
and in this State will replace the silo to a great extent.
To the tobacco growers it is especially valuable, replacing
to a large extent the costly cottonseed hulls, which are of
little real feeding value, compared to cost.
A few acres of Japanese sugar cane, costing but a small
sum per acre to cultivate, would furnish immense quan-
tities of better feed at far less cost in time and money than
the costly imported feeds now used.

FERTILIZERS.

This report shows the consumption of 124.606 tons of
commercial fertilizers and cottonseed meal, costing 833.00
per ton, on $1.111,998. A large part of this sum could
be retained in the State by an intelligent system of stock-
raising, combined with the growing of the stock feeds
necessary. While the direct saving of money would be
great, the indirect profits in more fertile fields and larger
crops would be much greater.
No State has better facilities for profitable live stock
farming, where all the necessary feeds can be produced.
than has Florida. With little care and the application of
modern methods the best of beef, mutton and pork can
be produced, while no locality offers greater inducements
to the dairyman.
With our mild climate, abundance of water, numerous
pasture grasses oT superior quality, together with the
legumes mentioned, the "fat formers"-sugar cane. riec.
cassava, etc.-both our feed and fertilizer bills should be
materially reduced, and our farms rapidly enriched in-
stead of being impoverished.
The most expensive ingredient of our fertilizers is nitro-










gen. A crop of cowpeas, velvet beans or beggarweed will
produce and leave in the soil more nitrogen per acre than
a ton of the best commercial fertilizer, while the feedstuff
produced will equal the value of the fertilizer in addition.
These facts have so frequently been demonstrated that it
is only necessary to educate our farmers and stock men, to
induce more effective, economical and scientific methods,
reducing the cost of fertilizers and feeds, and enhancing
the profits of the farm, garden and grove, while increasing
the fertility and productiveness of our fields.

FARMERS' INSTITUTES.

The Legislature of 1907 provided a small fund for Far-
mers' Institutes. This is a subject of congratulation to
our farmers and stock men. The practical results derived
from those held in 1903 and 1904 are evident. This work
should be encouraged, and the latest, most practical and
economical methods brought directly to the homes of our
farmers. Those States in which the Farmers' Institute is
fostered and liberally provided for are far in advance of
others, where the Institute is not properly cared for. In
Florida particularly are these Institutes of value, as the
peculair conditions of the soil and climate present prob-
lems for solution that require the aid of our Experiment
Station and trained agriculturists. The problems worked
out by the station and the results obtained should be made
generally known to our farmers. This can be best and
most economically accomplished by sending the trained
agriculturists from our Experiment Station, with others,
to discuss these problems with the farmer in his own
neighborhood.
While the Farmers' Bulletins published by the general
Government, the Agricultural Experiment Station and the
State have done much to advance the science of agriculture
and are of great value for reference, still, the Farmers'
Institute has proven to be the most practical and effica-
cious method of teaching the adult farmer the truths dem-
onstrated by the Experiment Station, and to disseminate
a knowledge of their practical application.
The Farmers' Institute, and the Rural Agricultural
High School, to connect the farm with the Agricultural
College, will soon, I believe, be demanded by the great
American farming class, to teach the science of agricul-











ture to our youth-to dignify the profession by placing it
among the intellectual pursuits of equal dignity and im-
portance to the so-called learned professions.
The bill providing for 'Rural Agricultural High
Schools and City High Schools of Domestic Science."
recently introduced in Congress by the Hon. Chas. R.
Davis of Minnesota, was heartily indorsed by the 'South-
ern States Association of Agricultural Commissioners."
at their recent meeting in Columbia, S. C. This bill pro-
vides for the teaching of rudimentary, practical agricul-
ture in the various States, to prepare our youth for better
understanding the science and art of agriculture, and to
better prepare such as desire to enter our agricultural and
technical colleges.
The demand for knowledge by our farmers, as shown
by this movement to foster Farmers' Institutes and Far-
mers' Schools, is universal. The necessity for these means
of agricultural education is nowhere more evident than in
the South, and particularly in Florida.

PURE FOOD LAW.

The recently enacted Pure Food and Drug Law is now
in effect. The Rules and Regulations have been prepared
and published. The efforts of the Division have been, so
far, purely educational. The various officers have busied
themselves in visiting various parts of the State. consult-
ing with manufacturers, dealers, jobbers and consumers,
distributing copies of the law, rules and regulations,
directing and advising the citizen as to the proper
methods to comply therewith.
So far, with few exceptions, the people of the State
have expressed a desire to heartily comply with the law,
and cooperate with the State authorities in its enforce-
ment. But few cases of adulteration or misbranding have
been discovered, and in all such cases an immediate cor-
rection of the infringement has been effected by proper
branding or withdrawal of the offending material. That
the law will be of great value to our citizens is evident;
its enactment at this time has doubtless prevented the
influx into the State of numerous sophisticated food and
drug products prohibited by the United States law from
interstate shipment, and has to this extent protected our










people from the introduction within the State of such
questionable methods and materials.
The following extracts from the Pure Food and Drug
Law are quoted. Copies of the Law, Rules and Regula-
tions may be had from the Commissioner of Agriculture:

Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. That it shall be unlawful for any person to
manufacture, sell, keep or offer for sale within the State
of Florida, any article of food, drugs, medicine or liquors
which is adulterated or misbranded, or which contains
any poisonous or deleterious substance within the mean-
ing of this act; and any of the persons who shall violate
any of the provisions of this act shall be guilty of a mis-
demeanor, and for each offense shall, upon conviction
thereof, be fined not to exceed one thousand dollars, or
shall be sentenced to not more than one year's imprison-
ment, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discre-
tion of the court, and for each subsequent offense, and on
conviction thereof, shall be fined not exceeding two thou-
sand dollars or sentenced to not more than two years'
imprisonment, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the
discretion of the court.


Sec. 3. That the term "drug," as used in this act, shall
include all medicines and preparations recognized in the
United States Pharmacopoeia, or National Formulary, for
internal or external use, and any substance or mixture
of substances intended to be used for the cure, mitigation
or prevention of disease of either man or other animals.
The term "food," as used herein, shall include all articles
used for food, drink, confectionery or condiment by man
or other animal, whether simple, mixed or compound.
Sec. 4. That for the purpose of this act, an article
shall be deemed to be adulterated -

In case of drugs:
First. If, when a drug is sold under or by a name rec-
ognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National
Formulary, it differs from the standard of strength,
quality or purity, as determined by the test laid down










in the United States Pharmacopceia or National Formu-
lary official at the time of investigation; Provided, That
no drug defined in the United States Pharmacopceia or
National Formulary shall be deemed to be adulterated
under this provision if the standard of strength, quality
or purity be plainly stated upon the bottle, box or other
container thereof, although the standard may differ from
that determined by the test laid down by the United
States Pharmacopeia or National Formulary.
Second. If its strength or purity fall below the pro-
fessed standard or quality under which it is sold.

In the case of confectionery:
If it contains terra alba, barytes, talc, chrome yellow
or other mineral substance or poisonous color or flavor,
or other ingredient deleterious or detrimental to health,
or any vinous, malt or spirituous liquor, or compound
or narcotic drug.

In case of food:
First. If any substance has been mixed and packed
with it so as to reduce or lower or injuriously affect its
quality or strength.
Second. If any substance has been substituted wholly
or in part for the article.
Third. If any valuable constituent of the article has
been wholly or in part abstracted.
Fourth. If it be mixed, colored or powdered, coated or
stained in a manner whereby damage or inferiority is
concealed.
Fifth. If it contain and added poisonous or other
deleterious ingredient which may render such article inju-
rious to health; Provided, That when, in preparation of
food products for shipment, they are preserved by any
external application applied in such manner that the
preservative is necessarily removed mechanically. or by
maceration in water or otherwise, and directions for the
removal of said preservative are printed on the covering
of the package, the provisions of this act shall be con-
strued as applying only when said products are ready
for consumption.










Sixth. If the package, vessel or bottle containing it
shall be of such a composition, or carry any attachment
made of such a composition or metal or alloy as will be
acted upon in the ordinary course of use by the contents
of. the package, vessel or bottle in such a way as to pro-
duce an injurious, deleterious or poisonous compound.
Seventh. If it consists in whole or in part of a filthy,
decomposed or putrid animal or vegetable substance, or
any portion of an animal unfit for food. whether manu-
factured or not, or if it is the product of a diseased ani-
mal or one that has died otherwise than by slaughter.

Sec. 5. That the term "misbranded." as used herein,
shall apply to all drugs, or articles of food, or articles
which enter into the composition of food, the package, or
label of which shall bear any statement, design or device
regarding such articles or the ingredients or substances
contained therein which shall be false or misleading in
any particular, and to any food or drug product which
is falsely branded as to the State, Territory or country
in which it is manufactured or produced. That for the
purpose of this act an article shall also be deemed to be
misbranded-

In case of drugs:
First. If it be an imitation of, or offered for sale under
the name of, another article.
Second. If the contents of the package as originally
put up shall have been removed in whole or in part. and
other contents shall have been placed in such package,
or if the package fail to bear a statement on the label in
as conspicuous letters as is or may be prescribed by the
United States law or rules and regulations of the quan-
tity or proportion of any alcohol, morphine, opium,
cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta eucaine, chloroform, canna-
bis indica, chloral hydrate, or acetanilide, or any deriva-
tive or preparation of any such substance contained
therein; Provided, That nothing in this paragraph shall
be construed to apply to the filling of written prescrip-
tions, furnished by regular licensed, practicing physi-
cians, and kept on file by druggists, as required by law, or
as to such preparations as are specified and recognized by
the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary.











In case of food:
First. If it be an imitation of, or offered for sale under
the distinctive name of, another article.
Second. If it be labeled or branded so as to deceive or
mislead the purchaser, or purport to be a foreign product
when not so, or is an imitation in package or label of
another substance of a previously established name, or if
the contents of the package as originally put up shall
have been removed in whole or in part and other contents
shall have been placed in such package, or if it fail to
bear a statement on the label in conspicuous letters of the
quantity or proportion of any alcohol, morphine, opium,
cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta eucaine, cannabis indica,
chloral hydrate, or acetanilide, or any derivative or prep-
aration of any such substances contained therein.
Third. If in package form, and the contents are stated
in terms of weight or measure, they are not plainly and
correctly stated on the outside of package.
Fourth. If the package containing it, or its label, shall
bear any statement, design or device shall be false or mis-
leading in any particular; Provided, That an article of
food which does not contain any added poisonous or dele-
terious ingredients shall not be deemed to be adulterated
or misbranded in the following cases:
First. In the cases of mixtures or compounds which
may be now, or from time to time hereafter, known as
articles of food under their own distinctive names, and
not an imitation of or offered for sale under the distinc-
tive name of another article, if the name be accom-
panied on the same label or brand with a statement of
the place where said article has been manufactured or
produced.
Second. In the case of articles labeled, branded or
tagged, so as to plainly indicate that they are compounds,
imitations or blends and the word "compound." 'imita-
tion," or 'blend," as the case may be, is plainly stated
in conspicuous letters on the package in which it is
offered for sale; Provided, That the term "blend," as used
herein, shall be construed to mean a mixture of like sub-
stances, not excluding harmless coloring or flavoring
ingredients used for the purpose of coloring or flavoring
only; and, Pror idcd, fir-t'icr, That nothing in hliis act












shall be construed as requiring or compelling proprietors
or manufacturers of proprietary foods which contain no
unwholesome added ingredient to disclose their trade
formulas, except in so far as the provisions of this act
may require to secure freedom from adulteration or mis-
branding; Provided, also, That this act shall not apply to
stocks of drugs and medicines on hand in this State on
September 1st, 1907, until the first day of June, 1908.
Sec. 6. That no dealer shall be prosecuted under the
provisions of this act when he can establish a guaranty
signed by the wholesaler, jobber, manufacturer or other
party residing in the State of Florida from whom he
purchases such articles to the effect that the same is not
adulterated or misbranded within the meaning of this
act, designating it. Said guaranty, to afford protection,
shall contain the name and address of the party or
parties making the sale of such articles to such dealer,
and in such case the said party or parties shall be amena-
ble to the prosecutions, fines and other penalties which
would attach in due course to the dealer under the pro-
visions of this act.
Sec. 7. If, upon the trial of any person convicted under
this act, it shall appear that any article of food, drug or
liquor sold, kept or offered for sale by the person con-
victed is adulterated or misbranded, or is of a poisonous
or deleterious character within the meaning of this act,
the same shall be seized and destroyed by order of the
court in such manner as the court may in the order
direct.

STATE LABORATORY.

The enactment of the 'Pure Food and Drug Law," with
its necessary increase in analytical work, necessitated an
increase in the size and facilities of the State Laboratory;
which was not, previously to the passage of the law, suf-
ficiently commodious, nor properly equipped, for the pro-
per analytical work of the feed and fertilizer department.
An addition of four properly designed and conveniently
arranged rooms is now in course of construction, proper
equiipment ordered and apparatus designed. When com-
plete (within the next sixty days), the Florida State Lab-
oratory will be equal in equipment and facilities to any












state laboratory in the South, alike creditable to the
State and the Agricultural Department.



ANALYTICAL WORK, 1907.
The following analyses were made during the year:
Official samples Fertilizers........... 214
Special samples Fertilizers ........... 290
Official samples Feed stuff........... 200
Special samples Feed stuff ...........23
Miscellaneous materials, soil, water,
minerals, alcohol, fcod, etc ........ 285

Total complete analyses ............ 1,017

FERTILIZERS.
The average composition of the 156 samples of com-
plete fertilizer was:
Ammonia ................... 4.2 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid. .. .7.25 per cent.
Potash (K20) .............. 6.74 per cent.
The average "State value" of the 156 samples of com-
plete fertilizer was $29.32 per ton. The average price
was $33.00 per ton, an excess over State values of $3.68
per ton.
We find the price of these goods varied from $40.00 per
ton. with a State value of i:; :;:, per ton; an excess over
State values of $3.70; with a plant food content of 21 per
cent, or 420 pounds of high grade plant food per ton; at
an average cost of 9 1-2 cents per pound; to $22.00 per ton,
with a State value of $13.90, an excess of $8.10 over
State values, with a plant food content of but 200 pounds
of cheap materials, at an average cost of 11 cents per
pound, with an average value of 6.95 cents per pound
We find the 219 official samples of fertilizers were
divided into:
156 Samples of complete fertilizer.
3: samples of fertilizer material.

219 Total.












The 156 samples of complete fertilizers drawn through-
out the State, by the State Chemist, or Assistant Chemists,
have the following average composition:
Available
Phosphoric
Ammonia. Acid. Potash.
Official analysis. ..4.02 7.25 6.74
Guaranteed analy-
sis ............3.81 6.49 6.44

Average excess
above guaran-
tee ............. .21 .76 .30

Excess .20 per cent. above guarantee.

We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
.20 pcr cent (or 20 points)) as follows:

In ammonia............ 64 samples, or 41 per cent.
In available phos. acid 123 samples, or 79 per cent.
Ir potash, (K20)...... 76 samples, or 49 per cent.

Deficiency .20 per cent. below guarantee.

There was a deficiency greater than .20 per cent. (20
p'oimls), as follows:

In ammonia............20 samples, or 13 per cent.
In available phos. acid. .14 samples, or 9 per cent.
In potash, (K20)........37 samples, or 24 per cent.

The economy of the high-grade goods being apparent,
I again earnestly recommend the use of the high-grade
mixed goods as the most economical, and again quote
statements made in former reports as follows:

"The brands may be classifed as to valuation as fol-
lows:

Low grade, valuing at $17 or less................ $14.43
Medium grade, valuing at $17.0 to $23 ............ 18.84
High-grade, valuing at $23.0 and upwards........ 26.36









16

The composition, selling price and valuation of the
average brand of each group appears below.
Ava ilabloe T,,1,Al _\ : \ ---
Nitrogen. acid. tah. .
Low Grade 1.1 8.28 2.50 11.11 2.- 4 14.4:
Medium Grade. 2.:2 8.72 3.b6 14.4 2" u7 1i. 4
High Grade .23 S.0.5 3.66 8.42 :;. 2 t.

A survey of this table indicates that:
1. The proportion of nitrogen increases in regular grad-
uations from group to group; that of phosphoric acid is
fairly uniform in the lower and upper grades, and
increases a half per cent in the medium grade. while the
potash increases one per cent in the medium and six per
cent in the high grade brands, as compared with the lower
ones.
2. The low grade goods carry over seven times as much
phosphoric acid as they do nitrogen, and over three times
as much phosphoric acid as they do potash. These pro-
portions become, roughly, four and two and one-half in
tte medium grades. In the high-grade fertilizer there is
but two and one-half times as much phosphoric acid as
nitrogen, and rather more potash than phosphoric acid.
The latter grade more closely resembles the proportions
commonly present in plants than- do either of the other
grades.
3. The medium grade goods, for an eighth advance in
price over the cost of the low grade brands, offer a fifth
more plant food and nearly a third more commercial
value.

"Thle high-grade fertilizers, for but little more e than a
third advance in price over the cost of the low-class goods,
furnish two-thirds more plant food and fire-sixths more
commercial value."

Those consumers requiring the low grade goods, the
"8-2-2" of the cotton and corn planter, I would say
purchase your acid phosphates as such; also your kainits,
cotton ceed meal, blood, bone or tankage, make your own
mixtures, using the proper amount of each to give ypiu the
desired percentage. The excess in cost of mixed low grade
goods is excessive. Their purchase is not economical, in










view of the fact that the material could be purchased of
and mixed by the manufacturer for much less than the
selling price of certain brands of ready mixed goods. The
materials necessary to make a ton of "8-2-2" goods can
be purchased, mixed and bagged for $18.30 at any reliable
Florida factory for cash at the factory. The same goods
sold under some fancy brand, would be $22.00 per ton.
If purchased at interior points, freight must be added
in either case.
FEEDSTUFFS.

The following analyses were made during the year:
200 Official samples of Feedstuff.
23 Special samples of Feedstuff.

223 Total analyses of Feedstuff.

The average composition of the official samples was as
follows:
Protein Starch and Sugar. Fats.
official analysis. .16.53 53.80 4.1u
Guaran'danalysis 15.93 51.86 4.36

Excess ........ .60 1.94 Deficiency .17

We find that of the official samples of Commercial Feed-
stuff, the following samples exceeded the guarantee .20
per cent (or 20 points) :

In Protein, 123 samples .............. 61.5 per cent.
In Starch and Sugar, 101 samples..52. per cent.
In Fats, 61 samples. ................. .3.5 per cent.

There was a deficiency of .20 per cent. (20 points), as
follows:

In Protein............48 samples,.. .24. per cent.
In Starch and Sugar, 73 samples,...36.5 per cent.
In Fats ............ .... 92 samples,. 6. per cent.

Showing that the general average of all the Commercial
Feed sold in the State was slightly above the guarantee.
2- -A\g











an improvement on previous years, showing that dealers
and consumers are beginning to understand the law.
and take advantage of its 1,rovisions. and that manu-
facturers of low grade or inferior feed find the Florida
market does not demand their inferior goods.
A striking example of the increased value of the feeds
sold in thle State is illustrated by the increase in value of
one of the popular mixed feeds-by-products of a cerealine
factory. This feed, of which there was consumed in the
State some six thousand tons, was, prior to the passage
of the law, sold with a guarantee of above 10 per cent
protein, with an actual content of but S.350 per cent of
protein; the same feed is now sold with a 14 per cent
guarantee of protein, and so far has met the guarantee;
an increase in the value of this feed of practically 82.50
per ton, representing a sum of $15,000.00. added to the
value of the feed consumed by our people, in this one
instance.
If consumers and dealers will require that each sack
bear the 'guarantee tag" and "stamp." and will insist
that the goods come up lo the guarantee. by sending in
samples of suspected feed for analysis, the stock feed If
the State will soon occupy the same high standard of
excellence as is now the case with our fertilizers. No
State demands, or receives, of her manufacturers, a
higher grade fertilizer, made of better material. than
does Florida.
The orange, vegetable, and pineapple growers of the
State are probably the best posted users of fertilizers
in America; knowing what they want. and demanding
it of the manufaclturrs. They take advantage of tile
'special sample," provided for in the law. and 1)i its
means discover if the goods ;'re as represented or not.
When our dairymeltn and others who use large i ;iiinti-
li;s of Stock Feed, (Colton Seed Meal, Beian, Shunos, Mill
,F'ed, etc., demand the guarantee to lie fully met. s~iil in
specialsl" and convince Themselves of the value. study liie
tables of comparative values, as do the fertilizer cn-
sumers, the sale of inferior Stock Feed in the State will
cease.












