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 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Weather report
 Fertilizers and feeding stuff






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00004
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents--by divisions
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
    Weather report
        Page 17
        Page 18
        General summary
            Page 19
            Page 20
        Climatological data for May 1907
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
    Fertilizers and feeding stuff
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports, January 1907
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Jacksonville prices current
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Factors for conversion
            Page 39
        State values
            Page 40
        State valuations
            Page 41
        Special samples
            Page 42
        Light weight--false statements
            Page 43
        Analysis of special samples
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
        Analysis of feed stuffs
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
        Miscellaneous
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
Full Text
L1



VOLUME17 NUMBER 2




FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT



JULY 1, 1907


B. E. MCLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAMASSEE, FLA.



Part 1-Crops Part 2-Weather Report
Part 3-Fertilizers and Feed Stuff


Entered January 81,1903, at Tallhahassee, Florida, as second class matter
under Act of Congress of June 1900.

THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED fRE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

CAPITAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,
State Printer.
Tallahassee, Florida.
<840-I









COUNTY MAP OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA.

















PART I.
CROPS













DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla.-ll.



Southern Division.
Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.

Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.

Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia-9.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
B. E. McLIN, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS-BY
DIVISIONS.
NORTHERN DIVISION.-Although a larger acreage was
planted in cotton than last year the unfavorable cold and
dry spring that followed planting served to cut down the
acreage by failing of the seed to germinate, and dying out
of the plant from other causes. With the exception of a
few isolated localities the whole district suffered severe
losses. A portion of June was favorable; giving the crops
a period of warm weather followed by copious warm rains
which benefited the cotton and all other crops very greatly.
Not only cotton suffered from the unfavorable weather
conditions, but all field and late vegetable crops; next to
the cotton the most important crop to suffer damage was
corn which has been reduced to a prospective yield of
only about three-fourths of a crop. The cotton crop in this
division is at present in poor condition compared to what
it should be. The most flourishing crop grown in this
section is tobacco, which under the methods of culture in
use is yielding a full crop of the finest quality.
WESTERN DIVISION.-The same weather condition ex-
isted in this division as in the foregoing one, or if any-
thing perhaps, the average is a little worse. Cotton is in
worse shape and a little more backward; the corn crop is
about the same as in the Northern Division; all the field
crops are late and indicate short yields and the vegetable
crops were also damaged, some amounting to a failure.
In both of these divisions of the State the scarcity of
labor is a very serious drawback to successful farming;
owing to its uncertainty and no little degree of ineffici-
ency, it has the effect of preventing the increase in acre-
age that otherwise would be and the proper cultivation
of crops in many instances where acreages are increased.
A well nigh perfect season for cotton from this on will
be absolutely essential to anything over a medium crop,
appearances at present do not indicate over 75 per cent. of
a crop.




A









Live stock in this division as in the preceding one, is in
excellent condition, with the exception of hogs, which
are to some extent affected with cholera in a few localities.
NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this division the crop con-
ditions are best, and both cotton and corn are doing well:
the general average condition of crops in this division
is good and if favorable weather conditions continue the
general yield of crops will be fair to good; the small
fruits, such as strawberries, etc., were badly damaged by
the long continued drought; vegetables also suffered to a
considerable extent, worse in some localities than others.
Live stock is in good condition.
CENTRAL DIVISION.-Almost the entire area embraced in
this division suffered for months from the most disastrous
and prolonged drought in recent years; in some localities
the field crops are fair to medium, in others, entire fail-
ures, and the vegetable crops with scattering exception
can be set down as failures; it is doubtful if these crops
will average over one-fourth or one-third of a crop, and
the field crops not more than 70 per cent. of an average
crop. The fruit is also damaged very heavily; the yield
cannot be expected to reach over two-thirds of a crop. The
drought has also been severe on the live stock and has
entailed a very heavy loss on the cattle growers especially.
SOUTHERN DIVISION.-In this division the same condi-
tions have obtained in even a more aggravated form. In
this division the greatest part of both the fruit and veg-
etable crops for commerce are produced, and hardly more
than half a crop of vegetables and a third of a crop of
fruit has been made; the average for the orange crop in
the division being only 48 per cent. of what was expected:
other fruits yielded some less; the orange crop for the
State as at present indicated will not exceed two-thirds
of a crop. The field crops in this section are also very
short and live stock, cattle especially have suffered greatly
for lack of water. The latter part of this month, however,
has brought good rains which will bring about an im-
provement speedily.







Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops, Fruit and Fruit
Trees, for Quarter Ending June 30, 1907, as Compared With an Aver-
age During Same Period In 1906-Also Condition of Live Stock.



COUNTIES 2 5



Northern Division g U Q U U U U
Franklin ........ ...... ...... 90 90 ..... 95 ....
Hamilton ....... ...... 75 50 75 5 501 50
Jefferson ....... .. 901 90] 95 95 ..... 95 ......
Lafayette ....... ..... 70 751 751...... 50 25
Leon ........... 75 75 80 ...... 1 80 80
Madison ....... 1001 10 10 100 100 50 100
Suwannee ...... .... 60 701 901 901 901 100
Wakulla ........ 50 50 50] 75] 95 95 ......
Div. Av. per. cent] 791 74] 761 861 841 76 71
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ 75. 65] 851 90 75 801 100
Escambia ....... 65..... 751 80 75 80K 53
Holmes .. 60.... 80 95 ...... 901 100
Jackson ........ 651...... 80 85 ...... 85 90
Santa Rosa. ... 60 ...... 601 60 ...... 75| 80
Div. Av. per cent] 65] 651 761 821 751 82; 84
Northeastern Division.
Alacnua ....... ....... 95 80 751 ..... 100 90
Baker .......... ...... 97 70 65 .. 80 55
Bradford ....... ...... 8J 75] 60 75 90
Clay ........... ...... 90 1101 110 ...... 100 100
Columbia .. .... ... 95 90| 80 1001 103 100
Nassau ......... ... ........ 1001 ............ 90| 85
D:v. Av. per cent ...... 91 87] 781 100] 911 87
Central Division.
Levy .................. 100] 100] 100] 60] 90 90
Marion ........|...... 90] 100 100 ...... 95] 100]
Orange ......... ...... ...... 801 100 100) 80] 100
Pasco .......... ..... ...... 751 80] 95] 90 95
Sumter ........ 80' 80] 90 70 ...... 601 .....
Volusia ......... ............ 8 80 .... 50 90
Div. Av. per centl 801 901 87| 881 851 781 95
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ ..... ...... 50 50 ...... 10 100
Dade ........... I...... .... ...... ...... ...... 100 100
DeSoto ......... ...... ...... I 100 75 75 100] 100
Hillsborough ... 80] 80 851 73 ...... 80] 90
M manatee ......... ... .. .... .0 .1 ...... .. ...
Osceola ...... ... .. .I 10 15 ...... 25 80
Polk ........... ... .. ...... 25] 25 ...... 50] 80
Div. Av. per cent] 80] 80] 54] 47, 75] 761 92
State Av. per cent] 761 801 761 761 84] 811 86








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.



& > >-
COUNTIES : >U <



Northern Division C
Franklin ............. ...... 90 90 ...... 6 ....
Hamilton ....... ............ ...... 751 50 75 ......
Jefferson ....... ...... ...... ...... 95 100 ...... ......
Lafayette ...... ...... ....... 50 100 25 ......
Leon ........... ...... ............ 75 100 75..
Madison ........ .... .. ............ 115 60 90 ....
Suwannee ...... ...... ...... 80 1001 100 100 ......
'W akulla ........ ...... ...... ...... 60 90 100 ...
Div. Av. per cent............ 85 82 86 75......
Western Division.
Calhoun ................... ...... 85 ............ .....
Escambia .......' 5J3 501 75 90 75 100 75
Holm es ........ ...... ...... 75 100 0 100 ......
Jackson ............ ............. 90 85 90 ......
Santa Rosa ............... ....... S0 75 0 ......
Div. Av. per cent' 501 501 751 691 63 87 75
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........ ...... ...... 901 100 8 90 ......
Baker .......... ...... ...... .... 75 75 80 ......
Bradford ....... .... ...... ...... 65 80 100 ...
Clay .......... ..... ..... ...... 130' 100 100 ......
Colum bia ............. ...... ...... 100 80 100 ......
Nassau ......... ...... .. ....... 100' 80. .........
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... 90 83 94 ......
Central Division.
Levy ........... 100 ..... .. 100! 100 100......
Marion ...103. ...... .. 100' 100 100 .....
Orange .......... 501 ...... ...... ...... 100' 200 ......
Pasco ........... 851 ...... 751 80! 50 90 90
Sumter .......... ................. 80' 90 95 ......
V olusia ......... 701 ...... ...... ....... ...... 90 ......
Div. Av. per cent 81'...... 75' 90. SO' 83 90
Southern Division.
Brevard ......... ...... ...... 100 ....... 5 .............
D ade ........... ....... ... ... .... ... ... .. ln ......
D eSoto ......... I 100 ...... ...... I ...... 110' 100 .....
Hillsborough ...1 951 ..... I 80 80 90 90 ......
M anatee ........ ...... ...... .... .......
Osceola ......... 10. ... .. 10 15' 50' SO ......
I-olk ........... 75 ...... 50o 50 75' 80' .....
Div. Av. per cent 701 ...... 60 48 75' 90......
State Av. per cent- 67 501 771 76 7 7 86 2








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Si Orange Lemon
Guavas Bananas Orage Le
Trees Trees
COUNTIES 2
o u. Co C u c

o o o
Northern Division i U U: 5 : |
Franklin ....... ...... ...... ............ ... ..
Ham ilton ....... ...... ...... ...... .... .. ...
Jefferson ....... ...... ... ..... .... .. ..... ...
Lafayatte ....... .... ....... ....... 7.75" 25 ......
Leon .......... ...... .... ... .. ...... ...... ...... ......
Madison ........ ....... ..... .......... .
Suwannee :... ... ... ..................... .
Wakulla ........... ..... .... .... ..............
Div. Av. per cent]...... ...... ...... ...... 75! 25 .
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ ...... ............ ...... 100 100 ......
Escambia ....... ... .... ...... ...... ... .. ..... .
Holmes ............... ....... .. ....... ..
Jackson ........ .................. ............
Santa Rosa ..... ...... ...... ........... ... ..... ......
Div. Av. per cent...... ...... ...... ...... 1001 1001......
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ..... ....... .......... .... 90 50 ......
Baker .......... ...... ...... .. ...... 100 ...........
Bradford.. .......... ....... ...... ...... ......
Clay ........... ............. ...... ... 105 110 ..
Colum bia ....... ...... ...... ............ .... ..
Nassau ........................... ... 100 .... 100
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ...... ...... 991 80' 100
Central Division.
Levy ............ .. .... ...... ...... .. .. ..... ..
M arion ......... .... .... ...... ..... 90 85 .....
Orange ......... ......... ... ...... 100 80 ......
Pasco ............ ..... 65 50 ......
Sumter .............. .. .... 90 ...... ......
Volusia ......... ...... ..... '....... ..... 80 50 ......
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ...... ...... 851 66 ......
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ 1 175 251 751 251 75 50 25
Dade .............. 10 100 100 100 75 60 75
DeScto ........... 50 50 100 100 75 801 75
Hillsborough ... 70| 20 80 50' 100 65! 70
Manatee ........ 25 10 50 25' 50 25 50
Osceola ......... ... ..... ... ... .50 30 ......
Polk ............. 25| 25! 25 25 50 251 25
Div. Av. per cent 58' 387 72' 54] 68] 48i 53
State Av. per cent' 58 8 381 72! 541 851 64 ~ 76








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Leon Lime Tres Grape Fruit Tobacco
Trees Trees
COUNTIES



Northern Division -- '
Franklin ..... ............. .... .........
Ham ilton ....... I .... .
Jefferson .. ....... ... .......
Lafayette ...... ..... ...... .. ...............
Leon ............. ...... .............. ...... 10. 125
Madison ..... ... ...... ...... ................... .....
Suwannee ...... .. ..... .... ............
Wakulla ....... ...... ..... ...... ...... 100 1
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ...... ............. 100 112
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... .... .... .... .. ... 100. 1 ) .... .......
Escam bia ....... ...... .... ...... ..... ...... 75 5
Holmes ........ ..... ... ...... ...... ...... 95 100
Jackson .......... ...... .. .... ...... .......... .......
Santa Rosa ..... ...... ........... ...... .
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ...... 1 100 100 85 75
Northeastern Division.
A!achua ........................... o 490 4. ...........
Baker .............. ......... ...... ........................
Bradford ....... ............ ...... .... ............. ......
Clay ............. ...... .. ......
Columbia ....... ............ ...... ...................
Nassau ......... ........ .............
Div. Av. per centI ...... ...... ...... 90 ..........
Central Division.
Levy ............ ...... ...... ...... .................
Marion ...... 901 s0............
Orange ......... ...... .. .... .. 100 SO ...... ......
Pasco ...... .......... ...... ...... 70 50 90' 95
Sumter ....... .... .. .. ...... 90 .............
Volusia .... ....... ..... .. ..... 80 60 ...........
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... ...... 86j C8 90 95
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ 25 ...... .. .. 75' 50 ...... ......
Dade ......... 75 75, 751 75 60 ..... .....
DoSoto ......... 75 75 75 75 7 ............
Hillsborough .... 20 70 50 100 50 ..........
Manatee ........ I 25' 50 25' 50 25 ............
Osceola I 501 20: ............
Polk ............ 25 ...... ...... 50 25 ...........
Div. Av. per cent! 411 67! 56 69 44...........
StateAv. per cent] 41' 671 56] 86 63 92 94








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Tomatoes Pears Peaches Water
melons
COUNTIES g


Northern Division U P z
Franklin ........ 80 85 901 90 ...... ...... 45
Hamilton ........ ...... ......I 25 251 25 25 50
Jefferson ....... ..... .... :. '. ..... ...... ...... 100
Lafayette ....... ....... ......... .. ... ..... ..75
Leon ............ 100 1001 601 601 401 100
Madison ......... ...... ...... 501 50 25 25 75
Suwannee ....... ....... ......... ... ...... ..... 100
W akulla ........ ...... ............. .... .. .... 40
Div. Av. per cent 901 921 561 561 501 301 73
western Division.
Calhoun ................. .. ...... ...... .. .... ...... 60
Escambia ....... 100 100 251 525 25 25 50
Holmes ......... 901 100 ...... ...... ..... ...... 100
Jackson ............ ... ..... ::: 100
Jackson ........ ...... ...... ...... ........ ...... 100
Santa Rosa .. ... ... .. ..... ... 40 101 50
Div. Av. per centl 95j 1001 251 251 33j 181 72
tNortheastern Division.
Alachua ........ 60 25 ...... ...... 501 70 100
Baker .......... ..... ...... 75 251 50 ...... 90
Bradford .......o....... ...... ...... ... .... 80
Clay ....... ... I 100 100 ............. 80 75 75
Columbia ........ 100 1001 ...... ..... ........ ...... 100
Nassau .......... 50 50 25 25 501 10; 100
Div. Av. per centl 771 691 501 251 57 80 91
Central Division.
Levy ........... 100] 100 ...... ...... I ... .. ..... 100
Marion ............. 100 1001 ...... ...... 901 80 100
Orange ......... 100 100 .... ........ 1001 100' 50
Pasco .......... 80' 801 501 20 801 75i 50
Sumter ......... 851 801 50; 10 50 501 96
Volusia ......... 80] 70J 801 40 80! 701 100
Div. Av. per centl 911 881 601 231 80 751 83
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ 100 100|.... .... .. 50 50i 10,
D ade ............. ......... ... I ... ... .. 100
DeSoto .......... 60 50............ ... 80
Hillsborough .... 70 50 100 80 90 401 80
Manatee ........ ............ ............ 5 100 25
Osceola ......... 201 30 801 60 90 80 30
Polk ........... 501 50 ...... ...... 751 501 50
Div. Av. per cent] 601 561 901 701 761 64 66
State Av. per centl 83; 81] 561 40] 56: 531 77








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Water C
nielon.
COUNTIES



Northern Division
Franklin ....... 40;
Hamilton ..... 5 .
Jefferson ....... 1001
Lafayette .......1 100..
Leon ............. 125
Madison ........ 75
Suwannee ...... 90
W akulla ........ 40]
Div. Av. per centi 78,
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ 50..
Escambia ....... 7
Holmes ........ 1001
Jackson ........ 1001
Sanata Rosa .... 501
Div. Av. per cent] 75]
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........ 100,
Baker .......... 100]..
Bradford ...... 75 .
Clay ........... 80 ..
Columbia ....... 1001
Nassau ......... 1001
Div. Av. per cent] 93|
Central Division.
Levy ........... I 100
Marion ......... 100;
Orange ......... 50
Pasco .......... 501
Sumter .........I 90!
Volusia ......... 103i.
Div. Av. per centj 821
Southern Division.
Brevard ....... 1001.
Dade ........... 100 .
DeSoto ......... 75 .
Hillsborough .... 801
Manatee ........ 20!
Osceola ........ 30 .
Polk ........... 50]
Div. Av. per cent! 65!
State Av percent! 791


:antaloupes Pinea


,-Z



100 l00.....

