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 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Weather report
 Commercial fertilizers and commercial...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00002
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Division of the state by counties
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents--by divisions
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
    Weather report
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Some features of May
            Page 21
        General summary
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
    Commercial fertilizers and commercial feeding stuff
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports, January 1906
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Jacksonville prices current
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Factors for conversion
            Page 41
        State values
            Page 42
        State valuations
            Page 43
        Special samples
            Page 44
        Light weight--false statements
            Page 45
        Ashes, hard wood, palmetto, Canada ashes
            Page 46
        Analysis of special samples
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
        Analysis of feed stuff
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        Fertilizers: Lecture before Florida Farmers Institutes
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Super-phosphates
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
Full Text






VOLUME 16
NUMBER 3




FLORIDA

QUARTERLY

BULLETIN.

OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


JULY 1, 1906.

B. E. McLIN,
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


Part 1-Crops. Part 2-Weather Repor'
Part 3-Fertilizers and Feeding Stuff.



Entered January 31, r3, at Tallahassee, Florida as
second-class matter, under Act of Congress.
of June, oo19


These Bulletinsare issued freetothose requesting them.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
CAPITAL PUBLISHING CO., STATE PRINTERS













Coauty Map of the State of


D A 0 E


\7~7/: ;rl O I
,I
r


Florida.




















PART I.
CROPS.

















DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla-11.
Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.
Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,


Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.
Central Division.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco,
Sumter,
Volusia-9.
Southern Division.
Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Hillsborough,
Lee,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.





























































































































4












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

B. E. McLiN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.,



CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS-BY
DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIvisioN-The condition of crops in this sec-
tion of the State has deteriorated materially in the last
few weeks, and especially since the rainy season has set in.
The long dry spring interfered much with the planting of
both cotton and corn, as well as the minor crops; cotton
and corn came up badly giving poor stands, and when the
rains enabled the seed to come up, the grass had the start,
and has, on account of the continuous rains far outgrown
the crops in many instances. Corn is in better shape than
cotton. A very serious drawback is the scarcity of labor
with which to cultivate the crops that are growing; what
there is is mostly inferior, and very unreliable. The condi-
tion of cotton is approximately the same as at this time
last year, as far as size and health of plant goes, but the
grass with continued rains, has an advantage that it did
not have last season; consequently the crop products are
not near so promising as in 1905. To sum up the situa-
tion, the cotton plant is small, the acreage cut short by
various causes, stands are poor and grassy, and the qual-
ity of labor insufficient and inferior.
WESTERN DIVISION-In this Division. though planting
of crops was backward on account of drought, the seasons
were better somewhat than in the Northern Division; the
condition of crops, such as cotton, corn and other field
crops is only fair, and while the farmers have their crops
in fair shape, the same trouble of scarcity of labor exists
as in other sections. If they can maintain themselves un-
der the present conditions they will do well, but when
harvest time comes the seriousness of the situation will
then be apparent, and unless relief can be obtained much
loss will be sustained by the farmer; labor is poor in
quality and barely sufficient to take care of the growing










crops; when it comes to gathering the corn and cotton.
losses will begin. Other crops than cotton and corn are
doing well, and most of them have been benefitted by the
rains; except cotton, the field crops generally are in fair
condition, but if the rain continues cotton will be short.
LiNe stock throughout this section is reported in excellent
condition.
NORTHEASTERN DIVISIoN-Of the six counties reporting
in this Division, the complaint is general throughout. of
damage by excessive rains in all portions of the district.
Cotton has suffered from the effects of too much water,
more than most of the crops, unless it is the tomato crop.
which was practically drowned out in a large number of
instances. Water melons were also badly damaged by ex-
cess of water in many localities as were also cantaloui:e.S
both of which crops are short and much later than usuaf.
Other crops that have been damaged by rains are, peanuts.
field peas, and all late vegetable crops; scarcity of labor
is not so much complained of in this district as in the
Northern and Western, obviously for the reason that the
negroes who compose the farm help in the sections named
are continually drifting east and south to the vegetable
and fruit growing districts, where, owing to the quick
growing and more remunerative crops. higher wages are
paid for labor than the purely agricultural country farm-
er can afford. Unless the season improves the cotton
crops will be very poor. The fruit crops are reported
fair as to quality and quantity; live stock is also reported
in fine condition, with no disease among any of them.
CENTRAL DIVISION-Seven counties out of the nine
grouped in this Division report a generally fair condition
of crops. As this Division lies, much of it. in the upper
portion of the fruit and vegetable growing section of the
State, rains that are ordinarily excessive for some minor
crops, are usually welcomed on account of the great benefit
to the citrus trees and their crops, which is so necessary
at this season of the year. The vegetable crops are about
all marketed and in most cases brought remunerative
prices to the growers. The peach crops are reported as
generally good, though poor in some localities; the melon
crops gairly good, and crops prospects generally, are good.
Live stock is reported also in fine condition, no disease
having made its appearance among them.








9

SOUTHERN DIVISION-In all the reports from the coun-
ties embraced in this Division come only favorable reports,
of crop conditions of all kinds; the field crops are all re-
ported in good condition and good prospective yields for
the future; the fruit crops are all making good, and the
citrus trees growing as well as could reasonably be asked.
It is said by many of our correspondents that the citrus
fruit crops, oranges and pomelos in particular, will in all
probability be the finest since the great freeze, in quantity
and quality. In this group of counties are the great stock
ranges of the State, probably the greatest east of the
Mississippi River, and from all our correspondents come
the best of reports of the high condition of the live stock
that feed on these vast ranges. In no case are any dis-
eases reported, which we may add, is indeed remarkable,
considering the vast territory covered by these ranges, and
the intermingling of thousands of stock coming from
widely separated districts.









Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for Quarter
Ending June 30, 1906, as Compared with an, Average During
Same Period in 1905-Also Condition of Live Stock.



COUNTIES a /
.2 oo. =

Northern Di- r
o o o o] o oS I i
vision. u a U C a 0 J O
Franklin ....... ...... .. 90 ... 90 901 90
Gadsden ....... 72 75 95 95 85 90 85
Hamilton ...... ...... 75 75 751 60 60 60
Jefferson ....... 85 80 90 95|...... 100 100
LaFayette ...... ...... 75 65 75 50...... ....
Leon .......... 85 ...... 100 100 ...... 1001 100
Liberty ........ 75 ...... 100 90 ...... 801 75
Madison .......... 80 75 75 1001 100 80' 90
Suwannee ...... ...... 90 100 100 90 100 100
Taylor ......... ...... 85 90 70 ...... 80 80
Div. Av. per cent| 791 791 881 861 79] 871 87
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ 501...... 75 90 ...... 90 ......
Escambia........ 1 751...... 90 90 80 90 85
Holmes ........ 90 ...... 100 100 ..... 100 100
Santa Rosa ..... 75 ...... 85 100 ...... 751 100
W alton ........ 90 ...... 105 100 ..... 100 100
Washington .... 90 90 100 l00| 110 100] 125
Div. Av. per cent] 78] 901 931 971 95] 93| 102
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ....... ..... 60 80 95 90 70
Baker ................ 55 55 85 ..... 80 50
Bradford ....... ....... 50 75 100 ...... 90 60
Clay ........... ...... 65 50 75 65] 851 90
Columbia ...... ...... 75 85 75] 100 80 90
Putnam ........ ...... 75] 851 90 ...... 1001 80
Div. Av. per cent ...... 631 72| 87] 83] 88] 73
Central Division.
Hernando ...... ......7*777 -- 10 100 80 n100 100
L ake ........... ...... ...... 100 ...... ...... 50 ......
Levy ........... ...... 85 95[ 90 ...... 90| 100
Marion ......... ...... 85 100| 95| 951 105] 100
Pasco ...................... 75 90 ...... 98 100
Sumter ....... ....... 85 100 95 100 100
Volusia ....... ..... .80 90 .80 90
Div. Av. per cent] .... 851 93] 941 891 89] 98
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ ...... ......... ..90.. .. 100 ......
Dade ........... ...... ............. .. ...... 100 100
DeSoto ........ ...... ...... 50 100 100 501 100
Hillsborough ... ...... ... 90 110 100( 1001 90
L e e ............ ...... ...... ...... .. ... ...... ..
Manatee .................... 100 10 00| 100] 100
Polk ....................... 90 75 20 80ol 70
St. L ucie ....... ...... ... .. .. ..... ... ...... I .
Div. Av. per cent ...... I...... 821 951 80] 88] 92
State Av. per ct. ] 78! 78[ 861 911 84| 891 90








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


COUNTIES


Northern Di-
vision.
Franklin.......
Gadsden ........
Hamilton .......
Jefferson .......
LaFayette ......
Leon ...........
Liberty ........


Q


100


oa a c


S 90 0





. . .. . .. .
90 90


Madison.......................
Suwannee ........ 25 ......
Taylor .......... ...... ..........
Div. Av. per cent| 100 25; 90O
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ ...... ...... ......
E scam bia ....... ...... ...... ......
Holmes ..................... ....
Santa Rosa ..... ...... ...... ......
Walton ....... .... ............
W ashington .... 125...........
Div. Av. per cent| 1251 .... ...... j
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........ ...... ..... ......
Baker .................... ...
Bradford ....... ..................
Clay ........... 100 ...... ......
Columbia .........................
Putnam ........ 90 ...... .....
Div. Av. per cent| 951...... | ......


601
100
75
82


90
80
70

50
75
80
781..
100,
401
741


75 ......

70 ... .
100 100
100 ... .
100 ..... .
881 87

100! 75
70 .....
100 1001
90 950
90 90
100 100
921 921


90U ......
95i .. ..
75 ..
100! 100
50 ......
100 .....
95 ......


S7 1 ....


75 .....
90 .....
100 ...
95 ......
75 .
150' ......
83: ...

85 ......
89 ......
85 ......
90 .
80 ..
85.


Central Division.
Hernando ....... ...... ...... 90 100 120 14 ....
Lake ........... ...... ...... ... ... ..... 75 .....
Levy ........... ... .. .... ... .. 95 100 100' ......
Marion ......... ...... ...... 105 90 1051 .....
Pasco .......... 70 ... 95 93 85 1-11 23
Sum ter ............... ...... 100 100 ...... 75 ......
Volusia ......... 100 ............ ..... 100 10 ......
Div. Av. per centj 851...... 951 981 991 99 25
Southern Division.
Brevard .... ......... ... .. ... ... .. ... ...
D ade ........... ... 90 ...... ...... 100 ......
DeSoto ......... 100 .. 50 ...... 100 100 .
Hillsborough .... ...... ... ........... 100! 90 ......
Lee ...... .... .. .. ... ...... ...... .
Manatee ........ ...... .......... 100. ...... 1 ...
Polk ............ ............... .. 100 70......
St. Lucie ....... .... ........... ........ ..........
Div. Av. per cent! 100 ...... 701 100! 100 92 ..
State Av. per ct. 1 1011 251 87 921 901 91' 62







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops--Continued.


COUNTIES Guavas Bananas Orage reem'
COUNTIES ___Trees Frees
00 0

Northern Di- g g 0 4 0 g0
vision. Q 0 4 0 P
Franklin .............. ...... ..........................
Gadsden ............. ................. ............. ......
Hamilton ...............................................
Jefferson .............. ...... ..... ..................
LaFayette ........................ .. ............... ......
Leon ............................. .. ......... ..........
Liberty ........................... .. ......... ..........
Madison ........ ......................... ...
Suwannee ..... ......... ... .
Taylor .................
Div. Av. per cent ...... |........ ..... ...... ...... .. ......
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... .. ... ...... ........... 90 ...... ......
Escambia ....... ..... ... ........ .. ... ...... ......
Holmes ......... ...... ...... ...... ...... .......... ..
Santa Rosa ..... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ......
Walton ......... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
W ashington ..... ...... ... ....... ... ... ...... ...... ..
Div. Av. per cent ...... .... I ...... ........ 901 ...........
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. ............ .... 100 ...........
Baker .......... .... .. ...... ...... ...... o 100 100 ......
Bradford ....... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ... ......
Clay .................. ......... ....... 100 70 ......
Colum bia ....... ......................... 90 10 ......
Putnam ........ 100 90...... ... 80 75 .....
Div. Av. per cent I 1001 90 ...... ...... 941 64......
Central Division.
Hernando..... .......... ...... ...... ...... 1201 200 ..
Lake ........... 100 50 ............ 100 100 ......
Levy ........... ... ............ ...... 100 ...... ......
Marion .... ... .. ....... ...... ...... 105 130 100
Pasco .......... 100 100 95 90 90 98 ......
Sumter ......... 125 100 1 00 100 125 100 125
Volusia ........ .... .. ... ...... 100 70 ...
Div. Av. per centI 1081 83] 981 951 1061 1161 112
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ 100 75 90 1001 100 901 ...
Dade ........... 100 100 100 100 100 1101 100
DeSoto ......... 100 100 100 1001 100 100j 100
Hillsborough ... 110 125 100 1001 95 90 ......
Lee ............ 100 100 100 100! 100 90 100
Manatee ....... 100 1001 100 10 100 100
Polk .......... ... .. .. ... 100 80 ......
St. Lucie ....... 501 25 ...... ... 100 80
Div. Av. per cent 94| 891 98) 1001 991 931 100
State Av. per ct.l 1011 87! 981 971 1001 981 106







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Lem'n Lime Trees Grape Fruit Tobacco
COUNTIES Trees T rEe.s
^ ,= .

-% r
Northern Di- 01 Z
vision.
F franklin ....... ... ....... .... ..... ...... ......
G adsden ........ ...... ...... ...... ...... ... ...
H am ilton ....... ...... ...... .... ......
Jefferson ....... ...... ...... ...... ..... .. ... .
LaFayette ...... .... .......... ....
L eon ........... ...... ..... ... ... ... .. .. 1
L iberty ......... ...... ...... ................. ......
Madison ................. ....... ....... ......
Suwannee ...... ..... .........................
T aylor .......... ...... ............. ..... ....... .. ......
Div. A v. per cent ...... .......... ....... ..i 1'
Western Division.
Calhoun ....... ...... ...... ..... ....
E scam bia ..... ... .. ........ ......... ......... 55
Holmes ...... ...... ........ .. .. .. ...
Santa R osa .' .. ... ...... ... ...
W alton .............. ................
W ashington ..... ...... ...... ...... ........ ....
Div. Av. per cent ...... ...... I ...... 75I ...... S 5
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ......... .... .. ....... ..........
B aker .......... ...... . 0 1 .... ..
Bradford ....... ............. .... .. ......

Colum bia ....... ...... .. .
Putnam ........ .. .... .I .... .....
Div. Av. per cent ...... .... ....... 92. 7; ............
Central Division.


H ernando ...... ...... ......
Lake ........... ........... .. ...
Le y ........... ...... .......
Marion ......... 110 100| 110
P asco ........ ..... ...... .. ... .
Sumter .........! 1001 1i25 1001
Volusia ........... ............ .
Div. Av. per cent' ]in0 112' 10
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ ...... ...........
Dade ........... n1 100! 59-1
DcSoto ......... 100' 10n' 100'
Hillshorough .... ...... 90li 900
Lee .............. 0nn 1010 10n!
Manatee ........ 100 10n1 1001
Polk ............ ...... ..... ... ....
St. L ucie ....... I...... ... .. .
Div. Av. per centl 100' fs 97'
State Av. per et.' 10' In' 1ni1


150' ..... ......
7. ............


116'.




S. .





] .. .
' . . .
S . .. . ..
01'. ...... ......