UNIT VALUES OF COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFF.

Numerous requests have been received for a method
of calculating commercial value of various feedstnlfs,
similar to the "State values" fixed for fertilizers. This
has been the subject of much study, experiment and dis-
cussion, by various authorities, experiment stations, scien-
tific experimenters, and chemists. After correspondence
with the officials of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, Profs. P. H. Rolfs, Director, and John M. Scott,
Prof. of Animal Industry, and other authorities, a
method has been suggested to arrive at a practical means
of closely approximating the unit values of the "Proteins,"
Starches and Sugars." and "Fats."
A table has been prepared by the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, which will be published in bulletin
form in a short time. These tables will, however, be based
upon the "feeding value," or "nutritive value," of the
\;l ious feeds. For He purpose of this Iepartment, how-
ever, the commercial values must be considered; that is,
a fair market value of the various feeds, compared to
the market value of other feeds, equally as desirable for
the use of the consumer, the dealer, and manufacturer.
Assuming that the nitrogen content of feed, which is
Protein," (nitrogen multiplied by 6.25, or ammonia mul-
tipl ied by 5.15) is valued commercially the same as nitrogen
in fertilizers, (ammonia, State value ::..;. per unit in fer-
tilizers,) the "State Value" of "Protein" is fixed at 65
cents per unit of 20 pounds, or 3.25 cents per pound.
Deducting the '.'... ;l" value from the price of the ma-
Ierial, the remainder would be the value of the "Starch
ao d Sugar" and "Fats" (total carbohydrates). Assuming
lihe value of "Fats"' to be 2.25 times that of "Starch and
Sugar." we find the factors become practically thus:

Per. lb.
Protein is worth i.5c per unit of 20 lbs. or. ....... :,.25e
Starch and sugar l-:0c per unit of 20 lbs., or. ....... 1.5Uc
Fats 6,5e per unit of 20 lbs., or................... .25c

For all practical purposes, using the total chemical
values as factors (including the indigeslible as well as
digestible protein, carbohydrates and fats), we fix as a











"State value" for feedstuff for the year 150S the fol-
lowing:

STATE VALUE FOR FEEDSTUFF.
Per unit
Per lb. of 20 lbs.
Protein ................. .3.25 cents or, 65 cents.
Starch and Sugar ......... 1.50 cents or, 30 cents.
Fats .....................3.25 cents or. 05 cents.
To calculate the State value, multiply the percentages
by the unit values as given:

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

CORN-(The assumed standard.) Present market value
$30 per ton.
Protein ............. 10.50 per cent @ 65c, 6.825
Starch and Sugar ...... 69.6C1 per cent @ 30c, 20.SS
Fats ................. 5.40 per cent (( ( 5c, 3.51
.31.21
EXAMPLE No. 2

BRAN-(Present market value $30 per ton.):
Protein .............. 15.10 per cent @ G5c. $ 9.81
Starch and Sugar .... 57.28 per cent @ 30c, 17.1S
Fats ................ 3.65 per cent ( G5c, 2.37
$29.8;5
EXA-MPLE NO. 3.

MID)LINGS-(Present market value 9:2 per ton.i
Protein ..............17.23 per cent @ G65c, s11.20
Starch and Sugar ..... 56.70 per cent ( 30c. 17.111
Fats .................. 4.72 per cent 65c G 3.117
$31.2S

These "unit values" are practically the same if all the
an: lyses of commercial feed sold in the State are average'l
as well as their prices.








21

The average composition of all commercial feed sold in
the State was as follows:

Protein .......................... .16.53 per cent.
Starch and Sugar .................. 53.80 per cent.
Fat ...................... ......... 4.19 per cent.

The average price being. .................. .. .1 ..:'.OO0
The average "State value". ................ 29.61

These "State values" of Feeds, like the "State values"
for Fertilizers, are not assumed to be exact; they are based
on current prices, and subject to change with the market
and to the supply and demand for certain feeds; Indian
corn being chosen as the standard, as it fixes the value
of all other stock feeds.

SHEDDED SUMATRA AND SUN-GROWN HAVANA
TOBACCO.

The rapid development of the tobacco industry of the
State in the counties of Gadsden, Leon and Pasco has
become generally known very recently. Few of our own
people were aware of the large investments and extensive
business of growing the finer grades of cigar tobacco, both
wrappers and fillers, in Florida.
For years the business has been the principal one of
Gadsden county, where some four thousand acres of shed-
ded Sumatra leaf are grown, and also a large acreage of
Havana seed leaf grown in the open air.
The quality of this tobacco, both tiller and wrapper, is
equal to the best imported, and commands as high a price
as the best Cuban tobacco.
There are three to five millions of dollars invested in
tobacco growing in the counties of Gadsden, Leon and
Pasco; probably no agricultural pursuit ha:s paid larger
dividends on the amount of capital and labor invested
than has the cigar tobacco industry of Florida. The
business is expanding rapidly; while at present confined
to a few localities, there is no reason, climatic or other-
wise, why the same success should not be had in every
county in the State.
There are equally as well adapted soils in all the coun-
ties of the State, where the same careful and intelligent








S-1

culture and fertilization will produce io, arni f |';11:1l
value. The advance in scientific knowledge of the selc-
tion of seed-correct mIethods of culture and feriilizinii_--
has been g'ral during the past few vyealls. T''l, l-ni tdil
for comnpelent rained men for all agricultural lpur>uin-
and particularly for lile r \ow ing of line radlts of ibiihlai.....
is large, whli ill he su1p ly i: limited. It is now\ r' ., -
niized llat 111ore deplends on the proper soli ,f s .-.
li hlllods ofi' Il 'r iliziig' a11 cullht r ,. i ,w ll -il '
cigar toNli'cro, ]laivillni the proper texture size an., s1;l;.e'
of le t, com bin dil With t wh prope r ,Ii-aii!. 1" it i \,,.
wilh iesirll e burning ui allies. l i;l e i ru i ,, ni o tii.
T ier] c is ( I 'V r'Isoi ii o b lie> tlm r cotlin ilillt I: il,
sel'cltion anld exp"'.rinll i ti s In living so( a c l'nI' Nl]\ i:kid'' ih\
Ihe I'niled Statl s A Hriculurai l )epiartriielnr. in lh;tl'iiii'nI
]i t:1 an1d a:ssisled ]Iy the i il]a -'o gc'l' 'wers l tf 11i I I;i,.
tlimat lhe sulfldy of choice ,ig:tr lidacco of thle rnnilry \\i:1
be lpr lud 'ed in Florida; l ha t ii will ri\i ;ll ht i ;'ll ,i
Cuban cigar tobacco in quality is now fully esta1lishd :
the quantity will beI limited to only the nulither uf pr ip-
erly trained imen to produce it.

TOBACCO FIRTILIZEIS.

FERTILIZERIS FOR S I>IIEI> SLU",I\ATlRA AND (CUt AIN STUN
(i O\w l TUAI(. '' o.

From the best information obtainalle. that I(f pr;lini-
cal successful growers, from hle Bureau (if Plant Indlni-
try. Bulletin No. 91. and other United States bulletins
and circulars on the subject, obtainable from the United
States Agricullural )Departmlent, Washington. C.. i he
following formulas are deducted:
Per ct.
20(10 pounds (Colttl seed mowl ........ 7. Aninionia.
3(0 pounds ('alhlotle of Polash ... .1 Porash (K- i
700 pounds (;Grond fine lone....... 22 Phos. Acid.
(700 pounds (round fine bone.... 4 Ammonia.,

This formula analyzes ,practically as follows:

An1m onia ............................. ; con .
Phosllhoric Acid ..................... I pe. r cent.
Potal sh ................ l( K I ......... 7 per' cent.












Using 3.000 pounds per acre. A number of the most
successful growers use 4,000 pounds per acie.
In addition to the above commercial fertilizers, twen y
loads of co(w allillure I froimn ca le( fed (on cotton seed mealI
and hulls, making an unusually rich inutainre is applied
'to each acre with 700 pounds of lime. broadcast. per acre
on shedded tobacco.
For Cuban Sun Grown tobacco, grown in the open with-
out sheds, one-half of the same fertilizers :s recommended.
All Sulphates or Muriates are avoided; as are organic
ferilizers, tankagee," btood-and-bolw, fish scrap, etc..
experience having demonstrated that the ''lavor" and
"burn" of the tobacco are seriously affllected by the grosser
organic fertilizers, and acid phosphate.

CAUTIO(N. Carbonate of potash, and bone meal,
should not be mixed until read, to apply it. If mixed any
length of time previously to using, a considerable loss
of ammonia will certainly occur. This will doubtless be
the case with Imuch of thlie mixed "PHone and Potash." now
being purchased bIy tobacco growers, ready mixed. The
carbonate of poIash and bone and meal should be mixed
and applied to the soil immediately, ollerwise a large
part of the nitrogen (ammonia) will be necessarily lost.

I would suggest the following formula as a substitute
for the one generally used; one ton of which is equal to
three thousand pounds of tle ordinary materials used. It
is devised of high-grade salts, and may le mixed and
kept indefinitely, without danger of delreciatlion or
loss of ammonia. With the appllication of tie usual
(quantity of cow manure it will be found equally satisfac-
tory, and at present prices o' chellicals it is less costly
than the ordinary mixtlire:

P1er ct. '(er ct.
450 lbs. nitrate of potash.. .1 Amm\lnonia;. 44 Potash.
5001 Ibs. cottonseed meal.... T 7 Ammonia.
850 lbs. fine raw bone meal. 4 Amnmolnia. 2,2 Phos.Acid.
200 lbs. nitrate of sod:... .. I. 1 Ammonia.

2000











This formula has approximately the following per-
centages:

Ammonia ......................... S.75 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid .................. l. .0i per cent.
Potash (K2O) ................... .11.00 per cent.

Apply one ton per acre tc shedded tobacco, with 20
loads cow manure, or 1,000 pounds per acre of Sun
tobacco, with 10 loads (or more) cow manure per acre.
In conclusion, I desire to commend the industry. care
and scientific accuracy of the Assistant State Chemists,
Messrs. L. Hieimburger, B. H. Bridges and A. M. Henry,
on whom the greater portion of the technical work of the
division necessarily devolves; also to Messrs. J. H. Jones
and W. W. Trammell, the Inspectors of the Department,
upon whose constant vigilance, courtesy, and knowledge
of the law and regulations, largely depends 1he sunco-ful
carrying out of the law, 1he elimination of deficient. ,dul-
te(a'ted, or fraudulent material, and the proper collection
of 11he inspection fees.
To the Hon. B. E. McLin, Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, I desire to express the thanks of myself, and other
officers of the Division, for his uniform patience, courtesy,
and hearty cooperation, in enforcing the laws, and regula-
lions governing the work of the Chemical Division of the
Agricultural Delpartment.
Very respectfully.
STATE CHEMIST.











REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.

SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding
Stuffs sent in by purchasers, under Section 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure
fair samples of sufficient size to make the necessary deter-
minations, and to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for two months from date of cer-
tficate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed, and
frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ; fre-
quently there are no marks, numbers or other means of
identification; the postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must not be less than one-half
pound, in a can or bottle, scaled and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sende.'s name and ad-
dress must ;15so be on the package, this ru-le apl.,li.uig to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.











INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.
Each package of Cominercial Fertilizer. and i eh
parikage of C'omirme(ia Feeding Situf i'i 1ii ];iv\I
securely attached thereto, a lag with thd iuar-
anteed analysis required by law, and the stamp showing
the payment of the inspector's fee. This provision of the
law--Fection 3 of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required t, plroprly
tag and stamp each package of Conmmercial IFeri'lizt(r or
Commercial Feeding Stufi under penalty as fixed an sec-
tion G. of both laws. Tais -hall he attache to Ihi to
end of each bag. or head of each barrel.


INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCITASERS.
Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feediun Stuir that dIIs
cnot bear on ch(i packl/'qc an analysis t' withi
lihe -'uaran(tee required by law, and tlhe s- mp
showing the payment of the inspector's fee. G( ls not
having the guarantee t ag and stamp are irregular and
fraudulent; the absence of tie guarantee tag and stamp
being evidence that the manufacturer or dealer has not
complied with the law. Without the guarantee tag and
stamp showing what the goods are guaranteed to contain.
the purchaser has no recourse against the manufacturer
or dealer. Such goods are sold illegally and fraudulently,
and are generally of little value. All reputable manufac-
turers and dealers now comply strictly with the law and
regulations by placing the guarantee tag and stamp on
each package.


INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.
The attention of Sherills of the various .rImnti.
is called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from tire imposition of fraudulent, inferior or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuffs.
B. E. McLIN.
Comnnissioner of Agriculture.








27

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS A-ND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA PORTS,
JANUARY, 19!S.


Ammoninates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cent.
Ammonia ...............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia ..........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. Am-
m onia ..................
Dried Blood 15 per cent. Am-
m onia ...................


Less than 5 to 10
5 tons. tons.


10 tons
& over.


$60.00 ..".' $59.00

74.00 73.50 73.00

60.00 59.50 59.00

54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ............
Carbonate of Potash 60 per
cent. Potash (K20) (90 per
cent Carbonate of Potash)
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42
Potash (K20) ............
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash. .


50.00 49.50

30.00 29.50


49.00

29.00


46.00 45.50 44.00


110.00 -

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent Ammonia ....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
6t/ per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent, Phosphoric Aid...
Raw Bone, 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid ..............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00











L
Ammoniates.
Ammonia and Phosphoric Acid.
Ground Castor Pomace, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid.....
Bright Cottonseed Meal, 8
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ..............
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ..............


ess than 5 to 10
5 tons. tons.


10 tons
& over.


$25.00 $24.50 $24.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


24.00 23.50 23.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid .............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00 14.50 14.50

14.00 13.50 13.00

24.00 23.50 23.00
25.00 24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ..................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia. 10 per cent.
K20 Potash ............
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1l per
cent. Ammonia, 1i per
cent. Potash ............
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks ......


25.00 24.50 24.00

16.00 15.50 15.00


23.00 22.50 22.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


18.50
14.50
10.25


18.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.






29

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICE CURRENT.
JAN. 1, 1908-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

Ammoniates.
Ammonia, sulphate, foreign, spot per 100 lbs..... 3.021@ 3.05
futui sas .................................. 3.05 @ 3.071
Ammonia, sulphate domestic, spot. ............. 3.00 @ 3.024
futures ............................... 3.024@ 3.05
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and 14 p. c.
bone phosphate, f.o.b. fish works, per unit... 2.80 & 10
net, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia, 3 p. c.
phosphoric acid, f.o.b. fish works ....... 2.60 & 35
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11 p. c. am-
monia and 15-17 p. c. bone phosphate, c.i.f.
N. Y., Balto. or Phila. .................. 3.00 & 10
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago.... 2.25 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago........ 2.20 & 10
Tankage, 64 and 25 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago..........20.00 @ -
Tankage, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago............ 2.25 @ -
Garbage, tankage ............................. 10.00 @11.00
Sheep manure, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago, per ton 7.25 @ -
Hoofmeal, f.o.b. Chicago, per unit.............. 2.40 @ 2.421
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f.o.b. New York. 2.45 @ 2.50
Dried blood, high grade, f.o.b. Chicago. ........ 2.30 @ 2.40
Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c. spot., per 100 lbs........ 2.35 @ 2.40
futures, 95 p. c........................... 2.40 @ 2.45

Phosphates.

Acid phosphate, per unit......................... 70 @ 75
Bones, raw, per unit per ton........ ...........16.00 @18.00
ground, steamed, 3 p. c. ammonia and 50 p.
c. bone phosphate ......................20.00 @22.00
unground, steamed ....................... 17.00 @18.00
Phosphate rock, ground, f.o.b. Charleston, 2,000 Ibs. G.75 @ 7.00
So. Carolina phisphate rock, undried, per 2,400
Ibs., f.o.b. Ashley River.................. 5.75 @ 6.00
So. Carolina phosphate rock, hot air dried, f.o.b.
Ashley River............................. 7.00 @ 7.25
Florida land Irbble phosphate rock, f.o.b. Port
Tampa, Fla. ............................... 7.50 @ 7.75
Florida high grade phosphate rock, f.o.b. Florida
or Georgia ports ........................ .10.25 @10.50
Tennessee phosphate rock, f.o.b. Mt. Pleasant, do-
mestic, per ton, 78@80 p. c. ............... 6.50 @ 6.75
75 p. c. guaranteed........................ 6.00 0 6.25
68@72 p. c. .............................. 4.00 @ 4.25

Potashes.

Muriate potash, basis 80 p. c., spot, per 100 lbs.... 1.95 (7 1.98
Muriate potash, basis 80 p. c., future............. 1.90 @ 1.93
Manure salt, 20 p. c., actual potash .............. 14.75 @15.40














doubly manure salt, 48 p. c ................
Sulphate potash (basis 90 p. c.) ..................
K ainit, in bags, 2,240 lbs.......................
K ainit, in bulk, do.............................
Potash, per 100 lbs... ..................
carb. calcined 80@85 p. c..................
calcined 96(@98 per cent..................
hydrated 80s 85 per cent ..............
ca u stic ............................ ....
Saltpeter, crude ..............................
refin ed ................ .... ........


1.16 (a 1.19
2.18 t 2.22j
:.50 10.5,-
\.59 9. 50

4i' 4j
4?S 5j
4 _i 4t
4 C. 64
4 4;
42' 5j













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Phosphoric
Ammonia Acid Potash
Niitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 ........... ............
Sulphate of Ammonia ... 21 to 241 ........... ......... ..
Dried Blood....... ....... 12 to 17 .......................
Concentrated Tankage.....1 12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
Bone Tankage ............ 6 to 91 10 to 151...........
Dried Fish Scrap ........ 8 to 11 8 to S ...........
Cotton Seed Meal......... 7 to 101 2 to 31 1l to 2
Hoof Meal ............. 13 to 171 1j to 21 ..........

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.


Pounds Per Hundred.
Insoluble
Ammonia Available Phosphoric
Phos. Acid. Acid


F'lorida Pebble 'Pospnate. .......... ........... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. .......... ............ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.. ........) 14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to17
Steamed Bone ............ 2 to 4 6 to 9 1J to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4) 13 to 15 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.


Po

Actual
Potash
Muriate of Potash......... 50
Sulphate of Potash........ 48 to 52
Carbonate of Potash....... '55 to 30
Nitrate of Potash ......... 140 to 44
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag.. 126 to 30 .
K ainit .................... 12 to 12 .
Sylvinit .................. 116 to 20
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. .. 15 to 30
Wood Ashes, un leached.. 2 to 8
Wood Ashes leached....... 1 to 2.
Tobacco Stems ............ 5 to 8
Cow Manure (fresh) ...... 0.40
Horse Manure (fresh)..... 0.53
Sheep Manure (fresh) ..... | 0.67
Hog Manure (fresh) ...... 0.60
Hen Dung (fresh) ........ J.85
Mixed Stable Manure. ..... 0.63


unds Per Hundred.
Phos-
Am'nia phoric Lime
Acid

........ ........ I......