100] 100 .....
.i. .. ... .....
100 125 ......
75 75 ......
100! 100' ....
40; 40 ......
86i 90 ......


50] 75 ......
90 100 ......


pples


Grapes


-.


11,1_1





liii


.11




I~I


. . 2 3 2 5
...... 25 2


90 ....................
10 ...... .................
691...... .... .5


80 S...... ....
. . . . . ..

. . . . . . .
103 100 ...... ......
1001 100 ...... ......'
931 93 ............


100
100
50
7U


1' '0

100
50
72


100 100 ...... ...... ...... ......
100l 100 ...... ...... ...... ....
50 500 5 50 100 1110
501 50 ............ 65 70
96 90 ...... ......
..... ...... .... .... ... 100, 00
79 78' 601 50 88' .J


. . . .
. . . .

70 60
251 20

501 251
481 32
751 72


75 75 ,3
75 .... ....
100 ...... .....
50 SO SO
20 75
1.' fl SO
25 75 -0

51' 77 72
5,_ 2 1








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.



COUNTIES r0 _

r C r
Northern Div, 0 0
Franklin . 90 9 90 .. ........... ..... .
Hamilton . 100 100 751 75 ....... ...........
Jefferson ...... 100 100 75 .........................
Lafayatte ..... 65 75 80 ......................
Leon .......... 100 100 100 100 274,0001..... .....
M adison ... | 801 75| 100 100 .... ...... .....
Suwannee ... 95! 951 901 90 ...................
Wakulla ...... 1001 100 1001 100 12,000J 30,000; 600
Div. Av. per c't.l 911 92 89 931286,0001 30,350 1.200
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... 100 801 501 1001....... ...... 6 ,a00
Escambia .... 100 100 80 75 ... ...... 6,00
Holmes ....... 95 1001 85 90| 2,000 40,000 60,0oJ
Jackson ...... 95 90 80 901.... .... ...
Santa Rosa ... 75' 90...... 75 ..................
Div. Av. per c't. 931 92 74| 86 2,0001 40,0001 72,500
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ......| 100i 80] 1001 ...... ....... 10,000 5,000
Baker ........ 100 100 80| 100 ....... ... 5,000
Bradford ...... 1001 110 100 ...... .................
Clay .......... 1001 100 1 100 100 .............. .
Columbia ..... 100 100 1001 90....... 2,000 500
N assau ........ 1001 1001 75 75 ....... ....... .....
Div. Av. per c't.j 1001 981 931 911.... .. 12,000 10,5lO
Central Division.
L3vy ......... 100 100 1O 0 1 ....... 10,000 O 5,0J
Marion ....... 1001 100 90 100 ....... ............
Orange ....... 901 901 851 80 ...... 12,000 2,000
Pasco ......... 80 90o 751 70 6,20 260 7'000
Sumter ........ 100 1001 85 1001.................
Volusia ....... 1001 90 100 100...... 50,000.....
Div. Av. per c't.l 951 95 891 921 6,200 72,2601 19,000
Southern Division.
Brevard ...... 100 100i 101...... ...........
Dade .......... 1001 100 ..... ............... .......
DeSoto ........ 1001 1201 100 100............. ......
Hillsborough I 1030 1001 901...... .......... ... ...
Manatee ... 100 50 75 100..............
Osceola ...... 100 901 1001 80 ....... 1,000 25,000
Polk .......... 110| 100 1001 1001....... 1.0001 20,000
Div. Av. per c't.| 101 94\ 941 95]........ 2,0001 45,000
State Av. per c'tI 96 94 90! 91'294,2001106,C101148,200





















PART II.
Weather Report















U. S. Department of Agriculture.
CLIMATOLOGICAL SERVICE
of the

WEATHER BUREAU
Central Office: Washington, D. C.
----~----
FLORIDA SECTION,
A. J. Mitchell, Section Director.
Report for May, 1907.


GENERAL SUMMARY.
Some high winds occurred during thunderstorms that
prevailed over a large territory on the 8th, 11th, 12th, and
the 31st. The highest velocity recorded at a regular sta-
tion was 56 miles at Jacksonville on the 8th.
The average temperature during the month was 76.2
degrees, or 0.4 degrees above the normal, and 1.0 degrees
above the mean of May, 1906. There were several days
during which the temperature remained below normal, but
the deficiency was more than offset by the excess in temper-
ature that obtained during most of the month. Periods of
relatively cool weather occurred over portions of the
northern and western counties on the 12th and 13th, the
16th to 19th, the 28th to 29th, and on the 30th. The mid-
day temperatures over the western district were gener-
ally below 90 degrees; the maxima over the northern and
central districts, however, were more frequently above
than below 90 degrees, and occasionally maxima of 95
degrees to 98 degrees were recorded. The warmest weather
occurred on the 2nd, 3rd, 9th, 10th, and the 30th. The
highest temperature during the month was 99 degrees, and
the maximum for May since the climatological service
has been established is 102 degrees.



























Archer.............
Federal Point......
Fernandina .........
Gainesville.........
Huntington.........
Jacksonville ........
Jasper.............
Johnstown.........
Lake City..........
Macclenny..........
Middleburg.........
Otter Creek........
St. Augustine ......
Switzerland ........


Alachua...........
Putnam .......... I
Nassau ...........
Alachua..........
Putnam ...........
Duval.............
Hamilton.........
Bradford..........
Columbia ........
Baker.............
Clay..............
Levy .............
St. Johns.........
St. Johns..........


..... l.... ... .. ." ", *... ....... I., x t. 1 --'1 t. 4* .......o.
24 ..... --1.8 92 4*| 57'20 34 5.031 --1.6612.10 1 53 1514 2 e0.
101 74.4 --1.0 9027 1 56118 241 3.131 -1.56'0.89 11 1610 5 nc.
21 76.8 --1.1 94 3*| 5518 321 3.91 -]-0.9611.33 11 ... ... ... e.
10la76.8 --0.9 b94131 5817*1 291 7.15 --4.0611.03 15 14 71 10 1.
35 74.81--0.61 89130 59117 22 5.40 --1.401.72 11 9[ 1 71 e.
9 74.81-0.4[ 92j26* 52117* 33 1.971 -1.6710.801 61... ...... ne-sw
11a73.8--1.7a921 3* a5018 |36 0.991 -2.0410.60i 41... ... ......
18 75.2--0.9 92 3* 52 18 32| 3.65 --0.81i1.26. 8 9 20i 21 se.
12 74.01-1.7 9130 4918 39 7.47 --3.9312.06 13 22 9 0 e.
7 ..... ..... ... .. ... ... -.. .... 1. .... . ... .. . .... ... .. .
... . ... ..... ... ... .. ....
57 74.9 -1.1.9 9127 5718 127 4.07 --0.4610.83 15116] 6 9 se.
10c74.7--3.4c913'0 c5218 c33 3.60 -0.451.85 12....... .....
S I I |1I











CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1907.--Continued


STATIONS.






CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow .............
Brooksville .........
Clermont...........
DeLand ............
Eustis..............
Fort Meade........
Fort Pierce........
(leorgiana..........
( rasmere ..........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee ........
M lalar. ...........
New Smyrna......
Ocala.............


COUNTIES.








*olk...........
Hernando.........
Lake.............
Volusia...........
Lake............
Polk ..............
St. Lucie..........
Orange...........
C itrus.............
O *eola...........
Brevard..........
Irevard ..........
Volusia...........
Marion ..........


i

.- C
"
CC CC
O I
o

S Sl


1218
141
14
6 .


Temperature in degrees F


0
o 4








_79.6 --2.4 g9810 g59 1
77.4 -0.7 97 29 57118
79.8 -1-1.81 97 3* 60118
.... I ... ... .. ... ...


171 77. | -1-0.4
2;3 77.6 -1-2.2
161 77.0 -1-0.4
26; 77.2 -1-0.9
10I 78.8 --2.6
( ... ...
15 77.4--0.3
5 77.31-1-1.4
19 74.4--0.2
20' 77.2 -1-2.3


961 3 56 !S
95 2* 5418
921 9 59 1
90o 9 64.13
96129 59118

94( 2* 50 2
94 9 61 1
911 9 58117
96 10* 57|18


aah Preciptation in inches



ce .










72 5.57 --2 .912.25 ^

.,1 4.1 -1.1311.90 19 17



291..... .. .. ... 26
z z






g34. ..... .. ..302.11 1
35 4.16 -.3.19 0.93. 91 20
321 5.57 --2.91j12.25; 9| 8


34115.58! -1-I1.464.75 11 10
291 4.77 -I- 1.471.6S 4 24
191 3.75 -.0. 14 1.07| 8 19
291....... ....... 26.... .
44 3.89 0.731.411 0, 1 5
26 4.91 -1.9 2.00 8...
281 3.60 --1.04 1.14 7...
32 6.75 -3.771.40 11 12


Sky.
0








.. "."




5 6 nw.
23 01 e.

131 1' ne.
18j 5 (sw.
1 41 se.
I 10 2 se.
5i 01 sw.

.o.
... ...
1 4 5 se.




I









CLIMATOLGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1907.--Continued


STATIONS.


Orainge City........
Orlando............
Panasoffkee.........
Plant City.........
Rockwell ...........
St. Leo...........
Tampa.............
Tarpon Springs.....
Titusville...........

SOUTHERN SECTION

Arcadia............
Avon Park.........
Flamingo...........
Hypoluxo...........


COUNTIES.


Volusia...........
Orange ...........
Sumter...........
Hillsborough ......
Marion ..........
Pasco..............
Hillsborough ......
Hillsborough ......
Brevard...........



DeSoto............
DeSoto...........
Monroe...........
Dade.............


Temperatu













10 7 d77.01 --0.1
140 121 77.5--0.4
20 171 77.71-1-2.2
aS '











2Q0 23 76.31 --1.1
61 15 175.61 --1.1



... ... -.... --
15 10 78.5 --1.9
41 6 78.81-0.1
4 10 78.6 --2.4
1


re ii





-,
VI
1


n de


grees FI







cts


99 3 54 18*1
971 3* 56118 |
95 6* 5518
951 1*1 5318
d94[ 3* d53 22
961 3 57118
92121 61j18
93 5*- 5418
a93 10* 58 1*

S I I

96 9 57181
87 11* 671 1
90 10* 65 18
I I


ah Preciptation in inches Sky.
o



40 5. --2.0 ,2 1 w.


S2.75 -0.60. 6 21 4 se.


35 4.90 ....... 1.48 11 14 10 7 sw.
40 5.00 -|-2.00|1.56 10 12 16 3 w.

351 4.90....... 1.481 14 710 sw.
351 8.721 --4.51 3.13 6 .. ... ... ..
d41 4.03 J-01.02 1.47 4 ... ... ... w.
33 5.32 --.1.61381 11 12 15 4 w.
251 2.90 -1-0.471.281 7 20 9 21 ne.
331 2.381 -0.261.721 4 28 0 3 w.
311 7.801 --3.712.61 9 11 13 7 se.




30 7.721 -.-3.76@2.42 11 17 12 2 se.
171 1.34 -2.4410.45 7 20 9 Z se.
22 3.58 -1.6710.96 7 181 131 01 se.
1I 1 1 1 I 1










CLIMATOLOOA CAL





STATIONS. COUNTIES.


Jupiter.............
Key West...........
Manatee............
M iam i.............
M years ..............

WESTERN SECTION.

Apalachicola ........
BonGifay ............
Carrabelle..........
D )Funiak Springs..
Fenholloway ........
Galt.................
Madison ............
Marianna..........


Dade.............
Monroe...........
Manatee..........
Dade.............
Lee...............



Fiapklin .........
Holmes ...........
Franklin..........
Walton ..........
Taylor............
Santa Rosa.......
Madison ..........
Jackson ..........


SDATA FOR MAY, 1907.--Continued


Temperature in degrees Fa



o




19 77.6 -1-1.2 89]28 63 2

36 80.7-1.7 8822 60128
23 77.1 -1.1 9428*1 60 1
11[ 79.8 --2.1 11 6618
23 78.21 --0.8 9321 5918

S74.2..... 8621* 5617

Q 73.4-1.6 8820* 5317 1
11 73.6--2.2 87121 5217
10 73.47--0.7 89 26 55118
12 74.8 .....1 9 31 5017

41 75. --....1 9 4* 65318
I I I
3 74.2 8 8621 2 5617







I 1017


.h Precip


P4


20
15
34
20
28


E,

4.58
3.52
2.54
3.41
6.46


22 8.62
31 5.87
27 5.30
30 3.31
35 6.231

32 2.07
33 3.17
I


station in inches Sky.





-331426 21 o .
C3 a z o *




-0....... 2.0 111 4 241 ... sw.
-1-.3 2.0 8|..171 101 41 e.



.3 0 ....








I I I I I
0.715 l i 4 3 se.



a 3. 5 21. t10. AJ..Oh. *






...... .... ... .......w.

-1.7:32.00 n|.... ... .i sw.








CLIMATOLOOICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1907.-Continued


STATIONS.






Molino .............
Monticello .........
Mount Pleasant.....
Pensacola..........
St. Andrew .........
Tallahassee.........
W ausau............

LATE REPORTS.
April, 1907.

DeLand............
Plant City.........


COUNTIES.






Escamb.a ........
Jefferson...........
Gpdsden ..........
Escambia ........
Washington .......
Leon .............
Washington.......


Temperatui


.


Sa
CSi)
Q l


... ... 69.6
... ... a70.8
- I I


re in degrees








a P


w92126 e42 17
90126 o50 17
95123 50 18
87 21 59 28
9122 52117
88124* 53 17
92 22* 4917




891 8* 35115
a96 26 a351 3


Fah





ib


Precipitation in in






A 0.

5.8 ....



5.88 ..... .2.83
5 08 | 70


S181 5.33 --2.001.53
28] 5.42 --1.23 2.0d
251 3.851 -l-0.232.50
S37 a.00 -1.481.10




39j... ....... ....
a51 1.14 -1.340.50


che Sky.







02 21


... ... ... .. n .

6 18 41 91 sw.
0 . ... ...
12 7 11 13 s.
9 24 5 2 s.
5 16 10 5 s.
8 10 13 8 s.




... 17 11 2 sw.
31 .... ... ......
I I


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature and precipi
station are based on records from stations tha have ten or more years of observation.
The letters a, b, c, etc., indicate number of days missing fro report. More than one day.


- ---- --------




















PART III.
Fertilizers and
Feeding Stuffs














REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.

SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.

Special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding
stuff sent in by purchasers, under Sec. 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested wit-
nesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed and
a fair sample of the same of not less than eight ounces
(one-half pound), shall be placed in a can or bottle, ,sealed
and sent by a disinterested party to the Commissioner
of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Not less than eight ounces
in a tin can or bottle, will be accepted for analysis. This
rule is adopted to secure fair samples of sufficient size to
make the necessary determinations, and to allow the pres-
ervation of duplicate sample in case of protest or ap-
peal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for two
months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser. The propriety of the
method of drawing and sending the samples as fixed by
the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce) ;
frequently there are no marks, numbers or other means
of identification. The postmark in some instances is being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to avail
themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of the
law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations will
be required. The sample must be not less than one-half
pound. in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture. The sender's name awd ad-
dress must also be on the package. This rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or coMmercial feeding stuff.











INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer and each pack-
age of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have, securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis re-
quired by law, and the stamp showing the payment of the
inspector's fee. This provision of the law-Section 3 of
both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6, of both laws; tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag
and stamp are irregular and fraudulent: the absence of
the guarantee tag and stamp being evidence that the man-
ufacturer or dealer has not complied with the law.
Without the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the
goods are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no
recourse aganist the manufacturer or dealer; such goods
are sold illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of
little value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers
now comply strictly with the law and regulations, by
placing the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of sheriffs of the various counties is
called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties,
This department expects each sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior, or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff.
B. E. McLin.
Commissioner of Agriculture.










The following tables of average composition of Commer-
cial Feed Stuff are compiled from the report of the Con-
necticut Experiment Station. They cover a large num-
ber of analyses and are fully representative of the stand-
are composition of the various feeds in the tables. They
are given for reference. Should a feed stuff vary materially
from these averages, its purity may be questioned. If
the "ash" content exceed to any great extent, sweepings
may be suspected. If the crude fiber be excessive, oat
hulls, corn cobs, rice chaff or other ligneous or fibrous
materials may be suspected; while the valuable constit-
nents, "protein," "sugar and starch," and "fat," should
not materially vary from these tables of averages, that
are practically standards of comparison, for the feeds
mentioned in the tables.

COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their pro-
tection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
Fame to the Commissioner of Agriculture.









32

AYERA\' E COMPO-TI'ON 01 ( OM'-E.C AL.
FEED STUFF.