S . .
91 Q, 9 t








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

\VW 'ter
Tomatoes Pears Peaches mel-
COUNTIES ons
S] C C ,

Northern Di- ;:g 0 r, C o
vision S 0 r_) 0
Franklin ........ 801 80 80[ 75 ...... 1001 100
Gadsden ........ 80 75 100 60 ............ 90
Hamilton ..... .. .. ...... 50 50 50 50 60
Jefferson ....... 100 90 95 90 80 701 100
LaFayette ...... ...... ...... 35 20 75 301 50
Leon ........... 85 85 100 35 80 35 100
L iberty ........ .. .. .... ... ... ...... ....... ..... 85
Madison ........ 100 100 50 50 50 50 80
Suw annee ...... .... 0 ... .... . .... 90
Taylor ......... 40 501 30 80| 35| 100
Div. Av. per cent 811 801 711 511 691 451 86
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ 90 851 80 25 75 75 75
Escambia ....... 80 80 50 30 90 75 100
Holmes ......... 100 100 ...... 50 50 110
Santa Rosa..... ...... ...... ...... ..... 25 251 55
Walton ................. ...... ... .... ...... .. 100
Washington .. .....I..... 75 0 50 5 100
Div. Av. per cent! 901 87| 681 431 58! 551 90
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ....... .. ........... 50 40I 100 I)(! 90
Baker .......... 0 40 40 40 | 1001 100 40
Bradford .. ........ ...... ...... ...... 75
Clay ........... 100 90 0G 40 901 SO 85
Columbia ....... 90 90 25 80 85 85 5 90
Putnam ........ 75 60 ...... ....... 75 75! 90
Div. Av. per cent 81l 70 44[- 50nl 9nl0 7S
Central Division.
Hernando ._..... 0[ 320 100- 100 0 1 i 120 150 1i00
Lake ........... 801 80 ..... .... 100 100 60
L evy ........... 100 80 ...... ...... .. ...... 90
Marion ......... 80 85 100 105 100 5 105 100
Pasco .......... 8S 75 75 80l 85! 80! 75
Sumter .........I 100 300 100! 100 125 1001 100
Volusia ......... 80n 75 50' 40 1001 100! 80
Div. Av. per cent! 89 SSI 85! 85! 105, 96! 8
Southern Division.
Brevard ........ ...... I ............ .... .. .. .. ..
D ade ........... 951 7 nl...... ........ .. .. .. 1,,
D eSoto ......... 50) 5 01...... ......I lO l oOl 50n
Hillsborough .... S8O 801 ...... ...... 100' 100 75
L ee ............ 75 751 ...... ...... ...... I ...... I 0n
M anatee ........ 100|1 001 .... I .... 1 00 10o! 50
Polk ........... 80 75 701 70! I0
St. Lucie ....... ...... ........ .... ...... .... ... I ......
Div. Av. per cent) 80| 751 ...... 1 .... .. I 921 921 76
Stnte Av. per (t.t S41 Si C7' r5( 82- 771 84








Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Wat'r
mel- Cantaloup's Pineapples Grapes
COUNTIES ons
0 a 0a '5 Q r


Northern Di- 0 0 0 0 o
0 r 0 3>
vision. 9L IV. U =
Franklin ....... 100 100 100............ 1. 1 00
Gadsden ........ 95 90 901 .. ...... .........
Hamilton ....... 60 50 50............ 75
Jefferson ....... 100 100 100 ..... ....... 1' 0 100
LaFayette ...... 70 ...... ...... .... .. .. ..
Leon ........... 90 100 100 ...... ....... 10 1,0
Liberty .............90 .................. ...... 90 S5O
M adison ........ 80 75 75 ...... ...... 11,' 110
Suwannee 95 .. .. ... ..... 1m0 10
Taylor .......... 100 ...... ..... .. ...... 10I O 100
Div. Av. per cent| 881 861 871...... ....... 97 96
Western Division.
Calhoun ........ 80 ...... ...... ...... ...... 901 90
Escambia ....... 90 100 95 ...... ..... 10 100
Holmes ......... 100 90 90 ... ... 1001 100
Santa Rosa...... 55 75 75 ..... ...... 1 100
W alton ......... 90 100 90 ...... ...... 90 90
Washington .... 105 100 100 ...... ... .... ......
Div. Av. per centi 871 93| 90 ...... ...... 96 96
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........ 100 9..... 100'
Baker .......... 40 40 4 100 10
Bradford .... 70 75 70 ... .. 100 100
Clay ........... 660 ... .... .. ...... 100' SO
Columbia ..... 90 95 95 .. .... 90' 60
Putnam ........ 75 80 651.... 100' 90
Div. Av. per centl 731 761 731...... ......I 98 SS
Central Division.
Hernando ....... 100 100 100 ... .. ...... ......
Lake ........... 60 ............ ... .. .. 50 50
Levy ........... 90 .
Marion ......... 11 100 110 ...... 100 105
Pasco .......... 70 65 70............ 90 95
Sumter ......... 100 100 10 ...... ...... 100' 100
V olusia ......... 80 ...... ...... ...... ...... 100' o
Div. Av. per cent! 88| 91 95 ............' 9
Southern Division.
Brevard ..... ............ .. .. I nn1 100 nnl.. .... .
Dade ........... 100 ...... ..... 1101 1251 100 100
DeSoto ......... 50 ............ 100 100l 100l n00
Hillsborough ... 75 75 80 801 701 100' 90
Lee ............ 100 ... 1001 100 ...... .....
Manatee ....... 501 50 50! 100! 1001 100 100
Polk 801 70....... ................
St. Lucie ....... ...... .. .... 100 55 .. .
Div. Av. per cent! 761 651 671 991 931 100n 98
State Av. per ct.l 831 821 821 99! 93' 96' 94






Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


IC e ) 0 -i

COUNTIES 0 w
0 0 0 0 i y
o no i '0

Northern Divis- n
10on.0
Franklin .85 80 80 85 ........ .......... .....
Gadsden 90 85 8 85 1,550,000 ........ .
Hamilton ... 7 75 100 ..... .. .
Jefferson ....... 100 100 100 .. 1,00 ........
LaFayette ...... 75 75 751 .... .... .........
Leon ........... ..I l10 1100 100 200,000 2.000 1.000
Liberty ........ 98 98; 80 85' 1,000 20,000 50,000
Madiscn ........ 80 100 100 90 ............... .......
Suwannee ...... 85 9 90 .............
Taylor .......... SO 95 80 35 ........ ........ ...
Div. Av. per centl 87| 921 88[ 8311,701.000 23,(00 51.000
Western Division.
Calhoun .. 901 90 100 100 ........ 200.000 50,000
Escambia....... 9 95 90 90........ 15,000 20,000
Holmes ........ 90 95 90 85 ...... ......... 0 2,000
Santa Rosa ..... 90 85 75 80 ........ 4,0001 50,000
Walton ........ 10 100 75 90 ........ 6,000 52,000
Washington . 100 100 100 100........ 5.0001 30,000
Div. Av. per centl 931 931 881 911........ 230,0001 224,000
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........ 901 951 90 90 ... ............... ..
Baker .. ........ .. 95 95 85 90 ........ 500 1,500
Bradford ....... 1001 100 100 100 ........ .
Clay ........... 901 80 701 75 ........ ..............
Columbia ...... 100 95 95 95 ........ 20,0001 2,000
Putnam ........ 100 901 100 90 ........ 5,000 ........
Div. Av. per centl 961 931 901 701 ........ 25,5001 3,500
Central Division.
Hernando ...... 100 110 110 1001........ 1,0001 3,500
L ak e ........... .... . . .. .
Levy ........... 100 100 100 100 3,000 3.000 10,000
Marion ...... 100 100 100 100 ........ 1,000 20,000
Pasco .......... 95 90 75 851 2,7001 460 5,700
Sumter .. ....... 100 1001 75! 1001 1,100 8001 1,000
Volusia ......... 90 1 901 701 80 ........ 15.0001 18.000
Div. Av. per cent: 991 98s 891 941 G.8001 21.2601 38.200
Southern Division.
Br varn d ........ 1 ... ........ .....
1)ndpe .......... 1001 10) 100 100 ................ ........
DoSoto ......... 1 1001 100' 50' 100 ........ ...... ....
Hillsorcuh .... 1 00I 110 901 ........ ....... .........
i .('0 . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .
.Manatee ..... .... 10 1 0 .......... ................
Pollk ........... 90 95 90 ........ ........
St. Lucie .......! 100! 100mo .I ........', .... ..
Div. Av. per centl 99 1 ; 1i;: 100I) ................ i........
Div. Av. per cent1 995 1011 84 2 .
State Av. per ct. 951 f;i 84 ,6f' 1. 7 '.C0' 2S1.7, -0' ?,16.700t
2 Bul




U


















PART II,
WEATHER REPORT.
















I



















































































I














U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE
OF THE

WEATHER BUREAU.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

REPORTS FOR MAY, 1906.


SOME FEATURES OF MAY.

About three-quarters of an inch more rain falls during
May than during April; and the location of the area of
greatest rainfall shifts from the northern and western
portions of the State to the southern. The greatest
monthly total precipitation is 18.0 inches; the least
monthly amount recorded at any station since 1892, was
0.0 inches in 1902. On an average, rain is greatest during
May over the southern portion of the State. The month
is given to abnormally heavy rains, although severe
storms rarely occur. With an area of high barometric
pressure over the Middle Atlantic States and an area of
low pressure over Florida, or in the East Gulf, heavy
rains may be expected over East Florida-particularly if
the Florida low pressure increases in depth. Thunder-
storms are frequent, and occasionally result in high
winds.
There is a sharp rise in temperature, the change for
the month being about 6 degrees higher than during
April. The mean temperature during May is 76 degrees.
A maximum temperature of 102 degrees has occurred,
and a minimum of 38 degrees has prevailed, showing an












unusual range in temperature of 64 degrees. The mean
maximum temperature during May is 86 degrees; the
mean minimum, 66 degrees. Light frost occasionally
forms over interior portions of western and northern
Florida during the first decade; it rarely occurs over the
central portion during any period of May. There is
much cloudiness during the month, with increasing rela-
tive humidity.



GENERAL SUMMARY.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 5 stations .... 29.97
Departure from the normal, 5 records .......... -0.02
Highest observed, at Jacksonville on the 12th ...... 30.41
Lowest observed, at Jacksonville on the 2Sth.... 29.63
Absolute range for the State.................... 0.79

TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean, as determined from records of 56 stations.. 75.2
Departure from the normal, 33 records........... -0.6
Highest monthly mean, at Key West............. TS.S
Lowest monthly mean, at Molino................. 70.4
Highest recorded, at Orange City* on the 2d.... 99
Lowest recorded, at Molino and Johnstown on the
llth .......... ........ .................. 3
Absolute range for the State ................... 61
*Also at Marianna on the 21st.

PRECIPITATION.
Inches.
Average, as determined from records of 55 stations 6.96 ,
Departure from the normal, 39 records.......... -3.39
Greatest anmunt for any 24 hours, at Jacksonville
on the 21st and 22d ............................ 7.7
Greatest monthly amount, at Middleburg......... 17.13
Least monthly amount, at Pensacola ............. 1.74
Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 9










23

SUNSHINE AND CLOUDINESS.

Average number of clear days .................. 12
Average number of partly cloudy days.......... 13
Average number of cloudy days .................. 6

WIND.

Prevailing wind direction ................... Northeast










24

COMPARATIVE DATA FOR STATE. MAY.

PreQIipi-
Temperature station
Year
Monthly Highest Date Lowest Date nthly
Average Average

1892......... 75.3 98 28 48 23* 2.19
1893......... 76.3 101 29 49 5 3.92
1894......... 74.6 98 30 44 21 2 51
1895.......... 75.9 97 26* 48 13 4.46
1896......... 74.7 100 19* 48 9 2.73
1897......... 74.0 99 22 47 2* 2.25
1898......... 76.4 102 28 41 8 1 60
1899 ........ 78.2 101 18 52 1 1.22
1900......... 75.5 96 17 47 12 3 83
1901......... 75.1 98 15* 43 28 4 3S
1902......... 77.7 101 26 51 7T 2.45
1903........ 73.7 101 26 49 1 5.36
1904 ........ 74.9 100 27 44 11 2.51
1905......... 78.7 101 12 48 2 5.56
1906......... 75.2 99 2 1 38 11 6.96
*Also on other dates.

PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Wind Velocity in Relative
Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humidity

STATIONs -

11 I i

acksonville.. 29.90 30.41 12 20,.63 28 8477i 37 7 42 -8
upiter .. 29.97 30.28 12 29.6- 22 9,014 36 W c ;8 8S
ey West.... 29.95 30.17 I2 29.700 1 7,01i 40 oSW. 28 i0 0 -
Pensacola..... 0o.0o 30.39 12 29.74 2 7,850 36 nw 7 I 0 47 .
Tampa........ 29.97 30-33 12 29.67 2n 6,54 37 nw 21 100 77








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1906.


STATIONS.


Northern Section,
Archer...............
Federal Point........
Fernandina.........
Fort Georgef ........
Gainesvill ..........
Huntington ..........
Jacksonville .........
Jasper...............
Johnstown ...........
Lake City............
M acclenny ...........
Middleburg .........
Otter Creek ..........
St Augustine........
Switzerland .........


COUNTIES.


Alachua .....
Putnam.....
Nassau ......
Duval........
Al chua.....
Putnam ....
Duval ........
Hamilton....
Bradford ..
Columbia....
Baker.......
Clay..........
Levy... ....
St. Johns ....
St. Johns... :


Temperature, in degrees Farh. [Precipitation, in inches


75 2-0.1 97
73.8 0.0 91
74.4+1.0 94
73 5-1.1 90
75.5-0.3 96
75.4 -0.5 94
73.2-1.7- 91
72.8-2.4 95
l)73.4 2.1 94
73 6-2.5 95
74.2-1.5 94
730+0.2 97

74 9+1.1 92
a73 8 1.3 94


* 4211
2 4711
1 5211
3 5810
1 4811
2* 5211
L 4911
1 40 11*
1 3811
1 4211
1 4011
1.

2 56 10*
1* 4311


0
t3


371 5.11
28 12 81
26 9.12

30 6 67
29 7.94
23 14.31
40 8 74
36 11.57
36 9.96
36 13.38
... 17.13

24 i020
35 11.42

\^ ---


o









+1.38
+9 44
+4.43

3.72
+4 85
+10.31
-[5.10
+8.54
+7.12
+9.84
+10.82

+6.59
+7.37


12
13
12

9
11
12


10
11


10
1o


25

Sky.

d
I t









14 13 4 e.
9 16 6e.

lne.
... ... ti 1e .
10 3 18 .....
14 10 7e.

1 7 6esw.

S1 13 ne.
15 6 10 ne.
10 5 16 ne.

16 8 7 ne.
S7 [,e.












CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY. 1906-Continued. 26


STATIONS.


COUNTIES.


Central Section.
B artow ............... Polk..........
Broo,.sville .......... Iernando ..
Clermont............. Lake ........
De Land ............ Volusia .....
Eustis ... .. ...... Lake. .. ...
Fort M ead. ....... olk... .....
Fort Pierce ....... l. l i ie ......
( ir sim ere ....... n
[iiveri-n ss .... C it s ........
K isi si niiiee ........ .. )ceola.....
M aa l b r ... l -;rd .....
Mel rritt's Island .. I tlrc var ....
Now Siyrni a .. ... Volsia ...
()o ;lal; ..... ... .. ... M ari .....
Orange, (ity: ... Volusia .....
Orange nie ... III. Int ....


I Temperatiire. in degrees Falir.



rt ~ ~ -------------------
I I








14 78.0 ( 97 2 5 1 28a
S-54-06 93 2_ 4 11 26
SI 9--1 3 91 4 11 B3
in 7.,Q ) 110 A 1 i .11


23 77.31 1 9 97
15 75 8 0 8 95
10 77 -+0.8 9
(6 75 4 -*0 91

5 770 II I 9
2: 76 6 0-1 3 91
18 75 i3 I 0.7 91
1!) 76 0 I I I 1
1; 77 1 10 5 991
21 76 6i 94


57 11
62 1*
54 11
5 1 11

63 1
64 1I
63 1 I
5211
4t8 1
55|11


4 .50
1; 77
8 3:8
10,36
9 (XM
7 140
9 46
5 25S


50,

+4 961
-i .13
3.181
S45S
-1-6 7(
(1 35--
| 1 42
2 6 55
| 2 091


2 24
2 70
3.48
2 30 .
2.29
3 H14
2.34-


Sky



i


C
I.
V
be.
C '


7 16 14 1 sw.
10 12 14 5 w.
9 2 24 5se.
10 16 5e.
14 15 2ne.
6 26 5 0 w.
13 13 3 15 '.
241 8 2sw.
9 0 19 6"sw.
1 8 22 I se.
8 21 8, 2e.
l3 12 8 1 se.

1 13i 13 .6
11 1 1 1.1 2 w.
1 5 21 2 iw.








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1906-Continued


STATIONS.





Orlando..............
Plant City............
Rockwell. ............
" St. Leo ........... ...
Tam pa...............
Tarpon Springs ......
Titusville............
Southern Section.
Avon Park...........
Flamimgo ............
Hypoluxo... ........
Jupiter...............
Key West............
M anatee .............
M iam i ...............
M years ................
Nocatee. ............


COUNTIES.
a





Orange... ... 98
Hillsbor'gh.. 121
M arion ...... ...
Pasco.. 140
Hillsbor'gh..20
Hillsbor'gh. 201
Brevard...... 11


De Soto......150
Monroe .. .. ll
Dade......... 8'
Dade......... 28
Mcnroe ....22
Manatee ..... 16
Dade......... ...
Lee........... 19
De Soto...... 43


Temperature, indegrees Fahr.


77.2+0.
78.7 -0.S
76.6]+0.4
77.4 1. 1
78.8 -O.
75.3 -0.i
78 0-0.L
76.6 -0.
76.8 0.1


4 0 Q a C 0

97 2 51 11 29 9.40

92 1* 5012 42 7.93
94 6 5311 28 6.85
9131 5511 26 4.77
9130 5111 30 4.08
94 3 6011 30 9.78


94 6* 6011 28 4.44
94 9 65 6* 23 3.45
94 6 6525 2 8.42
89 5 6819 17 7.04
8727 I7013 16 5.23
9131 5611 29 3.38
91 7 6 6 2 7.89
9130 6012* 26 6.12
9530 5412 34 1.86


Precipitation, in inches
I Ir


I


in ihe


a


o 0




+6.04

+3 92
+3.22
+2.32
+1.50
+5.60


+0.48
-0.33
+3.17
-1.75
-2.07
-0o.34
+2.12
+2.97
-1.16


Sky










15 16 0
3 0 *


815 8
3 20 8

16 11 4
4 8 19


16 9 5
17 4 10
14 9 8
4 20 7
13 9 9
14 14 3
5 24 2
23 5 3
9 15 7


a
o


0
0-
'0





ne.

ne.