................. I.......
........ ........ ........
12 to 16 ..... ........


.. .... 7 to 9 10
..... .. to 2 .......
........ lto 1 1 35 to 40
2 to 4 ........ 3j
0 to 411 J.16 0.31
0 to 60 0.28 0.21
1.00 0.23 0.33
0.55 0.19 0.08
2.07 1.54 0.24
0.76 0.26 0.70


-- -- --











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.


To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by ........... 0.824
Ammonia into protein by...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by ........... 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by ...... 16.47
Nitrogen into protein by....................... 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2,184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate potash, multiply by 1.5S3
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.S5
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by .... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and you
get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or to convert 90 per cent carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K2O), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.-2
per cent actual potash (KO2).



COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER AND STOCKFEIE I
LAWS.

Citizens interested in Ile fertilizer and stock feet lai\
of lie State, and desiring to avail tlemselvest of tlirii
protection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending f.ir
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.

COPIES OF TILE PURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW.

Copies of the Pure Food and Drug Law, rules and r1ci
nations, standards, blanks, etc., can be obtained friin Tlh
Commissioner of Agriculture.











STATE VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1908.

Available Phosphoric Acid ............5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ........... 1 cent a pound
A_-imonia(or its equivalentinnitrcgen) 161 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash. K20) ........ .5 cents a pound

If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .......... 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .$3.30 per unit
Potash ................................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid ..6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ..1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia ..................3.42 per cent.x 3.30-11.28
Potash .....................7.23 per cent.xl.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging ........................ 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. $27.25

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid .... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$8.00
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.60
Potash ........................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging ............................ 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. $18.30

The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
3-Ag












ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e:

Available Phosphoric Acid ..........90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) .................. .. .99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen). $2.97 per unit

The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended 1b the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a bulletin, or the opening of the "seasio'n.'
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or
decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "'Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets." loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which the
various ingredients necessary to use in compounding a
fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased fori' cash in ton lots at
Florida sea ports.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 190S deducted
therefrom.












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers or feeds) that
the law is becoming more generally understood by the
farmer, fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who
have any reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee
on the goods furnished them, do not hesitate to send in
samples for analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of the law
-without charge-the inspection fees covering the cost
of analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had a
direct influence upon the increased quality of the goods
sold in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, wit-
nessed and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved
a safeguard to the customer, legitimate dealer, and man-
ufacturer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or!
fraudulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection
denuinded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials.
only upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to
analysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are im-
ported direct by factories and dealers located at our
seaport cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Ger-
many are now frequently received by Florida importers,
while large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured
at and exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
Tables of the average composition of feeds and ferti-
lizer materials will be found in this bulletin. The con-
sumer should consult them, compare the guarantee tag
therewith, and if doubtful of the truthfulness of the "guar-
antee," send a "Special Sample" in a tin can to ehe
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis, as directed in
regulations governing the taking and sending of special
samples-on another page.












FEEDSTUFF DIVISION.



JACKSONVILLE PRICES CURRENT.
January 1st, 1908.

COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS.

Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7.50 per cent ammonia.
per ton .................. ................. 27.50
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 4.50 per cent ammonia,
per ton .................................. 23.00
Pure Wheat Bran, per ton ...................... 30.00
Middlings, per ton,............................. 32.00
Shorts, per ton.......... ..................... 32.00
Purina Feed, per ton......................... 33.00
Victor Corn and Oats, per ton.................. 32.00
Sucrene Horse Feed, per ton ................... 29.00
Diamond C Corn and Oats, per ton ............... 3.0
Sucrene Dairy Feed, per ton. ................... 30.10
W hite Corn, per ton........................... 29.00
Mixed Corn, per ton............ ............. 28.00
Oats, per ton.................................. 42.i11
Hominy Feed, per ton ........................ 31.11)
Gluten Feed, per ton........................... 33.00
Mixed Feed, Corn and Oats, per ton.............. 34.00
Beet Pulp, per ton............................. 30.00








37
AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDSTUFFS.



NAME OF FEED *

U C z2 0 C

Bright Cotton Seed Meal 7.05 38.83 27.57] 9.22J 6.60

Dark Cotton Seed Meal ...... 21.43 36.56 5.451 ......

Linseed Meal ........ 8.76 34.70 35.91 5.34 6.12,

Wheat Bran.......... 8.39 15.10 57.28 3.65 5.33

Middlings ........... 6.36 17.23 56.70 4.72 4.30

Maxed Feed (wheat).. 7.80 16.86 54.44 4.79 5.30

Corn Meal .......... 1.64 8.73 71.32 3.14 1.20

Corn (grain) ......... 2.10 10.50 69.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Cobs ........... 30.10 2.40 54.90 0.50 1.40

Corn and Cob Meal... 6.60 8.50 64.80 3.50 1.50

Corn & Oats, eq'l p'ts.. 5.80 9.60 66.10 4.40 2.20

Wheat .............. 1.80 11.90 71.99 2.10 1.80

Oats ................ 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.09

Soja Beans .......... 4.80 34.00 28.00 16.50 5.40

Velvet Beans & Hulls.. 9.20 19.70 51.30 4.50 3.30

Rice Hulls ......... 35.70 3.60 38.60 0.70 13.20

Gluten Meal......... 1.25 37.061 46.521 3.27 0.68

Gluten Feed.......... 7.311 24.17 54.30j 3.44 1.80








38

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED-
STUFFS- (Continued.)


NAME OF FEED.



Hominy Feed ........

Rye Products (bran)..

Barley Sprouts ......

Distillers' Grains ....

Oat Feed ............

Provender ...........

Ship Stuff...........

Victor Feed .........

XXX Corn & Oat F'ds

Corn & Oat Feeds....

Proprietary Horse F'ds

Molasses Feeds ......

Poultry Feeds .......

Beef Scrap ..........

Quaker Dairy Feed...

Creamery Feed ......

Purina Feed .........


4.05

4.53

10.94

12.90

20.57

3.911



10.63

9.94

12.09

9.57

8.49

4.62!



15.53

10.07!

12.601


-^ ; 1
aL a

10.49 65.27 7.85 2.54

15.57 61.28 3.02 3.80

27.20 42.66 1.56 6.34

32.23 33.34 12.09 1.86

7.91 54.58 3.26! 5.34

10.621 67.34 4.03 1.83

16.30 58.14 4.28].....

8.83 62.46! 4.02! 3.64

9.66 64.66 5.09 3.24

8.73 61.73 3.73 3.22

12.48 60.54 4.27' 2.83

16.34 51.72 1.79 6.18

15.89 60.27 5.32 27.63

44.70 3.28 14.75' 29.20

14.42 52.12 4.05 5.31

20.06! 51.00 5.38 3.57

15.10 56.50 4.10 4.65
1 1 1______








39

COMMERCIAL STATE; VALUES OF FEED-
STUFF 1908.

For the season of 1908, the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers.
These values are based on the current price of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDSTUFF FOR 1908.

Protein, 65c per unit of 20 lbs............ .. 3.25c per lb.
Starch and Sugar, 30c per unit of 20 lbs...... 1.50c per lb.
Fats, 65c per unit of 20 lbs ................. 3.25 per lb.

Indian corn being the standard @ $30.00 per ton.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE NO 1.
HOMINY FEED-
Protein, ......................10.49 x 65c, $ 8.82
Starch and Sugar,............ 65.27 x 30c, 19.58
Fats, ......................... 7.85 x 65c, 5.90

State value per ton ..................... $33.80

EXAMPLE No. 2.

CORN AND OAT FEED-
Protein ....................... 9.66 x 65c, $ 6.27
Starch and Sugar..............62.46 x 30c, 18.73
Fats .......................... 5.09 x 65c, 3.30

State value per ton .................. ..$32.30
See discussion on preceding pages.

FORMULAS FOR VEGETABLES.

As vegetable growing for the early markets is one of
the most important industries of the State, a few accepted
formulas have been selected from those recommended by









40

various Experiment Stations, and from the experience
of practical growers and manufacturers of standard com-
mercial fertilizers. It is conceded that ammonia (or nitro-
gen) is required in relatively large quantities for suc-
culent crops, such as cabbage, celery, lettuce, cucumbers,
string beans, and for young fruit trees to induce growth.
That phosphoric acid is required for fiber production,
and to mature the woody parts of plants.
That potash is demanded by starch and sugar producing
plants, potatoes, beets, sugar cane, peaches, oranges, pine-
apples, etc., to mature their sugars and starches. The
predominant element required for different classes of vege-
tables or plants, is, other things being equal:
For foliage crops, cabbage. lettuce, spinach, etc., am-
monia. For woody plants and for fiber, phosphoric acid.
For fruits, sugar and starch productions, potash.

For Celery-7 per cant. Ammonia, 5 per cent. Avail-
able Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
1 300 ibs Nitrate of Soda......
800 lbs Fish Scrap.......... 6.9 pr. ct. Ammonia
600 ibs Acid Phos., 13 pr.ct.. yields 15.5 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash...... 17.8 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs.
2 250 lbs Nitrate of Soda......
600 lbs Dried Blood ......... 17.2 pr. ct. Ammonia
850 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. .1 yields 15.5 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash....... 7.8 pr. ct. Potash
2,000 lbs.

For Irish Potatoes-6 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per cent.
'A cailable Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
1 300 lbs Nitrate of Soda......
600 lbs Cotton Seed Meal.... 5.4 pr. ct. Ammonia
800 lbs Acid Phos ........... yields 7.2 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 Ibs Muriate potash ...... 18.1 pr. ct. Potash
2.000 lbs

2 300 lbs Nitrate of Soda.....
600 lbs Fish Scrap.......... [5.8 pr. ct. Ammonia
800 lbs Acid Phos., 14 pr. ct.I yields 6.8 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash...... 7.8 pr. ct. Potash

2.000 lbs












3 200 lbs Nitrate of Soda.....
900 lbs Fish Scrap..........I 6.4 pr. ct. Ammonia
600 lbs Dissolved bone black yields 6.6 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash..... 17.8 pr. ct. Potash

2.000 lbs

4 220 lbs Nitrate Soda........
500 lbs Dried Blood........ 16.1 pr. ct. Ammonia
970 lbs Acid phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 6.8 pr. ct. Avail. phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash.. ... 8.0 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

5 300 lbs Nitrate Soda........
600 lbs Cotton Seed Meal...1 15.4 pr. ct. Ammonia
800 Ibs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 6.0 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate Potash.... 8.3 pr. ct. Potash

2.000 lbs


For Radishes and Turnips-5 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per
cent. Available PhosJhoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.

1 250 lbs Nitrate Soda........
550 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 14.6 pr ct. Ammonia
900 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 6.5 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash...... 18.3 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs


For Asparagus-5 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per cent. Avail-
able Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.

1 200 lbs Nitrate Soda........
700 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 4.9 pr. ct. Ammonia
800 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields |6.1 pr ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate Potash.... 1 8.4 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

2 300 lbs Nitrate Soda........
600 lbs Tankage............ 15.5 pr. ct. Ammonia
800 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct.I yields 16.4 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Sulph. Potash, H. G.I 17.8 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs









42

For Beets and Lettuce-6 per cent. Ammonia. 5 per
cent. Available Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
1 300 lbs Nitrate Soda........
800 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 16.2 pr. ct. Ammonia
600 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 4.9 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash ..... 8.5 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

2 200 lbs Nitrate Soda........
800 Ibs Fish Scrap.......... 5.9 pr. ct. Ammonia
700 lbs Acid Phos., 11 pr. ct. yields 5.4 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash.... .. 7.8 pr ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

For Cabbage, Cauliflower, Cucumbers and Melons-6
per cent. Ammonia, 5 per cent. Available Phosphoric Acid,
7 per cent. Potash.
1 300 lbs Nitrate Soda........
750 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 6.0 pr. ct. Ammonia
700 lbs Acid Phos., 11 pr. ct. yields 4.8 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
250 lbs Muriate potash...... 7.1 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

For Spinach-5 per cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent. Avail-
able Phosphoric Acid, 6 per cent. Potash.
1 200 lbs Nitrate Soda........
650 lbs Fish Scrap ........ 5.2 pr. ct. Ammonia
950 lbs Acid Phos., 14 pr. ct. yields 7.7. pr. ct. Avail phos acid
200 lbs Muriate potash...... 16.0 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

2 300 lbs Nitrate Soda........
500 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 5.0 pr. ct. Ammonia
1,000 lbs Acid Phos., 14 pr. ct. yields 7.6 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
200 lbs Muriate potash...... 5.6 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs.

For Egg Plant and Tomatoes-5 per cent. Ammonia,
6 per cent. Phosphate Acid, 7 per cent. Pctash.
1 200 lbs Nitrate Soda........
700 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 4.9 pr. ct. Ammonia
840 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 6.3 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
360 lbs Muriate potash...... 7.4 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs












For Onions-5 per cent. Ammonia, 5 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.

1 200 Ibs Nitrate Soda........
750 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 5.1 pr. ct. Ammonia
750 lbs Acid Phos., 11 pr. ct. yields 5.1 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash......1 8.5 Tr ct. Potash

2.000 lbs

For Sweet Potatoes-3 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.

1 100 lbs Nitrate Soda........
400 Ibs Fish Scrap........... 3.5 pr. ct. Ammonia
1,180 lbs Acid Phos., 11 pr. ct. yields 7.8 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
320 lbs Muriate potash...... 8.3 pr. ct. Potash

2.000 lbs

2 100 lbs Nitrate Soda........
500 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 3.5 pr. ct. Ammonia
1,100 lbs Acid Phos., 13 pr. ct. yields 7.8 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
300 lbs Muriate potash...... 8.3 pr. ct. Potash

2,000 lbs

For Beans and Peas-3 per cent. Amm ionia, 7 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid, 7 per cent. Potash.

1 100 lbs Nitrate Soda........
450 lbs Cotton Seed Meal... 12.9 pr. ct. Ammonia
1,200 lbs Acid Phos., 11 pr. ct. yields 17.0 pr. ct. Avail phos acid
[6.9 pr. ct. Potash
2,000 lbs

Note.-In the preceding formulas, H. G. Sulphate may be sub-
stituted for Muriate of Potash wherever it occurs.
Muriate is ordinarily used by vegetable growers, though the
sulphate is preferred by many. H. G. Sulphate, 48 per cent. pot-
ash, is now quoted at $52.00 per ton, or $1.09 per unit of potash.
Muriate, 50 per cent. potash, is quoted at $46.00 per ton, or 92
cents per unit.

FORMULAS FOR COTTON.

The following formulas for cotton are the result of care-
ful experiments by trained investigators on worn soil. It
was found that cotton required a combination of nitrogen,
phosphoric acid and potash. Phosphoric acid is the domi-











nant element, however, with nitrogen standing next in
importance. The relative proportion of the three im-
portant elements of plant food is one part nitrogen, two
and a half of phosphoric acid, and three-fourths of potash.
The quantities required by a crop of 300 pounds of lint cot-
ton per acre are nitrogen, 20 pounds, phosphoric acid, 50
pounds, and potash, 15 pounds. The different formulas
given below are so calculated as to contain very nearly
these quantities of the three important elements, and are
so varied as to meet the requirements and convenience of
almost every farmer. No one formula can be said to have
any special advantage over the other; just use the one
you can get together with the greatest convenience and
least cost to yourself. Each one will analyze about 20
pounds of nitrogen, 50 pounds of phosphoric acid, and 15
pounds of potash in the whole formula. Fertilizers may
be applied either in drill or broadcast where used liberally,
but if used sparingly, drilling is considered preferable:

Muriate of Potash ........................... 30 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................ 334 lbs.
N itrate of Soda ............................ 125 lbs.

Muriate of Potash .......................... 20 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................. 281 lbs.
Cotton Seed Meal ............................ 285 lbs.

Cotton Seed Hull Ashes ...................... 45 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ................. ........... 261 lbs.
Cotton Seed Meal ............................ 286 lbs.

Wood Ashes unleashedd) ................. ... 164 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................. 261 lbs.
Cotton Seed Meal ............................ 286 lbs.

M uriate of Potash ........................... 30 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................ 334 lbs.
D ried Blood ................................ 167 lbs.

Muriate of Potash .......................... 10 lbs.
Acid Phosphate, with Pot, 2 P. C., (K20) .... 312 lbs.
Cotton Seed Meal ........................... 286 lbs.








45


K ainit ................ .................... 58 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................ 300 lbs.
Nitrate of Soda ............................. 70 lbs.
Stable Manure ...... ...................... 20001bs..

Muriate of Potash ........................... 20 lbs.
Acid Phosphate ............................. 300 lbs.
Nitrate of Soda ............................. 64 lbs.
Cotton Seed ................................. 132 lbs.

If you want to buy the goods already made, write to the
manager of fertilizer factory nearest you and ask for a
goods to analyze as follows:
Per Cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid .................... 7.00
A m m onia .................................... 3.00
Potash .................................... 2.50
Use 400 pounds per acre.

If you prefer to make the goods yourself, buy 14 per
cent. acid phosphate, kainit and cotton seed meal, and
make up this mixture for each acre you intend to plant:
Pounds.
Acid Phosphate ............................... 200
Cotton Seed Meal ............................. 145
K ainit ....................................... S-

If you want to plant ten acres then buy ten times those
quantities, and mix together. The mixture will analyze
about as above, 7 per cent. available, 3 per cent. ammonia
and 2 per cent, potash.











INSECTICIDES-FUNGICIDES.



Many inquiries for approved formulas for insecticides
and fungicides are received by this division. A full list
of such was published in the June bulletin, No. S3. of
1903.
Florida growers interested in spraying and other means
of checking insect pests, should write the director of the
Florida Experiment Station, at Lake City, for "Farmers'
Institute Bulletin" No. 1; also, for Bulletins Nos. 29, 34,
40, 42, and 46. The following "Farmers' Bulletins" issued
by the U. S. Agricultural Department at Washington, D.
C., are also valuable for those interested in Insecticides
and Fungicides: Nos. 38, 47, 70, 80, 91, 130, 145, 146. and
115. They are sent free on application to the Secretary
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
As the number of formulas published is very great. fre-
quently practical duplicates of each other, a few prepared
receipts are appended sufficient to meet all practical needs
and not confuse by a number of similar formulas.
For fungus diseases, etc., the use of "Bordeaux Mixture"
is now practically universal. For insects, mites, scales,
etc., Paris Green (wet and dry), kerosene emulsion, resin
mixtures, and sulphur are now the most commonly used;
probably more depends on the method, time and thor-
oughness of the application, than on the efficacy of the
material used. If the application is not prompt and thor-
ough, it will certainly be of little, if any value.
A few receipts are appended of simple mixtures easily
prepared, and of acknowledged worth. As a general in-
secticide probably nothing is more universally satisfac-
tory than a solution of soap-soap suds practically if
made of the common yellow resin soap. I"Resin Was.h.'"
"Resin, Lime Mixture," etc., are simply soaps.
A soap solution, one pound of soap to three gallons of
water, will be found a generally satisfactory insecticide.
if thoroughly applied, at proper intervals. The addi-
tion of a small quantity of Paris Green, or a mixture of
soap solution and sulphur wash, is excellent for scales.
miles, and white fly.
The various "Whale Oil" and other "Fish Oil" soaps,
potash soaps, etc., have no intrinsic value over other soaps.











Equally as good results may be had with any common
laundry soap, if properly and persistently applied.



FUNGICIDES.

BORDEAUX MIXTURE.