NAME OF FEED -


Cotton Seed Meal .. 7.05 43.16 24.59 9.22 6.60

Linseed Meal ...... S.76 34.70 35.91 5.34 6.12

Wheat Bran ....... S.39 15.93 54.62 4.70, 5.33

Middlings ......... 6.36 17.14 50.60 4.26, 4.30

Mixed Feed (wheat). 7.80 16.86 54.441 4.79 5.30

Corn Meal ......... 1.64 8.73 71.32 3.14 1.20

Corn (Grain) ..... 2.10' 10.50 69.60' 5.40 1.50

Corn Cobs ......... 30.10 2.40 54.90 0.50 1.40

Corn and Cob Meal. 6.60 8.50 64.80' 3.50 1.50

Corn &Oats, eq'lp'ts 5.80' 9.60, 66.10' 4.40' 2.20

W heat ............ 1.80' 11.90: 71.99 2.10' 1.80

Oats ............. 9.50 11.80' 59.70 5.00 3.09

Soja Beans ........ 4.80 34.00 28.00 16.50' 5.40

Velvet Beans & Hulls 9.20 19.70' 51.30' 4.50' 3.30

Rice Hulls ........ 35.701 3.60! 38.60' 0.70T 13.20

Gluter Meal ....... 1.25' 37.06 46.52' 3.27' 0.68

Gluter Feed .......' 7.31' 24.17' 54.30' 3.44 1.80

Hominy Feed .....' 4.05' 10.49' 65.27' 7.85' 2.54
P i i








33

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED
STUFF- (Continued.)


-
NAME OF FEEl). "|
x
-." 1


Hye L'roducts (bran) |

Barley Sprouts ....

Distillers' Grains...

Oat Feed .........

Provinder .........

Victor Feed .......

XXX Corn&Oat F'dsl

Corn & Oat Feeds... .

Proprietry Horse F'ds

Molasses Feeds ....

Poultry Feeds ....

Beef Scrap .......

Quaker Dairy Feed.l

Creamery Feed ...

Purina Feed .......


4.5;I

10.04)

12. 90

20.57T

3.91

I0. (;|

9 )41

12. 09



8.- 1>

4.062

.. .....

15.53

10.071

12.601


15.571

27.2011


I
32.23|1

7.911

10.062

8.83|

9. (;6

S.73|

12.481

16.341

15.891

44.701

14.421

20.06(

10.101


l61.28i

42.66!

33.34

54.581

67.341

62.461

6.1.6 3

61.73

60.541

51.72

60.271

3.28
I

52.12

51.001

57.031
1


1 .561

12. 09

:.2 61

4.031

4.021

5.091

3.731

4.271

1.79

5.32

14.751

4.05

5.38

5.75


3.80

6.34

1.86

5.31

1.83

3.64


3.22

2.83

6.18

27.63

29.20

5.31

3.57

4.65


3-Bull.








34

COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Phosphoric o
Ammonia Acid Potash

Nitrate of Soda.......... 17to19 ............ ..........
Sulphate of Ammonia..... 21 to 21 ............ ...........
D ried Blood.............. 12 to 171............ ............
Concentrated Tankage..... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ............
Bone Tankage....... .......| 6 to 9j 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap.......... 8 to 10 6 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 7 to 10 2 to 31 1l to 2
Hoof Meal ................ 13 to 171 l to 21............

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Insoluble
Ammonia Available Phosphoric
Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphate. I.......... ............ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate ....................... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate............. 14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 61 5 to 81 15 to 17
Steamed Bone ............ 2 to 41 6 to 9) 13 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4| 13 to 15! 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Actual Phos-
Potash Am'nia phoric Lime
Acid
Muriate of Potash.........[ 50 ................. .....
Sulphate of Potash........ 48 to 52 ......... .... ........
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26 to 30 ......... ...............
Kainit .................... 12 to 12 ......... ........ ........
Sylvinit .................. 116 to 20 ......... ........ ........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ........ 7to9 10
Wood Ashes, unbleached... 2 to 8 ................ ........
Wood Ashes leached....... Ito 2 ......... ltoli 35to 40
Tobacco Stems ............ 5to 8 2 to 4 ........ 3
Cow Manure (fresh) ...... 0.40 0 to 41 3.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh) ..... 0.53 0 to 60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh) ..... 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh) ...... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) ........ J.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure...... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70









MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-


ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA
JANUARY, 1907.


Ammoniates.
Nitrate of Soda, 17 per cen
Ammonia ..............
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 pc
cent. Ammonia .........
Dried Blood 17 per cent. An
m onia .................
Dried Blood 15 per cent. An
m onia ............ .....


SEA PORTS,


Less than 5 to 10 10 tons
5 tons. tons. & over.
t.
$60.00 $59.50 $59.00
!r
S 74.00 73.50 73.00
I-
S 60.00 59.50 59.00
- 5
. 54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).
Low Grade Sulphate Potash
26 per cent. Potash (K20).
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ............
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42
Potash (K20) ...........
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash...
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash...


50.00 49.50 49.00

30.00 29.50 29.00

46.00 45.50 44.00

84.00 83.50 83.00
13.00 12.50 12.00

17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,
10 per cent Ammonia.....
Low Grade Blood and Bone,
61/ per cent. Ammonia, 8
per cent, Phosphoric Aid...
Raw Bone, 4 per cent. Am-
monia, 22 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid ........... ..
Ground Castor Pomace, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 2 per
cent Phosphoric Acid.....
Bright Cottonseed Meal, 8
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ..............


40.00 39.50 39.00


31.00 29.50 29.00


32.00 31.50 31.00


25.00 24.50 24.00


31.00 29.50 29.00










Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6
per cent. Ammonia, market
quotations ..............


4.00 2;3.30 2'.UU


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


Highi Grade Acid Phosphate,
1( per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid .............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
lioneblack t7 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Odorless Phosphate ........


15.00 11.50 14.50

14.00 13.50 13.00

24.00 23.30 23.110
25.00 24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


If. (G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. PotNsh ............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ..................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per
cent. Ammonia, K20 Pot-
ash .....................
Tobacco Dust. No. 2, 14 per
cent. Ammonia, 14 per
cent. Potash ............
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land Plaster in sacks .....


25.00 24.50 24.00

16.00 15.53 135.0


23.00 22.50 22.00


19.00
15.00
10.50


18..50
14.50
10.25


18.00
14.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.











Jacksonville Prices Current.



FEEDSTUFFS.

Pure wheat bran, per ton, $27.00.
Pure Middlings, per ton, $29.00.
Purina feed, per ton, $27.00).
Victor meal, per ton, $24.100.
(otton hulls, per ton, $10.00().
Other quotations are:
(Gluten food, for cows, per ton, .$.:I.iIII.
IJersey cow feed, per ton, $22.00).
Purina stock food, 100 sacks, 175 His., .-'1....
Purina stock food, less quantity 10) lhs., $27.00).
Atlas stock feed, per ton, $2S.00.
Atlas sugar feed, per ton, .l'.". 11.
Southern seed rye, per bushel, $1.25.
Texas rust-proof seed oats, per bushel, (;.,(.
May or Burt seed oats. 32 pounds to bushel. per bushel,
80 cents.
(otton seed meal, hrilght, 100 sacks, per ton, $.31.00.
Cotton seed meal, bright, less quantify., per ton, .$31.50.
Cotton seed meal, dark. car load, per ton. $24.00).
Cotton seed meal, dark, 100 sacks, per ton. .24.50.
Salt, 200-1b sacks, per sack, $1.00.
Rock salt, for stock, per pound 1-c.
White corn, car load, per slck, of 100 pounds, $1.25.
White corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.::).
White corn, less quantity, per sack of 10) pounds, $ ..3.
Mixed corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.20.
Mixed corn, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds. $1.25.
White oats, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1..0.
White oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $11.)0.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.(.5.
Fancy White clipped oats, 100 pounds, 5e per sack
higher.
Note-Consumers are urged to compare the current
prices with the "Feeding Value" as shown in the tables
of analysis of feed slulT. It will be noted that Middlings
and Bran at lhe prices quoted are more economical than
holier feeds, which sell for more per ton and are far be-
low the standard in value. Low grade feeds, mill offal,








38

and similar feed, are largely advertised and sell for higher
prices than standards, though of much less value.
A comparison of these prices and the tables will show
that price does not govern value or quality; that some of
the highest priced feeds have less value than others that
can be purchased for less money. The effect of the
"Stock Feed Law" has already been of marked benefit to
the State. A number of low grade feeds, with fancy
brands, and largely advertised, have been to large extent
withdrawn from the State. If consumers will carefully
study the tables of analysis of various brands, and com-
pare them with the market prices, and purchase only
those that compare favorably in quality and price, in-
ferior feeds will soon disappear from the State.











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by ........... 0.824
Ammonia into protein by...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by ........... 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by ...... 16.47
Nitrogen into protein by....................... 6.25
Bone phosphatet into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2,184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by.... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash,multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by 2.33

For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and you
get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.









STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values' a're the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers, at the date of issuing a bulletin.
or the opening of the seasonon." They may, but seldom do,
vary from the market prices, and are made liberal to meet
any slight advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
he answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia.
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined.
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
Stale values do not consider "trade secrets." loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
leclions. The "State value" is simply that price al which
the various ingredients necessary lo use in compounding
a fertilizer can le piuchascd for cush in ton lot. at f .'lor-
id(l sca porls.
These price lists in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, wilh the "Slate values" for 19!17 dedirlted
therefrom.









STATE VALUATIONS.


For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1907.
Available Phosphoric Acid ............5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .......... .1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)16J- cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash. K20) ........5, cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .......... 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .$3.30 per unit
Potash ................................ $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
l:ting lhe value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ..6.22 per cent.x$1.00- 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ..1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.30-11.2S
l'olish ..................... 7.23 per cent.xl.10- 7.95
Mixing anld I:.gging ........................ 1.50

commerciall value at sea ports .................27.25
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ....8 per cent.x$1.00-$8.00
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.30- 6.60
Potash ........................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging ............................ 1.50

commerciall value at sea ports ................. $18.30
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
Ion lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.
Available Phosphoric Acid .........90 cents per unit
I'otosh (K20O) ...................... 99 cents per unit
iAmmonia (or equivalent in nitrogen). $2.97 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.











SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Ii is shown by the number of "Special Samples" those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers) that tnhe
law is becoming more generally understiood by the farmer.
fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have any
reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on the
goods furnished them, do not hesitate to send in samples
for analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the Stale (hemist, under Sertion 9 of the law
-without charge-lIe inspection fees covering the cist
of analysis, as well as inspection --ls doubtless had a di
rect influence upon the increased quality of the goods sold
in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, witnessed
and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved a safe
guard to the customer, legitimate dealer, and manufac
turer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or fraud
ulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer iith Ilih (I, r' ,pro ction dir-
man(led by the manufacturer, who buys is ateriials only
upon the guarantee, and pays for ithlmi accordlini! to an-
alysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida, are manufactured or mixed by factories iu
the State. Large amounts of fertilizing materials are im-
ported direct by factories and dealers locaied at our sea-
port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from German
are now frequently received by Florida importers, while
large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured at and
exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida seaports as cheaply as at any of
the seaports of the country.
On a preceding page a table of the "Average Composi
lion of Commercial Feed Stuffs" will be found. The con-
sumer should study this table, select the foods best suited
to his demands-price of course considered-see that the
"Guarantee" on the package he purchases compares favor-
ably with the average in the table, and if doubtful of the
truth of the statement on the "Guarantee" send at once
a sample of the suspected material to the Commissioner
of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Send one half pound in a
"tin can, sealed," as provided by law.











LIGHT WEIGHT-FALSE STATEMENTS.

Some complaint has been made recently as to failure to
furnish full weight as guaranteed.
In one case of light weight cotton seed meal, discovered
by the Inspector, the goods were sold by the sheriff, as
provided by law.
Other cases have been reported, particularly "kainits."
The public, dealers and consumers, are cautioned to
examine their purchases, and in case of doubt, have the
casks weighed at the railroad station, or at the ware-
house-reporting deficiencies in weight if found to exist,
with names of sellers, manufacturers and witnesses to the
weighing and other fucts and circumstances. This ap-
plies to fertilizers and feeding stuff-(also to grain and
other articles).
The department is desirous of maintaining the standard
of both quality and quantity as expressed in the guar-
antee, and to this end requests the active co-operation of
all citizens.
A false sltemient of weight on grain or feed is a misde-
meanor, and subjects the seller to fine or imprisonment,
or both, under Chapter 4967 (No. 92) Acts of 1901. Also
the sale of light weight fertilizer and feed stuff subjects
the seller to a fine and forfeiture of the goods, under the
Fertilizer and Feed Stuff Laws.













BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. Rose, State Chemist. L. If, ii.l.i,.. Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by Purchaser.)


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND.


I I i
Fertilizer No. 1........... .10 71.. 3.33J 5.15 S. -.1
F fertilizer N o. 2............. 1 71 ...... ...... 1...... ..
Soft Phosphate (Matrix) ..... .. ..r
Pebble Phosphate washed ). 17-. .................. 2.!1 .
Phosphate ................. 1075.............. ...... 1 1.. s2
Sulphate of Potash .......... l ... ... .. ............
Blood and BoI'........... 77 ...... 1 2. 19'
Siliihlat of Pot.sh .......... I1 ;7 ...... ...... ...... ...... i
Fertilizer ................. 1079l 11.5:1 11.71 5,25' 15. !2
Fertilizer ................... losi 7. 57 5 .971 7. 2
I'hoqhilat ............ I...... 1 ..... .. .. n 1. 7 9
Phosplial ................. 1 Sl ...... ...... ...... : .I:
Fert ilizet r .. ................ ..I 12.7:2 5.521 2'. 7 7.i0l


0
ci



0
p.


BY WHOM SENT.


.::10 S.42 W. J. Kimball, Fort Pierce, Fla.
-I.sT7 S.(;5 W. J. Kimball, Fort Pierce, Fla.
...... ......P. A. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
...... ...... P. A. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
. .. ......Bowen Shepard, Bristol, Fla.
...... l..NMoore & Moore, Eldred, Fla.
G;.l-1 ..... Many Laniir, Tampa, 'la.
S. 152.12 E. B. Arnlil, Malabar, Fla.
.7T 2.22,J. G. May, Fort Pierce, Fla.
1.5 Ii .:S'C. t IlixIvy, Fort Pierrr la.
...... ...... |\V. S. ioyli, 'Tamnii Fla
...... ...... W S. Doyle. T'nlma, I'lIa.
...... ...... Ilowen Slie rlm llristol, Pla.
:.i s .,:l'l'. P. \VW ln (Calloway, Ila.







Fertilizer ................. 10851 6.02 2.61 3.16 5.77 6.20' 10.35'George W. Ruple, Fort Pierce, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1086 3.54 3.95 2.56 3.51 4.25 13.44 Joseph Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1087 5.10 4.72, 3.90 8. 62 7.04 5.82 J. M. Kay, Boynton, Fla.
Soft Phosphate ............ 1088 ...... ............ 22. 94 ...... ......J. Hamontree, McMeekin, Fla.
Pebble Phosphate ......... 1089 ...... ...... ...... 30. 90 ...... ...... J. Hamontree, McMeekin, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1090...... 6.47 2.26 8. 73 4.22 9.42Ssmesames & Edwards, Tampa, Fla.
Phosphate No. 1 ............ 1091 .... ........ ...... 31.261 ..... ...... .J. G. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
Phosphate No. 2............ 1092 .. .... .... 30. 99 ...... .... J. G. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
Phosphate No. 3........ .10931 ................. 32. 63 ...... ...... J. G. Gibson, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 2.......... 10941 17.54 4.96 1.37 6. 33 5.19 11.54 Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
Phosphate ................. 1095 ...... ...... I ...... 22. 45 ...... ...... .C. J. M miller, Lakeland, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 110961 9.81 6.791 0.37 7.16 1.52 13.40'T. Kimball, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1097 ...... 5.911 1.14[ 7.05 4.341 7.12 W J. Tweedell, Homestead, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1098 5.17 7.71 2.90' 10.61 4.47 8.55J.* J. Harvey, Hastings, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1099 9.09 7.54' 0.73 8.27 3.42 9.10 J. E. Rawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 2............. 1100 11.73 6.96 0.43' 7.39' 3.301 10.53J. E. Rawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 3.............11101 6.45 10.22 0.08] 10.30 4.77 13.07 J. E. Rawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 4............. '1102 5.74 8.70 0.15' 8.85 4.98 14.22'J. E. Rawlerson, Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer ............. 113 7.97 6.05 0.44 6.49 3.59 10.921S. B. Hull, Oakland, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 3............. 1104 5.36 6.30i 0.881 7. 1S 8.06 11.89W. Waldin, Miami, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 11051 10.34 7.93] 0.341 8.27 2.23 12.41A. B. Harrington, Winter Haven, Fla.
Canada H. W. Ashes....... .1106 13.80 ...... ...... ...... ...... 2.89'0. Larson & Sons, Boynton, Fla.
Fertilizer ................. 1107 ...... 6.63 0.29| 6.92 4.84 13.63'tR. E. Mims, Bonaventura, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 11081 10.27 6.32 0.5' 6.83 3.26 9.32!D. W. Brown, Arcadia, Fla.
Phosphate No. 2............ 11109 ... ... .. 28. .......... .... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Phosphate No. 3......... 1110 ...... .......... 27.74 ...... ...... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green Fla.
Phosphate No. 7............ 1111 .................. 31.37 ...... ...... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green Fla.
Phosphate, No. 10........... 11 .................. 28.48 ..... ..'N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1113 ..... ..... ...... ...... 7.68 .. Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Phosphate No. 1. A........ 1114 ...... ...... ...... 29.83 .... .....John L. Morgan, Tallahassee, Fla.
1 ____i I I I











BUREAU OF FERTILIZ E RS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND. BY WHOM SENT.