W.
ne.
w.
e.


e.
sw.
ne.
se.
ne.
Sw.
se.
se.
se-sw










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR M AY, 1906--Continued. 28


STATIONS


Western Section.
Apalachicola ........
Bonifay ...........
Carrabelle...........
DeFuniak Springs...
A Fenholloway ........
G alt .................
M adison ...........
Marianna....... ...
Molino. ..............
M onticello..........
Mount Pleasant......
Pensacola ...........
St. Andrew .........
Stephensville ........
Tallahassc .....
\\'ausau ...... .....
\cwahitchka .......


COUNTIES


Franklin .... 28
Holmes......116
Franklin.....12
Walton ......193
Taylor....... ..
Santa Rost.. ...
Madison...... .
Jackson.....85
Escanibia.... 49
Jefferson.. .. 207
Gadsden...... .
Escaibia... 5
Washington. 12
Taylor.......
Leon. ........ 73
Washington. 25
Calhoun.. .. .


Temperature, in degrees Fahr. Precipitation, in inches Sky a
o



7 0 L: : l


74.0 ..... 10 21 4 -0.96 1 7 e.
. . . .
7.4 C" ,a







--. .,9 0 1 36 2.95 -1.62 1.12 .. .
S.
CO m w S

Pg r Z/5.c Z (


74.0.... 8928 5210 21 3 44 -0.96 1 70 6 11 2( 0se.
73..-1.8 9520 4511 34 4.54 -0.8i 1.86 7 7) 15s.

71.4 --2.7 9620 43 11 36 '2.95 .-L62 1.12 7 8 20 3s.

I .. ... .. . .. .. 1 5... ..
9221 12 15 4sw.
g750 .. 921 4910 33 7 06 +3.26, 1.35 10 ... ...ne.
73 6 -0.2 9921 4311 44 6.6( +0.36 1.60 6 12 13 (ne.
70 4 3 7 97 1 38 11 4 2.9 --2.431.61 4 22 7 2s.
73 ..... 96 1 4711 3 543 ....... 2 46 5 10 w.
. 95 1* . 3 10 ..... 2.00 2 .. ....
72.0-1.5 8620 5310 21 1.74 1.5 0.51 7 15 9 7sw.
72.2 -2 8 9021 43 12 2 2.52 --1.67 1.24 7 20 11 Csw.
72. --1 5 91 2 3 111 3i 3.35 -+1.14 1.33 4 10 19 2sw.
73 I -1-0. 91 1 49 10 26 2 91 -0.70 0.9C; 9I 12 11 .
97 19 .... ... 3..1 3.3 1 .4 8 7 6sw.
i3 ....... .


All records are used in determining S tat means, I:ulL thle MIleani dep I)l'uires froin the iiortel'll templilrature and
I)i'ceil)itation iare 1ased only on records from sta.ions that have ten or minl years of ohse.rvatlion.
Ti[ letters a, h, c, etc., in'licate mininlr of days missing from report. *Moure ihan one day.
SNeather I)burea'iL. Th''llcrinloiineters are noti self rlegistim:ihig and readings are inade at 7 a. i1., 2 p, in. ;and 9
p. in. daily.




















PART III,
COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS AND COM,
MERCIAL FEEDING STUFF.










4 31


REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.
Special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding
stuff sent in by purchasers, under Sec 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND), SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND sENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to se-
cure fair samples of sufficient size tomake the necessary
determinations, and to allow the preservation of a du-
plicate sample in case of protest or appeal. These du-
plicate samples will be preserved for two months from
date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special samples from the purchaser. The propri-
ety of the method of drawing and sending the samples
as fixed by the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very smallquantity (less than ounce)
frequently there are no marks, numbers or other means
of identification. The postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to
avail themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10
of the law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The sample must be not less than one
half pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture, the senders name and ad-
dress must also be on the package. This rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.






32

INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each pack-
age of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have. securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. This provision of the law-Section 3
of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6, of both laws, tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag
and stamp, are irregular, and fraudulent; the absence of
the guarantee tag and stamp being evidence that the man-
ufacturer or dealer has not complied with the law.
Without the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the
goods are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has no
recourse against the manufacturer or dealer, such goods
are sold illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of
little value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers
now comply strictly with the law and regulations, by
placing the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.
The interest of the consumer, the farmer, or stockman,
demands that they purchase no Commercial Fertilizers,
of Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not have securely
attached, the guarantee tag and inspection stamp.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of the Sheriffs of the various counties
is called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State









from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior, or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff.
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

The following tables of average composition of Commer-
cial Feed Stuff is compiled from the report of the Con-
neticut Experimental Station. They cover a large num-
ber of analysis and are fully representative of the stand-
ard composition of the various feeds in the tables. They
are given for reference, should a feed stuff vary material-
ly from these averages, its purity may be questioned. If
the "ash" content exceed to any great extent, sweepings
may be suspected. If the crude fiber be excessive, oat
hulls, corn cobs, rice chaff or other ligneous or fibrous
materials may be suspected. While the valuable consti-
tuents, "protein" "sugar and starch," and "fat," should
not materially vary from these tables of averages, that
are practically standards of comparison, for the feeds
mentioned in the tables.

COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their pro-
tection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.
3 Bul.








34

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF C O M M E R CIAL
FEED STUFF.


NAME OF FEED.


Cotton Seed Meal...............

Linseed Meal ...................

Wheat Bran...................

Mid flings,...................

Mixed Feed, (wheat)............

Corn Meal............ ..........

Corn (Grain)...................

Corn Cobs....... ..........

Corn and Cob Meal............

Corn and Oats, equal parts ....

Wheat ......... .............

O ats ........... .............

Soja Beans ......................

Velvet Beans and Hulls........

Rice Hulls .......................

Gluter Meal...................

Gluter Feed.....................

Hominy Feed...................

Rye Products (bran)............

Barley Sprouts .................

Distillers Grains ...............

Oat Feed.....................

Provinder......................

Victor Feed....................

XXX Corn and Oat Feeds......


Crule' Pro- !Starch
Fbrel tein Id at Ash
g'tlar


7 05

8 76

8 39

6 36

7 80

1 64

2 10

30 10,

6 60

5 80

1 80

9 50

4 80

9 20

35 70

1 25

7 31

4 05

4 53

10 94

12 90

20 57

3 91

10 63

9 941


43 16 24 59

34 70 35 91

15 93 54 62

17 14 50 60

16 86 54 44

8 73 71 32

10 50 69 60

2 40; 54 90

8 50. 64 SO-

9 60 66 10

11 90 71 99

11 80 59 70

34 00 28 o00

19 70' 51 30

3 60 38 60

37 06; 46 52!

24 17 54 30:

10 49 65 27

15 57 61 28

27 20 42 66

32 23 33 341

7 91 54 581

10 62! 67 341

8 83: 62 461

96 6 64 66


9 22

5 ,4

4 TO,

4 26

4 79

3 14

5 40

0 50
3 50S

4 40

2 10i

5 00

16 50

4 50

0 70:

3 27'

3 44

7 85,

3 02!

1 56

1209



4 03

4 02
5 09


6 654

6 12

*) 33

4 30

5 30)

1 20

1 50)

1 4)

1 5'-

2 20

1 S0

3 09

5 40

3 30

13 20

8) 63

1 80

2 54

3 80

634

1 86

5 34

1 83

3 64

3 24







35

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED
STUFF-Continued.

FCrude Pro- Starch
NAME OF FEED. t dr^ a Fat Ash
IFibreI tein Sugar Ft Ash

Corn and Oat Feeds............. 12 09 8 7 61 73 3 73 3 22
Proprietary Horse Feeds........ 9 57 12 48 60 54 4 27 2183
Molasses Feeds.................. 8 49 16 34 51 72 1 79 6 18
Poultry Feeds................... 4 62 15 891 60 27 5 32 27 63

Beef Scrap. .................. ........ 44 70 3 28 14 75 29 20
Quaker Dairy Feed..............15 53 14 42 52 12 4 05 5 31
Creemer3 Feed................. 10 07 20 06 51 0 5 38 3 57











Composition of Fertilizer Materials,

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Po:ah


Nitrate of Soda ....... ... 17 o 1 .
Sulphate of Ammonia ....... 21 to 24
Dried Blood.. ..... .... 12 to 17 .. ...
Concentrated Tankage ....... 12 to 5 1 to 2 ....
Bone Tankage ............... 6 to 1) to 1 ...
Dried Fish Scrap ........ 8 to 11 to ...
Cotton Seed Meal............. 7 to 10 2 to 3
Hoof M eal ......... ... : 13 to 17 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


1- to 2


I Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... ....... .......... .6 to 32
Florida Rock Pnosphate.... ........ ....... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.... ........ 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone............... 3 to 6 5 to S 15 to 17
Steamed Bone................ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissoved Bone.............. 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

Phos-
Actual Am'nia phoric Lime
Pota'h Acid
M uriate of Potash........... ......U.. .
Sulphate of Potash .......... 48 to 52 .................. .
Double Sul. of Pot.& Mag. 26 to 30 ... ...
Kainit ....................... 12 to 12 ...... .................
Sylvinit....................... 16 to 20 ....... .......
Cotton Seed HullAshes...... 15 to 30 ........ to 9 10
Wood A-hes, uneached..... 2 to 8 ........ to 2 30 to 25
Wood Ashes leached......... Ito 2 ........ 1 to 1 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems............... 5to 8 2 to 4......... 31
Cow Manure (fresh)......... 0.40 0 to 41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh). ..... 0.53 Oto60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)...... 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh) .......... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)............. 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure. ...... 0 63 0.76 0.26 0.70


Ammona hophri
\' --i











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA
JANUARY, 1906.


AND FERTILIZ-
SEA PORTS,


Less than 5 to 10
Ammoniates. 5 tons tons.
Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent.
Ammonia ............... $57.00 $56.50
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per


10 tone
& over.

$56.00


cent. Ammonia .......... 72.00
Dried Blood 16 per cent. Am-
m onia ...... ............ 56.00


71.50 71.00

55.50 55.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20)....
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20)......
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ..... .........
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot-
ash (K20) .................
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash......
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ......


52.00


51.00 50.00


32.00 31.00 30.00

46.00 45.00 44.00


82.00
14.00

17.00


81.00 80.00
13.50 13.00

16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone,10
cent Ammonia ........... 36.00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6
per cent. Ammonia, 8 per
cent. Phosphoric Acid..... 28.00
Owl Brand Tankage, 51 per cent.
Ammonia ................ 20.00
Raw bone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid 33.00
Ground Castor Pomace 6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid .......... 23.00


35.50 35.00


27.50 27.00

19.50 19.00

32.50 32.00


22.50 22.00











Bright Cotton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tations ........ ......... 31.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6 per
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tions ........ ........... 21.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent. Avail
able Phosphoric Acid......
Odorless Phosphate..........


15.00

14.00

25.00
25.00


29.50 20.u1


2-3.-0 -2o. 1


14.50 14.50

13.50 13.00

24.50 24.00
24.50 24.00


MISCBLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ..............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ...................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1 ,3 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 K20 Pot-
ash ......................
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 11/2 per
cent. Ammonia, 11/2 per cent.
Potash ..................
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land plaster in sacks........


25.00

16.00


21.00


16.00
16.00
10.50


24.50 24.00

15.50 15.00


20.50 20.00


15.50
15.50
10.25


15.00
15.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging, any special or regular formula, is $1.50 per top
in excess of above prices.













JACKSONVILLE PRICES CURRENT.



FEED STUFFS.

Pure wheat bran, per ton, $25.00.
Pure middlings. per ton, $27.00.
Purina feed, per ton, $26.00.
Victor meal, per ton, $25.00.
Cotton hulls, per ton, $10.00.
Other quotations are:
Gluten food, for cows, per ton, $29.00.
Jersey cow feed, per ton, $22.00.
Purina stock food, 100 sacks, 175 lbs. .i;..'i.
Purina stock food, less quantity. 100 lbs. $27.00.
Atlas stock feed, per ton, $28.00.
Atlas sugar feed, per ton, $25.00.
Southern seed rye, per bushel, $1.25.
Texas rust-proof seed o:ts. per bushel, i5c.
May or Burt seed oats. 32 pounds to bushel, per bushel,
80 cents.
Cotton seed meal, bright, 100 sacks, per ton, $31.00.
Cotton seed meal, bright, less quantity. per ton, $31.50.
Cotton seed meal. dark, car load, per ton, $24.00.
Cotton seed meal. dark, 100 sacks, per ton, $24.50.
Salt. 200-lb sacks, per sack, $1.
Rock salt, for stock, per pound, lic.
White corn, car load. per sack, )f 100 pounds, $1.35.
White corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.40.
White corn, less quantity. per sack of 100 pounds. $1.45.
Mixed corn. 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds. $1.35.
Mixed corn, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.40.
White oats. car load, per sack of 100 pounds. $1.60.
White oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.65.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds. $1.70.
Fancy white clipped oats, 100 pounds, 5c per sack
higher.
Fancy white clipped oats, 100 pounds, 6c per sack
higher.
Mixed oats, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.65.








40

Note-Consumers are urged to compare the current
prices with the "Feeding Value" as shown in the tables
of analysis of feed stuff. It will be noted that Middlings
and Bran at the prices quoted are more economical tha:
other feeds, which sell for more per ton and are far be-
low the standard in value. Low grade feeds, mill offall.
and similar feed, are largely advertised and sell for
higher prices than standards, though of much less value.
A comparison of these prices and tile tables will show
that prices does not govern value or quality; that sonie of
the highest priced feeds have less value than others that
can be purchased for less money. The effect of the
"Stock Feed Law" has already been of marked benefit to
the State. A number of low grade feeds, with fancy
brands, and largely advertised, have been to large extent
withdrawn from the State. If consumers will canrful-l
steady the table sof analysis of various brands, and com-
pare them with the market prices, and purchase onl
those that compare favorably in quality and price. in-
ferior feeds will soon disappear from the State.











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into Protein by ..................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 16.47
Nitrogen into Portein by ..................... 6.25
Bone Phosphate into phosphoric acid,multiplied by 0.458
Phosphoric Acid into Bone Phosphate,multiply by 2.184
Murate of Potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into Murate potash, multiply by.. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.4ti6
For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen is equiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and you
get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.












STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers, at the date of issuing a bulletin,
or the opening of the "season." They may, but seldom do,
vary from the market prices, and are made liberal to meet
any slight advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which the
various ingredients necessary to use in compounding a fer-
tilizer can be purchasedfor cash in ton lots at Florida sea
ports.
These price lists, in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1906 deducted
therefrom.
The valuation for 1906 being the same as for 1905.











STATE VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1906.
Available Phosphoric Acid 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5- cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.10 per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per cent.x$1.00 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. 1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................3.42 per cfnt.x 3.10- 10.60
Potash.. ... ... ..... ...7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging ......... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ................... 26.57
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available phosphoric acid. .. 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia............. ......2 per cent.x 3.10- 6.20
Potash ......... ...... ..... ..2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging....................... .... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports........ .......$17.90
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid -93 cents per unit
Potash (K20) -99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) $2-79 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.











SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers) that the
law is becoming more generally understood by the farmer,
fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have any
reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on the
goods furnished them, do not hesitate to send in samples
for analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of the law
-without charge-the inspection fees covering the cost of
analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had a di-
rect influence upon the increased quality of the goods sold
in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, witnessed
and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved a safe-
guard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and manifac-
turer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or fraud-
ulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection de-
manded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials only
upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to an-
alysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida, are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertlizing materials are im-
ported direct by factories, and dealers located at our sea
port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Germany
are now frequently received by Florida importers, while
large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured at and
exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida sea ports as cheaply as at any of
the sea ports of the country.
On a preceding page a table of the "Average Composition of
Commercial Feed Stuffs" will be found. Consumers should
study this table, select the food best suited to his demands-
price of course considered-see that the "Guarantee" on the
package he purchases compares favorable with the average in
the table, and if doubtful of the truth of the statement on the
"Guarantee' send at once a sample of the suspected material to
the Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Send one-half
pound in a "tin can sealed," as provided by law.










LIGHT WEIGHIT-FALSE STATEMENTS.