4 pounds copper sulphate (blue vitriol).
4 pounds lime (unslacked).
Dissolve the copper in hot or cold water, using a wooden
or earthen vessel. Slack the lime in a tub, adding the
water cautiously and only in sufficient amount to insure
thorough slakiDg. After thorough slaking more water can
be added and stirred in until it has the consistency of
thick cream. When both are cold, pour the lime into the
diluted copper solution of required strength, straining it
through a fine mesh sieve or gunny cloth and thoroughly
mix. The standard mixtures are:
(a.) 25 gallons (full strength solution, or 4-4-25 for-
mula.)
(b.) 50 gallons (half strength mixture, or 4-4-50 for-
mula.)
It is then ready for use. Considerable trouble has fre-
quently been experienced in preparing the Bordeaux Mix-
ture. Care should be taken that the lime is of good
quality and well burned and has not been air slaked.
Where small amounts of lime are slacked it is advisable to
use hot water. Lime slakes best when supplied with just
enough water to develop a large amount of heat which
renders the process active. If the amount of lime is
insufficient, there is danger of burning tender foliage. In
order to obviate this, the mixture can be tested with a
knife blade or with ferro-cyanide of potassium (1 oz. to 5
or 6 oz. of water). If the amount of lime is insufficient,
copper will be deposited on the knife blade, while a deep
brownish red color will be imparted to the mixture when
ferro-cyanide of potassium is added. Lime should be
added until neither reaction occurs. A slight excess of
lime, however, is desirable.











The Bordeaux Mixture is best when first prepared.
Stock solutions of lime and copper can be made, and
mixed when required..

2. The following, known as the 6-4-50 formula, is in very
general use.
6 pounds copper sulphate.
4 pounds lime.
50 gallons water.

3. BORDEAUX MIXTURE FOR PEACH FOLIAGE.

The Bordeaux Mixture as ordinarily applied frequently
injures to some extent the foliage of the peach, etc.,
causing a short hole effect on the leaves. This injurious
effect has been shown to be largely obviated by the use
of the following:
3 pounds copper sulphate.
6 pounds lime.
50 gallons water.

This is known as the 3-6-i0 formula. Some experi-
menters have also recommended the following for peach
foliage:

(a.) 2-2-50 formula (Cornell Ag. Exp. Sta. Bul. 1SO.)

(b.) 3-9-50 formula.

The latter contains three times as much lime as copper
sulphate.

4 BORDEAUX RESIN MIXTURE.

5 pounds resin.
1 pint fish oil.
1 pound caustic potash, or soda.
5 gallons water.

To make resin solution, place resin and oil in a kettle
and heat until resin is dissolved. Cool slightly and then
add lye slowly and stir. Again place the kettle over the











fire, add the required amount of water and allow the
whole to boil until it will mix with cold mater, forming
an amber-colored solution. Take 2 gallons of the resin
solution and add to it 10 gallons of water. Mix this
with 40 gallons of Bordeaux Mixture.

5 IRON SULPHATE AND SULPHURIC ACID.

Water (hot) 100 parts.
Iron sulphate, as much as will dissolve.
Sulphuric acid, 1 part.

Prepare solution before using. Add the acid to the
crystals and then pour on the water. Valuable for treat-
ment of dormant grape vines affected with Anthracnose,
application being made with sponge or brush.




INSECTICIDES.

6 PARIS GREEN-DRY.

1 pound Paris Green.
20-50 pounds flour.

Mix thoroughly and apply evenly; preferable when dew
is on plants.

7 PARIS GREEN-WET.

1 pound Paris Green.
2 pound quick lime.
200 gallons water.

Slake the lime in part of the water, sprinkling in the
Paris Green gradually, then all the rest of the water.
For the peach and other tender leaved plants, use 300 gal-
lons of water. Keep well stirred while spraying.
4-A Ag











8. KEROSENE EMULSION.

pound hard soap, shaved fine.
1 gallon water.
2 gallons kerosene.

Dissolve the soap in the water, which should be boiling;
remove from the fire and pour it into the kerosene while
hot. Churn this with a spray pump till it changes to a
creamy, then to a soft butter-like mass. Keep this as a
stock, using one part in nine of water, for soft bodied
insects such as plant lice, or stronger in certain cases.

9. MECHANICAL EMULSION.

A substitute for the last. Made entirely by the pump,
which draws water and kerosene from separate tanks and
mixes them in the desired proportion by a mechanical
device. Several pumps for this purpose are now on the
market.

10. RESIN-LYE MIXTURE (SOAP.)

5 pounds pulverized resin.
1 pound concentrated lye (caustic soda.)
1 pint fish or other animal oil.
5 gallons water.

Place the oil, resin and 1 gallon of hot water, in an iron
kettle and heat till the resin softens, then add the lye and
stir thoughly; now add 4 gallons of hot water and boil
till a little will mix with cold water and give a clear,
amber-colored liquid; add water to make up five gallons.
Keep this as a stock solution. For use, take 1 gallon stock
solution, 16 gallons water, 3 gallons milk of lime, I pound
Paris Green.
The object of this preparation is to obtain an adhesive
material which will cause the poison to adhere to smooth
leaves. It has been highly recommended by the New York
State (Geneva) Experiment Station.












11. LIME, SALT AND SULPHUR.

(Oregon Formula.)

50 pounds unslaked lime.
50 pounds of flowers of sulphur.
50 pounds of common salt.

Slake the lime in enough water to do it thoroughly; add
the sulphur and boil for an hour at least, adding water if
necessary. Then add the salt and boil 15 minutes more;
add water to make 150 gallons and scrape hot through a
coarse nozzle.

12. LIME, SALT AND SULPHUR.

iMarlatt's Formula (from Smith.)

30 pounds unslaked lime.
30 pounds sulphur.
15 pounds salt.
60 gallons water.
Boil with steam for four hours and apply hot.

13. ARSENITE OF LIME.

1 pound white arsenic.
2 pounds of fresh burned lime.
1 gallon water.

Boil together for 45 minutes and keep in a tight vessel.
Add one quart of this to a barrel (50 gallons) of water
for use.
This insecticide has been recommended by a number of
Experiment Stations, but has not yet been sufficiently
tested to receive endorsement.

14. ARSENITE OF LEAD.

4 ounces arsenate of soda (50 per cent. strength).
11 ounces acetate of lead.
150 gallons water.

Put the arsenate of soda in 2 quarts of water in a











wooden pail, and the acetate of lead in 4 quarts of water
in another wooden pail. When both are dissolved, mix
with the rest of the water. Warm water in the pails will
hasten the process.

15. BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND PARIS GREEN.

4 ounces Paris Green.
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.

16. BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND ARSENATE OF
LEAD.

1 gal. Arsenate of Lead (made by formula No. 14.
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.

17 BORDEAUX MIXTURE AND ARSENATE OF
LIME.

1 qts. Arsenate of Lime (made by formula No. 1:..
50 gallons Bordeaux Mixture.

18. SOAP MIXTURE.

1 bar soap (10-cent size.)
3 gallons water.

Apply warm, as it thickens on cooling.
Recommended for rose mildew, red spider, plant
lice, etc.
Any common laundry soap, particularly the yellow
resin soaps, dissolved one iound of soap to five or ten
gallons of water, is an efficient application for white fly.
red spider, plant lice, etc. The addition of 1-4 pound of
Paris Green to each 50 gallons of soap solution adds to
its efficiency.
Equal parts of soap solution and sulphur wash-made
by dissolving 20 pounds of sulphur with 10 pounds of
caustic soda-is a most excellent general application.
Sulphur wash is prepared as follows: First mix 2,)
pounds of flowers of sulphur into a paste with cold water.
then add 10 pounds of pulverized caustic soda (9S per
cent.) The dissolving lye will boil and liquefy the sul-











phur. Water must be added from time to time to prevent
burning, until a concentrated solution of 20 gallons is
obtained. Two gallons of this is sufficient for 50 gallons
of spray, giving a strength of 2 pounds of sulphur and one
of lye to 50 gallons of water. An even stronger applica-
tion can be made without danger to the foliage. This
mixture can also be used in combination with other
insecticides.
The chemical combination of sulphur and lime known
as bisulphide of lime is perhaps a better liquid sulphur
solution than the last remedy as a remedy for mites. It
may be very cheaply prepared by boiling together for an
hour or more, in a small quantity of water, equal parts of
flowers of sulphur and stone lime. A convenient quantity
is prepared by taking 5 pounds of sulphur and 5 pounds
of lime and boiling in 3 or 4 gallons of water until the
ingredients combine, forming a brownish liquid. This
may be diluted to make 100 gallons of spray.

'"WHITE FLY."

Numerous letters are received by the Agricultural De-
partment asking for recipes and directions for destroying
white fly.
It is evident from the widely distributed addresses of
these inquiries that this pest has become widely scattered
over the State, and that in a few years, if means are not
provided, it will generally infect all the groves of the
State. The white fly can be found in different localities,
from Tallahassee to Fort Myers.
That it can be eradicated from infected groves admits
no doubt, as it certainly has been so eradicated, for a
time at least; that it may reappear is probably certain,
and most likely it will require constant vigilance to keep
it within bounds.
The use of Resin Wash No. 4 is the most common rem-
edy, if used as a spray. At the time the young are crawling
it is effective. Good results have also been had by using
a solution of common laundry soap-resin soap-while
equally good results have been had from the use of soap
powders-"Pearline" and "Gold Dust." It is evident that
in each and all of these applications, the virtue is not
in a particular kind of soap, but the fact that the soap
fills the breathing pores and thus suffocates the insect.










The same results occur in the use of Kerosene Emulsion.
A mixture of soap solution, or resin wash with sulphur
wash, as described in No. IS, will be found effective, if
applied at proper times-in the winter when the young
are dormant-in spring and summer when the young are
crawling. The work must be thoroughly done; one good
spraying is better than two poorly applied ones. This
matter is a serious one, atfecting as it does one of the prin-
cipal industries of the State. It demands joint action of
all neighborhoods now affected, and should receive the
careful attention of the various counties, and the State
Legislature, with a view of some general effort being had
looking to the proper control of the pest.
All orange growers interested in ridding themselves of
the 'fly" or keeping their groves uninfected, should send
to the State Experiment Station at Lake City. for Bulle-
tin No. 67, "White Fly," by Prof. H. A. Gossard, in
which the subject is exhaustively treated.
For White Fly there is probably no better spray than
a solution of common laundry soap-the cheapest yellow
resin soap preferably-using a pound bar to about three
gallons of water. The writer has found it equally as
effective as the "Resin Wash" (which is simply a soap
solution) or the more costly 'whale oil soaps." The appli-
cation should be made while the young are crawling, and
followed by another spraying within a few weeks. The
pest must be destroyed while in the crawling stage-at
which time the damage is done. The adult flies cannot
be destroyed; the young can be. A strong solution of
common resin soap is as effectual for this purpose as any
known spray-and is harmless to the trees, or foliage.
The secret (if there be any) is persistent fighting-fre-
quent sprays, thoroughly and effectually applied.













R. E. Rose, State Chemist.
Analyses of Specia


NAME OR BRAND.


0-
c a.
c' .
0%
.0


Fertilizer No. 1............. 1071
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1072 .
Soft Phosphate (Matrix).... 1073 .
Pebble Phosphate (washed). 1074 .
Phosphate ................. 1075 .
Sulphate of Potash ......... 10761.
Blood and Bone........... 1077.
Sulphate of Potash..........1078.
Fertilizer ................ 1079
Fertilizer .................. 1080
Phosphate ................. 1081.
Phosphate .................. 1082.
Phosphate .................. 1 83|.
Fertilizer .................. 10841


BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
L. Heimburger, Assistant Chemist.
1 Samples Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by Purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid.

0
d BY WHOM SENT.




I I I I
..... 3.33 5.15 8.451 4.301 8.421W. J. Kimball, Fort Pierce, Fla.
..... ...... ...... 0.82 4.87 3.651W. J. Kimball, Fort Pierce, Fla.
. ...... .. .. 20. 54 ...... ...... P. A. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
..... ............ 29.91...... ...... IP. A. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
..... ...... ...... 14. 2 ... ........ owen Shepard, Bristol, Fla.
..... ...... ...... .. .. 48.48'Moore & Moore, Eldred, Fla.
..... ...... ...... 12.69 G.4 ...... Maney Lanier, Tampa, Fla.
....... ........... ...... 45.121E. B. Arnold, Malabar, Fla.
11.531 10.64 5.28 15.92 3.771 2.22 J. G. May, Fort Pierce, Fla.
7.57 3.85 3.97 7.82 4.95 11.381C. S. Bixley, Fort Pierce, Fla.
.... ... ... ...... 28.93 ...... ......W S. Doyle, Tampa, Fla
..... ...... ...... 15.79 ...... ........ W S. Doyle, Tampa, Fla.
.. .. ...... ..... 33.03 ...... ..... Bowen Shepard, Bristol, Fla.
12.73 5.53 2.37 7.90 3.08 5.34 P. P. Winf. Galloway, Fla.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosl:horic


NAME OR BRAND. .



-1
I
Fertilizer ........... ...... 1085
Fertilizer .................. 1086
Fertilizer .................. 1087
Soft Phosphate ............ 1088
Pebble Phosphate .......... 1089
Fertilizer .................. 1090
Phosphate No. 1............. 10911
Phosphate No. 2............ 1092
Phosphate No. 3............1093
Fertilizer No. 2............. 10941
Phosphate ................. 10951
Fertilizer .................. 10961
Fertilizer .................. 1097i
Fertilizer .................. 1098
Fertilizer No. 1.. ........... 1099
Fertilizer No. 2 .............1100
Fertilizer No. 3 .............1101
Fertilizer No. 4 .............1102


S


6.02
3.54
5.10






17.54

9.81

5.17
9.09
11.773
6.45
5.74


A


I .1
2.61 3.1U6
3.95 2.56
4.72 3.90

. . .
6.47 2.26
.. . . .


4.96 1.37
...... ......
6.791 0.37
5.91 1.14
7.71 2.90
7.54 0.738
G.06; 0.4
1,).22 0.08
8.70 0.15


cid.










5.771
5.51
8.62
22.94
30.90
S.731
31.260
30.991
32.631.
6.33
22.45
7.;16
7.05
10. 61
27
7. :!
10. 30
8.85


0




6.2u0
4.25
7.04


4.22



5.19

1.52
4.34
4.47
3.412
3.30
4.77
4.98


BY WHOM SENT.


10.351George W. Ruple, Fort Pierce, Fla.
13.44'Joseph Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
5.82 J. M. Kay, Boynton, Fla.
...... J.amontree, McMeekin, Fla.
...... Hamontree, McMeekin, Fla.
9.42,Seessms & Edwards, Tampa, Fla.
...... J. C. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
..... J. C. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
...... .. C. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla,
11.54 Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
...... C. J. Miller, Lakeland, Fla.
13.40'T. Kimball, St. Petersburg, Fla.
7.12 \V. .. Tweedoll, Iomestead, Fla.
S.55 l .1. H. arvey, Iastings, Fla.
9.10.1. H. tRawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
10.53i.1. I1. Rawlcrson, Lilly, Fla.
1:'.07.1. I-,. Itawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
14.221|J. E. Rawlerson, Lilly, Fla.







Fertilizer .................. 1103 7.971 6.05 0.44 6.49 3.59 10.921S. B. Hull, Oakland, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 3.............. 1104 5.36 6.30 0.88 7.18 8.06 11.891W. Waldin, Miami, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................1105 10.34 7.93 0.34 8.27 2.23 12.41A. B. Harrington, Winter Haven, Fla.
Canada Unleached Ashes... .1106 13.80 ........................ 2.890. Larson & Sons, Boynton, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................1107..... 6.631 0.29 6.92 4.84 13.63 t. E. Mims, Bonaventura, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1108 10.27 6.321 0.5'j 6.83 3.26 9.32 D. W. Brown, Arcadia, Fla.
Phosphate No. 2..... 1109...... 111091 ... .......... 28.6 ........ .. N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Phosphate No. 3........... 1110 ...... ...... ...... 27.74 ...... .. ... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green Fla.
Phosphate No. 7............ 1111 ...... ............ 31.371............ M. Sauls, Bowling Green Fla.
Phosphate, No. 10........... 1112 ................. 28.48 ............ N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal............ 1113 ...... ...... .......... 7.68 ...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Phosphate No. 1. A ..........111 ..... ...... 29.83 ...... .....John L. Morgan, Tallahassee, Fla.
Fertilizer ................. 1115 17.81 5.281 1.69 6.97 2.8 4.59IWalter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
Bat Guano ....... ..... 1116 9.721...... ...... 5.36 17.03 2.48 Sanders Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tobacco stems ............ 1117 18.60 ...... ...... ...... 3.02 5.87,L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2...... 1118 ...... ..... ...... ......[ 6.69 ...... Florida'. Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fertilizer ............... .. 1119 ...... 8.26 0.81 9.07 4.16 6.30,S. M. Holding, Dania, Fla.
Sheep Manure ............. 1120 11.52 ............ 2.48 3.00 2.15A. D. Key, Sanford, Fla.
Fertilizer ................. 11121 4.791 8.32 0.95 9.27 5.97 2.95 S. C. Mayo, Reddick, Fla.
Phosphate ................ 1122 ...... ...... ...... 31.27 ...... ...... J. N. Harrell, Bristol, Fla.
Phosphate .................. 1123 ...... ...... ...... 7.08 ...... ...... M. Ramsey, Bristol, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (L. & N.)..111241 ...... ...... ........... 7.30 ...... Wedel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (P. & M.).. 11251............ ...... ...... 726 ..... Wedel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (T)....... 1126................... 8.60 ....Wedel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Ashes ..................... 11271 0.31 ............ ........... 0.46 John H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (79)... 1128 .............. ...... ............ 63.20 Schroeder & Arguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (113)... 1129 ...... ....... ........... 61.80 Schroeder & Aguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (7703) ..1130 ...... ...... ... ..... ..... 58.85 Schroeoer & Aguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (7726). 1131 ............ I ........ .. ..... 57.70 Schroeder & Aguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1132| 11.531 5.621 1.871 7.49 2.07| 10.88|G. H. Hicks, Galloway, Fla.
I I I I I I I I












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


CD C
13 a
2
S3 H


Fertilizer ................. 11133 8.53 6.28 0.50 6(.78
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1134.............. ..........
Fertilizer No. 4.............. 1135 5.67 6.49 1.701 8.19
Fertilizer No. 6............. 1136 11.11 5.40 1.00 6.40
Fertilizer .................. 1137 6.75 7.99 1.51 9.50
Fertilizer ..................11381 10.58 6.47 1.38 7.85
Castor Pomace No. 1........ 1139...... ...... ...... ...
Castor Pomace No. 2....... 1140 ..
Castor Pomace No. 3......... l41 ...... ...... ...... ......
Fertilizer No. 1..............1142 4.23 8.04 0.22 8. 2;
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1113 7.34 5.47j 3.:811 9. 1
Fertilizer No. 4............. 11441 6.83 4.871 1.59 6.46
Fertilizer No. 5 ............. 11 15i 5.17 6.55 1.37 7. 2
Fertilizer No. 6 ............. 1114 8.4G 6.0:l 1.72 7.75
Fertilizer No. 7 ............. 11 47 6.01 4.59 1.37 5.9l;
lFertilizer ................... 1 .l 6 32 :2 5.61; 1 .111 6.;7
lcrt ilizor ................. 1 .... 1 1 7.11 O.s: 7.9 .
Pebble I'hosplhat(e No. I ... 11150 j ........ ...... 31. S:.


BY WHOM SENT.


II
4.141 13.92 Ed. V. Lindberg, Crescent City, Fla.
8.03[...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
4.411 8.96A. D. Smith, Oxford, Fla.
4.44 7.85'A. D. Smith, Oxford, Fla.
4.40 4.98C. L. Eaddy, Linden, Fla.
4.59 5.55J.ames McKay, Boynton, Fla.
6.68 ...... W. W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
5.87 ...... W. W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
5.63 ... ..W. W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
5.18 12.1(;W\. Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
7.84 10.16 W. Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
3,.46 S.1( C. N. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
3.69 :1.S2 (C. N. I'erry, Oxford, Fla.
4.35S 8.1 C. N. I'erry, Oxford, Fla.
'1. 45 (;. 55(. N. PIerry, Oxford, IPla.
4.85 4. .(;(5 M. I'erry, Oxford, Fla.
4.71 5. IS A. 0. ( Iraddiy, I artow, 'la.
..... ...... N. M. Sauls, Bowling (ireen, Fla.