Fertilizer .................. 1115 17.81 5.28 1.67 6.971 2.861 4.59 Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
Bat Guano .............. 11 9.72 ...... ... 5.36 17.03 2.48 Sanders Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tobacco stems ............ 1117 18.60 ............ ..... 3.02f 5.87 L. R. Woods, Tampa, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2...... 1118 .................. .... 6.69 ...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jaacksonville, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1119 ...... 8.26 0.811 9.07 4.16 6.30 S. M. Holding, Dania, Fla.
Sheep Manure ............. 1120 11.52 ........ .... 2.8I 3.00 2.15 A. D. Key, Sanford, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................112 4.79 8.33 0.951 9.27 5.971 2.95S. C. Mayo, Reddick, Fla.
.,-l.i, .... .............. 1122..... ... .. 1 31.27 ...... ...... J. N. Harrell, Bristol, Fla.
Phosphate .................. 1123 ...... ...... ...... 7.0 ...... ..... A. M. Ramsey, Bristol, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (L. & N.)..1124 ...... ......... .... 7.30 ..... Wdel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (P. & M.).. 1125 ..... ........ 7.26 ...... Wedel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal (T)....... 1126 ........ ......8.60 ...... Wedel's Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
Asles ......................1 1271 0.31 ...... ...... .. ...... 0.46 John 11. Blake, Tampa, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (79)... 1128 ... ..... ...... ...... ...... 63.20 Schroeder & Arguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (113)... 11291 ...... ...... ...... 1.80 Schroeder & Aguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Carbonate of Potash (7703).. 130 ...... ............ ............ 58.85 Schrovocr & Aguinbaw, Quincy, I'la.
Carbonale of Potash (772(;).. 1131i ...... ...... .. ..... 57.70 Schro(der & Aguinbaw, Quincy, Ila.
FO'rt lizr ............. ..... 1132' 11.531 5.62| 1.871 7. 1' 2.07 10.8S' 11. I lclis, nllowny, Fla.







Fertilizer .................. 1133i 8.53 6.28 0.50| 6.78 4.141 13.921Ed. V. Lindberg, Crescent City, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal...........1134 ...... ...... .......... 8.031...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 4............. 1135 5.67 6.49 1.701 8.191 4.411 8.96 A. D. Smith, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 6............. 1136 11.11 5.40j 1.00 6.40! 4.44 7.851A. D. Smith, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1137 6.75 7.99 1.51 9.50i 4.40 4.98C. L. Eaddy, Linden, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1138 10.58 6.47 1.38 7.851 4.59 5.55 James McKay, Boynton, Fla.
Castor Pomace No. 1........1139.................... 6.68 ...... W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
Castor Pomace No. 2....... 1140 ...... ..... .... ... 5.87 ...... W. W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
Castor Pomace No. 3 ........ 1141 ...... ..... .......... 5.(; ..... W. W. Blackmer, Delray, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1............. 1142 4.23 8.04 0.22 8.26 5.18 12.16|W. Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 2............1143' 7.34 5.47, 3.841 9.31 7.84 10.16W. Cliff, Crescent City, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 4............. 1144! 6.83 4.87 1.59 6.46 3.48 8.161C. N. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 5............. 11451 5.17 6.55 1.37 7.921 3.69 3.821C. N. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 6............ 1146 8.46 6.03 1.72 7.75 4.35 8.14jC. N. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 7............. 1147 6.01 4.591 1.371 5.961 3.45 6.55'C. N. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1148 6.32 5.66 1.01 6.67 4.85 4.651C. M. Perry, Oxford, Fla.
Fertilizer .................. 1149 ..... 7.11 0.93 7.94 4.71 5.18 A. O. Graddy, Bartow, Fla.
Pebble Phosphate No. 1...... 11501 ....................... 31.83 ........... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Pebble Phosphate No. 2.... 11511...... ............ 34.02 ...... ...... N. M. Sauls, Bowling Green, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1............111521 4.00 6.951 1.44 8.39 4.72 6.82 E. P. Iley, Webster, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 2............ 11531 10.63 6.91 1.00 7.91 3.97 5.91 E. P. Iley, Webster, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1............. 1154 6.99 6.31 1.35 7.66 2.55 8.34 James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
Ashes No. 2................ 1155 18.55 ..... .. I .. ......... 3.12 James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 3............. 156 8.26 6.37 2.03 8.40 4.01 9.831James Freedland, Boynton, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1157 ........... ...... ...... 7.00 ...... J. L. McFarlin, Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................|1158 7.07 5.57 0.54 6.13 4.23 15.161H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1159 ...... ...... ...... ... .. 7.781...... Taylor Brokerage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Rock Phosphate ............111601...... ...... ...... 36. 57 ....... .... W. S. Hancock, Fort Myers, Fla.
Fertilizer ................ 1161 8.98 8.031 0.251 8. 28 4.29 9.53 W. P. Crawford, Crescent City, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................'1162 7.011 4.44 0.37 4.81 3.50 5.141Walter Waldin, Miami, Fla.
I I I 514Wltr\adnMimF.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND. .

o z



Fertilizer No. 2............. 1163 5.26 8.00 0.34 S.:4
Fertilizer No. 3............ 11 4, 5.97 9.211 0.30 9.51!
Kainit ..................... 1165 ..... ...... ...... ..
Dried Blood ................ 1116G ............. .. ......
Fertilizer .................. G11( 7 11.82 7.13] 0.37 7.50
Fertilizer .................. 11GS' 5.92 3.08: 6.42 9.50
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1169 .......................
Bone and Potash ..........1170i 0.741 6.71! 12.87 19.5 ,
K ainit ..................... '1171 ... .. ..... ...... i.
Fertilizer .................. 1172, 1 1. 2.10; 1.17 13.271
Cotton Seed Meal........... 11 ...... ...... ..... .....
Fertilizer ..................1174 11.33 7.88, 2.15 10.o8W
Cotton Seed Meal........... 175 .... .. .. ....... .....
Cotton Seed Meal.. .... 1176 ..... ..... ..........
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 1177..... ...... ...... ......
Fertilizer ................11 6.20 7.0 0.57 7.
Ferlilizer .................. 1179 10.43 7.; 1 2.31' 9. 7
Fertilizer No. 1............ 1180 9.64 6.92: 1.72 s.641


BY WVHOMC SENT.


4.221 9.42 A. S. Nelson, Dunedin, Fla.
4.39' 11.46A. S. Nelson, Dunedin, Fla.
..... 12.37R. .. Bush, Westlake, Fla.
15.64 ..... IH. Witherington, Sanford, Fla.
3.18 6.07'J. B. Evans, Live Oak, Fla.
4.49 5.01W W. Blackman, Delray, Fla.
7.541...... 1Barrass-Cawthorn DeFuniak, Fla.
1.80 20.20Shroeder & Argu'inbow, Quincy, Fla.
.. 12.53J.lohn High, Baker's Mill, Fla.
1.001 1.57jD. T. Williams & Co., Milton, Fla.
7.97 ...... A. M. Rae, Monticello, Fla.
9..16; 1.821Oscar Vickers, Edwards, Fla.
7.66 ...... John W. HIenderson, Tallahassee, Fla.
(. N9. ...... ilohn WV. Ienderson, Tallahassee, Fla.
7.99 ...... T. T ylor, Quincy, Fla.
1.:I) 9.91 11.. I I' linhm, Oxford, Fla.
5.95! 8,.11 Geoige I'. lHull. Ojus, Pla.
5.3)1 4.071,1. I. Da)vis, itartow, Vla.









tFertilizer No. 2.............111811 10.76 6.34
dFertilizer ................. !1182 7.39 7.55
EFertilizer ............... 118..... 11 ......
Fertilizer .................. 1184 4.95 8.58
K ainit ..................... 1185 ..... ......
Pebble Phosphate .......... 1186 ..... ......
Rock Phosphate ...........11187 ..... .....
Home Mixturre Guano ...... 1188 12.00 4.47
Potash Mixture ............ 1189 17.17 10.27
Cotton Seed Meal......... 11901 ............
Acid Phosphate ............ 1191 21.48 13.07
Pebble Phosphate ..........1192..... ....
Fertilizer ......... ........ 11193. .... 8.09
Castor Pomace No. 1........ 1194...... .....
Castor Pomace No. 2......... 1195 ...... ......
Cotton Seed Meal............ 11196 ...... ..
Fertilizer ................... 1197 12.31 7.55
Fertilizer ..................1198 12.31 5.49
Fertilizer "G".............. 1199 11.19 7.05
Fertilizer "P"............... 1200 11.85 8.50
Fertilizer .................. 1201 12.98 9.37
Acid Phosphate ............ 1202 ...... 13.70
Fertilizer ..................1203 ...... 7.83
Bone and Potash "B". ..... 1204 ......9.93
Fertilizer ..................1205 .... 7.00
Rock Phosphate ............1206 .........
Fertilizer No. 1............. 1207 ..... 4.81
Fertilizer No. 2............ 1208 ...... 6.97
Muck Ashes ................ 1209 ............
Cotton Seed Meal........... 1210 ...... ...1..


0.98 7.321 5.44 5.91 J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
0.74 8.29 2.85 8.03W. H. Gillette, Sarasota, Fla.
...... 2.92 2.91 0.66 F. P. Pillsburry, Palma Sola, Fla.
2.24 10.821 4.06 5.24W. F. McDermitt, Oxford, Fla.
...... ...... ...... 12.93rZ. T. Terry, Madison, Fla.
...... 3).34 ...... ...... J. L. Morgan, Tallahassee, Fla.
...... 37.47 ............ B. F. Hampton, Gainesville, Fla.
1.21 8.68 2.89 3.12 Marianna Mnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
0.58 10.85 ...... 3.70|Marianna Mnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
.... ...... 8.80 ...... Marianna Mnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
2.27 15.34 ...... ...... Marianna Mnfg. Co., Marianna, Fla.
...... 30.97 ...... ...... E. F. Moody, Bowling Green, Fla.
10.69 18.78 2.26 18.62 J. Hirshberg, Tallahassee, Fla.
..... ...... 6.75 ...... N. J. Parks, Stuart, Fla.
...... ...... 7.00 ...... N. J. Parks, Stuart, Fla.
...... ...... 7.70 ..... J. Hirshberg, Tallahassee, Fla.
1.58 9.13 2.79 3.08 J. W. Wilks, Pitts, Fla.
3.34 8.83 6.94 10.991J. F. Horr, Jacksonville, Fla.
0.84 7.89 2.98 3.03M. Stevenson, Bonifay, Fla.
1.82 10.321 0.53 3.77 M. Stevenson, Bonifay, Fla.
0.30 9.67 4.48 8.031D. S. Borland, Buckingham, Fla
0.38 14.08 ......1.... IA. L. Willson Co., Quincy, Fla.
4.02 11.851 3.43 12.03 Hal. S. Thomas, Eldred, Fla.
7.97 17.90 1.601 20.97 E. B. Shelter Co., Quincy, Fla.
0.20 7.2) 5.92 6.841M. O. Causey, Seville, Fla.
..... 11.62 ........ J. W. Brandon, Brandon, Fla.
0.97 5.78 6.051 7.87 R. E. Mims, Bonaventure, Fla.
1.75 8.72 5.36 5.18R. E. Mims, Bonaventure, Fla.
...... 0.58 .......I 0.06J. B. Thomas, West Palm Beach, Fla.
...... ...... 7.98 ...... J. Hirshberg, Tallahassee, Fla.












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.





Phosphate No. 1 ...........
Phosphate No. 3...........
Phosphate No. 6...........
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer ............... .


BY WHOM SENT.


. ..... 7.76 ..... ... ...M. O. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
..... 22.91 ..... ..... O. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
. ..... 28. .1... ...... M. O. Overstreet, Orlando, Fla.
0.24 6.67[ 0.:51 7.06 A. Sims & Bro., Monticello, Fla.
0.44 7.501 3.99 13.03 Patrick Bannon, Haynes City, Fla.
I I I






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

For values see heading "State Values."
NoTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers of
"Special Samples" sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for examination
before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not an evidence that
the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State Chemist, or his assist-
ant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis,
and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Mositure not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought for
the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (I pound) is required for a "Special Sample."
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prim, meial-though the guarantee is but 4 per cent. of Am-
monia-it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of prime meal.














DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

R. E. Rose, State Chemist, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1905, L. Heimburger, Assistant Chemist.

Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


NAME OR BRAND.


iC
7d.
rCCZ


Bowker's Dissolved Bone...1 8IiGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis
Williams & Clarks' Fruit
and Vine ............... S42(Cuarant'd Analysis
Omicial Analysis
Bradley's Special Fruit
aI d Vine ............... S-l: uarant,'d Analysis!
Official Analysis

Iradlecy's Orange Tree.... Sl 8(;uarant'd Analysis
Ollicial Analysis

Amer'ican Standard (ano.. Si, (15 Iuarint'd Analysis
IOilirial Analysis


Phosphoric Acid.





C)
S o
*-
0


10.00
12.54


7.31

o. 00o


10.00
10. 18

10.00
12.171


1G.00i
18.94

5.50!
8.49

5.50(
7.2,1'
1, .

;.r57

8.111)1
s.7o


BY WHOM AND

WHERE

MANUFACTURED.


1.00 ...... ...... ...... !Amn. Agrl. Che( i. Co.,
0.27; 19.21 ........... Jacksonville, Fla.

3...... 2.25 10.0 Ainn. Agrl. Chlim Co.,
0.71' 7.201 2.:S 10.30 Jacksonville, Fla.

;.00 ....... I .251i lI).,)l Alin. Agrl. Clwin. Co.,
1.98I .22! ...2:: 71.7l .Jaclsonville. 'la.

1 .0 ...... .5 5.001 .\ Agrl. Chemi Co.,
1.51; 8.1: ... :.5 J lisonville, Fla.

2. 00 ..... 2. 2.OA inn. Agrl. Chnll i. Co.,
2.18 11.18 I 2. '- .I0 cliSonvlllo, 'tin.






Williams & Clark's Florida
Vegetable ............... 846 Guarant'd Analysis 10.03
Official Analysis 8.94

Bradley's Nursery Stock... 8471Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 10.94

Bradley's Fruit and Vine.. 848 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00;
IOfficial Analysis 7.41

Special Bone and Potash.. 849 Guarant'd Analysis] 10.00
lOfficial Analysis 11.31

Bradley's Florida Vegetable. 850 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
|Official Analysis 8.95

Armour's Vegetable ...... 851Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis I 9.81

Armour's Special Mixture. 852 Guarant'd Analysis 13.00
Official Analysis 6.60
Armour's Largo Special F.
& V. .................... 853 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 8.24

Ideal Fruit and Vine...... 854 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 1 7.84

Special Mixture No. 1...... 855 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis 11.22
I


6.00 1.00 ......
7.28 1.54 8.82

8.03 1.00 ......
9.86 1.71 11.57

5.50! 3.00 .... *
7.02; 0.33 7.35

12.00 ..... ........
14.50 0.05 14.55!.

6.30 1.00 ......
7.17 1.58 8.75

7.00 2.00 ...
7.85 1.11 8.96

6.251 1.50 .....
6.331 1.89 8.22

6.00 0.50 ......
6.16 0.67 6.83

6.00 ...... ......
6.76 0.42 7.18

6.00I 1.0 ......
6.22 1.10 7.32


4.00
3.81

4.50
4.53

2.25
2.41




4.00
4.02

4.00
4.03

4.25
4.92

3.001
3.24

3.00
3.33

5.00
5,02


5.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
4.92 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
3.43 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
9.56 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00!Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
11.071 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
5.66 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Armour Test Works,
6.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.37Armour's Test Works,
7.72 Jacksonville, Fla.

13.001Armour's Test Works,
9.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
10.43 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
5.31 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.













BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.


Special Strawberry Fort...


Peruvian Vegetable Manure.


Peninsular, Friut and Vinec.


Slu.c l IVerlilizer ...........


Ideal l'Ottln e e'rtilizer....


Ileal Vegetalble e'r(lillzer. .