Some complaint has been made recently as to failure to
furnish full weight as guaranteed.
In one case of light weight cotton seed meal, discovered
by the Inspector, the goods were sold by the sheriff, as
provided by law.
Other cases have been reported, particularly "Kainit.."
The public, dealers, and consumers, are cautioned to
examine their purchases, and in case of doubt, have the
sacks weighed at the railroad station, or at the ware-
house-reporting deficiencies in weight if found to exist,
with names of sellers, manufacturers and witnesses to the
weighing and other facts, and circumstances. This
applies to fertilizers, and feeding stuff-(also to grain
and other articles).
The department is desirous of maintaining the standard
of both quality and quantity as expressed in the gauar-
antee, and to this end requests the active co-operation of
all citizens.
A false statement of weight on grain or feed, is a misde-
meanor, and subjects the seller to fine or imprisonment,
or both, under Chapter 4976 (No. 92) Acts of 1901. Also
the sale of light weight fertilizer and feed s"'uff, subjects
the seller to a fine and forfeiture of the goods, under the
Fertilizer and Feed Stuff Laws.









ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO. CANADA
ASHES.

The attention of -purchasers, dealer and consumers, is
called to the analysis of various ashes, hard wood and
otherwise, in this and other reports, seldom do these ashes
cantain more than 3 per cent of potash-frequently less
than 1 per cent; as the potash content is the only fertil-
izing ingredient (excepting a very small amount of phos-
phoric acid) it becomes a very expensive source of potash.
Most of the ashes examined by the department have evi-
dently been leached. Ashes should be purchased strictly
upon guarantee (as should all other fertilizers and feeds)
and the seller held strictly to his guarantee.
There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this
State. When they can be purchased at a price compara-
ble with their actual value they are doubtless a most val-
uable source of potash. The average price of these goods is,
however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained
from this source generally costs much more than from
other reliable sources-Sulphate, or Muriate of Potash.
Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory, Maple, Palmetto
and other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0.57 to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth
from $0.62 to $4.66 per ton at seaports. The average of
four samples shows 2.56 per cent. of Potash. Guarantees
are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The mimimum is the
actual guarantee. The best unleached ashes contain but
8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. L. HEIlaBUGanR, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).

Phosphoric Acid


NAME OR BRAND


Pine Ashes..................
Fertilizer No. 3 (Sulphate of
Potash)....................
Fertilizer No. 4..............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Hard Wood Ashes.. ...........
Fertilizer... ................ .
Fertilizer.....................
Hard Wood Ashes...........
Fertilizer ..... .............
Dissolved Bone Black.........
Ground Ky. Tobacco Stems....
Fertilizer ..... ..............
Fertilizer.....................
Fertilizer ....................
F ertilizer ..... ...............
Cotton Seed Meal.............


842 8
843
844 31
845 9
846 4
847.
848...
849 14
850 .
851 ...
852
853 5
854 ...
855 ...


I I






.35 8.36 0.93 9.29

.26 .. .. .. ......
00 3.99 0.64 4.63
.75 11.52 1.35 12.87

.. 5.68 1.87 7.55
.58 168.97 0.40 17.37
.8 26 0.19 8.45
. 8.87 0.23 9.10
.03 2.5 5.14 7.66
9 32 0.08 9.40
. ... ..... .. .66


BY WHOM SENT


--- -7.98 B. S. Ashley, Lakeland, Fla


4.30
8.25

2.99
0.25

2.70

3.06
4.02
2.47
5.23
3 95


7.63)


47.32 F. T. Dorsey, Pebb'e, Fla.
6.97 F. T. Dorsey, Pebble, Fla.
.. .. E. A. Hargrove, Quincy, Fla.
0.68 J. E. Pale, Sanford, Fla.
15.56W. H. Meynardie, Jaeksonville, Fla.
10.95 Johnson & Co., Leesburg, Fla.
1.85 S. A. Bravo, Miami, Fla.
6.74 H. G. Hicks, Galloway, Fla.
...... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
10.67 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
11.95T. G. Albritton, Gardner, Fla.
2.57 Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
7.46 J. S. Smart, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
12.00W. E. Wilder, Arcadia, Fla.
...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee, Fla.


- -












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND


Cotton Seed Meal.............
Fertilizer No. 1... ..........
Fertilizer N o. 2................
Fertilizer ...................
Acid Phosphate No. 657 .....
Fertilizer .... ........
Fertilizer (R. I. B. 35)..........
F fertilizer ...............
Cotton Seed Meal............
Cotton Seed Meal..............
Fertilizer ...............
Fertilizer ... .. ... .
Orange Fruiter ........ .
Fertilizer.. .. ..
Tankage. .. .... .
Tankage.............. .
Fertilizer .. .......
Fertilizer No. 1 (Sulphate l ,f
Potash) ... ...... .
Fertilizer No. 2 (Sulpltdi of
Potash) .......... .
Fortilizr N o. 1 ........


11.17
8 72
9.2l





10.940







9 6l
....


Phosphoric







9.75 1.1





5.18 2.6s'


8, 48 0.Sti
8.25 0.27
S47 0.15
6.25 10.)0

10.2r, 0.:;3



3 1I6 3.)7


Acid i
C3
"- BY WHOM SENT




8.1 I Florida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee, F
10.94 2 60 5.1( W. It. Mevnardie, Jacksonville, Fla.
7.62 4 68 8 94 W11. 3IMeynardie. Jacksonville, Fla.
9 28 2 5" 2.73 Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, F
17.55 ... ..... 1 0. Iainter Fert. Co., Jacksonville,
6 4l 3 41 10.63 11 Morgan. Fort Ogd n, Fla.
9),l| 4.5; 11 80 [. W. Graves, Ocee, Fla.
7.,' 3.08 9.92 Joseph IDuncan, Lilly. Fla.
.... 7.95 .... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahasseo, F
1 97 4.69 1.45 Florida Cotton Oil Co Jacksonville, I
9 33 5 26 4.91 E 1R. Parker, Pebble, Fla.
8 52 3.81 12.04 J. 1. Soaler, Oakland, Fla.
8. 3.80 11.. 10 \rmoun r Fort. Works, Jacksonville, Fla
7 i' 2 93 9 So L,'ee t Lton, Areadia, Fla.
5 47 9,95 .. .. Sanier's FI'rt, Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.92 9.75.. .sar ler'.s 'For. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
10 5.O 3.21 11. 691E. M. lruiumby, Dunedin, Fla.

..... 9 9O ll .\. A. 'rry, I')liona, Fla

48 .18 II. A. l' 'rry, o(miioina, Fla
7 4 : 6 33 3 ';A. 1,. I arrioiifton, W inter Haven, Fla.


la.


'la.
Fla.



la
la.


i.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND



Fertilizer No. 2................
Fertilizer ..... ................
Fertilizer .....................
S Fertilizer ........... ... ...
Fertilizer........ ........ .
Fertilizer No. 12........... ...
Nitrate of Soda...... ......
Cotton Seed Meal............
Acid Phosphate...............
Bulphate of Potash...... .........
Fertilizer......................
Fertilizer No. 1..... .......
Fertilizer No. 2..................
Cottou Seed Meal.............
Fertilizer ......................
Cotton Seed Meal ...........
Velvet Beans and Hulls........
Fertilizer ......................
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Ashes No. 1.................
Ashes No. 2 ...................


4 Bul.


_~_


2
a




876 9.57
878 ......
879 .. .
880 .....
881 9.69
882 4.92
883 ... ..
884 ......
885 ......
88 ......
887 .....
888 ......
889 ......
890 ......
891......
892 ......
893
894 ......
895 ....... .
896 ..
897 ..
898 ....:


Phosphoric Acid






6.93 0 81 7.74
1.66 1.34 3.00
5.54 1.67 7.21
5 28 2.62 7.90
5.42 1.12 6.54
4.83 1.46 6.29


15.06 1.46 16.52

5.48 0.43 5.91
6.45 1.05 7.50
4.27 2 52 6.79

7.13 1.07 8.20
. . . . .S
0.87
7.39 0.44 7.82



..............


~


3.21
5.80
3.13
3.68
3.27
3.40
18.60
8.00


3.88
3.38
4.62
7.56
4.04
8.23
3.38
2.28
8.13
8.13


0
SBY WHOM SENT



13.38 A. B. Hariingion, Winer Haven, Fa.
7.20 W. H. Howard, Deer Field, Fla.
9.02 Se ujdr's Fert. Co. Jacksonville, Fla.
10.51 S.C. Gates, Wimaumi, Fla.
9 09 W. H. Platt, Lilly, Fla.
10.43 0. B. Graham, Pebble, Fla
...... FranKlin Tylr, Arcadia, FlI.


49.16
10.9( V. P. Cowburn. Crescent City, Fla.
9.09 C. L. Eaddy, Linden, Pla.
9 .99 .
...... Florida Cotton Oil Co., TallahaseH,F Ia.
8.7 8- M. Alsobrook, Dania, Fla.
..... J. B. Huggins, Bluff Springs, Fla.
0.89 W. A. Terrell, Bushnell, Fla.
9.93B. J. Lohmeyer, Seven Oaks, Fla.
...... W. Ellis, Caryville, Pla.
.......Florida Co'ton Oil Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
2.64 L.Tedder, Boynton, Fla.
3.86 Tedder, Boynton, Fla.












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND.


------ -


Fertilizer .......................
Fertilizer............... ......
Cotton Seed Meal ..........
Fertilizer ....... .... .......
Acid Phosphate................
Fertilizer No. 1................
Sheep Manure.................
Fertilizer............. ......
Fertilizer No. 4 ...............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Fertilizer .......................
Fertilizer .......... ..........
Sea Bird Guano..............
Kainit ................... .....
Fertilizer............. ......
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Kainit.......................
Acid Phosphate..............
Nitrate of Soda............
Kainit .... ..
Fertilizer No. l................
Fertilizer No. 2............ .
Fertilizer No. 3........ ......


I


900.


901 .
902 .
908 .
904 ......
905 ..
906.. .
907 ...
908 ... .

910 ..
911 .. .
912 ....
913
914 .....
915 ...
916
917 .....
9181.....
919 ...
920
921; .


__


Phosphoric Acid


S .



4.97 1.18 6.15
3.02 3.70 6.72

3.63 2.62 6.25
12.54 0.34 12.88
5.99 1.59 7.58
1.76
4.74 0.92 5.66
6.41 1.10 7.51

6.03 0.45 6.48
2.61 4.71 7.32
...... .. ... 13 00

4.73 1.76 6.49
...... ...... ......

15.84 0.85 16.69


6.0i 0.78 6.81
7.71. 0.13 7.92
8.3!6 0.83 8.65;


0
a
o
S



5.40
2.33
8.64
6.75

3.34
2.90
4.00
3.79
7.94
3.69
4.06
10.33

4.64
7.65


17.80

4.27
3.95
4.06


BY WHOM SENT.

o

5.12L.Tedder, Boyton, Fla.
10.47 Hux Umatilla, Fla.
...... J. L. Alexander, Blounts Town, Fla.
10.99 J. S. Smart, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
S... M. B. Anderson, Edwards, Fla
8.71 Sander's Pert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
1.96 W. S. Ross, Sanford, Fla.
7.04 R. Christiensen, Ovedio, Fla.
7.68 L. Eaddy, Linden, Fla.
...... N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs, Fla.
11.52 J. R. Leatherman, Delray, Fla.
7.48 C. T. Brown, DElray, Fla.
2.10 John T. Hill, Tarpon Springs, F;a.
12.51 J. W. O'Neal, Lamonte, Fla.
6.75 A. S. Nelson, Dunedin. Fla.
...... Florida Cotton Oil Co Tallalassee, Fla.
12.65 M. F. Horn, Jasper, Fla.
...... 11. Anderson, Edwards, Fla.
...... S Page, lartow, Fla.
12.54 S. C. Counce, Lake City, Fla.
11.89 Sartorius, Seminole, ilt.
11.63. Hartoriius, Seminole, VI'l
11.783 Sartebrius, SHninole, Fla.


.









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND
o06


Fertilizer No. 1 ...................... 922
Cotton Seed Meal No. 2............. 923
Fertilizer No. 3 ...................... 924
Kainit ............ .................. 925
Fertilizer .......................... 926
Fertilizer No. 2 ...................... 927
Fertilizer No. 1 ...................... 928
Fertilizer No. 1. ................... .. 929
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1, No. 2, No. 3. 930
Cotton Seed Meal No. 4, No. 5....... 931
Dried Blood No. 34,371 .............. 932
Cotton Seed Meal .................... 933
Fertilizer No. 1...................... 934
Fertilizer No. 2...................... 935
Cotton Seed Meal................... 936
Fertilizer No. 1 ...................... 937
Fertilizer No. 2...................... 938
Fertilizer No. 2 ...................... 939
Fertilizer ........................... 940
Fertilizer ........................... 941
Cotton Seed Meal .................... 942
Fertilizer .......................... 943


Phosphoric
Acid
a BY WHOM] SENT

So
H ___ __
... 0.34 1.78 2.12 0.35 43.04 J. W. Robertson, Chipley, Fla.
......... .... 7.12 ... J. W Robertson, Chipley, Fla.
....10.07 0.94 11.01 1.88 2.06 J. W. Robertson, Chipley, Fla.
............... ........ ..12.971C. W atson, Jasper, Fla.
..... 3.66 2.16 5.8215.10 3.491G. A. Spross, Winter Waven.
. 8.38 2.01110.39 3.31 3.80 W. W. Knowles, Altha, Fla.
... 9.80 0.85 10.65 2.43 2.42 W. W. Knowles, Altha, Fla.
. 5.44 2.25 7.69 3.81 6.84 Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
..... ..... ... 7.59 ..... Florida Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
.... .... ... ..... 7.05 .... Florida Tobacco Co., Quincy, Fla.
. ... ... ... ..... 14.72 ..... E. O. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
..... ..... ..... ..... 7.18 .....Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
..... 6.70 1.58 8.28 1.88 1.67 J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
..... 6.16 0.65 6.81 5.46 5.76 J. R. Davis, Bartow, Fla.
......... ..... .... 7.80 .....A. L. W ilson Co., Quincy, Fla.
.... 8.25 0.87 9.12 2.79 4.01 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
..... 7.14 1.48 8.63 2.82 3.83 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
.. 4.82 2.23 7.05 3.91 6.44 Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.... 7.121 8.12 3.38 11.09 ..Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
..... 4.470.74 5.21 3.17 18.60 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
. .. .. .... .... 6.75 .... J. S. Howell, Chumuckla, Fla.
..... 8.221 0.261 8.58 6.18 10.591W. E. Wilder, Lilly, Fla.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


H. G. Blood and Bone No. 645......
H. G. Blood and Bone No. 594.......
F ertilizer ...........................
Fertilizer No. 1 ................... ...
F ertilizer ...........................
A shes ..............................
Fertilizer No. 00 .....................
Ground Ky. Tobacco Stems..........
Acid Phosphate ................... ..
Tankage No. 3 .......................
F ertilizer ..........................
Pebble Phosphate ...................
F fertilizer ..........................
Fertilizer "A ....................
Fertilizer "B" ....................
Fertilizer "A" .....................
Fertilizer .........................
Fertilizer .........................
Fertilizer ...........................
Fertilizer "A" .....................
Cotton Seed Meal No. 18169.........
Cotton Seed Meal No. 13,885. .......


Phosphoric
Acid.

.' 5 ~ BY WHOM SENT.



944 9.191...... .. 2.10 12.09 ..... Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
945 11.15 ....... 2.93 12.38 ..... Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
946 ..... 8.65 0.36 9.01 4.18 11.27 W. T. Linebough, Tampa, Fla.
947 7.98 6.31 0.30 6.61 3.95 12.66 W. G. Nosworthy, McIntosh, Fla.
948 .... 5.96 6.25 12.21 4.60 4.38 A. H. MacFarlain, David, Fla.
949 3.58 .................... 2.44 Benson Bros., Boyton, Fla.
950 .55 .... ....... .... 0.11 0.09 Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
951 ................. .. 2.79111.21 J. H. Blake, Palmetto, Fla.
952.. 15.80 1.30 17.10 ............ Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
953 ...............3.47 11.091 .... J. H. Blake, Palmetto, Fla.
954 6.64 8.24 0.35 8.59 4.27112.04 F. P. Conroy, Jacksonville, Fla.
955............. 26.00 ......... S. McFall, Tampa, Fla.
956 7.18 6.53| 4.40 10.93 4.08 9.73 G. H. A. Fish, Pomona, Fla.
957 ..... 6.811 0.84 7.65 1.94 6.52 W. C. Slator, Bonifay, Fla.
958 ..... 6.971 0.96 7.93 2.731 1.91 W. C. Slator, Bonifay, Fla.
95911.54 8.75 3.0011.75 1.911 2.10 J. E. Pitts, Bonifay, Fla.
960 9.10 5.871 0.72 6.59 3.09,13.71 John H. Blake, Palmetto, Fla.
961 8.07 5.40 0.86 6.26 3.31 14.19 E. L. Sommers, Braidentown, Fla.
962 8.1: 8.031 2.22110.251 9.98 8.09 H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
963 7.54 5.391 1.971 7.361 3.841 8.92 Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
964 .... .. .. .. 1 8.34 .. Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
965 ........ .. .. ... 7.61 ..... Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
o Phosphoric
Z Acid. 0

NAME, OR BRAND. S BY WHOM SENT.
od
o o
0o Cc 0 C
-1 0 P ____________
Fertilizer ............... ....... 966 .... 5.66 1.16 6.82 2.28 3.681F. D. Waldie, Lakeland, Fla.
Fertilizer "B" .....................I. 967 10.02 9.43 3.6111.04 0.42 2.281J. E. Pitts, Bonifay, Fla.
Fertilizer "C". ....................... 968 9.93 9.15 2.71111.86 1.80! 2.271J. E. Pitts, Bonifay, Fid.
Acid Phosphate ................... 9691 ... 14.351 0.34114.69 .. .. .. .. Jas. A. Dezell, Mt. Pleasant. Fla.
Fertilizer ........................... 9701..... 6.621 0.881 7.50 4.72 8.631 J. J. Pope, Bristol, Fla.
Fertilizer ......... ........ ........ 971 9.121 7.951 0.03( 7.981 2.66113.261A. B. Harrington, W inter Haven, Fla.
Fla. Sea Bird Guano................ 972126.83110.82 5.86116.681 8.441 1.941L. Ferguson, Tarpon Springs, Fla.
Fertilizr .................... ..... 97311.37113.021 0.23 14.051 0.11111.521G. W Brown, Palmetto, Fla.
Fertilizer .............. ............ 9741. .... 5.74 0.40 6.141 1.651 3.701T. D. W aldie, Lakeland, Fla.
Acid Phosphate ......... .......... 9751..... 17.96 0.36118.321..... 1 ..... W H. Meynardie, Jacksonville, Fla.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 54
For values see heading Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of Special Samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (i pound), is required for a "Special Sample."
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal---though the guarantee is but 4. per cent. of
ammonia---it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of
prime meal.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY. 55
R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1905, L. HEIM BURGER, ASSISTANT CHEMIST.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


z
NAME OR BRAND


+e


Cotton Seed Meal.......