NAME OR BRAND.








Pebble Phosphate No. 2.... 11511..... ..........
Fertilizer No. 1............|11152| 4.00| 6.95 1.44
Fertilizer No. 2............. 11531 10.63 6.91 1.00
Fertilizer No. 1............. 11541 6.99 6.31 1.35
Ashes No. 2................. 1155 18.55 ...... .....
Fertilizer No. 3............. 1156 8.26 6.37 2.03
Cotton Seed Meal ........... 1157 ...... .. .. ..
Fertilizer .................. 1158 7.07 5.59 0.54
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1159 ...... ...... ...... .
Rock Phosphate ............ 11601 ....... ......
Fertilizer ............... 11611 8.98 8.031 0.25
Fertilizer ..................1162 7.01 4.44 0.37
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1163 5.26 8.00 0.34
Fertilizer No. 3............ 1164 5.97 9.21 0.30
Kainit .................... 1165 ............ ...... .
Dried Blood ................ 1166 ...... ...... ...... .
Fertilizer .................. 1167 11.82 7.13 0.37
Fertilizer ................ 1168 5.92 3.08 6.42
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1169 ......
Bone and Potash............. 1170 0.74 6.71 12.87
K ainit ..................... 11711...... ...... .. .
Fertilizer .................. 11721 16.08 12.10 1.17
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 11173 ..... ......... .
Fertilizer .................. 1174 14.33 7.88 2.15
Cotton Seed Meal ........... 1175 ...... ....
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1176 ...... .... ... .
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1177 ..... ...... .... .
Fertilizer .................. 1178 6.20 7.07 0.57
Fertilizer .................. 1179 10.43 7.66 2.311
Fertilizer No. 1............ 180 9.64 6.92 1.72
I I I I


34.021.


7.911
7.66

8.40

6.13

36.57
8.28
4.811
8. 341
9.51

....5.1
7.501
9.50

19.56

13.27

10.03



7.64
9.971
8.641
1


4.72
3.97
2.55

4.01
7.00
4.23
7.78

4.29
3.50
4.22
4.39

15.64
3.18
4.49
7.54
1.80

1.00
7.97
9.46
7.66
6.89
7.99
4.30
5.95
5.31


.... N. M. Sauls, Bowing Green, Fla.
6.82 E. P. Iley, Webster, Fla.
5.91 E. P. Iley, Webster, Fla.
8.34 James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
3.12 James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
9.83 James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
...... J. L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
15.16 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
...... Taylor Brokerage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
...... W. S. Hanson, Fort Myers, Fla.
9.53 W. P. Cowburn, Crescent City, Fla.
5.14 Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
9.42 A. S. Nelson, Dunedin, Fla.
11.46 A. S. Nelson, Dunedin, Fla.
12.37R. J. Bush, Westlake, Fla.
..... H. Witherington, Sanford, Fla.
6.07 J. B. Evans, Live Oak, Fla. t
5.011W. W. Blackman, Delray, Fla.
...... .Barrass-Cawthorn DeFuniak, Fla.
20.201Shroeder & Arguinbow, Quincy, Fla.
12.53]John High, Baker's Mill, Fla.
1.571D. T. Williams & Co., Milton, Fla.
...... IA. M. Rae, Monticello, Fla.
1.82 Oscar Vickers, Edwards, Fla.
...... John W. Henderson, Tallahassee, Fla.
...... John W. Henderson, Tallahassee, Fla.
...... J. T. Taylor, Quincy, Fla.
9.91H. E. Parham, Oxford, Fla.
8.11 George P. Bull, OJus, Fla.
4.07 J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
I











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.



NAME OR BRAND. .Y BY WHOM SENT.

0



Fertilizer No. 2........... .11181 10.76 6.3 0.9 7.32 5.44 5.91 J.R. Davis, Barlow, Fla.
Fertilizer ................... 1182 7.39 7.55 0.74 8.29 2.851 8.03 W. H. Gillette, Sarasota, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1183 ...... ...... ...... 2.92 2.911 0.6C F. P. Pillsburry, Palma Sola, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1184 4.95 8.58 2.24 10.82 4.061 5.241W. F. McDenrmitt, Oxford, Fla.
Kainit ..................... 1185 ...... .... ..... ...... ....... 12.93Z. T. Terry, Madison, Fla.
Pebble Phosphate .......... 1186 ...... ...... ...... 3J.4 ............. J. L. Morgan, 'allahassee, Fla.
Rock Phosphate ............ 1187 ...... ...... ...... 37.47 ...... ...... B. F. IHampton, Gainesville, Fla.
Home Mixture Guano ...... 1188 12.00 7.47 1.21 8.(;S] 2.S9 3.12iMarianna Mnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
Potash Mixture ............ 1189 17.17 10.27 0.58 10.5 .... .70 Marianna Mlnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .........1190 ...... ...... ...... S. ...... Marianna Mnifg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
Acid l 'lP os lihate ............ .1191 21.48 13.07 2.27 15.:;.: ...... ...... Mariani na Mi'a Co., Marianna, Fla.
Pl'e lo I'llosplhat ......... 11192. ...... ..... ...... 30. 97 ...... ...... 1. F. Moody, How\ling Green, Fla.
Fortilize"r .................. 1193 ...... 8.09 10.09 18.78 2.2;I 1 2 .1. Ili rsh rtrg, Tallahassee, Fla.
(astor l'oinace No. 1........ 1194 ...... ...... ...... ...... ;.75 ..... N. .1. I'ar sli, S ulart, Fla.
(':i 1n )r I'on (ace No. 2 ......... 1195 ...... ...... ...... ...... 7. 00N 1. I.lar'ls, Sluart, Fla.
Coll( o Seed Meal ............ 1 .. .......... ...... 7 ........... I.I. llirslihl rg, T1 allaliha seI l'la.
F rtlilizer. ................... 1197t 12.31 7.55 1.58 U. : 2 .7: :1.0 .1. W W ill is, Pilts; la.
Forlilizer ................... 1198 ...... 5.49 i 3.341 8.S:: 6.9 I 0.991J.. F. lorr, Jacksonville, Fla.








Fertilizer "G".............. 1199 11.19 7.05|
Fertilizer "P"............. 1200 11.85 8.50
Fertilizer ..................1201 12.98 9.37
Acid Phosphate .......... 1202 .... 13.70
Fertilizer ................. 20 ...... 7.83'
Bone and Potash "B"...... 120 ...... 9.93
Fertilizer .................. 1205 ...... 7.00
Rock Phosphate ........... 1206 ............
Fertilizer No. 1............. 1207 ...... 4.81
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1208 ...... 6.97
Muck Ashes ............... 1209 ..... .
Cotton Seed Meal........... 210 ......
Phosphate No. 1............ 21 ...........
Phosphate No. 3............ 1212 ...... ......
Phosphate No. 6........... 1213..... .. ..
Fertilizer .................. 1214 ...... 6.43
Fertilizer ................. 1215 8.70! 7.06
Bone and Potash .......... 1216 6.79 7.82
Fertilizer, No. 1 ............ 1217 7.06 5.77
Fertilizer, No. 2 ......... 1218 5.44 8.46
Fertilizer, No. 3 ......... 1219 7.93 7.49
"Nitrate Soda" (Not Ni-
trate-Kainit ............ 12201 4.24 ..
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1221 ...... .... ..
Cotton Seed Meal (No. 2).... 1222 ...........
Fertilizer .................. 1223! 6.92 7.021
Fertilizer .................. 11224 5.08 6.92
Fertilizer .................. 12251 8.63 6.91
Fertilizer .................. 12261 6.98 7.35
K ain it ..................... 12271...... ......


0.84 7.89 2.98 3.031M. Stevenson, Bonifay, Fla.
1.82 10.32 0.53 3.77 M. Stevenson, Bonifay, Fla.
0.30 9.67 4.48 8.031D. S. Borland, Buckingham, Fla
0.38 14.08 ...... ...... A. L. Willson Co., Quincy, Fla.
4.02 11.85 3.43 12.03 Hal. S. Thomas, Eldred, Fla.
7.97 17.90 1.60 20.97E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy, Fla.
0.20 7.2) 5.92 6.84 M. O. Causey, Seville, Fla.
..... 11.62 .......... I. M. Brandon, Brandon, Fla.
0.97 5.78 6.05 7.87R. E. Mims, Bonaventure, Fla.
1.75 8.72 5.36 5.18R. E. Mims, Bonaventure, Fla.
..... 0.58 ...... 0.061J. B. Thomas, West Palm Beach,
...... ...... 7.98.1.... 'J. Hirshberg, Tallahassee, Fla.
..... 7.76 ...... ...... M. 0. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
...... 22. 91 ...... ...... M. O. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
28.81 ...... .... IM. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
0.24 6.67 0.35 7.06 A. Sims & Bro., Monticello, Fla.
0.44 7.50 3.99 13.03 Patrick Bannon, Haynes City, Fla.
10.66 18.48 1.10 18.801W. C. Cromartie, Tallahassee.
.96 6.73 2.401 9.551Fla. Fertz. Co., Gainesville.
.991 9.45 5.201 5.021Fla. Fertz. Co., Gainesville.
1.57! 9.06 3.74 4.27 Fla. Fertz. Co., Gainesville.

..... .. 12.80 J. P. Andrews, Denaud.
..... .. ..... 6.8 ...... Taussig & Co., Qiinryc
.. .. .. 6.93 ......|Taussig & Co., Quincy.
.24! 7.26 5.26 7.741D. S. Borland, Buckingham.
.111 7.031 2.95 16.48|Dr. Charles Drennen, Orlando.
1.631 8.541 4.93 5.56IH. A. Peny, Pomona.
.141 7.49| 3.92 11.52 Mrs. F. C. Grisham, Thonotosassb.
..... ...... ...... 11.561E. M. Albrittan, Lee.
I I I










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Contin ued.


NAME OR BRAND. .





fertilizer .................. 1228
L. G. Blood and Bone......... 11229
Fertilizer .................. 123J
"Potash Saltz" ............ 1231
Bird Guano ................ 1232
Fertilizer .................. 1233
Fertilizer .................. 1234
Sulphate Potash, No. 1 Dark. 1235
Sulphate Potash, No. 2 Light. 1236
Tobacco Dust, No. 1........ 1237
Cotton Seed Meal, No. 2...... 1238
Ashes ..................... 1239
Fertilizer ..................1240
Fertilizer, "X4" ......... 1241
Spec. Mixt. ................ 1242
Cotton Seed Meal ..........1243
Sul. Potash ................ 1244


Phosphoric Acid.





0
S, 3
d* ^ B


BY WHOM SENT.


10.22 8.75 .28 9.031 4.51 10.941H. A.Peny, Pomona.
6.91 ...... ...... 21.05 4.77 ......E 0E ainter Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Fla
7.02 9.51 .12 9.63 3.20 17.35jE. R. Kindig, Haines City.
5.73 ...... ...... ............ 28.60 J. E. Duboisson & Bro., Pensacola.
..... 13.73 1.36 15.091 13.41 1.78ILovitt Ferguson, Tarpon Springs.
6.96 9.01 .20 9.21 5.65 9.571J. W. Boatright, Arcadia.
9.48 7.70 .53 8.23 5.57 8.53W. S. Prior, Lake Como.
...... ...... ...... .. ....... 26.36 W J. Ragan, Banyan.
........... ... ... .. .. 26.84 W J. Ragan, Banyan.
............ ...... ...... 2.53 9.72 Hlardee Bros., Boynton.
...... ...... ...... ...... 8.02 ...... Illardee Bros., Boynton.
...... ...... ...... ..... .. .... 1.38 W 13. Kennedy, Sanford.
7.21............ 2.99 6.63 6.4S|C. S. Ilixhy, Ft. i ,erce.
10.111............ 5.501 7.19 2.72 .. 1. Scliobinger, Deliay.
8.01 ...... ...... 4.38 5.5 1; 8.57 1 'ast (Coast. (Cattle Co., 'Fl. Pierce.
................... 7. 1 .... .Daniel I). T. M ore, Illdred.
...... ...... I ...... .... ....... 50.00 ( Aik'II.n y F'ruit Co., l,':l red,







Cotton Seed Meal ......... 1245 ...... ..................
Castor Pomace ............ 1246 ............ ...... ......
Spec. Mixt. ............... 1247 9.37 ... .... ... 2.641
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 11248 ...... ...... ...... ......
Fertilizer .................. 11249 7.041 ...... ...... 7.80
Fertilizer No. 1.............. 1250 7.40 ...... ....... 8. 001
Fertilizer No. 2............. 1251 9.49 ...... ...... 11.961
Bone Meal .................. 11252 ...... ............ .98
Blood and Bone ............11253 ...... ....... ...... 4.50
Guano .................... 1254 9.22 8.38 4.75 13.13
Tobacco Dust ............ 1255 .. .. .
B lood ......... ......... 1256 ...... ...... ...... ......
B. Cotton Seed Meal ....... 1257 ........... ............
Palm etto Ashes ............ 1258 .... ...... ..... .. ....
D ried B lood ................ 1259 ...... ...... ...... ......
Fertilizer .................. 126 ...... 6.78 2.26 9.041
Fertilizer .................. 1261 5.24 7.60 7.39 14.99
Fertilizer .................. 1262 9.90 ...... ...... 11.65
Fertilizer .................. 1263 11.76 12.06 1.61 13.67
Fertilizer ..................1264 5.23 ............ 8.50
Castor Pomace ............ 1265
Fertilizer .................. 11266 19.91 6.00 1.29 7.29
Cotton Seed Meal, H. & T. C.I
11301 .................... 1267 ...... .... ... ...
K ainit ..................... 1268 ...... ...... ...... ... .
Fertilizer (Pineapple Mixt.). 1269 7.81............ 8.07
Blood and Bone ............ 1270 ...... ...... ...... 9.25
Tobacco Dust .............. 1271.......................
Fertilizer .................. 1272 7.18 8.18 .37 8.55
Fertilizer .................. 1273 ...... 6.88 .67 7.55


7.65 ...... Ankeney Fruit Co., Eldred,
6.80 ...... Ankeney Fruit Co., Eldred,
8.97 3.41F. W. Willis, Jensen.
8.80 ...... Baker & Holmes, Jacksonville.
5.82 8.71C. F. Olmstead, Ft. Pierce.
10.15 ...... J. G. May, Ft. Pierce.
7.33 4.611J. G. May, Ft. Pierce.
4.82 ...... A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
10.08 ...... A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
9.59 1.59 A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
2.93 12.66 A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
17.38 ...... A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
7.48 ...... A. N. Hoofnagle, Ft. Pierce.
..... 5.73 E. S. Montgomery, Cocoanut Grove.
17.24 ...... Ankeney Fruit Co., Eldred,
3.85 8.961M. F. Robinson, Sanford.
4.48 8.77W. E. Wilder, Lily.
7.27 6.51M. Neiman, Ft. Pierce.
2.19 3.99 J. W. Green, Macclenny.
6.13 10.41C. F. Olmstead, Ft. Pierce.
6.40 ...... H. J. Shultz, Jensen.
4.77 5.52 David Dowes, Crescent City.

8.75 ...... Wilson & Toomer Fertz. Co.. Jacks
..... 11.93 J. T. & J. B. Hunter, Genoa.
4.39 8.12W. W. Luce, Walton.
10.86 ...... C. J. Baird, Gainesville.
2.92 9.77 Chas. Montgomery.
4.10 11.50 J. T. Miller, Haines City.
3.231 9.60 Frank S. Pillsbdry, Palma Sola.


onville.


.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.-Contin ued.


Phosphoric Acid.



NAME OR BRAND. 5 a BY WHOM SENT.

.2 S -
0 .



Sulphate of Potash ........ 1274 .......... .. ......... ...... 47.91 V. C. Brewer, Quincy.
Peruvian Guano ........... 1275 ...... 8.35 0.95 9.30 S.00 2.28V. C. Brewer, Quincy.
Bone Meal ................ 1276...... 14.18 5.12 19.30 4.50 ......IV. C. Brewer, Quincy.
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1277 ..... ....... ........... 8.23 ...... V. C. Brewer, Quincy.
Nitrate of Potash ......... 1278 ...... ...... ...... 16.20 44.20 V. C. Brewer, Quincy.
White Feldspar ........... 1279 ...................... ......... 8.1 IV. C. Brewer, Quincy.
Fertilizer ..................1280 ...... .7.20 0.0O 7.80 3.03 4.22 S. W. Turner, Parrish.
Commercial Fertilizer ...... 1281 ............ .... ... .. 1.781 19.271T. M1. Puleslon, Monticello.
Fertilizer .................. 1282 20.96 7. 1.771 9.65 1.78 :.051.1. I). Sims, Marianna.
Fertilizer .................. 128 12.25 5.5!' 0.:11 5.!01 I.(5 .,51 \V. I. \ ilder, Lily, Fla.
Fer ilizer .................... .12S1 14.11 8. 1 (; .51 8. 7 : N S .2I) l,'. I ,. C( uirch, (oco(mia) i (ro)ve, Fla.
M uc ................... ... 2 .... ......... .. ... 2 .... I. I5l. y:iy.oIN er, .J:l livonville, 'la.
'I'ole:ncc Scrap .. ......... 12 ...... ...... .. ... .. ...... 1 t. \V l. T: I Fla.
'F rtiliz ir ................. 11287 ...... 5 .11 2 .15 7 .2;' 1.1;5 5. I;111, It. \\ ()lod T'I:1111 l : 1.
(' tl i n Seed( Me;l ...... .. ... .. .. 57.. .... ,MI :.. l.n lll: l M fi (..o. M :;ri;innm Fla.
Slie:1 11( d I lone M :il .. .... 1 2 91 .7 ..7I1.72 ... ...... | 21. I1 1. 21 ...... (. \v. M .Mell e in, E dlirl Fn .
FerIilizor .................. 129)01 5.61! ...... ... I ; .! : I I. 11. '.I i I' 1 l rn11. .I:(cls vill,, IF a.








Fertilizer ..................1291
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1292
TFertilizer .................. 1293
oFertilizer No. 1.............. 1294
Bone Flour No. 2.......... 1295
Dried Blood No. 3.......... 1296
Fertilizer No. 1........... 1297
Fertilizer No. 2............. 1298
Fertilizer .................. 1299
Fertilizer .................. 1300
Fertilizer No. 2............. 1301
Dis. Bone Black............. 1302
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1303
Fertilizer .................. 1304
Fertilizer .................. 1305
Sulphate of Potash ........ 1306
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1307
Fertilizer No. 2. ............1308
Fertilizer .................. 1309
Fertilizer .................. 1310
Fertilizer (organic) ........ 1311
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1312
Fertilizer .................. 1313
Cotton Seed Meal ......... 1314
Fertilizer .................. 1315
Dis. Bone Black ............1316
Fertilizer No. 1 ............. 1317
Fertilizer No. 2............. 1318
Steam Bone Meal No. 3.... 1319
Sulphate of Potash No. 4.. 1320
Sulphate of Ammonia ...... 11321
I


10..........
6.03...........


...... 6.44 2.21
...... 5.45 2.29
...... 7.04 3.79
10.10 ...... ......
9.74 ...... .... .
... .. 19.00 0.62

6.57 5.03 4.34
9.41 7.79 1.09

7.79 6.11 1.10
12.77 5.62 1.54
5.95 2.63 1.79
10.48 8.12 0.86
26.72 ........ .. .

10.12 6.33 1.22

7.85 8.71 0.07
10.031 18.05 1.02
6.28! 7.35 9.65
4.11 7.23 9.64
. . . .. .. .