1I
856 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis
I
S57!Guarant'd Analysisl
Official Analysis

85S Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

859 (;uarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

1S; |(inarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

S61 Guarant'id Analysis
Ofllcial Analysis


+-
a-



12.00
10.04

10.00
7.741

10.03
7 .(;(;



10. 85

10.00'
8.12

8.100
8.21


]


Phosphoric Acid.



a
a M




6.00 ...... .... 3.50 3.00 W ilso
6.491 1.011 7.50 3.77 3.57 Co.,

7.001 2.001 ...... 5.00| S.00 W ilso
7.20' 4.7, 11.9 4.91 7.S91 Co.,

6.OO I 1.o(l ...... 3.00 10 ).00 W ilso
6. 84 1 .59 8. 1: 3.75 9. (;i Co.,

5.00i 1.00 ...... .. *I .. 0 'lilso
5. 62 0 .5, 6.2 ( 4.14 5.951 (T o.,

;. .; )1 7. )W ilso
G.I 1.)02' 7 1 7. 1 i Co.,.
I .
I;. I1 ... .- I. I0 ".0O WVilso
5.! 51 0. 7 f.73 1 .,50I .S.' Co.,


Y WHOM AND
WHERE

MANUFACTURED.




n & Toomer Fert.
Jacksonville, Fla.

n & Toomer Iert.
Jacksonville, Fla.

n & Tooner Fert.
Jacksonville, Fla.

n & Tooier Fert.
Jacksonville, Fla.

nl & Toonlr Forl't.
Jacksonville, Fla.

n & Toolmei Fert.
Jacksonvilleh, Fla.








Florida Special Pineapple..] 862 Guarant'd Analysisi 6.00
Official Analysis 3.79

Favorite Early Trucker.... 863 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis 8.70

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 864'Guaran'td Analysis ......
|Official Analysis ......
Favorite Non Ammoniated
Special ................ 865 Guarant'd Analysis 13.00
Official Analysis 8.00

A. G. Acid Phosphate...... 8661Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
S Official Analysis 11.46
Favorite Bone Black and] I
Potash .................. 867 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
i Official Analysis 7.87

Favorite Fruiter Manure... 868 Guarant'd Analysis! 10.00
Official Analysis 6.54

Favorite Blood, Bone and ia Anysis .
Potash ................. 869 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
S Official Analysis 5.46

Simon Pure No. 1.......... 870 Guarant'd Analysis 8.'0
Official Analysis 8.41

Simon Pure No. 2.......... 871 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
Official Analysis 8.65


4.00 4.00 ...... 4.001 7.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
4.58 3.91 8.49 3.90 8.24 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 2.00 ......3.00 10.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
5.79 1.14 6.93 3.07 10.081 sonville, Fla.

..... .... 1.75 5.00 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
............... .. 5.12 ...... sonville, Fla.

10.00 1.00 ....... ...... 11.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
10.49 0.14 10.63 ...... 10.821 sonville, Fla.

16.00 0.50 ...... ...... ... Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
17.36 0.17 17.53 ...... ..... sonville, Fla.

8.50 0.50 ...... ...... 12.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
8.85 0.22 9.07 ...... 11.761 sonville, Fla.

8.00 0.50 ...... 4.00 12.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
8.50 0.50 8.77 4.43 11.811 sonville, Fla.
I I
8.00 1.00 ...... 5.00 7.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
8.47 0.84 9.31 4.89 6.87 sonville, Fla.

6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 11.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
6.34 0.21 6.55 4.78 12.74 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 2.00 ......4.00 6.001E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.43 2.15 9.58 5.41 6.79 Jacksonville, Fla.
1 I ____ _________________











ANALYSIS OF


NAME OR BRAND.





Gem Pineapple Manure ....

Goulding's 4 per cent Pot-
Gem Bean Fertilizer ......


Cucumber Special ........

Old Dominion Potato Ma-
nure ....................


Champion Citrus Compound.


Fla. Fruit Growers' Formula


3.-
0.




872 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

872 (iGarant'd Analysis
Ofiiciai Analysis

874lGuarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

875 Guarant'd Analysis
Otficial Analysis

S7(;(iiarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

S77 (gnaranl'd Analysis
Official Analysis
I


FRERTILIZERS-Co.ntinued.


Phosphoric Acid.






o -



.491 ...... .... 2.3 51 ,. 5

10.001 0 2.0()...... 5.00
8.11 6.72 1.18 7.90 5.08i

1 .()4. ... 3 .5 ...... .50.
9.72 4.29 2.4' 8.78 0

8.00 7.. 1.01 .. .. 5.00
3.41 7.21 0. 2 7.8 4. 81

10.00 4.00 1..0.l ...... ;.00
4.221 .92 04.4 7.37 3.0;3

8.00 7.0) 1.0 ...... 50
:5.86 7. ;5 0. 8.:i 3.95
I I I I I


BY WHOM AND

WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




6.00 j]. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
3.5: Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00]E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
4.711 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
.(;8 vannah, Ga.
I

1-l.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
11.891 vannah, Ga.
4.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4 .004 Va.C-ri. (hem. (o., S1G
5.45 vannah, Ga.
i








No. I Ground Tobacco Dust. 878 Guarant'd Analysis ..... 600
IOfficial Analysis 7.09| 7.12

Gem Bean Fertilizer....... 879 Guarant'd Analysis 13.00 8.00
Official Analysis 8.97 7.84
Williams & Clark's Frui
and Vine ................ 880,Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 6.001
IOfficial Analysis 8.98 4.7
Williams & Clark's Vegeta- uar d
table .................... 881 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00
Official Analysis 9.76 4.88

Bradley's Fruit & Vine.... 882 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 ..... .
1Official Analysis 7.17 ...... .
Bradley's Fla. Vegetable .... 883 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 .
Official Analysis 9.47 ......
Williams & Clark's Nursery
Stock ................... 884Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 ......
Official Analysis 8.84 .......

Mape's Orange Tree Manure 885 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00
Official Analysis 11.62 5.78

Mape's Fruit and Vine.... 886!Guarant'd Analysis. 13.00 5.50
Official Analysis 11.43 7.09

Star Brand Cotton Seed Meal 887 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 6.001
jOfficial Analysis ...... 8.041


J.vU ..... .
3.18 11.02

2.0 ......
4.76 9.49

2.00 ......
.. 40. .....




...... 2.40




2.00 ......
1.75 7.53

3.001 ......
0.36 7.45

1.001 ......
0.911 8.951


4.00 5.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
0.04 5.39 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.50 3.00 Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
4.37 3.83 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.001 3.00Mape's Formula, and P.
4.081 3.65 G. Co., New York.

2.00 10.00Mape's F. & P. G. Co.,
2.75 9.81 New York.

7.561...... J. Lindsay Wells Co.,
6.671...... Memphis, Tenn.

7.001 1.761Ga. C. 0. Co., Macon,
7.55 ...... I Ga.

2.00i 2.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
1.591 1.84. Jacksonville, Fla.
I i
5.001 3.001E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
4.911 4.13i Jacksonville, Fla.

2.25 10.O01Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
2.421 9.64| Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00IAmn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
4.09 5.531 Jacksonville, Fla.










ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME OR BRAND. .


1 II .0 I

Cotton Seed Meal ........| 8S8 Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 5.50 3.00 ...... 2
Official Analysis 7.94 6.561 0.76 7.321 2

Dark Cotton Seed Meal .. 889 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... ...... 1.75 5
S Official Analysis ...... ...... ...... ...... 5

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 890[Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 ...... ...... 2.251 7
| Official Analysis 7.53 ...... ...... ...... 8
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 8911Guarant'd Analysis 7.65 ... ........ 2..10 7
I Official Analysis 8..52 ................ 7
ash Acid ................ 8912Garant'd Analysis 16.00 8. 00) .00 .... ...
Official Analysis 12.88 8.9: 1.27 10.201...
Goulding's Bone Compound.i 89:;jGuaranl'd Analysis 16.0 8.00 1. .....
I ]Ollicial Analysis 9.27 8.211 3.15 11.26 2
I I


BY WHOM AND

6 WHERE
S a MANUFACTURED.
- ~rC


.25 10.00Amn. Agrl. Chem. Co.,
.42 9.73 Jacksonville, Fla.

.001 1.50 Fla. C. O. Co., Jackson-
.32 ...... ville, Fla.

.50 1.CG5Lathrop C. O. Co., Hawk-
.03 ....... insville, Ga.
I '
.001 1.761Ca. C. O. Co., Macon,
.21 ...... I Ga.

... 4.001 Gouldling Fort. Co.,
j.. 3.!)2 Pensacola, F'la.

2.001 2.'i)0 Co)uldin 's Vert. Co.,
.5: 2.0.1 I''insni ola, IFla.









Goulding's Bone Compound. 8041Guarant'd Analysis 16.001 8.00 1.00...... 2.J0 2.00 Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 12.39 9.04 2.40 11.44 2.23 1.741 Pensacola, Fla.

Acid Phosphate, 16 per cent. 895 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.00. .......... ... .. .. .. [Goulding's Fert. Co.,
]Official Analysis 15.71 14.94 2.37 17.3...... ...... Pensacola, Fla.
Goulding's Standard Mealj I I I
Mixture ................. 896Guarant'd Analysis. 16.00 8.00 1.00 ...... 2.00 2.00Goulding's Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis 12.75 9.10 1.64 10.80 1.71 2.06 Pensacola, Fla.

Acid Phosphate, 14 percent. 897 Guarant'd Analysis 16.00! 14.0 0! 1.001........... ..... IGoulding's Fert. Co.,
1Official Analysis 14.64 14.28 1.81 16.09 ............ Pensacola, Fla.

Cotton Seed Meal .......... 898 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... ........... 7.501 ...... Marianna Manufg. Co.
I Official Analysis ........... .... .. ...... 8.54. ...... Marianna, Fla.

Kainit .................... 899Guarant'd Analysis ...... .......... ..... ...... 12.00 Marianna Manufg. Co.,
I Official Analysis ........ ..... .... ..... ...... 13.11 Marianna, Fla.
H. G. Acid Phosphate, 4 per I ]
cent. Potash ............ 900jGuarant'd Analysis 12.00 9.00 2.00 ........... 4.001Marianna Manufg. Co.,
I Official Analysis 13.39 7.83 1.59 9.42 ...... 5.221 Marianna, Fla.

Acid Phosphate .......... 901 Guarant'd Analysis ..... 14.00 ............. ....... .... .Marianna Manufg. Co.,
Official Analysis... 17.66! 13.68 2.12 15.80 ...... ...... Marianna, Fla.

Home Mixture Guano .... 902CGuarant'd Analysis].10.001 8.00 2.00 ...... 2.001 2.001Marianna Manufg. Co,,
Official Analysis... 12.49! 8.47 1.63 10.10 1.951 2.811 Marianna, Fla.

Cowetta Dissolved Bone and I I
Potash .................. 903 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.00! 2.001 ...... ..... 2.00'Cowetta Feft. Co., New-
I Official Analysis...i 14.791 10.861 2.271 13.13 ...... 1.181 nan, Ga.
I I I I t I









ANALYSIS OF FRER






NAME OR BRAND. ?

2 m



Cowetta Cotton Seed Meal
Fertilizer ............... 904 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Fo Official Analysis... I 11.90

Pope Brown's Special For-
mula ................... 905 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 12.48

Armour's King Cotton .... 936Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 8.11

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 907Guarant'd Analysis .....
]Official Analysis ........

Prime Cotton Seed Meal.... 9081|Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
I Official Analysis........


LTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.
MANUFACTURED.
S. WHERE
z H BY WHOM AND
E3




8.00 2.00 ...... 2.00' 2.001Cowetta Feft. Co., New-
8.931 1.01] 9.94 1.605 1.691 nan, Ga.


8.2 1.811 10.43 2.12t 3.29 nan, Ga.

8.00 1.00 ...... 2.001 2.OOjArmour Fert. Works,
6.87! 1.241 8.11 2.00 1.96 Jacksonville, Fla.

........ 2.0 5.00| 1.501Fla. C. O. Co., Jackson-
.. ...... 4. 0 .... ... ville, Fla.

.... .. ...... 2.10 7.50( 2.001Ala C. O. Co., Monlgom-
.. ..... ...... 7.48 ... i cry, Ala.










Campbell's Perfect Satisfac-
tion .................... 909IGuarant'd Analysis 10.001
I Official Analysis.. 14.90

Honest Fertilizer ........1 910 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
I Official Analysis... 13.43

Ga. State Grange Fertilizer' 911Guarant'd Analysis 10.001
I Official Analysis... 12.34
Mobile English Acid Phos-] I
phate ..................... 912 Guarant'd Analysis] 12.00
Official Analysis... 16.281

Alabama Fertilizer ........ 913 Guarant'd Analysis 10.001
S Official Analysis... 13.19]
II I
Edisto Ex. H. G. Acid Phos.l 914]Guarant'd Analysis 12.001
| Official Analysis... 13.901
Scott's Champion Compound] 915 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
S Official Analysis... 12.08
Alkaline, Acid Phosphate,] I
4 per cent Potash........ I 916Guarant'd Analysis 12.00]
I Official Analysis... 10.68

Cotton Seed Meal ..........I 8l171Guarant'd Analysis ......
I Official Analysis... ......
Kainit ...................I 918 Guarant'd Analysis ......
I Official Analysis........
{'


I I 1 0
9.001 1.001...... 1.00 3.00A. D. Campbell, Chipley,
8.611 1.391 10.00 1.361 2.31 Fla.

8.00 2.00 ...... 2.00' 2.00 Campbell & Butler, Chip-
7.381 1.50 8.881 1.99] 2.95 ley, Fla.

8.00 2.00 ...... 2.00! 2.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
8.251 3.25 11.501 2.09' 1.84 gomery, Ala.

14.001 2.00 ...... ...... I ...... Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
13.48 2.581 16.061...... ...... gomery, Ala.
I I
8.50 2.0 ...... 2.18 1.50 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
9.14 1.94 11.08 1.84 1.421 gomery, Ala.
II I
16.001 2.00 ...... ...... I...... Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont.
14.96 3.541 1 .501...... ...... gomery, Ala.

8.001 2.00 ....... 1.00! 3.001Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
7.691 1.491 9.18 1.211 2.851 gomery, Ala.

8.00 2.001 ...... .....I 4.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
8.93 0.90 9.83 ...... 3.99 gomery, Ala.

.....I ...... 2.50 6.001 1.501So. Cotton Oil Co., Pen-
.. .. ... ...... 6.55 ...... sacola, Fla.

... ..... ...... i 12.00'The Adams Co., Jasper,
...... ..... ...... ... 14.31 Fla.










ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.


Sea Island Standard ......


K ainit ....................


Standard Early Trucker....


Standard Fruit and Vine..


Standard Fish and Potash..l


Standard Vegetable No. 1..


Phosphioric Acid.




m c
^ C. 3
. 5 p
C J


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


919 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00/ 8.001 1.00 ...... 2.001 2.00|Blackshear Manufg. Co.,
Official Analysis... 11.12 8.11 0.47 8.581 2.27' 2.19 Blackshear, Ga.

920 Guarant'd Analysis ...... ...... ...... .......... 12.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... ...... ...... ........... ....13.71' Gainesville, Fla.

9211Guarant'd Analysis 7.001 5.00 2.001...... 5.00 5.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.34 5.(;1 2.!)3! 8.571 4.95 5.05 Gainesville, Fla.

922,Guarant'd Analysis 5.001 7.00 1.00| 8.00 :3.00) 12.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
!Official Analysis... 5.881 7.97 0.(;)4 ,S.;l 2.(;5 13.(67 Gainesvillc, Fla.

923 Guarant'd Analysis 11.001 3.Il0 1.00! 1.(001) (;.0 I (i.ollStandard Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 5.5(; .5 i;| 1.2 .88 5. S 7.23 Gainesville, Fla.

924|Guarant'd Analysis| 8.00 4.501 2.00 ...... 4.50 (i.00S(andard Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis ... 5.98 5.25 2. 17 7.421 4.08 (;.711 Gaiesville, Fla.
1 1 1 1i


~~









Standard Orange Fruiter..1 925 Guarant'd Analysis 8.00
I Official Analysis... 7.28
No. 1 Peruvian and Fish
Guano Mixture, Double
Strength Potash ........I 926 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00

Official Analysis.. 6.32
Our Golden Fruiter ........ 927 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
IOfficial Analysis .. 4.06

No. 1 Peruvian and Fish I
Guano Mixture ..........928 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
IOfficial Analysis ... 6.76

No. 2 Orange Tree Mixture 9291Guarant'd Analysis 12.101
Official Analysis... 8.341

Potato Mixture ............ 930 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Official Analysis ... 7.59

Bean and Pea Special.... 931]Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
No Blod, one and Po Official Analysis...1 8.95
No. 3 Blood, Bone and Pot-1
ash ..................... 9321Guarant'd Analysis[ 12.00
Official Analysis... 7.25

Lettuce and Cuke Special.. 933 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
Official Analysis...1 7.03
I I


5.001
6.781


5.00o

7.251
6.001
7.961

i
5.001
7.01

6.00
6.471

5.00
5.491
6.00o
7.19

5.001
5.831

5.00
6.26
l


2.00o ..... .
2.47 9.25


1.00 .

1.17 8.411
1.00 ......
0.351 8.31


1.00i ... .
1.411 8.421

2.00 ......
0.761 7.23

1.00 ......
0.971 6.46

1.00 .....
0.341 7.53

2.001 .....
0.771 6.601

1.00 ......
0.70 6.961
I I


3.00
3.301
I

4.00

4.111
3.001
3.581


4.00o
3.33o

3.001
3.761

3.00o
3.151

2.501
2.741

4.00
5.s83

6.501
6.601
1


10.00,Standard Fertilizer Co.,
8.741 Gainesville, Fla.