Cotton Seed Meal........ 603


Cotton Seed Meal........ 604

Armour's Spec'al Lirgo
Tree Grower ............ 605

Armour's Original Mix-
ture No. 1............ 606


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10.00
7.79

10.00
8.97


PHOSPHORIC ACID


5.00
4.82

5.00
5.18


1.00
0.69


0.96


[--t
0




2.10


2.50


5.51


6.14


BY WHOM AND WHERE

MANUFACTURED


7.50 2.00 Alabama C. O. Co., Mo-
7.66 ..... bile, Ala.

7.50 1.50 Florida C. 0. Co., Talla-
7.09 ...... hassee, Fla.

8.00 ...... FloridaC. O. Co Jackson-
8.1 ....... ville, Fla.

4.00 6.00Armour's Fert. Works,
4.02 6.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00Armour's Fert. Works,
4.66 5.87 Jacksonville, Fla


____


L------












Armour's Practical


Armour's Practical
Trucker ..............


Armour's Celery Grower


Akmour'sOrange Fruiter

Armour's Blood, Bone
and Potash............

Armour's Largo Speeial
Fruit and Vine..........

Armour's Fruit and Root
Crop Special.........


Armour's Fruit and Vine


Armour's Lettuce Spoci'!

Armour's Stra w o rry
Fruiter................

Armour's Irish Potato
pe ial ...............


607 Guar
Offici


Offici

609 Guar
Office

610 Guar
Offici

611 Guarm
Offici
612 Guara
Office
613 Guar
Offici

614 Guar
Offici

615 Guan
Offlci

(ill Guar!
Offlci


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 56


ant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 2.00...... 3.00 10.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 8.17 6.22 1.30 7.52 2.85 9.11 Jacksonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10.00 5.00 1.00...... 8.00 4.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 8.12 5.32 0.68 6.00 7.35 5.22 Jacksonville, Fla.

nt'd Analysis. 10.0 8.00 0.00...... 4.00 12.00Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 10.94 8.47 0.15 8.62 3.80 11.40 Jacksonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10 0 8.00 1.00...... 5.00 7.00 Armour's Feit. Works,
al Analysis... 8.56 7.77 1.07 8.79 4.97 7.27 Jacksonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 0.50...... 3.00 10.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 760 5.61 1.91 7.62 3 97 10.18 Jacksonville, Fla,

ant'd Analysis. 10.00 8.00 1.00... 2.00 5.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 10.72 7.28 1.17 8.45 2.35 4.87 Jacksonville, Fla.
t'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00...... 2.50 11.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 9.34 5.24 0.72 5.9 2.55 10.39 Jacksonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10.00 3.00 2.00 7.00 4.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... 7.06 3.7,4 0.78 4.52 C..30 4.87 Jacksonville, Fla.

nt'd Analysis. 10.00 5.00 2.001 2.00 10.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
al Analysis.... (.98 6.31I 1.19i 7.5( 2.68 9.92 Jacksonville. Fla.
ant'd Analysis. 10.0 5.10 0.50 ...... 3.50 8.50 Armur's Fort. Works,
al Analysis ... .981 0.17 0.35 6.52 :.40 9.29 Jacksonvillo, Fla


__ _.


-~--







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERSContinued.


Armour's Watermellon
Special ..............

Armour's Special Mix-
ture No. 1.............


Ideal Fertilizer .........


Strawberry Special....


617


618


619


620


Fruit and Vine ......... 621


Ideal Lettuce Fertilizer.


622


Vegetable Fertilizer..... 623


Cotton Seed Meal....... 624


Cc ttn Seed Meal........ 625


Cotton Seed Meal....... 626


Guarant'd. Analysis. 1
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis. 1:
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis. 14
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis. 1'
Official Analysis.... I

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


0.25 ......
0.79 6.07

1.00 .....
0.79 6.86

1.00 . .
1.12 6.74


1.92 9.90


..... ......65
0.40 6.65


1.24 6.57 0.95 7.52

3.00 6.00 1.00 ......
9.08 6.80 0.77 7.57

. ..... .. 2.10


.... ...... .. ... 2 10


. .. ...... ..... 2.00
. . . 11 1 1. . *


3.00 8.00Armour's Fert. Works,
3.48 8.74 JacKsonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Armour's Fvrt. Works,
4.95 5.27 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00Willson & Toomer Fert.
5.62 6.55 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

3.50 3.00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
3.99 3.32 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Willson & Toomer Fert
3.68 9.76 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 6.00Willson & Toomer Fert.
6.06 5.89 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 8.00Willson & Toomer Fert
4.03 8.32 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 2.00 Ala. C. 0. Co., Montgom-
7.98 ..... ery, Ala

6.00 1.50 Southern C. O. Co., Pensa-
8.60 .. cola., Fla.

5.00 0.75 Fla. Mnfg. Co Madison,
5.53 ... .. Fla.


--~--------












ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Cotton Seed Meal........ 627 Guarant'd Analysis. ......
Official Analysis............

Cotton Seed Meal....... 628 Guarant'd Analysis. .....
Official Analysis........

Cotton Seed Meal....... 629 Guarant'd Analysis .....
Official Analysis.........
Cotton Seed Meal....... 630 Guarant'd Analysis.......
Official Analyls..... -- -
Special Mixture No. 1... 631 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00
Official Analysis.... 9.76
Armour's Stra w b err y
Fruiter............... 632 Quarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Offci Analysis.... 7.93
Cotton Seed Meal. ... .. 633 Guarat'd Analysis. ......
Official Analysis......
Armour's P'ractical
Trucker ............ 634 Guarant'd Andlysts. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 8.24
Armour's Largo Special
Fruit and Vine......... 635 Guarnt'd Analysis. 10.00
AOfflcal Analysis.... 7.46
Armiour's Fruit and
Vine.......... .. 636 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 5.6(l


. i

6.00
6.60

5.00
4.84




6.00
4.94

6 00
6.(X)

(1.00
6.83


2.60 7.44

2.50'
.. .. 2.50


2.00 ..
2.59 7.53

0 5 ... .
0.75 6.75

1.00 ......
2.22 8.05


7.00 1.00 Bradley C. O. Co., Brad-
8.13 ........ ley, S. C.

5.00 ...... Florida C. 0. Co., Jack-
4.85 ...... sonville, Fla.

8.00 .....IFlorida C. O. Co, Jack-
8.35 .... onville, Fla.

7.00 1.00 Independent C. O. Co.,
7:78 ...... Darlington, S. C.

5.00 5.00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
4.76 5.04 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 10.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
2.03 10.351 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Florida C. 0 Co., Talla-
7.15 ...... hassee, Fla.

3.00 10.10 Armour's Fert,. Works,
2.77 10.18 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.(X) 10.00Armour's F(rt. Works,
3.00 12.99 Jacksonville, Fla.

2 50 11 .00 AIrm'our's P'ort. Works,
2. i5 ) 10. acksonville, Flan.






ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Armour's Vegetable
M anure ............. .

Armour's Orange Tree
M anure ....... ......

Armour's Blood, Bone
and Potash...........

Armour's Largo Special
Tree Grower .........


Cotton Seed Meal.......


K ainit .............. ...


Kainit ................


H. G. Blood and Bone.


Cotton Seed Meal. ....


Simon Pure No. 1.......


Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 7.00 2.00
Official Analysis.... 8.07 6.57 1.84

Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 8.00 2.0C
Official Analysis.... 9.89 6.29 2.82

Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 8.00 1.00
Official Analysis.... 8.43 7.32 1.73
Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00
Official Analysis.... 7.62 5.70 0.55
Guarant'd Analysis ...... .... ......
Official Analysis.... ..... ...... ......

Guarant'd Analysis..
Official Analysis.... .

Guarant'd Analysis.................
Official Analysis................. ...

Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 3.00 1.5


Guarant'd Analysis. .. ......5
Official Analysis.... .303 379

'Guarant'd Analysis. ..
Official Analysis...... .......

Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.00 1.00
Official Analysis.... 8.99 6.26 0.84


8.41


9.11


9.05


6.25

2.50


6.82

2.40


:7.10


4.00 6.0C
3.93 6.48

3.50 4.00
3.23 4.24

5.001 7.00
4.73 6.92

4.50 6.00
4.10 6.55

7.50 1.50
7.17 ......

12.001 ...
12.78.

12.00 ..
12.83.

10.00.
9.55 ......

8.00 1.76
8.20 .. ...

4.00 11 00
4.51 12.89


Armour's Fert. Works,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Armour's Fert. Works,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Armour's Fert. Works,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Armour's Fert. Works,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.

American Agr'l Chem. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Sanders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.

Sanders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.


American Agr'lChem. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fia.

E.O. Painter Fert., Jack-
sonville, Fla.














ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 60


Gem Fruit and Vine ...


Simon Pure Tomato .....

Simon Pure Die Back
Fertilizer ............


Simon Pure No. 2.......

Bradley's Florida Vege-
table ..................


Cotton Seed Meal........


Cotton Seed Meal.......


Acid Phosphate........


Kainit ... .

A. A. Special lono aindl
I'otash....... ...


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Offlclal Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

(uarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


.. .. J



13.(10
4. :17


6.0C
6.38

4.00
4.81

8 00
7.62

6.0(O
6.70

6.00
7.03


14.00
1.137




12.0(
I 96


7.0o


O.W . .
3.45 8 2(


1.76 7.3S

2.00 .....
2.53 9.23

1.00 ......
1.08 8.11








0.74 15.11



1 .
1.41 13. 41


2.5C
3.18

5.00
5.7?




4.0(
4.48

4.0(
4.03

7.0C
8.34

8.OC
8.95


I I


T


10.00E. 0. Painter Fert.
11.69 Jacksonville, Fla.

9.00 E. O. Painter, Fert.
11.03 Jacksonville, Fla.

13.50E. 0. Painter Fert
14.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00E. O. Painter Fert.
8.38 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 American Agr'l Cheta
5.31 Jacksonville, Fla.

...... Maria-na Mnfg. Co.,
..... rianna, Fla.

...... Marianna Mnfg. (Co.,
..... rianna, Fla.

...... Marianna Mnfg. Co.,
...... riannia, Fla.

12.10 IMarianna Mnfg Co.,
12.00 tlanna, Fla.

:2.00 American Agr'l Clirm
II 581 .lacksonvillo Fla






ANALYSIS F FERTILIZERS Continued. 61


Bradley's Orange Tree..

Americus Florida Vege-
table ............ .....

Baker's Complete Vege-
table..................

Baker's Fruit and Vine.

Favorite Fruit and Vine.

Favorite Fruit and Vine
N o. 1..................

Favorite Special Pine
Apple .............. .

Favorite Special Cab-
bage .................

Favorite Strawberry
Special................

Favorite Vegetable.....


657

653


659


660


661

662


663


664


665

666


Guarant'd Anal
Official Analyst

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analys

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysi
Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysl

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysl

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysi
Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysl

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysi
Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysl

Guarant'd Anal
Official Analysl


I I- --~~-~~ -1--I~ -'


lysis. 13.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 3.50 5.00A
Is.... 10.07 6.65 1.55 8.20 3.60 5.31

ysis. 13.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00 5.00A
is.... 9.70 6.61 1.89 8.50 4.18 5.22

lysis. 13.00 4 50 1.00...... 3.50 10.00A
is ... 8.10 5.01 1.74 6.75 3.40 10.34

lyss. 13.00 6.00 1.00 ......2.00 10.00 A
Ia.... 7.71 1.62 1.63 8.25 2.38 9.80

ysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00 ...... 2.50 11.00S
is... 8.05 6.15 1.36 7.51 2.80 13.01

yasi. 10.00 6.00 1.00...... 3.00 10.008
s.... 10.31 5.69 1.17 6.86 3.33 10.86

ysls. 10.00 4.00 4.00 ...... 4.00 7.00S
Is.... 5.98 2.82 3.30 6.12 5.80 7.72

ysis. 10.00 8.00 1.00..... 3.00 5 00S
i... 11.72 7.55 1.18 8.73 3.86 5.39
ysis. 10.90 6.00 2.00...... 2.00 12.00S
a.... 8.62 5.07 3.81 8.88 2.35 12.64

yai. 10.00 7.00 2 00 .... 4.00 6.00S
. ... 8.46 7.15 2.18 9.33 3.71 6.32


Imerican Agr'l Chem. Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.

mierican Agr'l Chem Co ,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Lmerican Agr'l Chem. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Lmerican Agr'l Chem. Co ,
Jacksonville, Fla.

anders' Fert. Co.. Jack-
sonville, Fla.

anders' Fert Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.

anders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla,

anders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.

anders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.

anders' Fert. Co., Jack-
sonville. Fla.















Williams&Clark's Amer-
icus Fruit & Vine Grower 667


Simon Pure No.1.... .. 668


Ideal Fruit and Vine.... 669


Fruit and Vine........ 670


Tip Top Tomato........ 671

Old Domimon Potato
M anure ................ 672

Florida Fruit Growers
Formula............... 673

Mape's Orange Tree Ma-
nure ........... ...... 674

Champion Citrus Com-
pound................ 675


Cotton Seed Meal....... 676


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guaraut'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Offleial Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


13.00
8.03

8.00
8.43

10.00
9.97

8.00
8.62

8.00
8.62

.S.O0
9.02

8.00
9.38

12.00
15.29

1.).20l
10.00
7..42


11
5.501
6.17 i

6.00
6.40

6.00.
6.03

6.00
6.51

7.00
6.68

7.00
7.00

7.00
7.78

6.00
5.05

I 00
6.22


7.53


6.75


6.30


7.10


7.80


8.02

8 901


7.05

2.50


2.25
2.48

4.00
4.60

3.00
3.23

2.50
3.10

4.00
3.88


14.61

3.50O



3.70

3. 00
2.98

7 50
8.10


10.00
10.63

11.00
13.

*10.0
10.88

10.0
9.66

5.00
5.93

8.00
8.47

-1.00
4 5,6

3 00
3 2.1

14.00

1 50


American Agr'lChem. Co.,
New York.

E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Willson & Toomer Fert.
Co., Jacksonville Fla.

Va-Car Chem. Co., Savanah
Ga.

Va.-Car Chem. Co., Savan-
nah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Savan-
ah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Savan-
ah, Ga.

Mape's F. & P. G. Co., Now
York.

Va.(Car. Chem. Co., Savan-
ah, Ga.

Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
sonvillo, Fla.


L..







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 63


Sulphate of Potash......

Cotton Seed Meal.......

Georgia State Ammoni-
ated Superphosphate..

H. G. Florida Fruit
Growers Formula.....

DeSoto Brand Fruit and
V ine ............. ....

DeSoto Orange Tree
Grower ..............

Va.-Car. Fruit and Vine

Southern States Special
Vegetable............


Guarant'd Analysi. ......
Official Analysis.... ...-


678 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
679 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official A alysis.....

680 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis....

681 Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis....

682 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ..

683 Guaranteed Analysis
Official Analysis...

684 Guaranteed Analysis
Official Analysis....


10.00
10.99

8 00
9.75

10 00
6.08

10.00
7.97
8.00
8.01

8.00
8.57


8..00
7.02

7.00
7.68
6.00
6 76

6.00
6.06

6.00
6.23

6.00
6.891


10.08

8.96


0.09 06.85

0.67 6.17

1.00...
0.17 6.40

1.00 .. ..
1.33 8.22


... 48.00 Va-Car Chem. Co., Savanah
...... 49.72 Ga.