10.24 3.941 10.55C. T. Brown, Delray, Fla.
.... 8.51 ...... W. M. Hampton, Deerfield, Fla.
7.41 5.28 8.69 Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
14.66 3.48 12.45H. G. Stouder, Eldred, Fla.
21.57 2.82 ......H. G. Stouder, Eldred, Fla.
...... 15.23 ...... H. G. Stouder, Eldred, Fla.
8.65 5.64 5.88 W. J. Wicker, Coleman, Fla.
7.74 5.43 7.44 W. J. Wicker, Coleman, Fla.
10.83 5.86 5.72E. E. Brady, Sanford, Fla.
7.82 3.94 9.050. F. Kimball, Stuart, Fla.
7.22 4.01 7.72 F. Kimball, Stuart, Fla.
19.62 ...... ...... D. F. Carlton, Tampa, Fla.
...... 8.33 ...... Fla. Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
9.37 5.07 7.21W. J. Dyer, West Palm Beach, Fla.
8.88 5.34 6.69 Walter Walden, Miami, Fla.
............ 48.72 John J. Britt, Eldred, Fla.
7.21 3.17 10.96W. E. Campbell, Seminole, Fla.
7.16 5.39 5.27W. E. Campbell, Seminole, Fla.
4.42 5.30 7.52W. J. Dyer, Stuart, Fla.
8.98 5.43 6.66 E. Hy. Palmer, Winter Park, Fla.
4.30 11.64 ...... M. L. Varn, Eagle Lake, Fla.
7.97 ...... Sanders Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
7.55 5.33 9.05 Walter Walden, Miami, Fla.
.... 7.73 ..... (T. M. Scott, Scotland, Fla.
8.78 2.24 9.971H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
S19.07 ......... John H. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
17.00 3.32 16.33]J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
16.87 3.53 16.75 J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
28.67! 2.00 ...... J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
...... ...... 50.12J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
S...... 25.72 ...... 1J. Ed. Raulerson, Lily, Fla.
I I I








For values see heading "State Values."
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers of
"Special Samples" sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for examination
before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not an evidence that
the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State Chemist, or his assist-
ant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis,
and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in sample sen t in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought for
the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (I pound) is required for a "Special Sample."
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal-though the guarantee is but 4 per cent. of Am-
monia-it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its \va-lue is bit little more than half that of prime meal.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

R. E. Rose, State Chemist- ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1907.-L. Heimburger, Assistant Chemist.

Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


NAME OR BRAND.


Bowker's

Williams
ani Vin

Bradley's
and Vin


Bradley's


American
67


Dissolved Bone... 841 Guarant'd Analysis
& Clerks' ru Official Analysis
& Clarks' Fruit
e ............... 842 Guarant'd Analysis
S Official Analysis
Special Fruit
e ............... 843 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Orange Tree.... 844 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Standard Guano.. 845 Guarant'd Analysis|
S Official Analysis


Phosphoric Acid.


.0




10.00 16.00
12.54 18.94

10.00 5.50|
7.31 6.49

10.00 5.50
8.001 7.24

10.001 6.00J
10.18 6.57

10.00 8.00o
12.171 8.701


Ci
.o S


BY WHOM AND

WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


1.00 ...... ...... ...... A mn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
0.27 19.21....... ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 ..... 2.25 10.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem Co.,
0.71 7.20 2.38 10.30 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 ..... 4.25 10.30 Amn. AgrI. Chem. Co.,
1.98 9.22 4.23 9.79 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 ...... 3.501 5.001Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
1.56 8.13 3.oj6 5.53 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 ...... 2.00 2.30OAmn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
2.48 11.181 2.22 1.80 Jacksonville, Fla.











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.


Williams & Clark's Flerida
Vegetable ............... 846 Guarant'd Analysis
I Official Analysis

Bradley's Nursery Stock ... 847Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Bradley's Fruit and Vine.. 8481Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Special Bone and Potash.. 849 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Bradley's Florida Vegetable. 850 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Armour's Vegetable ...... 851 Guarant'd Analysisl


10.




8.94
10.00
10.94

10.00
7.41

10.00
11.31

10.00
8.95

10.00


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND
0
'. WHERE
"M MANUFACTURED.
0d z




6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00 5.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
7.28 1.54 8.82 3.81 4.92 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 1.001 ...... 4.50 3.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
9.8 3.71 11.57 4.53 3.43 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.50 3.00 ...... 2.25 10.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
7.02 0.33 7.35 2.41 9.56 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 .................. 12.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
14.50 0.05 14.55 ...... 11.07| Jacksonville, Fla.

.00 1.00 ......4.00 5.00Amn. Agr. Chem. Co.,
7.171 1 .S 8.75 4.02 5.66 Jacksonville, Fla.

S7.00 2.00 ...... 4.001 6.00 rmour's Fcrtz. Works,










I Official Analysis 9.81

Armour's Special Mixture. 852,Guarant'd Analysis 13.001
IOfficial Analysis 6.G60
Armour's Largo Special F.I
& V. .................... 853 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 8.24

Ideal Fruit and Vine...... 854,Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 7.84

Special Mixture No. 1...... 855Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis 11.22
Special Strawberry Fert... 856 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Official Analysis 10.04

Peruvian Vegetable Manure. 857 Guarant'd Analysisi 10.00
Official Analysis 7.74

Peruvian Fruit and Vinel 858|Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Manure.. .... .......... Official Analysis 7.66

I.eal Fertilizer ............ 859 Guarant'd Analysis 8.(00
Official Analysis 10.85

Ideal Lettuce Fertilizer..... 8GOGuarant'd Analysis 10.00
1Official Analysis 8.12

Ideal Vegetable Fertilizer.. 861 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
9 Official Analysis 8.21
69 Ir


7.85 1.11 8.961

6.251 1.501 ......
6.33 1.89 8.221

6.00| 0.50 ......
6.16G 0.67 6.831

6.00 ...... ... ...
6.76 0.42 7.18

6.00 1.00 ......
6.22 1.10 7.32
6.00 ...... ......
6.49 1.01 7.50

7.00 2.00.....
7.20 4.73 11.93

6.00 1.00 .. ...
6.84 1.59 8.43

5.00 1.00 ...
5.62 0.58 6.20

6 .00 ...... ......
6.14i 1.02 7.16

6.00 1.00 ....
5.95 0.78 6.73


4.03

4.25
4.92

3.001
3.24

3.001
3.33

5.00
5,02
3.50
3.77

5.001
4.91

3.00
3.75

4.00
4.14

6.00
5.81

4.001
4.501


6.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.75 Armour's Fertz. Works,
7.72 Jacksonville, Fla.

13.00 Armuur's Fetl:s. Works,
9.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.0 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
10.43 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
5.31 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
3.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
3.57 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

8.001Wilson & Toomer Fert.
7.89 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
9.61 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
5.95 co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
7.48 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toome. Fert.
8.84 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.










ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND. >
cd)




Florida Special Pineapple.. 862'Guarant'd Analysis, 6.00
Official Analysis 3.79

Favorite Early Trucker.... 863 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 8.70

Cotton Seed Meal ........I 864'Guaran'td Analysis ......
S Official Analysis
Favorite Non- Ammonlatedi
Special ................. 86f5'G arant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 8.00

11. G. Acid Phosphate ...... 8 661Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
O official Analysis 11.46

Favorite Bone Black and!
I'otash .................. 8 7 1(: arant'd Analysis 10.00
70 Ollfcial Analysis 7.87


Phosphoric


C3




4.00
4.58

6.00
5.79




10.00
10.49

16.0 0
17.:l(


8.,50
8.85


4.00
3.91

2.00
1.14




1.00
0.14

S0.50
5 0.17


0. 50
5| 0.22


Acid.







":
CS

I'


8.49


6.93

1.75



10.63


17.53



9.07


BY WHOM AND
O
3* WHERE

0 MANUFACTURED.
I J


4.00 7.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
3.0O 8.24 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
3.071 10.081 sonville, Fla.

5.00| 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
5.12 ...... sonville, Fla.

...... 11.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
...... 10.82 sonville, Fla.

...... ...... Sanders Fort. Co., Jack-
............ sonville, Fla.


...... 12.00 Sanders Fer.. Co., Jack-
...... 11.7(; sonville, 'la.









Favorite Fruiter Manure... 868 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 6.54
Favorite Blood, Bone and
Potash .................. 869 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 5.46
Simon Pure No. 1.......... 870 Guarant'd Analysis 8.)00
Official Analysis 8.41
Simon Pure No. 2.......... 871 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis 8.65

Gem Pineapple Manure .... 872,Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 6.49
I I
Gem Bean Fertilizer ...... 873 Guarant'd Analysisl 10.00
Official Analysis 8.11

Cucumber Special ........ 874 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis 9.72
V. C. Dominion Potato Ma- i
nure ................... 875 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis 3.44

V. C. Champion Citrus Corn- Guarant'd Analysis
pound ................. 876 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00

V. C. Fla. Fruit Growers'
Formula ............... 877 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
__ __ __ _I I 1


8.00
8.50


8.00
8.47

6.00
6.34

6.00
7.43




5.00
6.72

4.001
6.291

7.001
7.21

6.00
6.93

7.00
7.65,
1


0.50 ......
0.27 8.77


1.00 ......
0.84 9.31

1.00 .....
0.21 6.55

2.00 ......
2.15 9.58

2.50
2.30

2.00 ...
1.18 7.90

3.50 ......
2.49 8.78

1.00 ......
0.62 7.83

1.00 ......
0.44 7.37

1.00 ......
0.98 8.63
I I


4.001 12.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack.
4.43 11.811 sonville, Fla.


5.001 7.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack
4.89 6.89 sonville, Fla.

4.00 11.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
4.78 12.74; Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00 E. O. Painter Fert. CO.,
5.41 6.79 a Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00[ 6.00;E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
5.45| 7.521 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 3.00IE. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
5.08] 3.53 Jacksonviile, Fla.

6.50 5.001E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
6.76 4.71| Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 8.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4.81 8.86 vannah, Ga.

3.00[ 14.001Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
3.631 11.891 vannah, Ga.

3.501 4.00|Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
3.951 5.45, vannah, Ga.
I 71










ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND

NAME OR BRAND. ; WHERE
,' I MANUFACTURED.

i S

No. I Ground Tobacco Dust. 878 Guarant'd Analysis .... .. ..... ...... ...... 2.00 2.001E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 7.09 ................ 1591 1.841 Jacksonville, Fla.
I I I I
Gem Bean Fertilizr....... 879 Guarant'd Analysis 13.00 5.00 2.00...... 5.001 3.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
SOfficial Analysis 8.97 5.78 1.75 7.53 4.91 4.131 Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams & Clark's Fruit I
and Vine ................ 880 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.50 3.00 ...... 2.25 10.00|Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
Official Analysis 8.98 7.09 0.36 7.45 2.42 9.64 Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams & Clark's Vegeta-
table .................... 881 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00 5.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
SOfficial Analysis 9.761 8.04 0.91 8.95 4.09 5.53 Jacksonville, Fla.

Bradley's Fruit & Vine.... SS2Gunarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.50 3.00 ...... 2.25 10.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
Official Analysis 7.17 G.5G 0.76 7.32 2.42 9.73 Jacksonville, Fla.

lradley's Fla. V geta)le .... 8S3(Guaranl'd A ;nlysis 0.)(1) 6.00 1.00...... 4.00 5.00 Anin. Agrl. Chein. Co.,
1 Official Analysis 9.47 7.12i 1.79 8.91 4.04 5.39 .acksonville, Fla.








Williams & Clark's Nursery I I I
Stock ................... 884 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 1.00 ...... 4.501 3.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
Official Analysis 8.84 7.84 3.18 11.02 4.37 3.82 Jacksonville, Fla.
Mape's Orange Tree Manure 885 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.00 2.00 ...... 4.00 3.00 Mape's Formula, and P.
Official Analysis 11.62 4.73 4.76 9.49 4.08 3.65 G. Co., New York.
Mape's Fruit and Vine.... 886Guarant'd Analysis. 13.00 5.00 2.00 ......2.00 10.00Mape's F. & P. G. Co.,
Official Analysis 11.4: 4.88 3.40 8.28 2.75 9.81 New York.
Star Brand Cotton Seed Meal 887 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ... ........... 7.561...... J. Lindsay Wells Co.,
Official Analysis .6.67...... ...... 6.67 .... Memphis, Tenn.
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 888 Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 ...... ...... 2.40 7.00 1.76Ga. C. 0. Co., Macon,
Official Analysis 7.94 ............ .... 7.55...... Ga.
Dark Cotton Seed Meal.... 1889 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ............ 1.75 5.00 1.5 Fla. C. 0. Co., Jackson-

Official Analysis ....... ...... ........... 5.32 ...... ville, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 890 Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 ...... ...... 2.25 7.50 1.65 Lathrop C. 0. Co., Hawk-
Official Analysis 7.53 .....|. ............ 8.03 ......1 insville, Ga.
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 891 Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 ...... ......2.40 7.00 1.761Ga. C. O. Co., Macon,
G Official Analysis 8.52 ..... ............ 7.21 ...... Ga.
Goulding's 4 per cent Pot-"
ash Acid .............. 892 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 8.00 1.00 ...... ..... 4.00 Goulding Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 12.88 8.93 1.27 10.20...... 3.92 Pensacola, Fla.
Goulding's Bone Compound. 893 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 8.00 1. ...... 2.00 2.0Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 9.27 8.21 3.15 11.36 2.53 2.04 Pensacola, Fla.
I 173










ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND
NAME OR BRAND. WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




Official Analysis 12.39 9.04 2.40 11.44 2.23 1.74 Pensacola, Fla.
Acid Phosphate, 16 per cent. 895 Guarant'd Analysis ......16.00 ........................ Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Goulding's Standard Meal
Mixture ................. 896 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 8.0 1.00..... 2.001 2.00|Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Off ial Analysis 12.5 9.1

Official Analysis 12.75 9. 1.4 10.80 1.71 2.06 Pensacola, Fla.
Acid Phosphate, 14 per cent. 897Guarant'd Analysis 16.001 14.00 1.00.............. ......Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 14.64 14.28 1.81 16.09 ...... ...... Pensacola, Fla.
Cotton Seed Mea .......... 89 Guarant'd Analysis .. ...... .......... 7.50 ......ariana Manufg. Co.
Ollicial Analysis .. 1.... .81 .. .G.09 ....5 ...... IMarianna, Fla.

Katnit .................. 899!)Guarant'd Analysis ................... .......... 12.00 Mariainna Manufg. Co.,
SOfficial Analysis .............. ..... ..... .... 13.11 Marlanna, Fla.










H. G. Acid Phosphate, 4 per I
cent. Potash ............ 900 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 9.001 2.00 ......
Official Analysis 13.J9 7.83 1.59 9.42 .

Acid Phosphate .......... 901 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 14.00 ..... ...... .
Official Analysis... 17.66 13.68 2.121 15.80

Home Mixture Guano .... 9021Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 2.00 ......
Official Analysis... 12.49 8.47 1.63 10.10

Cowetta Dissolved Bone and
Potash .................. 903 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.001 2.00 ...... .
Official Analysis...] 14.79 10.86 2.271 13.131.
Cowetta Cotton Seed Meal I I
Fertilizer ............... 904 Guarant'd Analysis 10.001 8.00 2.001......
Official Analysis... 11.90 8.93 1.011 9.94

Pope Brown's Special For- 10.00
mula ................... 905 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 9.00 2.00 ......
Official Analysis... 12.481 8.62 1.81 10.43

Armour's King Cotton .... 9 ;)Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 1.00......
Official Analysis... 8.11 6.87 1.24 8.111

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 907 Guarant'd Analysis...... ...... ..... 2.00
1 Official Analysis ...!I.... ........ ... .. .
Prime Cotton Seed Meal.... 908IGuarant'd Analysis 8.00 ............ 2.10
S Official Analysis.. ...................
I| |


S4.00 Marianna Manufg. Co.,
"..... 5.22 Marianna, Fla.

.... .... IMarianna Manufg. Co.,
..... ...... Marianna, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Marianna Manufg. Co,,
1.95 2.81 Marianna, Fla.


..... 00Cowetta Feft. Co., New-
..... 1.181 nan, Ga.

2.001 2.00|Cowetta Feft. Co., New-
1.651 1.691 nan, Ga.


2.00 3.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
2.121 3.29 nan, Ga.

2.001 2.00 Armour Fert. Works,
2.00 1.96 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.001 1.50 Fla. C. O. Co., Jackson-
4.60 ..... ville, Fla.

7.50 2.00oAla. C. 0. Co., Montgom-
7.48 ...... e ery, Ala.
S I 75











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.





Campbell's Perfect Satisfac-
tion ....................


Honest Fertilizer ........


Ga. Slate Grange Fertilizer'

Mobile English Acid Phos-
pliale ..... .......... .


Allh iiia F rtilizer. ........


l'lisl l'x. II. C. Acid I'hos.1


Phosphoric Acid.


-1
I I



909 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 14.90

910 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 1:.4:8

9111Guarant'd Analysis 10.i)0
Official Analysis... 12.31

912, Unarant'd AnalysisI 12.00
Official Analysis... 1;.2 s

913:Gi'arant'd Analysis 10.00
Ol icial Analysis... 1: 1.!)

914|(!arant'd Analysis 12.001


9.00o
8.01

8.00o
7.381

8.001
8.251

1 I. 0.0


I. 4

1 ;. 00


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


I I I
1.00 ...... 1.00 3.00 A. D. Campbell, Chipley,
1.39 10.00; 1.306 2.31 Fla.

2.03 ...... 2.001 2.001Campbell & Butler, Chip-
1.50 8.88 1.99i 2.951 ley, Fla.

2.00 ...... 2.001 2.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
3.25 11.50; 2.009! 1.84 gomery, Ala.

2.00 .. .. ............ .Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
2.58 1(;.0(; ...... ...... gomcry, Ala.

2.00 ..... 2.1 1 .501 Va.-Car. Chelm. Co., Mont-
1.91 1 .O 1.S,1 1.42 gomery, Ala.

2.00 ..... ...... I...... Va:.-Car. Clih m. Co., Mont-









Official Analysis...
Scott's Champion Compound 915 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Alkaline, Acid Phosphate,
4 per cent Potash ........ 916Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 917 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Kainit ................... 9181Guaranttd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Sea Island Standard ...... 919 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Kanit .................... 92 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Standard Early Trucker..... 921 IGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Standard Fruit and Vine.. 922 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Standard Fish and Potash.. 923 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


13.90 14.96 3.54 18.50 ...... ...... gomery, Ala.

10.00 8.00 2.00 ...... 1.00 3.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
12.08 7.69 1.491 9.18 1.21 2.85 gomery, Ala.


12.00 8.0 2.00............. 4.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont.
10.68 8.93 0.90 9.83 ......3.99 gomery, Ala.

.. ...... ..... 2.501 6.001 1.501So. Cotton Oil Co., Pen
... ...... ...... 6.55 ... sacola, Fla.

10.00 ..... .. ............ ... 12.00 The Adams Co., Jasper,
.. .. ... .. ..... 14.31 Fla.

10.003 8.00 1.00...... 2.001 2.00Blackshear Manufg. Co.,
11.12 8.11 0.47 8.58 2.27 2.19 Blackshear, Ga.

... ... ....... ..... 12.00 Standard Yertilizer Co.,
... ... .. ... 13.71 Gainesville, Fla.

7.00 5.00 2.00 ...... 5.00 5.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
6.34 5.64 8.93 8.57 4.95 5.04 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 3.001 12.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
5.88 7.97 0.641 8.61 2.65 13.67 Gainesville, Fla.