10.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,

10.16 Gainesville, Fla.
13.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
12.931 Gainesville, Fla.


5.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
6.551 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00|Florida Fertilizer Co.,
5.271 Gainesville, Fla.

9.001Florida Fertilizer Co.,
9.561 Gainesville, Fla.

8.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
9.241 Gainesville, Fla.

4.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
4.68 Gainesville, Fla.
1
4.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
4.01 Gainesville Fla.
I











ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Co;ntinued.

Phosphoric Acid.

BY WHOM AND
NAME OR BRAND. WHERE

S. MANUFACTURED.
a


Cantaloupe Special ........ 934'Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.001 2.00 ...... 3.00 6.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.58 5.78! 0.G8 6.43 3.19! 7.33 Gainesville, Fla.
No. 2 Double Strength ofI I
Potash .................. 935Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 5.00 1.00 ...... 1.50 10.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.54! 6.40! 0.81 7.21! 2.45 11.28! Gainesville, Fla.
I I I I
Cotton Special ............ 93G|Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 6.001 1.00 ...... 2.00| 2.00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
O| official Analysis...I 7.02 7.13 0.42 7.55 2.761 2.9:' C Gainesville, Fla.
I I
Blood and Blon. ........I 9.371Guarant'd Analysis ...... 5.00 3.00 ...... 11.00 .. Standard l'ertilizer Co.,
Official Analysis... ....... 4.991 3.67 8.66 11.36 ......I Gainesvi]le, Fla.
Cotton Sied ilea| .......... !:9S(uarant'd Analysis 7.65 .... 2.401 7.00 1.7(;(eorgia C'. O. Co., Ma-
'Offcial Analysis... .. .. ...... .. .. .. I 8.17 ....... con, (Ca.
Tip Topi T lo Truao l(ckeri !: !)(liuaranlll i lysis 8.001 7.00 1 ..... 4.0(1 .S l Vi.C(ar. ('li Co., Sa-
I O()fl 'lal Analysis.. 7.67 7.54 0.S0' 8.:;1 4 .0 .51. i l v lh. (In.
II I I I I








-Seminole Tree Grower.....| 9401Guarant'd Analysis] 8.00 6.00]...........
I Official Analysis... 10.95 6.411 0.67 7.08
i I
Favorite Tomato Special... 9411Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 7.00 2.00 ......
Offical Analysis.. 7.30 7.15 1.491 8.64
Southern States Special Veg-I
etable .................. 9421Guarant'd Analysis 8.00 6.00 1.001......
Official Analysis... 4.541 8.57 1.64' 10.211

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 943 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 2.50
Official Analysis..". . | . .

Cotton Seed Meal (dark).. 944 Guarant'd Analysis.. ..... ...... 1.75]
,Official Analysis.. ..... ... ..... I
Cowetta Standard, Bone and 9
Potash ................. 945Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 10.00 2.00 ......
Official Analysis...' 16.07 11.88 0.72 12.60].
Pope Brown's Special For-
ula ..................... 946 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 9.00 2.00.....
Official Analysis... 13.13 9.00] 3.40! 12.40]
Cowetta Cotton Seed ideal, i I I I
Fertilizer ............... 9471Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 2.00 ..
I Official Analysis... 13.20 7.62 2.081 9.90i
Suwannee Ammoniated Bone
Guano .................. 9481Guarant'd Analysis 10.00] 8.00 1.00......
I Official Analysis... 9.06 8.081 1.32! 9.40!
Chas. Ellis' Cumberland Fer- [
tilizer .................. 949 Guarant'd Analysis 14.00 8.001 1.001 ......
Official Analysis...! 8.95 7.531 1.27| 8.80i
I I I I I I


4.001 S.001Wilson & Toomer Fert.
4.49| 8.47 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.001 9.00 Sanders Fert. Co., Jack-
4.491 8.82] sonville, Fla.

4.00 5.OJVa.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
4.72| 5.101 vannah, Ga.

7.50 1.50'Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
7.97 ...... sonville, Fla.

5.001 1.53 Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
5.36 ...... sonville, Fla.

2.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
.... 1.461 nan, Ga.

2.001 3.00]Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
2.411 2.741 nan, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Cowetta Fert. Co., New-
2.24 1.931 nan, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Mutual Fertilizer Co.,
2.091 1.841 Savannah, Ga.

2.00 2.001Mutual Fertilizer Co.,
1.93 1.811 Savannah, Ga.












ANALYSIS OF FRERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


Acid Phosphate ........... 950|Guarant'd Analysis 14.00 14.00
Official Analysis... 9.28 13.55!
Cumberland Bone Super-
phosphate .............. 951|Guarant'd Analysis 15.00 9.00
iOfficial Analysis.. 11.20 9.78
Bradley Palmetto Acid Phos-I
phate .................. 9521Guarant'd Analysisl 15.00 12.00
IOfficial Analysis...' 10.801 13.09

Special Mixture ........... I 953Guarant'd Analysis 10.O0 7.0,)
S Official Analysis... 3.461 5.65

Gennine Peruvian Guano.. 954](Cuarant'd Analysis 1(6.50 7.(60
I Official Analysis... 15.11 S.20

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 955 G arant'd Analysis ..........
Official Analysis... ...........


1.00.
1.00 ......
2.111 11.89

1.00 ......
0.981 14.97


9.68 15.33

1.80 ......
2.78 10.98


. . I. . I


0
o


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


I...... ...... Savannah, Ga.

2.00 1.0)Cumberland Bone Phos.
2.7o 1.801 Co., Portland, Me.

..... ...... Bradley Fert. Co., Bos-
...... ...... ton, Mass.

2.75 20.001Armour's Fert. Works,
2.271 17.68| Jacksonville, Fla.

8.70 1.90 Coe-Mortinmer Co., New
9.70 2.15 York.

7.50 ..... Bainbridge C. O. Co.,
...... 7.771 Bainbrldge, Ga.
I I


NAME OR BRAND.







Cotton Seed Meal........... 956|Guarant'd Analysis


Cotton Seed Meal ........ 957 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 9581Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 959:Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis...
I


.................. 2.50 7.50 1.50|So. C. O. Co., Fort Gains,
...... ...... .I..... 8.021...... Ga.

.................... 7.501 ...... eorgia C. O. Co., Al-
....... .. ...... 7.731 ...... bany, Ga.

...... ....... .. 2.0) 7.50 1.00 So. C. Co., Fort
.. ... ...... ...... 7.74 ...... Gains, Ga.

...... ...... ...... 2.50 7.50 1. Cuthbert C. O. Co., Cuth-
...... .. ...... ...... 7.77 ...... bert, Ga.


I













R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


Analysis of Special Samples under S ec. 9, Act approved May 24, 1905.

(Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME OR BRAND. '
__ ___ -


Bran .......................... 39 17.70 9.48
Cocoa Nut Meal ................ 40 13.34 20.56'
Cocoa Nut Meal ................ 41 12.63 20.971
Excelsior Corn and Oat Feed.... 42 11.96 7.251
Corn and Oat Feed ............ 43: 4.521 9.261
Our Own ............. .. .. 441 6.03 9.481
Peerless Feed-Wheat Bran.... 451 S.231 (;.501
Pcierless Feed-Wheat Bran ...... 46.( 7.821 15.83J
Plre Winler Wheat Middlings.... 47| 6.G6 19.31j
Sl orts ......................... 4Sl G .91 17.95


'U




53.45
38.28'
41.19i
61.75|
67.581
65.20
53.59
54.23
55.27!
53.77


BY WHOM SENT.


E4
_.; 1 .
Cd ~ t


2.051
9.651
9.70,
4.521
2.711

:;. -91
1. 631

'.4 11
4 (; I


4.60 John High, Baker's Mill, Fla.
5.751W. A. Bours, Jacksonville, Fla.
5.361W. A. Bours, Jacksonville, Fla.
3.581R. H. Mickler, Tallahassee. Fla.
1.93 Baker & Holmes. Jacksonville, Fla.
2.85 Baker & Iolmes .lacksonville, Fla.
5.19 J. Y. Detwiler, New Smyrna, Fla.
;.009!,. Y. Detwiler. New Smyrna, Fla.
4.:;0'Allen & Clayton, Tampa, Fla.
5.2912L. A. Mercer & Son. WauichIIla. Fla.


NOTICEI'-The especial alinut ion of consumers and d(i lers is called to the following paragraph:

consumerss d(esiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9. of the I.aws,, providing for "Specall Sant-
Iples" drawn bly consumers, are relmstled to read carefully S1c !9 of' thi Laws and the rules s and Regulationls (ovorn-
ing (1li taking and forwarding Special, Samples of' F'eed Still'f and Fl'rtillzers" found on it lpred(lclllng pago of l.te 1reporlt.
Also to compare the "otlicial analysis" and lhe markett valid ) olf' various f'eeds sold In (It State.

It will be found lhat In a niminber of cases tihe markett value," or price', is no crilerlon of the actual ftedling


BUREAUl OF FEED STUFFS.


B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant C~hemist.





value of the goods. That in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guaranteed tag on the bag with the table of averagee composition of feed stuff."
In case of doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law, and regulations, and send in
a tin box sealed, to the "Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guaranteed tags" off the packages, to compare
with the result of the analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.












R. E. ROSE, State Chemist-ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF, 1907-B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act Approved May 24, 1905.


E OR B ADDRESS OF
NAME OR BRAND. MANUFACTURERS.



Pure Wheat Middlings .... 211Guarant'd Analysis.... 5.75 40.00 4.00...... Hunter Bros.' Milling Co., St.
Official Analysis... 9.30 17.401 51.27 6.34 5.03 Louis, Mo.
Purina Feed .............. 242 Guarant'd Analysis 13.30 9.001 59.70! 4.50 ...... Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis.
Official Analysis... 11.40 13.55 57.491 3.97 4.371 Mo.

Feed Stuff ................ 243 Guarant'd Analysis 9.00 15.00...... 4.00...... Tri-State Milling Co., Nashville,
I Official Analysis.. 6.64 15.55 58.00 4.81 4.53 Tenn.

Sucrene Dairy Feed ........ 244Guarant'd Analysis 11.75 16.501 48.54 3.50 ...... .American Milling Co., Philadel-
Official Analysis... 9.26 17.911 45.91 6.13 9.231 phia, la.

Ballard's Ship Stuff........ 4 uarant'd Analysis 5.83 17.7 4.55 4.41 .... Ballrd & Ballard Co., Louis-
I Official Analysis... 6.21 17.81 55.34 4.77 4.81 ville, Ky.

Pure Wheat Bran.......... 246Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.001 55.10| 5.40 ....... A(me Mills and Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis... 8.341 16.(;71 54.031 5.041 5.62( Ilopklnsville, Ky.

Pure Wheat Bran.......... 247 uarant'd Analysis 9.50 11.501 50.001 4.00.. ... Lliorty Mills, Nashville, Te.n-
S Oftletal Analysis... 8.90 15.901 54.3> 4.17 6.40 nessee.
I"~ I4 .1 6.








Banner Feed .............. I 2481Guarant'd Analysisl 10.00 8.00 62.00
S Official Analysis... 10.14 11.78 6J.85

Pure Wheat Middlings..... 249 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 15.75 40.00i
Official Analysis.. 5.03 20.40 55.44

Pure Wheat Shorts........ 250 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42 16.00 48.00
Official Analysis... 6.25 17.651 53.891

Pure Wheat Bran.......... 251Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 14.50. 50.001
Official Analysis... 9.79 15.09| 53.991

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 2521Guarant'd Analysis ...... 38.62 24.00
Official Analysis... 5.691 31.70 40.90

Pure Wheat Middlings....... 253|Guarant'd Analysis ...... 15.70 60.30
[Official Analysis... 15.21 17.10 46.891

Feed Stuff .................I 254'Guarant'd Analysis 15.51 11.00 55.191
IOfficial Analysis... 20.27 11.01 50.36i

Pure Wheat Bran ........ 255|Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 14.50 50.001
Official Analysis... 8.20 16.45 51.971

Ship Stuff ................ 256Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.00 16.711
Official Analysis... 5.82 13.00 16.71!

Pure Wheat Bran.......... 257,Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.56t 46.00]
)Official Analysis... 9.83 15.451 53.411
____________________i_____________ II


3.50 ...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,
2.72 3.271Illinois.

4.00 ...... Hunter Bros.' Milling Co., St.
4.201 3.99 Louis, Mo.

4.00 ......Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
5.45 4.971 nessee.
1 1
4.001 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
4.001 6.971 nessee.

9.JO ....... Lindsey Wells Co., Memphis,
5.83 6.00 Tennessee.

4.30 ...... C. Baker Milling Co., Red Bud,
5.011 4.06 Illinois.

3.30 ..... Capital Grain, Co., Nashville,
2.181 4.43 Tennessee.

4.00 ..... Merchants' Mills, Mobile, Ala-
4.80 5.83 bama.

6.90 ..... 'Mountain City Mill Co., Chat-
6.991......1 tanooga, Tenn.

4.25 ..... .Koeningmark Mill Co., Water-
3.15 6.351 loo, Illinois.
I I









ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


Cs L ADDRESS OF
iN. g o
NAME OF BRAND. ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.
.Ship Stuff..... ............ 258 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 13.00 16.711 6.991...... Mountain City Mill Co., Chat-
Official Analysis... 5.65G 16.23 58.98 4.451 4.20' tanooga, Tenn.
Pure Middlings .......... 259'Guarant'd Analysis ...... If;. 00 58.00 4.75 ...... Columbia Mill and Elevator Co.,
Official Analysis... 6.15 16.90 57.76 4.10 4.27' Columbia, Tenn.
Pure Wheat Shorts......... 260 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42 (;.00( 48.00 4.00 ...... Cuberland, Mills, Nashville,
Official Analysis... 7.51 17.75 54.,)2 4.72 5.18 Tennessee.
Blair's Shorts ............ .261iGuarant'd Analysis 8.9:i 10.75 58.95 3.501...... Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
Official Analysis... 5.7i 17.72 56.95 4.171 4.33 Kansas.
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 262 Guaran'td Analysis .... 38.52 ... ...... ...... Florida C. 0. Co., Tallahassee,
Official Analysis... 10.5Si 41.21 24.59 8.65 6.491 Florida.
Pure Whcat Bran ........ 263Giarant'd Analysis ...... 16.001 55.10 5.4 0...... Acme Mill and Elevator Co,
Official Analysis... 7.J3i 1I.10U 53.02 4.29 5.69| Ilopkinsville, Ky.
Ballard's Ship Stuff........ 2C64 Guaranlt'd Analysis 5.83 17.237 40.581 4.411.. .. Ballard & Ballard Co., Louis-
Official Analysis.. 7.57 7.20 54.99 4.00 5.11 ville, Ky.
Globe Gluten Fleed........ 5(;Guarant 'd Analysis! ...... 2 5.100 51.00 2.50 ...... Corn Iroducts Refining Co.,
S Official Analysis... 7.S!9 2-s.:O, 19.0 2.5: 2.47 New York.






Ballard's Bran ............I 266 Guarant'd Analysis! 8.401
I Official Analysis... 112.27
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 267 Guarant'd Analysis ......
SOfficial Analysis... 23.17
Blair's Shorts ............ 268Guarant'd Analysis! 8.98
Official Analysis... 5.82
Prime Cotton Seed Meal.... 269 Guarant'd Analysis ......
S Official Analysis... 8.98

Cooked Cow Feed.......... 270 Guarant'd Analysis ....
OfIicial Analysis... 11 .33*
Purina Poultry Feed ...... 271 Guarant'd Analysis 4.00
Official Analysis... .80
Purina Feed ..............I 272 Guarant'd Analysis 13.30
I Official Analysis... 13.81
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 273 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 21.37
Mill Feed ............... 274 Guarant'd Analysi ......
Official Analysis... 5.35
Pure Wheat Bran.......... 275 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Oicial Analysis... 10.10


15.25|
16.02

22.00
18.30

16.75
17.641

38.62
40.171

26.00
28.52

11.00
10.721

9.00
10.051

22.00
22.07

11.38
12.55

13. J0
15.01
I ~l


38.59
50.35

30.00
40.291

58.95
56.31


25.43

44.00
38.441

65.00
69.19

59.70
59.23

13.00
36.04

65.39
63.94/

53.22
53.91


4.43 ...... Ballard & Ballard Co., Louis-
4.15 6.01 ville, Ky.

5.00 ...... Tennessee Fiber Co., Memphis,
5.33 3.99 Tennessee.

3.50 ...... Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
5.34 3.501 Kansas.

..... ...... Alabama C. O. Co., Montgom-
11.00 6.171 ery, Alabama.
I
7.50 ...... Nashville Feed Co., Nashville,
5.93 6.611 Tennessee.

3.60 ......Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis,
3.48 2.33 Missouri.

4.50 ..... Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis,
3.96 3.82 Missouri.