7.50 1.50 Florida C. O. Co, Talla-
7.18 .... hassee, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co, Sa-
2.17 1.98 vannah, Ga.

3.50 4.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Se-
3.02 2.23 vannah, Ga.

4.00 12.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co. Sa-
4.82 12.25 vannah, Ga.

5.00 6.50Va,-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
5.38 8.07 nah, Ga.

2.50 10.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.. Sa-
2.65 10.45 vannah. Ga.

4.00 5.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
.11 3.30 vannah, Ga.












ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
Nitrate of Soda........ 685 Guarant'd Analysis............. ..... 18.00|..... Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Savannah,
Official Analysis....|......... ..... ... 18.71 .... Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal...... 686 Guarant'd Analysis................ 1.50 7.00 1.00 Taylor Mfg. Co., Columbus, Ga.
Official Analysis.. .......... ..... .... 7.28 ...

Coton Seed Meal....... 687 Guarant'd Analysis. .......... ... 2.00 8.00 1.75 Georgia C. 0. Co., Macon, Ga.

Favorite Irish Potato Official Analysis. ... ... .... 8.16 ... .
Manure ............ 688 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 5.50 0.50.... 3.50 8.50Sanders Fert. Co., Jacksonville,
Official Analysis.... 7.12 5.30 1.74 7.04 3.38 9.32 Fla.
Ideal Fruit and Vine |
Manure ............ 689]Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 ..........3.00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
S Official Analysis.... 9.70 6.35 0.27 6.62 3.2310.45 Jacksonville, Fla.
Ideal Fruit and Vine
Manure ...... .. 690 uarand Analysis. 10.00 6. ........ 3.00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 8.87 5.20 0.11 5.31 3.6811.17 Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Mixed No. 2....1 691|Guarant'd Analysis. 10.001 7.00..... ..... 4.001 2.50 Wilson & Toomer Fort. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 111.20 6.70 0.57 7.27 4.151 3.20 Jacksonville, Fla.
Ideal Vegetable Manure! 6921Guarant'l Analysis. 8.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fort. Co.,
I Official Analysis.... 8.63 5.57 1.57 7.14 4.43 8.55 Jacksoniville, Fla.

Ideal Vegetable Manurel 693 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.01 6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
I Official Analysis.... 10.18 5.88 1.03 6.91 4.05 8.61 Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Mixture No. 1.. 694 1(irant'd Analysis. 8.11) 6.00 1.00 ..... 5.00 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co
Official Analysis.... .8! 6.25 0.80 7.05 5.10 (6.42 Jacksonville, Fla.







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Ideal Pota. Manure... 695 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.00 1.00..... 4.00 8.001Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 10.55 6.47 1.03 7.50 4.18 7.37 Jacksonville, Fla.
Special Mitxure Bone and
Potash ...... ....... 696 Guarat'd Analysis.... .... 14.50 ...16.50 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 4.39 3.74 9.32 13.06 .... .18.27 Jacksonville, Fla.
Mape's Fruit and Vine
Manure ............697 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 5.00 2.00 ....2.00 10.00 Mape's F. & P. 3. Co., New York.
Map ane Tre Official Analysis.... 10.89 3.68 4.02 7.70 2.13110.49
Mape's Orange Tree Ma-
nure ....... ........ 698 Guarant'd Analysis. 12.00 6.00 2.00 .... 4.00 3.00 Mape's F. & P. G. Co., New York.
Official Analysis.... 11.31 3.57 5.10 8.671 3.80, 3.84

Cotton Seed Meal...... 699 Guarant'd Analysis ..... ... ..... 7.50... Bainbridge Oil Co., Bainbridge,
|Official Analysis ... ......... 7.95 ... Ga.
Meal Mixture ......... 700Guarant'd Analysis. 16.0010.00 1.00..... 11.0 1.001Gouilding Fert. Co., Pensacola,
S Official Analysis.... 12.97110.48 0.9811.46 1.20 2.151 Fla.

Cotton Seed Meal ..... 701 Guarant'd Analysis. ............. 10 7.50 2.00 Ala. Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery,
I Official Analysis. ...... .... ........ 7.731... Ala.

Cotton Seed Meal...... I 702 Guarant'd Analysis .. ... .... 5 2.50 7.501 1.50 Goclding Frt. Co., Pensacola,
Official Analysis .. .... ..... .. .... ... 7.96 ..... Fla.

Bone Compound........ 703 Guarant'd Analysis. 16.00 8.00 ..... 2.001 2.00 Gculding Fort. Co., Pensacola,
16 per cent Acid Phos- Official Analysis.... 13.38 8.33 3.36111.69122.26 1.92 Fla.
phate ...... ......... 704Guarant'd Analysis 16.00 16.0 1.00 ..... .. .... Gouling Fert. Co., Pensacola,
SI _Official Analysis .... 118.08115.49 1.64117.131...........I Fla.
5 Bul.













ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
14 per cent Acid Phos-
phate ...... ....... 705iGuarant'd Analysis. I10.1( 14.00l 1.)1i .... ... ... ICG ulding PF rt. Co., Pensac-ila,
I Official Analysis .... 14.72 15.45 1.41 1;.8l ; .. ... ... Fla.
18 per cent Acid Phos- i I I I
phate ...... ........ 70G Guarait'd Analysis 1i6.ll 18.lil 1.(j 1 ............ ....Goulini Fel'lt. Co., Pensacola,
Official Analysis.. .14.19 17.15 ; 17. 1... ... ... Fla.

I. X. L. Acid Phosphatel 707 1Guarant'd Analysis. 12. 012.tI 2.(1)01i, ..... ..... .Va-Car. Cliho.!. Co., lMntgomery.
| Official Analysis. .. 10.12i12.77 2.97 15.741. ... ... Ala.
H. G. Meal Fertilizer... 70S Guarant'd Analysis. 16.I 10.0 l 1. :. .....; 2.n 2.(')ltGoulding; Foril. Co., Pensacola,
i official Analysis.... 12.18 10.-17 0.74 11.21 1.7(; 2.5,I Fla.
Armour's Corn and Cot- I I I I
ton Grower........... 7009Qu'arant'd Analysis. 10.001 7.0( 1 l .... 2 2.0l Al'IAr r VeIt. \\W ks., .laciksnville.
Dflicial Analysis .. 11.40 7. ; 1.:11 8.91 2.21 2.11 Fla.

Cotton Seed Meaal ..... 71) G ara t'd alysis. i... ......... 2. i; 7.511' 1. ilI' ida ('. 0. Co.. Tallliah ssc e,
S Oflieial Analysis.............. ..... .... .7.7 .... Fla.
Colton Seed Meal ..... 711 (Courainl'l Anal y is. ..... 2.I 7..il I.. li iS; ry C. (. (C .. 1onld i ini 'ry,
O( llicial Analysis....I .. ... I.. .... .. Ala

Cotton l Seed Meal ...... 712l(!uarai nt'd Analysis.. .... ..5 ...I .... I2.5 7 l 1.511 'S ('o l (Oil Co.. Alahilimnn.
|I O ici'ial A analysis .... ..... .......... .... 7.7,
Coltlol Seed M eal ...... 71 l: Siar:ill 'd Analysis. .... ..... .. ..... ll I ,l ilSo llie n (. (Co., I'ens;: a ,
O llicia l A n aly sis ..... .. .. .. . .h21 "... 1 I l;i.

Coll nl See' l ... 711,( ;im ri il'l A nalysv is .. .. .. ..... 2.15 | 7..l i l IS C 0 ', l I', :iol l':1.
| lli 'ia l A nal; sis .... .... .. .. . 7 .








Dark Cotton Seed Meal.


Special Mixture .......I

Favorite Tomato Special]

Favorite Sweet Potato
Special ......... .. I

Florida Bean Special...[

Williams and Clarks|
Vegetable ... ......
Armour's Blcod and
B one ................

Canada H. W. Ashes.. .


H. G. Ky. Tobacco Dust!

Mape's Fruit and Vine!
Manure ...... .. ...


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
SI l i I I
715|Guarant'd Analysis. ..... .......... 2.011, 5. 1.(00 Fla. Mlfg. Co.. Madison, Fla.
Official Analysis ..... ... .....

716 Guarant'd Analysis. G.1( C.oII 1.0 .I 5.00 5.o0 W\ilson & Tooiner Fert. Co.,
Official Analysis.... 8.41 (i.25 1.64 7.89! 5.3i 4.89 Jacksonville. Fla.

717 Guarant'd Analysis 10.00 7.02 2.00.... 5.00 9.00 Sanders Fort. Co., Jacksonville,
|Official Analysis.... 9.25 8.07 1.25 9.32 3.641 8.9S| Fla.

718 Guarant'd Analysis. |10.00 7.00 1.00(1..... 3.00 4.00 Sanders Fo't. Co., Jacksonville,
Official Analysis...[ 8.67 6.221 1.551 7.77 3.(;0 6.131 Fla.

719 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 6.001. 00 ..... 3..(11 0.0)0 'ilson & Toomer Fort. Co,
Official Analysis.... 8.17 6.12 0.79| 6.911 2.; 3 7.02 Jacksonville, Fla.

720 Guarant'd Analysis. 13.00| 6.001 1.00 .... 4.00 5.00 |AT'n. Ag'l Chem. Co., New
Official Analysis ... .10.42 6.61| 1.71 8.32 4.07| 4.491 York.

7211Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00| 5.00 4.10 ..... 7.00..... Armour Fert. Wks. Jacksonville,
lOfficial Analysis .... 6.58 3.47! 6.17 9.641 7.75. Fla.
I I / I I i !
7221Guarant'd Analysis. |15.00 .... ...... 5.00'lArmor FePt. V ks., Jacksonville,
Official Analysis .... .16.38 .. .. ......... .. 2.2-1 Fla.

723!Guarant,'d Analysis. 10.00 .. .. ..... 3.(l010 l 0 lArmour Fort. VvWs.. Jackson-
|Official Analysis .14.85 ..... ... ... 2.83 9.21I sonville, Fla.

724 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.0o0 5.00) 2.001 ..... 2.00 10.00Mape's F. &P. G. Co., New
lOfficial Analysis.... 9.49 3.20) 4.691 7.891 2.34110.181 York.













ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Map.e's Vegetable Ma-I |Guarant'd Analysis. 12.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 5.001 4.001Mape's F. & P. G. Co., New
nure ................ 725 Official Analysis.... 11.55 4.50 4.29 8.79 4.19 5.20 York.

Iape's Orange Tree Ma- Guarant'd Analysis. 12.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 4.00 3.00 Mape's F. & P. G. Co., New
nure ............... 726 Official Analysis.... 12.23 8.61 0.44 9.05 3.61 3.43 York.

Simon Pure No. 1...... 727 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.001 6.00 1.00..... 4.0011.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 8.81 6.13 0.25 6.38 4.20112.78 scnville, Fla.
Gem Fru,e and Vine.... 728 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.00 1.00 .... 3.00 10.00 E. O. Painter Fort. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 10.59 7.02 0.81 7.83 3.14 10.53 sonville, Fla.
Simon Pure Tomato .... 729lGuarant'd Analysis. ..... 4.00 3.00 ..... 5.00 9.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 9.33 5.21 1.96 7.17 5.71110.39 sonville, Fla. o
Special Mixture. ........ 730 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... ...... 50 4.00 7.00 E. 0. Painter Fert. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 8.69 ..... ..... 6.00 4.061 8.02 sonville, Fla.
Gem Swvoet Potato..... 731 Ouarant'd Analysis. .............. 4.001 4.001 8.50!. (0. Painter Fort.. Co.. Jack-
Official Analysis.... 7.35 .... .... 4. 3.89 7.27 sonville, Fla.
L. C. Illood and one. 732 Guaraint'.d Analysis. 5.00 ..... ..... 12.00 6.50 .... 1'. lninl r Forl C. o <-
Off(m ial Analysis.... 5.39 ......... 15.02 6.04 ..... villo, Fla.
11. G. 1lood andl lonol .. 733 narant'll Analyvsis. ..... ... ....... 0 6.00 7.00 ..... l':inlt r F r't. (Co k-


Collon Seed Meal ...... 73:1 omiraii;.'d Analysis. .......... .. .... 2.25, N,.)0 lilfori C. Co., I lwhin vill. ,
| llc'lnIAi I .l .ri .- ...... I .X. | 1 ( :





ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Cotton Seed Meal...... 735 Guarant'd Analysis. .. .... .... .. Quitman Oil Co., Quilman, Ga.
Official Analysis.... ..... ..... ....7.
Cotton Seed Meal...... 736 Guarant'd Analysis. .....2.......... .00 7 00 1.00 A. A. Smith, Atlanta, Ga.
Official Analysis.... ..... ..... ....0 ..... 8.01 .....
Armour's Sweet Potato
Special ............ 737 Guarart'd Analysis. 10.00 G.50 00 ..... 2.50 3.50 Arnicur Fert. Wks., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 7.96 7.85 1.12 8.97 2.52 3.23 ville, Fla.
Bradley's Florida Vege-l
table ............... 738 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.0 1.00 ... 4.00 5.00 Am'. Ag-'. Chem. Co., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 9.02 7.44 1.47 8.91 3.70 4.95 ville, Fla.
Bradley's Fruit and Vine 739 Guarart'd Analysis 10.00 5.50 3.00 ..... 2.25 10.00 Am n Ag'l. Chem. Co.. Jackson-
|Official Analysis.... 9.01 5.44 0.92 6.30 2.46110.41 ville, Fla.
Bradley's Special Fruit
and Vine ...... ...... 740 Guarint'd Analysis. 10.00 5.50 3.0..... 4.2510.00 Am'n. Ag'l. Chem. Co., Jackson-
Official Analysis... 8.2 6.34 0.91 7.25 4.64! 9.71 ville, Fla.
Williams & Clark's Or- I
ange Tree ........... 741 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00 .... .50 5.00;Am'n. Ag'l. Chem. Co., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 10.35 6.l1 1.02 7.93 3.760 5.SO ville, Fla.
Williams & Clark's
Special Fruit and Vine 742 Guarat'd Analysis. 10.00 5.501 3.00 .. 4.25 10.00|Am'n. Ag'l. Chem. Co., Jackson-
I Official Analysis.... 8.56 6.19 0.001 7.09 4.31110.229 ville, Fla.
Bradley's Orange Tree. 7431Guara't'd Analysis. 10.00 0 1.00 .....! 3.50 5.00Am''n. Ag'l. Chem. Co., Jackson-
Official Analysis.. 9.09[ 0.5(; 1.991 8.551 3.81i 5.661 ville, Fla.
Bradley's Nursery St)ck 944 Guarant'ft Analysis. 10.00 8.00 1.00..... 4.50 3.00 Am'n. Ag'l. Chem. Co., Jackson-
__l |Official Analysis .... 7.67! 8.941 0.751 9.69! 4.97 3.041 ville. Fla.











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
Armour's Orange Fruiter] 745 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.001 8.001 0.501..... 4.0012.00 Armour Felt. V/ks., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 8.90 8.04 0 .26 4.4712.70 ville, Fla.
1 0.221 8.26, 4 2.701 ile
Armour's F:uit and Vine 746 Guaraint'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00| 1.00..... 2.5011.00Armcur Fert. Vks., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 6.44 5.98 2.44| 8.42 2.78 11.13 ville, Fla.
Armour's Largo Special I
Fruit and Vine...... 747 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 0.50!..... 3.0010 ).00 Armour Fert. Wks., Jackson-
Official Analysis.... 7.87] 6.62 0.85 7.47 3.15 9.79| ville, Fla.
Armour's Vegetable.... 748 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 7.00 2.00.... 4.0110 6.001 Arm-our Fort. Wks.. Jackson-
I Official Analysis.... 8.50 7.87, 0.S4 8.711 4.14; 5.5; ville, Fla.
S I !
Special Fruit and Vine. 749 Guaran.t'd Analysis. 110.00( 600 1.00r..... 4.00 13.00 Wilson & Toomcr Fert. Co,
Official Analysis .... 7.531 6.641 2.681 9.32' 4.20113.88; Jacksonville, Fla.
Ideal Vegetable Manurel 750 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.001 l. ..... 4.100 8. 00 Wilson & Toomer Fort. Co., -
Official Analysis.... 10.87 6.35 0.901 7.25 4.11 7.54' Jackscnville. F!a.
Ideal Fruit and Vine... 751 Guaraat'd Analysis. 110.00, 6.1 ..... ... ) : 10.00( 1 Wil:on & TI'oonI(' Fort. Co.,
Official Analysis .... .031 (;.131 0.97 7.10 3.17!10.68; Jacl(sonville, Fla.
I I I ;
Ideal Fertilizer ........ 752CGuaraint'd Analysis. S (0 5.I00 1.10 ..... 1.01 (;.00W 'ilson & T''oli r Fort. Co.,
ua m 0.9;, C. (; 71 7.52! Jacla sw) il! e ,
Official Analysis.... S.O1 5.121 O.117 0.li7| 1.0li| 7.52 .lackso'lvile IF'l'.