11.00 3.00 1.00 4.00 6.001 6.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
5.561 3.56 1.322 4.88 5.831 7.231 Gainesville, Fla.
I I I 1 1 77









ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.
0L





Standard Vegetable No. 1.. 9241Guarant'd Analysis 8.00!
IOfficial Analysis.... 5.98|
I I
Standard Orange Fruiter. 925|Guarant'd Analysis 8.001
IOfficial Analysis... 7.28|
No. 1 Peruvian and Fish
Guano Mixture, Double |
Strength Potash ........ 926|Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
|Official Analysis ... .32

Or Golden Fruiler ........I 927 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Ollicial Analysis... 4.06

No. 1 I'Peruvian and Fishl
Guano Mixture .......... 92 |(l uarant'd Analysis| 12.00
I 011i(ial Analysi; ..; .761


Phosphoric Acid.





0 3


4.50| 2.00 6.501
5.25 2.17 7.42|


5.001 2.00 7.001
6.781 2.471 9.25


5.00 1.00 .....
7.2.4 1.171 8.411

0(;.00 1 .....
7.6 0. 35 8. 31


5. 1 1.00 .. .
7.011 1.411 8.421


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
o c MANUFACTURED.

1


4.50! 6.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
4.081 6.71] Gainesville, Fla.


3.00 10.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
3.30 8.741 Gainesville, Fla.


4.00 10.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
4.11 10.16; Gainesville Fla.

,3.001 13.00() lorida Fertilizer Co.,
:.5,| 12.931 (Cainesville, Fla.


'-01 5.0 l l'irida fertilizer Co.
3.22| (.551 ( ainiesville lFla.







No. 2 Orange Tree Mixture 929 Guarant'd Analysisl 12.101 6.001 2.00 ...... 3.00 5.001Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 8.34 6.471 0.761 7.23 3.76 5.271 Gainesville, Fla.
Potato Mixture ............ 9301Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00| 1.00 ...... 3.00 9.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
IOfficial Analysis.... 7.59 5.49 0.971 6.46 3.15 9.561 Gainesville, Fla.
1 II '
Bean and Pea Special.... 931 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 2.50 8.00,Florida Fertilizer Co.
S Official Analysi-... 8.95 7.191 0.34 7.53 2.74 9.24] Gainesville, Fla.
No. 3 Blood, Bone and Pot- 1
ash ..................... 932 Guarant'd Analysisl 12.00 5.001 2.00...... 4.00 4.00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 7.25 5.831 0.77 6.60 4.68 3.51 Gainesville, Fla.
Lettuce and Cuke Special.. 933 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.001 1.00 ...... 6.50 4.00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 7.03 6.26 0.701 6.9|6 6.60 4.010 Gainesville Fla.
Cantaloupe Special ........ 9341Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00 2.0 ...... 3.001 6.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.58 5.78 0.68 6.43 3.19 7.33 Gainesville, Fla.
No. 2 Double Strength of I
Potash .................. 935 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00i 1.00 ...... 1.50 10.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.54 6.40 0.81 7.21 2.45 11.28 Gainesville, Fla.
Cotton Special ........... 936 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 2.00 2.00|Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 7.02 7.13 0.42 7.55 2.761 2.93 Gainesvili, Fla.
Blood and Bone........ 9.37Guarant'd Analysis...... 5.00 3.00 ...... 11.00 .... Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... ....... 4.99 3.671 8.66 11.36 ...... Gainesville, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 938IGuarant'd Analysis 7.651 ...... ...... 2.40 7.001 1.76 Georgia C. 0. Co., Ma-
Official Analysis... ...... ...... ...... ..... 8.171 ...... con, Ga.
_______1_ I I_.1 -I--1 -- 79-










ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND. 6

iI I



Tip Top Tomato Trucker.. 939Guarant'd Analysis 8.001 7.00 1.00 .....
Official Analysis... 7.67 7.54 0.80 8.34

Seminole Tree Grower..... 940 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 ...... ......
OtOcial Analysis... 10.95 6.41 0.67 7.08

Favorite Tomato Special... 941Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 7.00 2.00......
Official Analysis... 7.30 7.15 1.49 8.64
Southern States Special Veg-]
etable .................. 942jGuarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 1.00 ......
Official Analysis... 4.54 8.57 1.64 10.21

Cotton Seed Meal ........ .943 uarant'd Analysis ..... ....... ...... 2.50
S Official Analysis.. ...... .... .. ...

Co( lou Seed Meal (dark).. 944 (luiarait'd Analysis. ..... .. .. .. 1 .751
Ofcial Analysis. .... ... ..... ...... ..... I


a
o


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


4.00 5.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4.081 6.501 vannah, Ga.

4.00] 8.00]Wilson & Toomer Fert.
4.491 8.471 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 9.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
4.491 8.82] sonville, Fla.

4.00 5.0,) Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4.72| 5.10 vannah, Ga.

7.50| 1.50 Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
7.971...... sonville, Fla.

5.001 1.51 Florida C. 0. Co., Jack-
5.36:..... sonvlll, Fain.








Cowetta Standard, Bone andi
Potash .................

UPope Brown's Special For-
u la .....................

Cowetta Cotton Seed ideal,I
Fertilizer ...............

Suwannee Ammoniated Bone
Guano ..................

Chas. Ellis' Cumberland Fer-
tilizer ..................


Acid Phosphate ...........

Cumberland Bone Super-
phosphate ..............

Bradley Palmetto Acid Phos-l
phate ............. ....


Special Mixture ...........


Genuine Peruvian Guano..

I


945 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

9460Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

9471Guarant'd Analysis
[Official Analysis...

948 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis..
948 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

949 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

950lGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...



Official Analysis...
9531Guarant'd Analysis
9521Guarant'd Analysis


Official Analysis...

9534Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
954iGuarant'd Analysis
iOfficial Analysis...1
I I


12.00
16.07

10.00
13.13

10.00
13.20

10.00
9.06

14.00
8.95

14.00
9.28

15.00
11.20

15.00
10.801

10.0 1
3.46

16.501
15.111
i


I |I
10.00 2.00 ......
11.88 0.72 12.60

9.00 2.00 ......
9.00 3.40 12.401

8.00 2.00 ......
7.62 2.08 9.901

8.00 1.00 ..
8.081 1.32 9.40

8.00 1.00 .... ..
7.53 1.27 8.80

14.00 1.00 .....
13.55 0.55 14.10

9.00 1.00 ......
9.78 2.111 11.89

12.001 1.00 ......
13.09 0.98 14.97

'.0o 10.50 ......
5.65 9.681 15.33

7.60 1.80 ......
8.20 2.781 10.981


...... 2.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
..... 1.46 nan, Ga.

2.001 3.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
2.411 2.74 nan, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
2.24 1.93 nan, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Mutual Fertilizer Co.,
2.091 1.841 Savannah, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Mutual Fertilizer Co.,
1.93 1.81 Savannah, Ga.

........... Mutual Fertilizer Co.,
..... ...... Savannah, Ga.

2.00 1.00 Cumberland Bone Phos.
2.7u 1.80 Co., Portland, Me.

...... ...... Bradley Fert. Co., Bos-
.. ... ..... ton, Mass.

2.751 20.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
2.271 17. 8 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.70 1.90 Coe-Mortimer Co., New
9.701 2.151 York.
81












ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


Cotton Seed Meal.......... 9551Guarant'd Analysis. ...... ..... ... ......
I Official Analysis... ...... ...... ...... ......
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 956iGuarant'd Analysis ............. 2.50
Official Analysis... ...... ..... ...... .....
I I
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 957 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... ...... ......
Official Analysis... ...... ...... ...... ......

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 958 Guarant'd Analysis ................. 2.00
Official Analysis.. ....... ...... ...

Coton Seed Meal.......... 959 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ............ 2.50
Official Analysis..........................

Simon Pure Garden........ 960JGuarant'd Analysi 8.001 .1.00( : .00 ......
Official Analysis... 7.73 6.141 2.041 8.1I8


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


7.501...... Bainbridge C. O. Co.,
7.77 ....... Bainbridge, Ga.
7.501 1.50 So. C. O. Co., Fort Gains,
8.02 ...... Ga.

7.50 ...... Georgia C. O. Co., Al-
7.731 ...... bany, Ga.

7.50 1.00 So. C. 0. Co., Fort
7.741 ...... Gains, Ga.

7.501 1.50Cutllberit C. 0. Co., Cuth-
7.771 ...... bert, (a.

5.091 6.50 i O. Painter 'c Co.,
0.95 6.11] J.lacksonvillc.


NAME OR BRAND.










Gem Fruit and Vine....... 961Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 1.00
Official Analysis... 6.38 6.60 1.05

H. G. Acid Phosphate...... 962 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.00 ..
Official Analysis... 12.07, 17.03 .60

Bright Cotton Seed Meal.. 963 Guarant'd Analysis ................
Official Analysis... .................

H. G. Blood and Bone.... 964 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00.... ......
Official Analysis... 5.021 ............

Simon Pure No. 1........ 9651Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 1.00
Official Analysis... 8.48 7.42 .35

Simon Pure, Pineapple Fruit
No. 2. ................. 966 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00..... ......
Official Analysis... 4.72 ..... .....

Armour's Original No. 1.... 967 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00..
Official Analysis... 6.62 6.60 2.85

Armour's Largo Spec. Fr.. 968 Guarant'd Analysis 10.30 6.00 5.00
Official Analysis... 7.55 6.76 .45

Armour's Fruit and Vine... 969 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.00 1.00
Official Analysis... 7.12 7.24 .56

Armour's Vegetable ...... 970 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 7.00 2.)0
Official Analysis... 8.96 7.68 .92


...... 3.00 10.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.65 3.31 11.46 Jacksonville.

..... ...... E. Painter Fert. Co.,
17.63 ...... ..... Jacksonville.

2.25 8.00 1.00E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
...... 8.43 ...... Jacksonville.

7.00 10.00 ......E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.531 11.09 ...... Jacksonville.

...... 4.00 11.00E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.77 4.06 12.70 Jacksonville.
67

7.00 5.00 5.00E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
8.59 6.36 6.51 Jacksonville.

......5.00 5.00 Armour Fert. Works,
9.451 4.98 5.37 Jacksonville.

...... 3.00 10.00 Armour Fert. Works,
7.21 3.14 10.22 Jacksonville.

...... 2.50 11.001Armour Fert. Works,
7.80 2.89 10.20 Jacksonville.

1...... 4.001 6.00jArmour Fert. Works,
8.60 3.92| 6.321 Jacksonville.
I I ( 83








ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND. .
S-' m 2

0 > "




and Potash ........... 971GuarantdAnalys 10.00 8.00 1.00 ......5.00
Official Analysis... 8.00 8.271 1.89 10.16 4.99

Orange Fruiter ............. 072iGuarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 5.00 ...... 4.001
Official Analysis... 7.83 9.53 2 .20 9.73 4.033

Armour's Potash Compound 973 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 10.0 1.00 ...... ......
Official Analysis... 11.9L 9.76 1.04 10.80 ......

Mapes' Fruit and Vine Ma- I
nuire ................... 974 Ci arani'dl Analysis 10.00] 5.100 2.00| ...... 2.00
Ollicial Analysis... 10.1(; 5.281 2.771 S.J5 2.75
Malnps' Orange Grove Ma- | |
nur .e ................... 975|GCnarant'd Analysis 10.00 (;.0 2.00 .... 4.00,
I O(llicial Analysis...| 11.48 G.111 4.161 10.30! 4.21!
i 1 I I I i


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


7.00 Armour Fert. Works,
6.961 Jacksonville.

12.001Armour Fert. Works,
11.3S[ Jacksonville.

11.00]Armour Fert. Works,
10.82 Jacksonville.


10.00! Mapes' Fort. and Per.
11.:;22 Guano Co., New York.

3.001O)M;aps' Fort. and Per.
3.551 (iiano Co., New York.
I










Am. Dis. Bone............ 976Guarant'dAnalysis[ 10.001 14.001
IOfficial Analysis...l 6.65 15.89
Special Mixture .......... 977Guarant'd Analysis1 10.00 7.00
Official Analysis... 4.48 6.54
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 978 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... .
Official Analysis......... ...... .
No. 1 Pure Guano Mixture,
Double Strength Potash.. 979 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00
Official Analysis... 6.68 6.26
No. 2Orange Tree Mixture.. 980 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 6.00
Official Analysis... 8.25 7.16
Fish and Potash .......... 981Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 2.50
Official Analysis... 6.11 2.821
Lettuce and Cuke Special.. 982 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.001
Official Analysis... 8.13 6.661
No. 1 Pure Fish and Guano | I
Mixture ................ 983]Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00
Official Analysis... 6.82 5.80
Standard Cuke Special.... 984 Guarant'd Analysis 9.00 5.00
Official Analysis... 5.16 5.12
Standard Vegetable No. 1.. 985 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 4.50
Official Analysis... 6.32j 5.95
-I I 1


1.00 ................. Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
.24 16.13 ...... 1...... Jacksonville.

10.50...... 2.75 20.00 Armour Fert. Works,
7.71 14.25 2.45 18.32 Jacksonville.

..... 2.0 7.00 1.00 Quitman Oil Co., Quit-
..... ...... 7.36 ...... man, Ga.

1.00 ...... 4.00 10.00 Florida Fert. Co., Gaines-
.67 6.93, 3.59 10.19 ville.

2.00 ...... 3.00 5.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
1.09 8.25 4.11 4.85 Gainesville.

2.50 ...... 6.50 5.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
1.41 4.23 6.28 6.81 Gainesville.

1.00 ...... 6.50| 4.00iFlorida Fertilizer Co.,
.821 7.481 6.151 4.631 Gainesville.

1.00 ...... 4.00 5.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
.87 6.67 3.96 5.41 Gainesville.

2.00 7.00 5.00 8.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
2.89 8.01 4.97 8.90 Gainesville.

2.00 6.501 4.50 6.00Standard Fertilizer Co.,
1.85 7.801 4.20 6.73 Gainesville.
85









ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Oontinued.


NAME OR BRAND.


0


Standard Potato Special.. 986 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 6.851

Standard Cantaloupe ...... 987 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 8.27
I
Standard Lettuce Special.. 988 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis... 7.161
Armour's Largo Spec. Fruit
and Vine .............. 989 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 5.59
Armour's Original No. 1 I
Mixture ................ 990Guarant'd Analysis] 10.00
Official Analysis... 7.02

(mi Brand Fctrz .......... !)91|Guarant'd Analysisl10.00
IOfficial Analysis.. 5.791


Phosphoric Acid.





c> 0



4.50 2.001 6.50
6.89 1.59 8.48

7.00 2.00 9.001
8.24' 1.38 9.671

5.00 2.00 7.00
5.70 1.41 7.11

6.00 .5 ......
6.411 1.15 7.56
5. 00 i ...... .
5.14 1.24 6.38

5.00 2.00.....
G.08 1.61 7.601


0
C11

I Q
0 *
Cd
t!,


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


3.50 8.00]Standard Fertilizer Co.,
3.55 7.81 Gainesville.

7.00 5.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
6.52 6.05| Gainesville.

6.00 6.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
5.83 6.55 Gainesville.

3.00 10.01)Armour Fertilizer Works.
3.09 9.50 Jacksonville.

5.00 5.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
4.60 5.39 Jacksonville.

5.0) 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertllzer
5.111 3.881 Comp'y, Jacksonville.









Williams & Clark Fla. Vege-j
table .................. 992 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Special Mixture .......... 993 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
Mapes' Fruit and Vine Ma-
nure ................... 994 Guarant'd Analysisi
Official Analysis...

Mapes' Vegetable Manure.. 995 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Mapes' Orange Tree Manure. 996 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Special Mixture .......... 997 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Gem Sweet Potato........ 998 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Simon Pure No. 2........ 999 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Simon Pure Spec. No. 1.. 1000Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Ceam Vpettable ............ 11001 Guarant'd Analysis


10.00
7.05

10.00
7.26

10.00
11.55

12.00
11.91

12.00
15.47


7.21|

8.00o
7.39

8.00
9.33

5.00
8.13


6.00
7.27

1.00


5.00
6.04

6.00
5.53

6.00
6.12


1.00
1.45

1.00


2.00
2.65

2.00
3.69

2.00
3.97


.. .... I .. .*1 .
9 .271 ......] ......


4.81

6.00
8.07


.23

2.00
3.10


8.72


4.54


8.69


9.22


10.09

1.50
2.50

4.00
5.04


ii.17


.00 1.0 .. ...
.95 .35 7.30

5.00 3.00 ......
.73 .79 13.52


4.00
3.99

5.00
5.25

2.00,
2.47

5.00
4.97I

4.00
3.69

6.00
6.57

4.00
4.59

4.00
5.10

2.00
2.81

4.00
5.47


5.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.'s
4.90 Works, Jacksonville.

8.00 East Coast Cattle Co., Ft.
8.03 Pierce.

10.00 Mapes' Fert. & Per. Gu-
11.71 ano Co.,NewYork, N.Y

4.00 Mapes' Fert. & Per. Gu-
5.59 anoCo.,New York, N.Y.

3.001Mapes' Fert. & Per. Gu-
3.21 ano Co.,New York, N. Y.

3.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co..
3.32 Jacksonville.

6.50 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
6.6 7 Jacbksonville.

6.00E. 0 Painter Fertz. Co.,
6.141 Jacksonville.

16.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
14.96 Jacksonville.

6.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
1.80 Jacksonville.
87


.


6
6


I IOfficial Analysis...











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid



NAME OR BRAND.







Official Analysis... ..... ...... ...... ... .

No. 1, Ground Tobacco Dust[1003 Guarant'd Analysis!.. ...... ..........
Official Analysis... .. ..
V. C. Champion Citrus Com- I
pound .................. 1004[Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.0 1.00 .

1 1 1
V. C. Fruit and Vine ...... 1005|Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 .00 .
Official Analysis... 6.8 7.89) .81| S.

V. C. Old Dominion .... 100( Gunarant'd Analysis 8.00 7.00 1.00 ....
Oli.ial Analysis... (.1 7.91 .: 8.:

V. C. Tip Top Tomatio. ... 1007 Cuaranl'd Anal ysis 8.00 7.00 1.00 .
SO0ficial Analysis.. 4.87 8. 17 .80 8,.


a
a
-r,

16.00 .
18.62 .

2.00
1.361

3.00
3.58

2.50
3.91

5.00
5.48

4.001
4.53


BY WHOM AND

WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


..... E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
..... Jacksonville.

2.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
1.111 Jacksonville.

14.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
13.62 Savannah, Ga.

10.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
9.19| Savannah, Ga.

8.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
S. (; Savannah, Ga.

5. 00 Va. Carolina Cheim. Co.,
6.011 Savannah, Ga.









XX Acid Phos. and Potash.l1008 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 10.
Official Analysis... 4.97 8.

Sulphate Potash .......... 1)09 Guarant'd Analysis 2.50 ....
Official Analysis... 0.95 ....

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1010Guarant'd Analysis..........
Official Analysis... ...... ....

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1011 Guarant'd Analysis .........
Official Analysis.. ...... ....

Cotton Seed Meal......... 10121Guarant'd Analysis ...... ....
Official Analysis... ....... ..

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1013 Guarant'd Analysis ..........
Official Analysis.. ..........


Phosphate of Lime...... 1014lGuarant'd Analysisi 15.001 9.
Official Analysis... 11.24 9.

Cotton Seed Meal........ 015 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ....
Official Analysis... .... ..

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 1016 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ....
Official Analysis... ..... ....

Fertilizer No. 3........... 1017]Guarant'd Analysis 10.00I 6.
Official Analysis.. 10.29 7


..... 4.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
3.37 6.73 Savannah, Ga.

..... 48.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
..... 49.56 Savannah, Ga.

7.50......McCaw Mfg. Co., Macon,
8.03 ...... Ga.

7.50 1.50 Piedmont Oil and Refin-
7.95 ...... ing Co., Farmsdale, Ala.

7.50 1.'O0Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
8.13 ...... sonville,
I I
7.00 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
4.90 ...... sonville.


2.00 1.00 Cumberland Bone Phos.
2.45 1.41 Co., Portland, Me.