5.00 ......IC. A. Tindall & Co., Memphis,
4.14 4.91 Tennessee.

4.32 ...... Riverside Mill and Power Co.,
3.11 3.51 Cartersville, Ga.

4.75...... Columbia Mill and Elevator Co.,
3.35 6.76 Columbia, Tenn.
I]










ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


S*d a): ADDRESS OF
NAME OF BRAND. MANUFACTURERS.


S1 I I I I
Victor Co. and Oat Feed.. 276|Guarant'd Analysisl 12.30 7.50j 62.00 3.00 ...... IAmerican Cereal Company,
IOfficial Analysis... 12.18 7.76 59.69 2.80 5.93 Chicago, I1.
Diamond C. Com. and Oat I i
Chops .................. 277Guarant'd Analysis 14.73 7.62 61.23 3.15 ...... Corno Mills Co., East St. Louis,
'Official Analysis... 14.671 7.40 59.96 3.95 4.501 Illinois.

Purina Poultry Feed...... 27Guarant'd Analysis 4.00 11.00 65.00 3.60 ...... Ralston Purina Co., St.
Official Analysis... 2.70 10.48 67.60 2.991 3.911 Louis, Mo.

Sugared Feed ............ 279Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 5.00 50.00 0.5 ......Atlas Feed Products and Mill
Official Analysis... 14.82 14.04 49.131 3.88 7.69! ing Co., New Orleans, La.

Feed Stuff ................ 280|Guarant'd Analysis ...... 11.00[ 55.19 3.30 15.51 Capital Grain Company, Nash-
Official Analysis... 13.97 12.3? 54.07 3.15 4.36 ville, Tenn.

Feed Stuff ............... 281 Giiarant'd Analysis 15.51 11.00 55.19 3.0 ...... Capilal Grain Company, Nash-
Official Analysis... 17.86 10.27 53.921 2.415 4.07 ville, Tenn.

Ilomiiny Feed ............I 282|!C arant'd Analysis G.81 1 .50 50.00' 10.00 ...... tCuml erlail Mills, Nashville,
0 i.Olhial Ali sly si i .05. I).5 (;S..1S 6.9!8 2. SlI TI' llie ssee.
I I I I I I









Globe Gluten Feed......... 283 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 25.00 51.001 2.50 ...... Corn Products and Refin-
Official Analysis... 7.30 27.16 49.101 3.80 3.87 ing Co., New York.
Bran Feed ................ 284 Guaran'td Analysis ...... 11.53 53. 2.631 ...... City Grain and Feed Company,
Official Analysis... 14.75 11.60 53.69 3.41 4.10 Columbia, Tenn.

Pure Wheat Bran ........ 285 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 14.66 63.58 4.33 ..... Acme Mill and Elevator Co.,
SOfficial Analysis... 10.77 13.901 68.75 4.15 5.31 Hopkinsville, Ky.
1. 6 4.061. .1Dahnke-Walker Mill Co., Union
Wheat Bran ..............I 286 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.001 54.00 4.06 ......Dahnke-Walker Mill Co., Union
S Official Analysis... 12.16 13.34 53.66 4.001 5.33) City, Tenn.

Excelsior Corn and Oat Feed 207 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 9.00 60.001 4.20 ...... Great Western Cereal Company,
Official Analysis... 10.54 9.00 60.79 5.61 4.29 Chicago, Ill.

Ship Stuff ................ 288 uarant'd Analysis ...... 13.00 16.71 6.99 ...... Mountain City Mill Co., Chatta-
Official Analysis...' 2.801 12.81 67.79 1.78 2.54 nooga, Tenn.
Blair Shorts .............. 2891Guarant'd Analysis 8.98 16.75 58.95 3 ...... The Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
Pure Winter Wheat Mid Official Analysis... 5.76 17.38 57.614.35 4.001 Kansas.
Pure Winter Wheat Mid-6.4. .....te Br Milling Co.,
dlings .................. 290 Guarant'd Analysis...... 1.0 56.00 4.00 ...... Hunter Brothers' Milling Co.,
Official nalysis... 4.60 17.5 58.83 3.73 3.81 St. Louis, Mo.

Lilly Bran............... 291 Guarant'd Analysis 8.50 15.50 57.00 4.50 ...... Lillie Mill Co., Franklin, Ten-
Official Analysis... 6.85 15.38 57.06 3.32 5.39 nessee.

Pure Wheat Bran .......... 292 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 14.661 63.58 4.33 ...... Acme Mill and Elevator Co.,
IOfficial Analysisj... 7.89 15.501 54.571 3.94 5.63 Hopkinsville, Ky.
I I I ~I I I I _








ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.


Pure Winter Wheat Bran..


Cotton Seed Meal..........


Pure Winter Wheat Bran..


Quaker Dairy Feed .......

Pure Winter Wheat Mid-
dlings .................


Feed Stuff ................


Blair's Shorts ............


W heat Bran ..............


293 Guarant'd Analysisl......
Official Analysis...1 8.87

2941Guarant'd Analysis: ......
Official Analysis... 9.07

395 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 8.221

296 Guarant'd Analysis 17.00
lOfficial Analysis... 15.87

297'Guarant'd Analysis.....
Official Analysis... 5.33

298 Guarant'd Analysis 15.51
Official Analysis... 22.11

299 (hiarant'd Analysis S.98S
Official Analysis...i 5.30,

300(l Gurant d Analysis ...
Official Analysis... 16.41


14.00O
15.60

38.52!
39.831

14.00
16.101
I
12.001
13.401

16.00
17.201

11 .00
8.85,
10.75


1(.00
1 I !
.8ic.


SC | ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.


54.00] 3.50 ...... Hunter Brothers' Milling Co.,
53.041 3.611 5.54 St. Louis, Mo.

..... .... .....5. IFlorida C. O. Co., Jacksonville,
32.55 11.38 6.05 Florida.

54.00 3.50 ..... Hunter Brothers' Milling Co.,
52.03 4.84 5.70 St. Louis, Mo.

52.00 3.00 ...... American Cereal Company,
52.161 4.29 4.12 Chicago, Ill.

56.00 4.00 ......Hunter Brothers' Milling Co.,
53.88 6.20 4.22 St. Louis, Mo.

55.19 3.30 ...... Capital Grain Company, Nash-
50.37 2.50 3.78 ville, Tenn.

58.95 3.50 .... Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
59.93 4.05 4.01 Kansas.

5.1.i0 4.06 ...... I)ahnlic-Wallier Milling Co.,
52.85] 1.87 l. 3t Union City, Tenn.









Blair's Bran ............. 301 Guarant'd Analysis 10.59
Official Analysis.. 7.7;-

Boss Corn and Oat Feed.. 302 Guarant'd Analysis 11.001
Official Analysis...! 10.80

Mill Feed ................ 303 Guarant'd Analysis .. .
S Official Analysis... 20.89'

Pure Wheat Bran.......... 304 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis...- 9.181

Purina Feed ..............1 3051Guarant'd Analysis| 13.30
S Official Analysis... 10.511

Victor Corn and Oat Feed.. 306 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00
S IOfficial Analysis... 9.26

Heavy Draught Feed ...... 337 Guarant'd Analysis......
lOfficial Analysis... 4.85

Globe Gluten Feed........ 308Guarant'd Analysis ......
SOfficial Analysis...! G.801

Excelsior Corn and Oat Feed 309 Guarant'd Analysis 10.10
Official Analysis... 11.25

Wheat Bran .............. 310 Guarant'' Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 11.09


13.961
13.901

9.00|
8.86

9.131
8.90
1
14.03|
14.80

9.001
11.74C

7.501
8.45

10.35|
11.50|

25.001
27.991

9.00|
9.10|

16.001
14.65|
I


56.841
57.971

60.00
61.85

65.21
53.52

50.00o
55.661

59.70o
59.091

62.001
65.04

64.43
65.03;

51.001
49.67

60.00
61.62

54.00
53.65


3 60 ...... The Blair Milling Co., Atchison,
3.53; 5.621 Kansas.

4.00 ...... Great Western Cereal Co., Chi-
3.181 4.74 cago, Illinois

2.33:..... The Capital Grain Co., Nash-
0.681 2.291 ville, Tenn.
1 I
5.00 ..... Tennessee Mill Co., Estell
2.331 6.461 Springs, Tenn.

4.50! .....Ralston Purina Co., St. Loouis,
3.401 3.851 Missouri.

3.00 ...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,.
3.18] 2.621 Illinois.

3.42 ...... United Grocery Co., Jackson-
3.651 1.72 ville, Fla.

2.50 ....... Corn Products Refining Co.,
4.32; 3.171 New York.

4.20 ...... Great Western Cereal Co., Chi-
4.981 4.75 cago, Illinois.

4.06 ...... Danke-Walker Milling Co., Un-
3.381 5.081 ion City, Tenn.
I I










ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


5 .
NAME OF BRAND. S


Lillie Bran ............... 311]Guarant'd Analysis 8.50
Official Analysis... 6.33

Pure Wheat Middlings.... 312OGuarant'd Analysis......
Official Analysis.. 4

Jax Feed .................. 313 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.. 19.391

Sugared Feed ............ 314!Guarant'd Analysis 30.00
Official Analysis... 12.51

Feed Stuff ................ 3151Guarant'd Analysis 15.51
1 Official Analysis... 1S.12

Pure Wheat Shorts ........I 316 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42
S Official Analysis... 5.78

Ballard's Ship Stuff .......I 317 (inarant'd Analysis 5.90
Official Analysis... 6.26

Forrest City Feed Meal ..' S(;uarant'd Analysis ....
Oll clial Analysis.. 20.01i


a



15.501
15.091

17.20
15.80

8.42
8.15'

5.00
(. 84!

11 .00
9.651

1I;.00
17.38|

1(;.871
20.95!

2:3. 1(11
24.301


57.00
57.23

57 001
60.651

54.03
58.J91

50.00
52.28

55.19I
53.341

48.001
57.281

47.1 )
5I .81i

::5.00
:5. o51


ADDRESS OF
,, MANUFACTURERS.


4.50 ...... Lillie Milling Co., Franklin,
3.92! 5.50 Tennessee.
I I
4.951...... Barrett-Kraft & Kaufman Mill-
4.181 3.78 ing Co., St. Louis, Mo.

1.58 ...... .United Grocery Co., Jackson-
1.56 1.961' ville, Fla.

0.50 ..A....Atlas Feed Products and Refln-
4.03 9.07 ing Co., New Orleans, La.

3.301 ...... Capital Grain Co., Nashville,
2.51' 3.981 'lennessee.

4.00 ...... Cuimberland Mills, Nashville,
5.09 4.371 Tennessee.

4.72 ...... 13allard & Ballard Co., Louis-
4.521 4.591 ville, Ky.
I I
4.501 ...... Soullthrn C. O. Company, Sa-
5.,83 5.071 vannah.-Ga.


ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF--Co tinueg.








Pure Wheat Bran ..........


Albatross Bran ............


W heat Bran ..............


Quaker Dairy Feed ........


Banner Feed .............


Pure Wheat Bran ........


Middling Feed ............

Quaker Dairy Feed........[


Gonzalez Cow Feed........


Shorts ...................
I


319|Guarant'd Analysis......
'Official Analysis... 8.541

320 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.. 8.85

321 Guaran'td Analysis 13.50
Official Analysis... 9.161

3221Guarant'd Analysis 17.001
,Official Analysis... 17.051

323 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00
Official Analysis... 8.72

3241Guarant'd Analysis 9.50
Official Analysis... 8.40
I
325 Guarant'd Analysis ......
iOfficial Analysis... 11.921

3261Guarant'd Analysis. 17.00
SOfficial Analysis... 19.07

327 Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis... 9.95

328|Guarant'd Analysis 6.25
Official Analysis... 6.95
I I


14.001 54.001
15.801 53.031

14.75] 52.00
15.901 53.181

14.50i 50.40
16.90q 53.42i

12.001 52.00
13.051 51.56

8.00i 62.00,
8.78 63.301

14.50 50.00i
15.60' 55.03

12.29 61.92
13.90 54.20

12.00 52.001
12.55 49.951

39.001 41.001
16.50' 51.931

15.50 61.251
17.11 54.39
1


3.501...... Kelly Milling Company, Kan-
3.901 6.06[ sas City.
I I
3.70i...... John E. Meyer & Son, Spring-
3.831 5.27[ field, Mo.
I I
5.60 ..... M. J. Kemper Elevator Co.,
3.53 5.32 Kansas City, Mo.

3.00 ..... The American Cereal Co., Chi-
3.68 5.361 cago, lillinois.

3.50...... The American Cereal Co., Chi-
3.58 2.98 cago, Illinois.

4.00 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
3.37 6.431 nessee.

3.28 ...... City Grain and Feed Co., Co-
2.79 4.261 lumbia, Tenn.

3.001...... American Cereal Company, Chi-
3.501 5.861 cago, Illinois.
1 I
5.00 ...... M. F. Gonzalez & Co., Pensacola,
6.761 4.121 Florida.

5.25...... John T. Kemper Elevator Co.,
4.95 4.831 Kansas City, Mo.
I I _










ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continlted.


NAME OF BRAND. Ia 2 ADDRESS OF
0 4 MANUFACTURERS.

Pure Wheat Bran ........ 329 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 14.84 55.52 3.(i1 ...... The Dunlap Milling Co., Clarks-
S Official Analysis...n 10.15' 14.95 54.02! 3.08 5.631 ville, Tenn.
Nutriline Stock Feed...... 330 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 12.00 58.J01 2.00 ...... Nutailine Feed and Oil Co.,
Official Analysis...' 9.02j 14.95 57.27 2.609 7.671 New Orleans, La.
Mill Feed ................ 3l1 (uarant' Analysis...... 9.1:1 65.21 2.33 ..... Capital Grain Co., Nashville,
Official Analysis... 8.76 12.07! 60.82! 2.72 2.G66 Tennessee.
Feed Stuff ..............I 332Guarant'd Analysis 15.51 11.0 55.19 .0 ...... Capital Grain Co., Nashville,
Official Analysis...l 12.37 12.77 55.221 2.481 4.451 Tennessee.
Sucrene Dairy Feed ...... 3331Guarant'd Analysisj 11.75 1. 51 48.54 3.50 ..... Ameirican Milling Co., Philadel-
'Official Analysis... 11.47 19.5 52.18S 5.29] 7.90] phhia, Pa.
Purina Feed .............. 334 Gueranl'd Analysis 13.80 9).00 59.90 4.501 ...... Ralslon Purina Co., St. Louis,
Official Analysis.. 1:3.66 10.791 5S.:!9 3.131 4.15 Missouri.
I I I | I I
Kyonio F'e!d ............... ::!5(Guairani'd Analysis 7.53 1;..11 56. 3. 62 ........ Tl M. M. Milling Co., Frank-
Officlal Analysis... 6.79' 15.8)SO 57.33 3.:19i 5.111 for., Ky.
ixc I Official Analysis... 10.721 7.99' ;61.51.] 4.18 41.20] ( i'icago, Illinois.






Pure Wheat Ship Stuff....1 337]Guarant'd Analyseis 5.001 16.00 56.00
I Official Analysis...j 5.231 15.501 60.04]
Globe Gluten Feed........ 338 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 25.00 51.00
Official Analysis... 7.58 26.59 51.03
Victor Corn and Oat Feed..1 339 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 7.05 62.00
Official Analysis... 12.19 7.55 63.59
Victor Feed .............. 340 Guarant'd Analysis 12.00 7.50 62.00
Official Analysi ... 12.60 7.80 62.20
Beet Pulp ................ 341 Guarant'd Analysis 19.33 11.78 62.30
Official Analysis... 19.86 8.95 58.90
Hominy Feed ............ 342 Guarant'd Analysis 6.81 10.50 50.00
Official Analysis... 5.15 10.71 61.391
Hominy Feed ............ 343 Guarant'd Analysis 6.81 10.50 50.00
Official Analysis... 4.55 10.50 64.13
Pure Wheat Bran ....... 344 Guarant'd Analysis 8.91 15.47 53.52
Official Analysis... 8.36 15.84 53.84
Pure Wheat Bran ........ 345 Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 14.50 50.001
Official Analysis... 8.82 14.95 54.49
Pure Wheat Shorts ........ 346 Guarant'd Analysis 6.42 16.00 48.00
Official Analysis... 7.01 17.00 53.66
______________


4.00j...... The Tennessee Mill Co., Estell
3.951 3.86G Springs, Tenn.

2.50 ...... Corn Products Refining Co.,
2.30 3.521 New York.

3.00 ...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,
2.83 3.37 Illinois.

3.00 ...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,
3.93 3.92 Illinois.

1.64 ..... L. T. Cotter & Co., Agents, Nor-
0.55 3.251 folk, Va.

10.00 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
9.30 3.28 nessee.

10.00 ...... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Ten-
9.08 2.921 nessee.

4.33 ...... Sunny Side Flour Mills, Evans-
5.24 6.16 ville, Ind.

4.00 ...... The Liberty Mills, Nashville,
4.71 6.5b Tennessee.