SpeI cial Mixture No. 1..I 75: Giarait'd Analysis. 8.00 I. .. 5.00 5. .00 W il-;Aon & Tooiw",' ''rt. Co.,
Official Analysis .... .9 .5; o. 11 7.1 80 5.:1 l .icl sonv'ill, i '.
(olBhlini' is lione Co(n-
pound ...... ........ 75l1 .(luarn,nt'd AnalysisJ. 1; 00 S.(Ill) 1 ..... I J ?.0i l 2. m l h I l ing l'Forl. Co., 'Pe'nsa(cola,
O llicinI A analysis .... 9.151 7.8ll 1 .9!' .S::! 2.211 :1.10 lla.
Cnuldini 's I ir cenilt I I I I
'o !tshi Arid ....... 755 (luan wi r ld Analysis. I o I ... I ow 0 .. ... Ill | ( uhilil- 'rl. Co., I',lensa olna
S Oillcial Analysis.. .. I :1 1.2 1 I 1 0. ... 2.8 1 Fai.










R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


BUREAU OF FEFD STUFFS.

B. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Cliemist.
Analys's of Special Samples under Sec. 9. Act approved May 24, 1905.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


-ri- ...... ..... .......

Shorts (Corn Meal)....................

Cotton Seed Meal......................
Bran .......... ........ .............
Ground Velvet Bean and IIulls.........
Ground Velvet Beans and Hulls..........
Purina Feed ..........................
Purina Feed ..........................
Cotton Seed Meal ......................
Lran No. 1 ............................
B ran N o. 2 ............................
1Bran ........................ .............
l Iannir Fei.d .......................... ..
I united S.ock Food No. I................
S h orlts ...... ............................
IB ra n ............. .................
Velvet BeI n Chop ......................
l na' n r F oe d ............................
S ho r l .................... ... ... .... ... ..
lI1ic M enl (TIulls .......................
1 l:nvy Draiughlit Feed ....................
Light Draulght Feed .....................
Fat Prolducer ...........................


7.60 16.94

0.95 12.64

12.17 38.61
16.431 11.41
9.50 17.11
9.85 21.24
12.27 9.92
10.90 10.35
20.52 20.36
4.u0 16.6,
4.82 18. 69
11.35' 12.551
10.07 9.921
8.70 10.u.,
12.99 10. 35
0. 80 8.601
12.591 19.192
12.921 8.951
16I.521 11.06;
14.591 11.41
4.88 10.35
18.351* 7.461i
20.401 8.f6[


53.961
71.211

25.94
52.38
52.34
50.19
58.53
57.84
39.12
58.26
56.17
56.07
61.80|
62.110!
55. 31
53.52|
49. 1;
63.59'
55.70
45. 09'
64. 431
54.751
48.78[


3.20

1.053

7.53
] .S5
4.10
4.58S
4.20
3.55
5.00
4.48
4.23
2.78;
2.O0
4.25
2.4' 1.
4.90n
3. 51r
:. 151
10.02 1
3. -42
2.121
2.09


5.051 The Alger Sullivan Lumber Co., Century,
Fla.
0.75 The Alger Sullivan Lumber Co., Century,
Fla.
5.65 The ferry Grocery Co., Perry,' Fla.
4.53 The Perry Grocery Co., Perr,, Fla.
3.251 II. Terrell, Bushnell, Fla.
3.67 Geo. II. May, Grandin, Fla.
3.65 B. E. McLin. Tallahassee, Fla.
i.081Consolidated Grocery Co., Pensacola, Fla.
4.20 Wells. Kahn & Co., Pensacola, Fla.
3.07 Geo. I. Davis. Tallahassee, Fla.
4.07 Geo.. I. Davis. Tallahassee. Fla.
4.75 Duval Brothlirs, Tallaliassee. Fla.
2.86(; scari E. M1aur (Co., Pensacola, Fln.
2.58 1'nitie (c ro r 'rv ('o. .l J cksonville, Fla.
7.56|V. I. ewis. TLimond, Fla.
1.151W ('liff. ('Cr s'. C ity, Fla.
3.44 (;,o. II. Mlys. (;I mdini, Fla.
0.74 Oscar I. ;:ln ai. Pensacola, Fla.
2.75 Petr MI li (rland. o. Fla.
9.111|V entres ;l(l Co., Palatkia. Fli.
'".9311|'nited (hiGr 'rv Co., Jacksonivill', Fla.
5.6011'nihcI (n .-rr" Co., Jacwksonville, Fln.
7.86|TTnit(,o<1 Groceryv ("Co., Jac;iksonville, Fla.


__ _I














BUREAU OF FEED STUFFS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.



Jersey Feed .. ..
Dairy Feed ............... .
Jar ksonville i"ii.d .......................I


S 2 16.82 40.90,
i 21.1 12.2 50. ;
S 21 7 8.42 5t.0 1


BY WHOM SENT.


3.7; I'nilhd dru tcery C .)o.. .Ilc.lsoivillh, I-i.
2.11 Iniiloan Croceryr o., .Jlckso ille, Fla.
-.:':1 united Grneery to., JnIceksnville, F:i.


NOTICE-The especial attention of cosnsmers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
Consumers desiring to avail themselves of the provisions of Sec. 9. of the Laws. providing for "Special Samples" drawn by
consumers, are requested to read carefully Sec. 9, of the Laws and the "Rules and Regulations Governing the taking and for-
warding Special Samples of Feed Stuff and Fertilizers" found on a preceding page of the report. Also to compare the "otricial
analysis," and the "market value," of various feeds sold in the State.
It will be found that in a number of cases, the "market value." or price, is no crilerton of the actual feeding value, of the
goods. That in several instances the highest "market value" is placed on the most Inferior goods.
Consumers should compare the guaranteed tag on the bag, with the table of "average composition of feed stuff." In case of
doubt as to the truthfulness of the guarantee, draw a sample, according to law, and regulations, and send In a tin box sealed.
to the Commissioner of Agriculture." Preserve the "guaranteed tags" off the packages, to compare with the result, of the
analysis of the sample by the State Chemist.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist-ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF, 190C-1-. H. BRIDGES, Assistant Chemist.

Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 24, 1905.


NAME OF BRAND. n




Diamond "C" Corn and Oat Chops... 80 Guarant'd Analysis. 11.40 10.00 61.20
Official Analysis... 14.80 7.02 61.41

Peerless Mixed Feed-Pure Wheat
Bran ........ .... ...... 81 Guarant'd Analysis. ... 16.06 58.10
Official Analysis... 6.92 16.67 55.74

Victor C. & O. Feed ............... 82 GuaranL'd Analysis .... 9.00 62.00
Official Analysis... 13.07 6.76 62t.97

"Make Fat" Mixed Br i.......... 83 Guarant'd Analysis. 13.75 14.98 40.33
Official Analysis... 13.42 11.41 55.35

Globe Gluter Feed ................ 84 Guarant'd Analysis ..... 26.00 51.00
Official Analysis... 7.00 27.20 51.23

Bran Feed ....................... 85 1G arant'd Analysis .. ..i11.53 53.971
Official Analysis... 16.(0210.00 6.88

Diamond "C" Corn and Oat Chops.. 86 Giarant'd AnAnalsis. 11.40 10.00 61.20
Official Analysis... 1S.30 7.28 58.77

Royal Stock Feed ................ 87 Guarntd Analyss. 10.2 0.00 18.00
Official Analysis... 12.371 0.33 56.25
________________________ __ I_______ II


ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS.


a


4.60 ..... The Como Mills Co., East St. Liuis,
2.10 3.67 I11.

4.83 .... Crescent Milling Co., Hopkinsvllle,
3.65 4.92 Ky.

4.00 ..... American Cerial Co., Chicago, Ill.
3.35 3.45

2.97 ..... Dahnke-Walker Milling Co., Union
2.00 4.00 City, Tenn.

2.50 J .... New York Glucose Co., New York.
3.87 2.70

2.63 ..... City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia.
1.33 3.62 Tenn.

4.60 .....The Como Mills Co., East St. Louis,
1.95 4.25 1ll.

1.00 ..... Atlas Feed Products a d Milling Co.,
3.10 6.85 New Orleans, La.


--I













ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.


lran Feed .......................


Shorts ..... ....... .......... .


Red Cross, Corn and Oat Chops....


IPeerless Mixed Feed, Pure Wheat
L ran ........ ........ .........


Bran Feed ............ ..........


M ill Feed ......................


IPure Wheat Shorts ................


I ilnlnlllm ( '. Feed ..................


lirin Feed .....................


P'trina Feed .. ....... ..........


0


on
ar


I I I
Guarant'd Analysis....111.53 o.7
Official Analysis ... 18.371 .56154.07
1 I 1. .
Guarant'd Analysis.... 16.75 58.951
Official Analysis... 5.87 16.50 56.48

Guarant'd Analysis. 11.40 10.00 61.20
Official Analysis... 14.15 0.84 61.11


Guarant'd Analysis. .... 1606 58.10
Official Analysis... 7.22 16.23 56.10

Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 11.5r3 53.1n7
Official Analysis... 19.27 9.04 54.04[

(Gu rant'd Analysis. ... .13165.21
Official Analysis... 16.75 15.091.1 ,63!

uanrant'd Analysis. 6,421160 ln|48(nl
Official Annlysin... 4.47 17.72 51.761

(:,arant'd Analysis ..... I 1 o1 6 11
l)f1 1ial Analysis... I I.8 L 772 541 8

I Ianran t'l Aiilyul s ..... 11.5; .3 !7
I fllclil Anslysls 2 .55r 1:1 3.1 6, 1 :l:l 1

l nrinilll'd Analysis 1 1.90 IO.:I0 6"31. 1
Ofcilal Analysis... 11.0011 7 0 61.!


ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS.

I r
4 c


2.6. (..... City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia,
1.20 4.00 Tenn.

3.50 ..... BIair Milling Co., Atchenson, Kan.
3.78 4.15

4.60 ..... he Como Mills Co., East St. Louis,
2.30 4.10 I11.


4.83 ..... Crescent Milling Co., HIopklnsvwle,
3.08 4.77 Ky.

2.03 ..... City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia,
1.88 2.63 Tenn.

2.33 .... Capital (Graiu Co., Nashville, Tenn.
3.43 2.41

4.0 .... Liberty Mills, Nashville, T'nn.
5.40 :3.50

4 (ln ..... .('Oho Mills, East St. Iouis, 111.
303 3.57

S63 .... 'lty ;rnin :Iand Feed (o., (olil ai) .
2.78 4.:30 T'en.

4.10 ..... ltaillton nPurina Co.., St.. Iouil, Mno.
4.131 3.841










Pure Wheat Middlings ............ 99 Gurant'd Analysis ..... 15.7 40.00 4.00 ... Hunter Bros. Milling Co., St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 4.25116.58 59.56 3.93 3.88 Mo.
oyal Stock Feed ................ Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 0.0048.00 1.00 .... Alton Feed Products and Milling Co.,
Official Analysis... 10.57 9.48 50.24 3.35 6.10 New Orleans, La.
I'ure Wheat Middlings ............ 100 Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 16.94 59.02 5.47 ..... Phoenix Flour Mills, Evansville, Ind.
Official Analysis... 5.46 17.38 56.29 4.73 4.35
Lillle Bran ...................... 101 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.50 15.50 57.00 4.501 ..... Lillle Mills Co., Franklin, Tenn.
Official Analysis... 7.31 16.15 54.66 3.65 5.46
Ilominy Feed ....... ............ 102 Guarant'd Analysis. 4.25 8.34 65.07 7.75 ..... American Hominy Co., Indianapolis,
Official Analysis... 3.52 11.32 64.85 9.58 3.26 Ind.
Victor C. and O. Feed. ............. 103 Guarantd Analysis. ..... 9.00 62.00 4.00 ..... The American Cerial Co., Chicago,
Official Analysis 1.14 8.34 63.33 4.05 3.47 I1. -
Ballards Ship Stuff ................ 104 Guarant'd Analysis. 5.83|17.37146.5S 4.41 .. Ballard and Ballard Co., Louisville,
Official Analysis... 4.71 17.81156.50 4.38 4.00 Ky.
Cotton Seed Meal ................. 105 Guarant'd Analysis. 25.75 ........... Florida C. 0. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Official Analysis... 16.97123.69 37.05 6.10 4.75
Su lrene Dairy Feed .............. 106 Guarant'd Analysis. 11.75 16.50 48.54 3.50 ..... American Milling Co., Philadelphia,
Official Analysis... 9.C5 16.23 49.371 4.38 7.17 Pa.
Pallards Bran .................... 107 Guarant'd Analysis. S.40 15.25 38 .5 4.43 ... Ballard and Ballard Co, Louisville,
Official Analysis... 8.83 14.U2 53.90 2.84 5.80 Ky.
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 108 (Guarant'd Analysis. 229S 14.28| 5.35 ... Grant Bros. Co., Memphis, Tenn.
Official Analysis... :. 2.0( 19.31 41.43 4.05 4.00
Cotton Sd Meal................109 Guarantd Analysis. ..... 22.00 13.00 5.00 .... C. A. Tindall & Co., Memphis, Tenn.
Official Analysis... 20.22 21.32 39.83 4.01 4.25
Bran Feed .......... .......... ... 110 Guarant'd Analysis. .....111.53 53.97 2.63 ...City Grain & Feed Co., Columbia,
Official Analysis... 1.441 9.21 9.21 54.08 3.50 Tenn.
__________I lI lF______________












ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.




Diamond "C" Corn and Oat Chops.


Victor Feed ............. ......


M iddling Feed ....................


Mixed Feed, Bran .................


Hominy Feed ......................


No. 3 Sugared Feed ................

Globe Gluten v'eed ...............


Victor (. & O. FeeId ..............


Bran Feed ...... ...............


Purinn Feed ............... ....


I


R
0


3 1 5 ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS.

I .. I .. .i

111 Guarant'd Analysis. 14.73 7.62161.281 3.15 ..... lTh Cioino Mills Co., East St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 17.183 7.72156.63 2.801 4.30 111.

112 Gnarant'd Analysis. ... 9.00162.00 4.00 ..... .Americnn Cerial Co., Chc. go. 111.
Official Analysis... 141.08. 7.20 61.95 2.35 3.45

113 Gunrant'd Analysis. .... 2.20 61.92 3.28 ... ity Grain & F-d Co., Columbia,
Official Analysis... 14i.(i7 10.53 55.35' 2.13 2.57 Teun.

114 Gunrant'd Analysis. .... 12.01 154.02 4.00 ..... Hardy Grain Co., Union City., Tenn.
Official Analysis. 1 .,. 7.)9 53.96 1.70 3.45

115j Guarant'd Analysis. 081 10., l0.00 10.00 ... Cumnerland 1Mills, Nashville, Tenn.
I official Analysis... l.0. 1 i.670GO.SSi 8 65 2.85

116 Guarant'd Analysis. 12.10 7.5015.00 1.00 .. At lass Feed I'rot.ucIts & Mill Co.,
officiall Analysis.. 11; 2 6. 1 0.29' 1.00 i .7 New Orleans, I.a.

117 Gua d Anaysis. .. 26.00 1. 250. .. .New Y ork Gluiecose Co., New York.
Oflici.al Analysis. 7.417 1S 8 ,s .:0G 1. !| 2 71

11H I a!nrant'd Analysis. ... 7.7 2.100 3.00 .... Anm rican Cerial Co., Chicago, ll.
fli'i: l Anlalys is... 1 51 21 .l).5r7 4.!01 3.72

11l Gnraint' Anlysis .... I.. 1: '.71 2.631. ... Cily Grnin & Feed Co., Columbia
OIl'li,,il Analysis... 20) ;., .,78 .13 1.00| 3.4.7 Te .