7.50 2.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Tal-
7.45|...... lahassee.

7.50 1.50 Piedmont Oil and Refin-
8.27 ...... ing Co., Farmsdale, Ala.

4.001 10.00|Southern Fertilizer Co.,
3.76 9.601 Orlando, Fla.
I _89

















NAME OR BRAND.


Fertilizer No. 4............ 1018

Fertilizer No. 1........... 1019

H. G. Acid Phosphate..... 1020

I
Sulplhatl of Ammonia...... 1021(

Ideal Voelgaible Mannm-r.. 1022

Ileal l'rilt andVino Malnmr1ll02:',
I I


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 90


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND

S WHERE
2o MANUFACTURED.



Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.00 2.00......3.0 10.00 Southern Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 9.45 7.1 .29 7.40 3.5 9.44 Orlando, Fla.

Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00 2.00...... 5.00 4.00Southern Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 12.29 6.75 .12 6.87 5.1 3.76 Orlando, Fla.

Guarant'd Analysis ...... .16.00 ..... ... ...... Southern Fertilizer Co.,

Guarant'd Analysis ...... ... ....... .. 2 .0 ...... .. Sout2 ern Fortili7er Co.,
Official Analysis................ .. ... .. 25.71 ... Orlando Fla

unra l'd Analysis R.001 0.00 1.00 ...... 4.011 S8.001Wilson & Toonier Fortz.
Official Analysis.. 10. 58 (. 56, 1.28I 7.81 4.:,71 8.511 Co., .Jachsonvillh, Fla.

larantd Analysis 10.00 (00......... ilson & Too r Fortz.
Official Analysis... :1 .511 ;.:l .9!| I17.I0( :I.001 9.95| Co., Jacksonvilll Fla.







Favorite Early Trucker.... 1024 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

7 per cent Blood and Bone 1025 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Hard Wood Ashes........1026|Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Armour's Largo, Special!
Fruit and Vine ........ 10271Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...!

Armour's Fruit and Vine.. 1028 Guarant'd Analysisi
Official Analysis.. .
Armour's Largo, Special
Tree Grower ........... 1029Guarant'd Analysisl
iOfficial Analysis...

Armour's Practical Trucker.!1030]Guarant'd Analysis!
Official Analysis...1

Fruit and Vine ............ 1031IGuarant'd Analysisl
Official Analysis...!

Pineapple Manure ........ 10321Guarant'd Analysisi
I Official Analysis...j

Orange Fruiter Special.... !1033IGuarant'd Analysis!
OOfflcial Analysis...
I 1


10.00 6.00 2.00 ......
7.68 6.51 2.09 8.60

10.00 4.00 3.00 ......
10.62 2.05 .64 2.69

15.00 ..................
6.75 ..................

I
10.00 6.00 5.00 .....
8.32 8.81 .99 9.80

10.001 6.00 1.00 .. ...
6.01] 6.761 .771 7.53

10.00 5.00 1.00 ... .
9.20 6.53 1.72 8.25

10.00 6.00 2.00 3.00
9.52 6.30 .35 6.65

8.00 6.00 1.00 ..
10.66 5.52 1.22 6.74

8.00 5.00 ...... 10.00
4.86 5.07! 2.21 7.28

8.00 6.00 1.00 ... .
9.65 6.20! 1.40 7.60
1 1


3.00 10.00 Sanders Fertz. Co., Jack-
3.28 8.88 sonville, Fla.

7.00 ...... Sanders Fertz. Co., Jack-
7.55 ...... sonville, Fla.

...... 5.00 Sanders Fertz. Co,, Jack-
...... 3.39 sonville, Fla.


3.00 10.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
2.94 9.38 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.50 11.00 Armour Fcrtz. Works,
2.841 10.26 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
3.85 6.15 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 5.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
3.23 10.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 12.00 Tampa Fertz. Co.,
2.01 11.71 Tampa, Fla.

6.00 8.00|Tampa Fertz. Co.,
4.671 9.031 Tampa, Fla.

2.00 16.00 Tampa Fertz. Co.,
2.15 14.58 Tampa, Fla.
StI 91













ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND
0
NAME OR BRAND. WHERE
0 C
dS C MANUFACTURED.
0 (

-I
I I 6i00 i S _
11. G. Vegetable Fertilizer.. 10 4 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00 2.00 ...... .0 6.0Tampa Fertz. Co.,
Official Analysis... 12.221 6.19 .691 6.88 3.23 6.36 Tampa, Fla.
Cuodaby's Regular Blood I
and Bonec .............. 10:5 Guarant'd Analysis 9.00 .00 8.00...... .5 ...... Tampa Ferlz. Co.,
I Official Analysis... ...... 31.54 1.05 12.50 7.20 ...... Tampa, Fla.

(CofIon SR ed Moal ........ 10:!; uar nt'i An ysi.s ............. ......I 1.7 5.00 1.50 Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Official .\n lysis ...... .... .. ...... ..... 75. ....... Jack.sonville, Fla.

(o(llon Soed Moal ....... :7 rn An lysis.... ..... ( .i AniK s ... ... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Florida Colton Oil Co.,
O flicial Analysis ... ...... ...... ............ 8.02 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

C(ollon S(, 11 Meal ........ 10:2 '( Illlr nld AiI lysil 7. 5 ....... ....... 2.25 7.50 1.;5|S)a: rl: ()Coliln Oil M ill,
O ,llici:dl A na l sis. ...... I ...... ...... .. .. ...... Spar (;i.
V':iv, il Non, A mi io i: led lj I
Sp''ial ................ 10: ( il'll Ana ysis 1 0. 00 .01) 1.01 ...... ..... .. I .00 ; S:iill iers I l (Co.. .1:lk-
I Ollici l Analysis .. 1 1.0 10.571 .;:! 11.20( ...... 10.51 sonvllle, Fla.






Favorite Fruiter Manure... 1040]Guarant'd Analysis!
Official Analysis...

Simon Pure No. 1......... 1041 Guarant'd Analysi
Official Analysis...

Simon Pure No. 2. ........1042 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Simon Pure Garden........ 1043 Guarant'd Analysis
lOfficial Analysis.. .

Gem Vegetable .......... 1044 Guarant'd Analysis
|Official Analysis...

Gem Pineapple Manure.... 1045 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Cotton Seed Meal......... 1046 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Williams & Clark's Orange
Tree .................... 1047 Guarant'd Analysis
lOfficial Analysis...

Am. Dissolved Bone....... 104l!Guarant'd Analysis
O official Analysis...

Williams & Clark's Fruit
and Vine .............. 10491Guarant'd Analysis
I Official Analysis...


10.001 8.00 .50 ...... 4.00 12.00 Sanders Fertz. Co., Jack-
6.14 8.79 .37 9.16 4.18 12.14 sonville, Fla.

8.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00 11.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
7.83 6.59 .02 6.61 4.62 12.58 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 6.00 2.00 ...... 4.00 6.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
7.13 7.93 1.60 9.53 5.37 6.88 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 4.00 3.00 ...... 5.00 6.50 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
7.94 5.61 2.56 8.17 5.43 6.901 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 5.00 3.00 ...... 4.00 6.00E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
6.24 4.94 2.66 7.60 5.04 7.25 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 ...... .... 2.50 5.00 6.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.56 ............ 2.43 5.90 6.84 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.65 .......... 2.25 7.50 ...... Central Oil and Fertz.
.... 7.71...... Co., Cordele, Ga.


10.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 3.50 5.00 American Agricul. Chem.
7.101 6.30 2.18 8.48 3.60 5.821 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 16.00 1.00 ..... ........American Agricul. Chem.
10.78 15.40 .22 15.62 .... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


10.00 5.50! 3.00 ...... 2.251 10.00 American Agricul. Chem.
7.79 6.281 1.111 7.391 2.421.10.661 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
1 I I 1" 1 93













ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.





Am. Dissolved Bone.......


Castor Pomace ...........


Bradley Fruit and Vine...

Williams & Clark's Florida
Vegetable ...............


Bright Cotton Seed Meal..


Am. Standard Guano ......


1050 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1051 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1052 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1053 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

1051 iGaraint'd Analysis
Official Analysis..

l05 (lunaranI'd Analysis
Official Analysis...


Phosphoric Acid.

BY WHOM AND

I WHERE
a S 0 MANUFACTURED.


S U | -I I I

10.00 14.00 1.00 ......... ...... I American Agricul. Chem.
10.3 15.09 .19 15.28 ...... ...... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

.................. 5.50 ...... American Agricul. Chem.
. ....... .......... 5.77 .. ... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 5.501 3.00 ...... 2.25 10.00 American Agricul. Chem.
6.51 6.05 1.27 7.;;2 2.36 10.18 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 (;.00 1.001 ...... .10 5.00 America Agricul. Ch .
7.88 0;.;; 2.12| S.7S 1.00 5.68 Co., Jacksonville, Fli.

...... .. ..... | .. 7. .50 ...... Al orican AgricuAi l. Clw(. m.
... .. ... .... .. 52| ...... ., aclisoonville, l'h,1.

10. 00o, .o0 2.00 ..... 2.00 :'.o)0|Ami ric;an Agrhi ll Chem.
13.75 .S 2.1 ; 11.07 2 .1; :3.0S Co., Jac. sotville, l'la.








Bradley Fla. Vegetable .... 1056 Guarant'd Analysis 10.0 6.00 1.00...... 4.00 5.00 American Agricul. Chem.
Official Analysis... 7.44 6.82 1.66 8.48 4.09 5.62 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
German Kainit ............1057 Guarant'd Analysis ..... ................ 12.00 American Agricul. Chem.
Official Analysis... ..... ...... ............ 13.881 Jacksonville, Fla.
Nitrate of Soda .......... 1058 Guarant'd Analysis .................. ...... 18.03 ...... merican Agricul.Chem.
Official Analysis... ...... ...... ...... ..... 16.00 ...... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Orange Fruiter ............1059 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 1.00...... 4.00 12.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
IOfficial Analysis... 9.62 8.67 .17 8.84 4.20 10.72 Jacksonville, Fla.










BUREAU OF FEEDSTUFFS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist B.H.BRIDGES, A. M. HENRY, Assistant Chemists.
Analysis of Special Samples under S ec. 9, Act approved May 24, 1905.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)



NAME OR BRAND. BY WHOM SENT.



Bran ........................... 39, 17.70 9.48] 53.4 2.05 4.60IJohn High, Baker's Mill, Fla.
Cocoa Nut Meal ................4 40 13.34 20.561 38.28 9.65 5.751W. A. Bours, Jacksonville, Fla.
Cocoa Nut Meal ................4 41 12.63 20.97 41.19 9.70 5.361W. A. Bours, Jacksonville, Fla.
Excelsior Corn and Oat Feed.... 42 11.96 7.25 61.75 4.521 3.581R. II. Mickler, Tallahassee, Fla.
Corn and Oat Feed ............ 43 4.52 9.26 67.58 2.711 1.931Baker & Holmes, Jacksonville, Fla.
Our Own ...................... 44 6.03 9.481 65.20 3.391 2.85 Baker & Holmes Jacksonville, Fla.
Peerless Feed-Wheat Bran.... 45 8.231 16.51 .59 4.63 5.19 J. Y. Detwiler, New Smyrna, Fla.
Peerless Feed-Wheat Bran ...... 461 7.82| 15.83 54.23 4.641 6.091.|. Y. )Detwiler, New Smyrna, Fla.
l'uire Winler Wheat Middlings.... 47 6.06 19.31 55.27 3.441 4.,0(Alhen & Clayton, Tampa, Fla.
Shorts ........................ 481 6.91 17.95 53.771 4.93; 5.2 lL. A. M rcer & Son, Wauellc la, Fla.
Bright Cotton Seed Meal......... | 49 9.56! 39.711 27. 5:1 9.00 6.1! W. S. lacklsoii, Miicanopy, Fla.
] .';.n ... ....... ........... .. 50 17.191 14.5(; 51.441! 2.57 4.261.1. II. Vidal, (ainesville, Fla.
C. ;. & Co., (Iround Feed...... .. 51 :.781 10.27 (69. 05i 2.1 I 1 .SS('Consolid(lat d (;rocery Co., Jac; soliville.
IK(ImplCr's Sei. Cattle Food ... 52! 12.66! 12.95. 53.26 22 5.79IWi.T'l. K3mlICer Ele'r Co., K1:anmi Ci(y,Mo.
Natal Crass Hay ............ .. 563 ;16.751 7.451 39.2:31 1.80 5.021 T. K. (Cod ey, Waldo. Fla.
.;i panese i Kuidzoo Vine Ilay ...... 54 40.09! 1G. 591 32. 81 1.681 8.831C. E. 'leas, Chiipley, Fla.








,Stafolife Feed .................. 55| 9.92j 11.721 52.641 7.551 7.92R. A. Jackson, Tampa, Fla. 97
Peerless Feed ................... 56 8.20 15.52 54.35 5.73 4.80R. A. Jackson, Tampa, Fla.
nGround Ear Corn ............... 57 6.87 7.02 69.66 3.41 1.06 T. L. Wells & Bro., Chipley, Fla
Shorts .......................... 58 7.00 16.50 55.19 4.70 5.47Martin & Carn, Ocala, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ................ 59 14.03 35.32 28.01 7.93 5.12 Henry W. Smith, Zolfo, Fla.
Cotton Seed Hulls.......... ..... 60 43.95 4.65 34.65 2.28 2.55 Henry W. Smith, Zolfo, Fla.
Feed ............................ 61 6.33 9.28 67.17 6.33 2.33 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.


NOTICE-The especial attention of consumers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9. of the Laws, providing for "Special Sam-
ples" drawn by consumers, are requested to read carefully Sec. 9 of the Laws and the "Rules and Regulations Govern-
ing the taking and forwarding Special Samples of Feed Stuff and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report.
Also to compare the "official analysis" and the "market value" of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases the "market value," or price, is no criterion of the actual feeding
value of the goods. That in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guaranteed tag on the bag with the table of 'average composition of feed stuff."
In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law, and regulations, and send in
a tin box sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guaranteed tags" off the packages, to compare
with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.











ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFF. 1907. 98
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist B. H. BRIDGES, A. A3. HENRY, Assistant Chemists.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1. Act Approved May 24, 1905.


NAME OR BRAND. ADDRESS OF
0 MANUFACTURERS.
Cz w

Pure Wheat Middlings .... 241 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 15.75 40.0o( 4.00! ...... .Hunter Bros.' Milling Co., St.
Official Analysis... 9.30 17.40' 51.27 6G.31 5.031 Louis, Mo.
Purina Feed ......... .. 242 Guarant'd Analysis 13.30 9.00 59.70' 4.50 ...... ]Ralston 'urina Co., St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 11.40 13.55! 57.491 3.97 4.37| Mo.
Feed Stuff ................ 243 Guarant'd Analysis 9.00 15.00 ...... 4.00 ...... Tri-State Milling Co., Nashville,
S Official Analysis.. 6.6(; 15.55 5S.00 4.81 4.53 Tenn.
Sucrene Dairy Feed........ 244Guarant'd Analysis 11.75] 16.50' 1I.51 :. 50 ...... American Milling Co., I'hiladel-
Official Analysis... 9.28i 17.91 45.91 (.13 9.2: phia, la.
Ballard's Ship Sluff ........ 245]Guarant'd Analysis 5. 17.7 .r5 .1 ...... HIll1rd & llllard Co., Louis-
Official Analysis... (;.21 I .1 55.:.1 4.77 .1.S1] ville, Ky.
4I I I
'ure W heat Bran.......... 24 ; Gui ranlt' A analysis ..... 1 55. ll) 5.01. ..... i r Acm lillls and KElvator Co.,
Official An;aly;is.. 8.:311 1 (;.7 51.0;1 5".011 5..62 1!opliinisvlle, Ky.
I''- Wl at Bran ..........| 2471Guara tl'd Anailysis 9.50 1 1.50 .00' ) 00| ...... Libe'ly NMills, Nasliville, Ten-
I Olicial Anailysis... S.!I 15. 0) 51.:8; 4.171 6.401 nesseo.








Banner Feed .............. 248|Guarant'd Analysisl 10.00] 8.00
i Official Analysis... 10.141 11.78
Pure Wheat Middlings...... 249 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 115.75
Official Analysis...| 5.031 20.40 1
Pure Wheat Shorts........ 250 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42 16.00
Official Analysis... 6.25 17.65
Pure Wheat Bran.......... 251Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 14.50.
Official Analysis... 9.791 15.09
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 252,Guarant'd Analysis ...... 3 28.62
S Official Analysis... 5.691 31.70
Pure Wheat Middlings......] 253Guarant'd Analysis ... 15.70
Official Analysis... 15.21 17.1

Feed Stuff ................ 254'Guarant'd Analysis 15.51 11.00
I Official Analysis... 20.27 11.01
II I I
Pure Wheat Bran ........ 255 Guarant'd Analysis 9.501 14.50
Official Analysis... 8.201 16.45
256I I ] I
Ship Stuff ................ 256 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.00
S Official Analysis.. 5.82 1.60
II ]
Pure Wheat Bran.......... 2571Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.56
S [Official Analysis.. 9.83 15.451


62.00 3.50 ...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,
63.85 2.72 3.271Illinois.

40.00; 4.00 ...... Hunter Bros.' Milling Co., St.
55.441 4.20 3.99 Louis, Mo.

48.00 4.00 ......Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
53.891 5.45 4.971 nessee.

50.00] 4.00 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
53.99 4.00 6.97] nessee.
I 1
24.00o 9.30j ...... Lindsey Wells Co., Memphis,
40.90] 5.83 6.00] Tennessee.

60.30[ 4.30 3.70 C. Baker Milling Co., Red Bud,
46.89I 5.01i 4.061 Illinois.

55.19 3.30 ...... Capital Grain, Co., Nashville,
50. 36 2.18; 4.43J Tennessee.

50.00 4.00 ...... 'Merchants' Mills, Mobile, Ala-
51.971 4.80i b.a3 bama.
I I
16.71 6.99 ...... Mountain City Mill Co., Chat-
56.30 4.241 4.C6G tanooga, Tenn.
I I I
46.001 4.25 ...... Koeningmark Mill Co., Water-
53.41] 3.151 6.351 loo, Illinois.
I l l 99










ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


I I I

NAME OF BRA.D. ADDRESS OF
0 MANUFACTURERS.
-I Iz I2

Ship Stuff ................. 258 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.00 16.71 6.99 ...... Mountain City Mill Co., Chat-
Official Analysis...l 5.65 16.23 58.98 4.451 4.20 tanooga, Tenn.
Pure Middlings .......... 259 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.00 58.00 4.75 ...... Columbia Mill and Elevator Co.,
S Official Analysis...j 6.15 16.901 57.76 4.10 4.27 Columbia, Tenn.
Pure Wheat Shorts........ 260 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42 16.00 48.00 4.00 ...... Cumberland, Mills, Nashville,
Official Analysis... 7.51 17.75 54.02 4.72 5.18 Tennessee.
Blair's Shorts ............ 261|Guarant'd Analysis 8.98 16.75 58.95 3.50 ...... Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
Official Analysis... 5.74 17.72 56.951 4.171 4.33 Kansas.
Cotton Seed Meal........ 22 Guaran'td Anaysis .... 38.52 ...... .... ...... Florida C. Co., Tallahassee,
Official Analysis... 10.58 41.24 24.59 8.65 6.49 Florida.
I I I 1*
Pure Wheat Bran .......... 263uarant'd Analysis.... 16.00 55.10 5.40 ...... Acmo Mill and Elevator Co,
Official Analysis... 7.: 18.1 53.02 4.29 5.69 Iloplinsville, Ky.
Ballard's Ship Stuff........ 261 Cuarant'd Analysis 5.83 17.:7 46.58 4.411 ...... Ballard & Ballard Co., Louis-
Oficial Analysis... 7.57 17.20 54.991 4.001 5.111 villc, Ky.




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