4.00 ...... The Liberty Mills, Nashville,
5.70 5.57 Tennessee.
I I












ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


S ADDRESS OF
NAME OF BRAND. S U MANUFACTURERS.

4 z F4 P4 3 P ,
Schumacher Stock Feed.... 3471Guarant'd Analysis 10.001 11.00 60.00 4.001...... American Cereal Co., Chicago,
|Official Analysis... 11.22, 10.27 55.38 2.37 8.951 Illinois.
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 348 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 25.00 ...... ...... ..... IFlorida Cotton Oil Company,
Official Analysis... 20.90 23.96 32.62 6.93 4.93 Tallahassee, Fla.

Pure Wheat Bran ........ 3491Guarant'd Analysis 9.50 14.00 54.001 5.00 ..... The Tennessee Mill Company,
[Official Analysis... 10.90 14.13 51.32 4.42 7.60 Estell Springs Tenn.

Pure Wheat Ship Stuff.... 3501Guarant'd Analysis 5.00 16.00 56.00 4.00 ...... The Tennessee Mill Company,
Official Analysis...j 6.37 16.50 56.86 4.171 5.00 Estell Springs, Tenn.

Cotton Seed Meal ..... .I 351Guarant'd Analysis 7.05 43.16 24.591 9.22 ...... R. Z. Cates & Co., Spartanburg,
Official Analysis... 10.91 37.40 28.581 8.48 6.46 South Carolina.

Puro Wheat Middlings ....I 352 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.45 59.58 4.54 ...... Inlehart Bros., Evasvill,
Official Analysis... 4.10 16.45 59.90 4.12 3.92 Ildiana.

Pure Wheat Middlings.... 35:Guarant'd Analysis ..... 15.70 60.30 4.:30 ......:. C. :er Milling Co.. It,1 Bud,
Official Analysis... 4.20 17.02 60.19 8.25 3.71 Illinois.

Cotton Seed Meal ........ 354Guarant'd Analysis ...... 38.62 24.00 9.00 ....... I. Lindsey Wells (o., Merniphis.
Official Analysis... 9.49 40.601 25.75! 8.97 7.64 Tennessee.






Pure Wheat Middlings .... 355 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 16.48 59.58 4.541...... Inglehart Bros., Evansville,
Official Analysis... 3.901 16.58 61.38 3.93 3.971 Indiana.

Banner Feed ............ 356 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 8.00 600 3.50 ...... The American Cereal Company,
Official Analysis... 8.15 9.05 66.15 2.19 2.85 Chicago, Ill.

Pure Wheat Bran ........ 357 Guarant'd Analysisl...... 13.00 35.00 3.501......Cleaveland Bros., Mobile, Ala-
Official Analysis... 9.66 15.53 53.15 3.63 6.081 bama.

Feed Meal ................ 3581Guarant'd Analysisl 20.00 25.00 35.00 4.00 ......Southern Cotton Oil Company,
Official Analysis... 24.321 22.60 34.22 4.65 4.38 Memphis, Tenn.

Mill Feed ................ 359 Guarant'd Analysis ...... 12.38 65.39 4.32 ...... Riverside Milling and Power
I Official Analysis... 4.42 12.37 67.02 1.181 3.02 Co., Cartersville, Ga.

Shorts .................... 360 Guarant'd Analysi 6.25 15.50 61.251 5.25 ..... W. T. Kemper Elevator Co,
Official Analysis.. 5.46 16.58 55.77| 3.78 5.71 Kansas City, Mo.


SPECIAL NOTICE-The attention of dealers and consumers, is called to the table of "average composition of
Feed Stuffs" on a preceding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feed stuffs sold
throughout the country. Any material variation, from these averages, is presumptive evidence of impurity or adul-
teration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee of
the manufacturer, should not vary materially from this table of average while the "official analysis" should show
practically the same composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers, are requested in all cases of suspected
inferiority, or adulteration to send a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.














Miscellaneous


The following address by Prof. P. H. Rolf, Director of
"The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and Presi-
dent of the Florida Horticultural Society, should be read
by every Farmer and Fruit Grower of Florida. In addi-
tion to his eminent scientific knowledge, Professor Rolfs
possesses in a high degree the practical knowledge of
Agriculture and Horticulture, so necessary for one who
teaches. This address needs no explanation from me and
no excuse for its reproduction in the Florida Agricultural
Bulletin.
While it was delivered to a Horticultural Socity,it is
equally applicable to an Agricultural audience, Horticul-
ture being only the elder daughter of agriculture, with
a few more "frills and furbelows" of a modern "young
lady," still she is of the rugged old stock of tillers of the
soil, and is able to teach many of the "farmers" of the
State important lessons. Every tiller of the soil, farmer,
or agriculturist, if you please, "cotton grower, "tobacco
grower," "stock grower, "potato grower, "pineapple" or
"orange grower," should become a member of the "Florida
Horticultural Society." If for no other reason than to re-
ceive a copy of the Annual Report of the Society, a report
now acknowledged to be one of the most valuable, prac-
tical, as well as scientific works now published. It is to
be hoped that more former or horticulturists-all agri-
culturists- will join this organization for mutual benefit
and for the unbuilding of the profession.
R. E. ROSE.
Tallahassee, June, 1907.



Address of President P. H. Rolfs, to the Twentieth An-
nual Meeting of this Organization, May 14, 1907.

Before presenting the address to the twentieth meeting
of the Florida State Horticultural Society, allow me to
congratulate the people of St. Petersburg on the splendid










success they have attained in building this beautiful city.
It is only the periodic visitor to your city that notes
the improvement and progress. Those who call for the
first time never know it to be different, and those who
are here always see the changes go on so gradually that
it is rather a development than a metamorphosis. 1 wish
also to congratulate the Pinellas Orange Growers' Asso-
ciation on the frequent and instructive meetings they
have held. This young association will make its presence
known and felt before the State Society adjourns.
Amid all of these congratulations, we feel deep down
in our hearts the absence of our genial president, whose
invaluable advice has guided us. Always ready as a
peacemaker; foremost among the progressive: ju-t enter-
ing upon a wider and more useful life for his county and
State. Personally, it is a loss of a kind friend and an
able counsellor. To the society it is an irreparable loss.
In this hour. when the shadow is over us. we cannot see
the design. We can only bow our heads in meek submis-
sion, and meekly say, "Thy will be done." I would urge
every member of the society to read again his masterly
address which came to us as a parting advice. Let me
quote one paragraph fro mthis address, which sums up
the whole thought in a rounded expression:
"I have felt strongly impelled at this meeting to press
upon your attention these important matters. To give
vent to the thought that has been growing in my mind
for some years, that the most vital and far-reaching ques-
tions now calling for solution by Florida producers were
not cultural questions, but commercial; not planting, but
marketing; not fertilizing, but transportation. Let us
think about these things, talk about these, study them.
conquer them. If this thought, talk and study take not
the form of action then we have labored in vain."
Those of the Florida Horticultural Society who are
favored with information on the commercial side of horti-
culture, especially with marketing and transportation,
should come forward and discuss these problems, just as
our chemists have come forward year by year and given
us the best their laboratories and brains afforded. The
botanists, the entomologists, and the plant breeders, all
have placed before us information that required years of










toil and untold disappointments, until our reports are
quoted and looked up to as standards, even in far-off
India and New Zealand. What we need is a careful, con-
cise and methodical study of this subject from the com-
mercial point of view. Professor Tenny will present to us
a paper dealing with some scientific features connected
with transportation. Why can we not have an equally
able paper discussing this from a commercial point of
view ?
I have confidence in the ability of this society to study
and master all problems connected with successful fruit
growing. Almost from its birth has it taken up prob-
lems for discussion and study that would have been con-
sidered heretical by the old school horticulturists. The
society has certainly shown its adaptability to new condi-
tions as they arose.
Chemistry, one of the oldest sciences, was among the
first to be laid under tribute by the advanced horticul-
turist. At one time it was thought that all causes for
crop failure, excepting those arising from climatic condi-
tions, could be discovered by an analysis of the soil. Hence
we were taught that a chemical analysis of the soil would
tell us exactly what elements were lacking, and what
elements were present in too great abundance. The small
amount of truth upon which these assertions were based
gave sufficient grounds for volumnious articles to be writ-
ten in a most lucid language. Unfortunately, the most
voluminous writers were deficient in scientific training,
and proficient in literary work. These men were unable
to understand the restricting language in which the sci-
entists had stated their proposition. Conseqently, they
builded up wonderful theories and hypotheses, all of
which had to fall because their major premise was only
partially correct. Unfortunately for the true scientist
and the receptive reader, it is frequently impossible for
the lay reader to distinguish between scientific fact and
scientific fancy. The whole structure, the scientific as well
as the fanciful, fell into disrepute. This condition led to
such terms as "Book Farmers," "Theoretical Farmers,"
"Newspaper Farmers."
"Truth crushed to earth shall rise again. The eternal
years of God are hers."










After clearing away the debris, the foundation of truth
stood there firm and immovable. We have learned not to
trust in the flimsy paper structure that some still try to
erect. The basis truths founded in the science of chem-
istry are so much a part of our knowledge now that there
is no horticulturist in my hearing but would rise in just
indignation should any legislator introduce a bill to the
abolitition of the office of State Chemist. There are still
many discourses written which are purported to be
founded on facts from the science of chemistry. Usually
these discourses imperfectly veil their advertising nature.
In addition to advertising essays, we have the pseudo-
chemical and pseudo-horticultural essays constantly
thrust upon us. These are often a serious menace to our
progress. They usually contain a few grains of truth in
a stack of chaff.
One of the most recent departures from the old school
horticulture is the study of soil physics, or the study of
the soil from the standpoint of a physicist. At first
thought it would seem difficult to form any connection
between pure physics and horticulture, but chemistry as
a science concerns itself with the composition and mate-
rials that make up the soils, while physics concerns itself
about the make up and conditions under which these
various materials are found. The border land of these
two sciences overlay one another from the realm of chem-
istry on the one hand, and from the realm of physics on
the other hand and find savants from both kingdoms
rightfully encamped on the same ground. Battles for the
mastery of these overlapping fields sometimes occur,
resulting in loss of time, and sometimes loss of temper;
all of which is a loss to horticulture and should not be
tolerated. There is really no harm in exploring a field
from as many points of view as possible, and frequently
a very great gain to all concerned. The able address before
this society last year by Professor Blair shows how little
we actually know about what goes on in the soil from
a physical point of view. We had all along felt that there
was a considerable loss of fetilizer from the soil, due to
leaching, but had been told repeatedly by trustworthy
witnesses that potash and phosphoric acid became fixed
in the soil. It is now demonstrated from a physicist's
point of view that a considerable amount of fertilizer is











actually washed out and carried into the static water in
the soil, from which it is impossible to reclaim any con-
siderable portion.
The chemist has told us faithfully what he found in his
crucible. The physicist is likewise telling us how differ-
ently natural and inert materials behave in the soil. How
the water moves; what effect different elements produce
in the soil when applied; but all of this still leaves us
in the dark as to what role different living subjects play
in the economy of plant growth.
For the solution of these problems we shall have to
look to the soil bacteriologist and botanist. I need here
only to mention the rather recent work that has been
done on the nitrifying organism, or the organisms which
enable leguminous plants to make use of the atmospheric
nitrogen.
We have here three distinct sciences-chemistry, phys-
ics and botany-which are each laboring actively to sub-
due the same realm, the soil. These three,however much
they may discover, will not complete the work for us.
What we shall need when these three have secured the
vast store of scientific information locked up in the soil,
is the psychological botanist to tell us what effect a varia-
tion of these factories has on our cultivated crops. Of
what use is it to raise an orange that turns even the
stomach of an insect, or to raise a variety of celery that
has such a thick epidermis that even a fungus cannot
pierce it?
There probably never has been a meeting of this society
during which the question of fertilizers was not discussed,
and it is to be hoped that this society will not let the ques-
tion rest until all superstition and misconceptions have
been cleared away. This ideal state will not be reached,
however, until we know more about our soil; until we
know more about the needs of our plants. What we
believe as true of certain elements today, may tomorrow
be proven to be a fallacy; and our beliefs of tomorrow
may likewise on the following day be shown to be incor-
rect. Let me cite a single illustration. during the early
history of our society, we found earnest and eloquent
advocates of the use of ground rock phosphates as a fer-
tilizer for citrus trees. These advocates have either been











converted to the use of soluble phosphates, or have been
silenced. Ground rock is no longer being actively advo-
cated by anyone. Now comes Prof. H. J. Patterson,
director of the Maryland Experiment Station. He used
nine different chemical fertilizers as sources of phosphoric
acid-all that are ordinarily found on the markets. In-
cluded in this list is acid phosphate, dissolved bone black,
bone black, raw bone meal, and Florida soft phosphate.
The plots were laid off in the regular form as is usual for
such work. The same chemical being applied year after
year since 1895 to each plot, making eleven years of con-
tinuous use of the same chemical on each particular plot.
Now comes the most startling part, his conclusions. Two
of them are of special interest to us. The third of his
conclusions is that. "Insoluble phosphates produce a
slightly higher total average yield than soluble phos-
phates, and at about one-half the cost." The sixth of his
conclusions is that "Florida soft phosphate produced the
best yield of corn." Let us not, however, conclude that
the use of insoluble phosphates is the best for us. In
these experiments annual plants alone were used, and
the soil upon which the fertilizer was applied was clayey,
and for the most part contained considerable humus. The
conditions, therefore, are not exactly the same as ours;
but these experiments do show us the necessity for care-
ful scientific work, even on subjects that we regard as
closed questions. Wheeler and Adams. of the Rhode
Island Experiment Station. working under different con-
ditions, find that ground rock, on floats, are the best form
of phosphates for squash and better than any of the solu-
ble or treated phosphates for corn.
The question of combating insects and of controlling
diseases is as old as the fertilizer question, and both are
older than our society. We have published valuable con-
tributions on both of these subjects annually. Whatever
we have attempted has been carried to a full and cred-
itable consummation. Every year we have advanced
slowly but surely. Sometimes our speakers have been a
little too far ahead of the average, but the foremost have
usually been abreast with the leaders. One of the lead-
ers has not had a spraying machine in his grove for years.
Last year there was a large exodus from the camp of
sprayers to the camp of those who use the natural enemies











for combatting scale insects. We must look upon the use
of spraying materials for controlling insects and fungus
enemies as temporary expedients, which for the most part
under our present knowledge are avoidable. In certain
cases it is absolutely necessary to spray in order that we
may avert certain failure, but we are gradually learning
how to keep our groves and vegetable fields from getting
into such distressing conditions.
The natural method of combatting scale insects is meet-
ing with the most flattering success, and can be econom-
ically applied. It is far cheaper to keep, a grove from
becoming affected with dieback than to cure the disease.
Many diseases and insects cannot be treated in a similar
way economically, because we have not yet learned
enough about them. The cottony cushion scale, which at
one time seriously threatened the sub-peninsula, has been
reduced to a negligible quantity by introducing the Ve-
dalia cardinalis, an Austrian lady bird. California spent
thousands of dollars in attempting to subdue this pest by
artificial means.
It is our province as a society to teach every member
of this association what to grow and how to produce the
best of everything. The old adage that, "There's plenty
of room at the top," was never more true than it is in
horticulture today. The man who markets the best prod-
oct never has to complain of poor prices. It takes brains
to do this, and brains will count whenever they are cor-
rectly applied. Some time ago we had a call from a gen-
tleman from Michigan who controlled capital, according
to his representations. He was in Florida with a view
of investing and had visited every vegetable growing and
fruit growing section, and closed his visit to the State by
calling at the Experiment Station. We discussed the
various crops. Citrus growing, in his opinion, was not
desirable, since it took a long time to get returns from
the investment, and then he was also told that the white
fly attacked the trees. Peach growing was also discussed,
but that was given up because the peach trees had to be
fertilized. One crop after another was passed in review,
every one having some weak point. Celery growing he
considered to be remunerative, but he had seen some
fields destroyed by blight. Finally he said what he wanted











was to learn of some crop that would not be frozen out;
that did not need to be fertilized; that was free from
insect attack and fungus infection. He was very confi-
dent that this information could be given him at the
Experiment Station, and so came to get it. The director
told him that this was a very easy proposition and advised
the man to plant saw palmettoes. I do not want any veg-
egatable or fruit that is not relished even by a bug, or
one too tough to be attacked by fungus, or too hard to
freeze. Give me the pineapple that has to be packed in
excelsior to keep it from being squashed in transit; give
me the orange that has to be scraped with a wooden-
bladed knife to keep from injuring the peel; give me the
cauliflower that has to be wrapped in tissue paper.
Horticulture is affected more or less by nearly every
science, and by nearly every art. Every walk in life is
affected by the horticulture of the country, and in turn as
we are able to take the advantage of the best of every-
thing, we will be able to prosper. During some periods,
our greatest needs lie in the direction of better methods
for controlling insects. At other times, information on
disease is needed most urgently. At one time we were in
great need of information on fertilizers. It seems to me
that what we are now needing most of all is information
that will enable us to put our crops into the hands of the
consumer at the least possible cost. We need a sort of
horticultural political economy.




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