120|4 G]arant'd] Ana.lysis 110 10 00 1 10 4.40 11 .... nl.li, I P ina o. St. Iouln, Mo.
Of()f ial Annlysis. ..1 20 I 11 .4l1 ,58 4.101 3128










Lillie Bran ...................... 121 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.50 15.50 57.00 4.50 Lllie Mill Co., Franklin, Tenn.
Official Analysis... 6.30 17.20 53.63 3.25 5.24
Sucrene Dairy Feed .............. 122 Guarant'd Analysis. 11.75 16.50 48.54 3.50.. American Milling Co., Philadelphia.
Official Analysis... 8.37 17.55 49.31 4.15 7.12 Pa.
Pure Middlings .................... 123 Guarant'd Analysis ..... 16.00 58.00 4.75 .....Columbia Mill & Elevator Co., Col-
Official Analysis... 5.00 18.78 55.00 4.65 4.17 umbia, Tenn.
Pure Wheat Middlings ............. 124!Guarant'd Analysis. .... 16.00 40.00 4.00 ..... Geo. P. Plant Milling Co., St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 4.87 17.20 56.71 4.01 3.97
Quaker Dairy Feed ............... 125 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... 14.00 52.00 3.50..... The American Cerial Co., St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 18.00 9.04 55.07 2.88 5.32
Middling Feed ...................I 26 Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 12.29 61.92 3.28 ..... City Grain & Feed Co., Columbia,
IOfficial Analysis... 6.00116.50 56.20 4.43 4.45 Tenn.
Bran Feed ...................... 137 Guarant'd Analysis ..... 11.53 53.97 2.63 ...... City Grain & Feed Co., Columbia.
Official Analysis... 18.50 9.65 54.58 1.65 4.07 Tenn.
Diamon "C" Corn and Oat Chops... 128 Guarant'd Analysis. 11.40110.00 61.20 4.60 ..... The Como Mills Co., East St. Louis
Official Analysis... 16.501 7.72 57.881 3.00 4.40 I1l.
"Our Own" Mixed Feed............ 129 Guarant'd Analysisl13.451 8.31160.351 3.26 ..... Baker & Holmes Co., Jacksonville.
Official Analysis...1 8.611 9.48163.461 3.20 2.60
Middling Feed ...................... 130Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 12.29161.92 3.28 ..... City Grain & Feed Co.. Cnlumbin.
Official Analysis.. .13.70 11.76 55.93 3.05| 2.82 Tenn.
ran ........ .. .............. ..... 11 Guarant'd Analysis. .... 9.69 3.2 7.18 .. mountain M ill Co., Chattanooga,
I Official Analysis.... 7.82113.43156.531 4.311 4.421 Tenn.
Purina Feed ........................ 132 G iarant'd Analysis. I11.011,, .30163. 10 4.401 .... IRalston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo.
Official Analysis.... 10.72110.97157.02 3.981 4.80!
Mill Feed .... .............. 133 Guarant'd Analysis.( 7.00114.001..... 6.00 ..... Etowah Mills, Cartersville. Gn.
Official Analysis....! 5.66113.16160.951 4.45 3.601
________________________________ __________________ I.1 _______________ ____________________













ANALYSIS OF FEED ST-FF -Continle d.




NAME OF lRlAND). 1A1
:5; A1



Purie Wl'e',A Shcorts .................. 1 134 Gimmint 11I-"I Kn. ;;llly; illlI~l.... i:! ~ f t &:rl S I,7:lIl1'Ili~m Alill cr
I lOfficiZ 5.,lxi 005 iS.3 5.12 :.,, x 1.01 kol.ui Ala.
Pure AVhleat Braln .................. (:;3f.:lua;l;ltrantO .\Ailx N i I ..... 116. 00 55.11) 1 5 ill, U ill A. 1 ('.. (, 11op-
Officr A!;k's.. .01 7.994:"'. 10 1, .., I~h..x II,. Kx.%

Lillie Pran ......................... 1..16 (1irmt' ad 0,,5015.50!5, .lll1 Xx0,U v Allll o.. Pio kh
Ofi) n 7 7 1 G.4;T 5 1.W 5 :i.1 5
II --I
lHorn14y FeedI....................... 137(11nini',i,,tI S\aixxn. I .:.1t .,. 7',x 7 .,.O. w Irnin> '.. III !hiinhi.v hlidi;I;p. o- W
Of1,,'iaI .1i. '511.:3 "f;.71 I is. I .. I. Inn.

Di:11mlx ld "C'' Corn ;md 4 at Chops' 1 1l(I m 41,,4',i~t'I An 1 455\ss~ 1 1. -:1 T. 11' GI :; Th. ('a,In li I")_1 45 :S S(xl '. I..rnis.
Off~ici,, \,,`I .l;,i, 0411,04.5,5 2 1**-' 111.

Pon. W ho\'lint PI,;Il ............ ..... A! : I:1: I1. I .ll~il!lysi.. ".! ..... .1) t Al I I I i 11 i ,ilil,: (,. I'll il~olcl pll kt,.
A im l\.is... 117 )

$1 "rom, Ilor, ;')r5 V-,d~t .............. I 10 (:iwint: lt'd .\1ll v'sis I 1. 50 12.50 Ali::1 1~ ~~ I1I.I:1I~ lllill" (I. I")_ Phi philllj t,


44li'ij. I J0i,,Ix ...... I I :I9.!: .... 4.. A ,:,.

I:I.: III ............ ................... W !11. : 11 I I\ I. 11 1


Vo`~ ~ d S11111 ........ ... ... ... ... l .. 111 00 V ..I'l i l









I
Bran Feed ..........................

Sugared Feed .......................

Sueerene Dairy Feed ...............

M ill F eed ....................... ..


Diamon "C" C. & O. Chops........

Cotton Seed M eal...................

B ran Feed ..........................

Cooked Cow FePd ................

Red Cross, Corn and Oat Chops....

D elta Feed ............ .............

B ran ................................

Mill Feed .........................

Purina Feed .. .....................

Diamond C. C. & O. Chops........


1441Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 11 .53153.971 2. 6 1 ..... City ,,rain ann Feed Co., Columbia,
lOfficial Analysis... .10 9.0 2.16 1.1;) 3. T 'enn.
1451 arant'd Ana lsis. 10.00 5.O 0 001i 0 ..... Atlas Feed & killing Co., New
Official Analysis.... 110.501 6. 16.62 1.10 8.10 O leans, La.
I I I
1 14;Guarantd Analysis. 11.75 16.50.lS .5 1 :I. ,0i .... .Ameriian Milling Co., 1'lPhiladelphia,
Official Analysis... | 8.55 19. 2249.991 2.'6 7.07 Ia.

1471(luarant'd Analysis.i 7.ull14. Oll ..... 6. 0 ..... to ih M ills, C;;rlersville, Ga.
IOflicial Analysis. 6.101 13.6060 .,J 4.153 3.95

148 Guarant'd Analysis. 4.73 7.62 61.-S ...... T'he Comno Aill Co., Fast St. Louis,
Official Anal'sis.... 13.05 8.16 60.641 3.2t1 3.5 1i1.
lI|(Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 13.n ... .... CGeorgia C. O. Co., Albany. Ga.
Official Analysis... ..... .lIi ...... ....
II I I I I
150lGuarant'd Analysis .... |11.5353 397 2.l; ... City (rin r & 1 C1d (o., (olumnii:i,
official Analysis.... 19.65i 9.71 54.04 1.36 : .75 Tenn.
1 CiGuarant'd Analsis. ..... 1 G.00'44.00 7.5i ...... .lAmenriicln Stim Feed Co., Nash-
Oflieial Analysis....; 7.65129.4414 .171 1;.52 (;.5i villo. Tenn.
I I I I I I I
152 1(unrant'd Analysis. 11.40 10.0 061O 20 4.n) ..... Thei Como Mills Co., East St. Louis,
Official Analysis... 17.281 S.57156.151 .541 10! Li.
153luaraint' A aly. sis.. 7.005R.00 4.0i The Viliey Ailling' C >., St. Louis,
JOfficial Analysis.... 9! .06 7. 164 41.641 2.87 7 ;7

1541Gnuarant'd Analysis. ..... 9.n69 :.92| 7.1 ....... l'The Motiitiin City Mill Co., Chat-
'Official Analysis.... I 6.95 l14.18:;'!5 .;5 4.06 .! tainooia, Tenn.
I .
13551(iiirant'd Annlysis. ..... I) .l .1 2. ..... C lital G ain Co., Nisivill, Ten""
Official Analysis.... 111. 9 9.58;70.(; 1.'I 1.5
15 niir; int'll Analysis.ll .9 1906. .70) 4-0 ..... Ii;ilston Purinn Co., St. Lonis, Mo.
Official Analysis... .113.03 9.36 15S.-i:;! 3. 1 4.
157iGnnr:int'd Analysis. 14.7. 7.62 61.2S 3.1.51 .....ITChe Como Mills. lEasqt St. Louis, Ill.
Official Analysis ... 11I4.R 7.02'61.19 2.0O! .821[












ANALYSIS' OF FEED STUFF-Continued.



NAME OF BRAND. | ,- ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS

S II I l I 3 I r

Middling Feed ...................... 15Guarant't Analysis .... 12.29161.92 3.2 ..... City Grain & Feed Co., Columbia.
IOfficial Analysis.... 17.57 11.85 63.86! 2.61' 3.10' Tenn.
Ship Stuff .......................... 159 G arant'd Analysis. ..... 14.43 45.19 2.4 .... Atlanta M killing Co.. Atlanta, i.
Official Analysis.... 11.42112.02155.571 3.92! 6.48
Mill Feed .......................... 160 Guarant'd Analysis. 7.00114.001..... I 6.00 ..... Etowal Mills, Cartirsvillo, C;a.
1Official Analyis .... 7.49113.43159.86I 4.951 4.10
Cotton Seed Meal .................... 161 Guarant'd Analysis.I ..... 3 .61 ..... ..... L ithrop C. 0. Co., Iawl in le,
Official Analysis....110.92 38.61127.13I 8.86 5.70 Ga.
Victor Cora and Oat Feed.......... 162|Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 7.0 .00 3.00 .... American CeriAl Co., Chicigo, 111.
Official Analysis.. 112.88 7.70162.441 4.711 :.971
f IcI I
I'crks M ule Feed .................. 1631Guarant'd Analvsis. 7 11.10 5 .S.01 3.01. ... llilmis Fe' M ills lo is, M,.
I Official Ana l3sis.. .1016.40 .90,153. 1 3.5, i 7.611
Diamon C. C. & U. Chops.......... 164 Gl1nrant'd A alysis..14.7:11 7A.fi1 6.2 .1 I... 'IT' (o0110 ills (o., E;as Si. l.ois,
Official Analysis .... 16i.51 7.70157.621 1.111 .l.'! Ill.
Pure lWheat M idi lings .............. 1651(,l ar:il l'd Analysis I ..... 1 .0 5.,.7 ..... Ii l MIliu o., l tial .;.
S IOflcial A. ia:ivsls.... 5.1511;6.10159.0:1 4.47 4..371 T 'a.
Kvyor l"'eed ....................... 1. il(nl rant'dt' Anavisis ... 17.071 I4 I... M lli.4 C lr, nl]K r. i.
| ( flicial A nalysis.... 7.53116.41156.011 :.t;2 l .:!









official Analysis.... 5.53 8.16 57.98 3.27 5.39
Cotton Seed Meal .................. 168 Guarant'd Analysis. ..... 38.52 ........... ... Florida C. C. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Official Analysis.... 14.69 35.45 28.74 7.86| 5.66

SPECIAL NOTICE-The attention of dealers and consumers, is called to the table of "average composition of Feed Stuffs" on
a proceeding page. This table shows approximately the composition of the various feed stuffs sold throughout the country. Any
material variation, from these averages, is presumptive evidence of impurity or adulteration.
A careful examination of the foregoing tables is recommended to both dealers and consumers. The guarantee of the manu-
facturer, should not vary materially from this table of average while the "official analysis" should show practically the same
composition as the guarantee. Dealers and consumers, are requested in all cases of suspected inferiority, or adulteration to
send a sample at once to the Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis.
6 Bul.
















FEFR TIL.IZER .



Lecture before Florida Farmers Institutes.



BY R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST.

In discussing a subject of this kind, I do not like to
make statements without making them positively; hence,
I do not like to make them from memory alone, so I usual-
ly read a paper.
As we all know, the question of fertilizers and their in-
telligent application is the most important one coming be-
fore the farmer. Your crops must be fed exactly as your
stock is fed. If you feed cattle on corn cobs, the result
would be very poor; but if onu feed them on a balanced
ration, the animnas thrive. It is the same with a crop.
The same elements that go to nourish our animals are
absolutely essential for the nourishment of our crops.
You buy cottonseed meal to feed to cattle for identically
the same purpose you buy it to feed to your plants. The
three essential elements required by the plants and ani-
mals are alike; therefore, our feed stuff for a crop should
be subjected to the same guarantee and care as that for
animals.
The use of fertilizers is rapidly becoming more gen-
eral. Last year more than four million tons of mixed
fertilizers were used in this country. Florida has a rep-
utation of being a sterile, poor State, but it today pro-
duces most of the high grade phosphate of the world.
Our high grade phosphate rock averages 71 to 78 per cent.
bone phosphate of lime and is the best rock on the Euro-
pean market. The Tennessee and Carolina rock never
goes above 60 per cent., and averages about 54 per cent.
bone phosphate of lime. In spite of the fact that we are
producing a very high grade article in this State, most of
our farmers insist on using a low grade fertilizer. It is
almost impossible for the manufacturer to make this grade












of goods. In this low grade there is about 1,280 pounds
per ton of fertilizer, and to make up the remaining 720
pounds he hauls foreign substances like slag of clinker.
grinds and mixes it up with the 1,280 pounds and giv,,s
you a ton of "fertilizer." You have to pay for the haul-
ing and crushing of this foreign substance without get-
ting any added plant food.
In regard to soil retaining its fertility under cultiva-
tion, I may say that in the State where I spent my young
manhood, the soil is considered the richest in the United
States. I refer to Louisiana. The lower portion of that
State is composed of soil Brought down by the large riv-
ers from the most fertile valleys of Missouri. Tennessee.
Kansas, etc. It was said that the fertility of this soil
was inexhaustible. I have seen thousands of tons of the
richest manure hauled to the river and thrown away. To
these same fields they are now applying from 900 to 1.500
rounds of commercial fertilizers yearly. A few years ago
they said they did not need commercial fertilizers in the
West. Today millions of tons of fertilizers are going into
that section.
The best agriculturists that the world has ever known
are probably the Japanese. They know how, but do not
pretend to know why. They have been successfully culti-
vating the same soil for thirty centuries. Agriculture
is porbably the oldest art, but it is the youngest science.
It is a subject which requires great study. The oppor-
tunities afforded along this line have been very meagre
until within the last few years. Within the last thirty
years there has been a considerable amount of discovery
along these lines. T hope to see the time when agricul-
ture will be taught in our public schools, along with the
multiplication tables and other elementary subjects. I
think it is as important that our farmers should under-
stand agriculture as it is for them to understand arith-
metic. There is no question more important to the
farmer and stockman, and to the world in general, than
the fertilizer question. The feeding problem and the fer-
tilizer problems are identical. Varied information on
the fertilizer question is contained in the monthly reports
of the State Agricultural Department. Those of you
who do not receive these reports can get them by writing
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, Tallahassee. Fla.









Question: Is there any difference in phosphoric acid
in dry bone and in the phosphate rock?
Answer: None in the world. It is absolutely the
same thing derived from whatever source. Ninety per
cent. of the "dissolved bone" sold in this and other coun-
tries is made from phosphate rock.
Question: It is known that phosphate rock and bones
are reduced by sulphuric acid. If there is a portion of
the acid left uncombined is it injurious to plants?
Answer: I do not think so. The amount of sul-
phuric acid would be so very small that the lime in the
soil would more than counteract it. There is no danger
of getting a phosphate that has an excess of sulphuric
acid unless you get it from the importer, before it has had
time for the acid to mix with the rock. In "green phos-
phate" there may be a little free sulphuric acid, but a few
days will allow this to become a dry, neutral mixture.
When the material first comes out of the mixer it is like
mortar. It is mixed in ton lots and, after standing a
short time, becomes a dry, neutral mixture.
Question: Does sulphate of ammonia take longer to
act than the nitrates?
Answer: I think so. Still I think it advisable to ap-
ply all fertilizers some time prior to putting in the crop.
Probably no question is of more importance to the
farmer than the cost, or value, of the fertilizer he uses, on
which depend the success or failure of his crop, the profit
or loss of his year's work. The question is frequently
asked by the farmer, or planter, "What is the value of
Jones' or Brown's guano?" "Do you consider Smith's
phosphate better than Green's?" Such question cannot
be answered categorically. The only reply as to the
values of any brand, that can be fairly made, is to give
the relative commercial or "State values" of the actual
"plant food" in the material.
The only comparison that can be drawn between two
brands is to compare the actual amount of available
"plant food" in each, giving to each its commercial value,
and noting the difference in the sum.
Fertilizers are of value only in proportion to the
amount of available nitrogen (or ammonia as known to
our law), available phosphoric aci'l, and potash, you are
getting.











The tons or pounds of other material with which it is
mixed should be considered no more than the weight of
the barrel, box or sack, in which it is packed.
The value of the various plant foods at our sea ports is
readily obtained from the price lists of reliable dealers
and from current market prices in the various trade jour-
nals.
Quotations are made daily or weekly, of the market
values of the various materials used in the manufacture
of commercial fertilizers.
The ammoniates, cottonseed meal, fish scrap, blood.
tankage, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, etc.. the
various phosphates; sulphlates. muriates. kainits. ashes.
etc.; the phosphates; acid phosphate. bone. bone black.
etc., are all quoted; and their price is fixed y thie unit. or
pound of the actual nitrogen. potash. or phosphoric acid.
in the material, regardless of the weight or bulk of the
extraneous matter combined with it.
To protect the citizen, the consumer, and legitimate
manufacturer or dealer in reliable goods from the impo-
sition of worthless or deficient fertilizers, the State has
passed a stringent law, plain in its terms. simple, and
readily understood, requiring the manufacturer, or seller
of fertilizers to place on each package of fertilizer sold in
the State, a plain statement, or guarantee. of the amount
or percentage of the three essential plant foods: namely.
ammonia, available phosphoric acid. and potash. It re-
quires the State Chemistrto annually publish a statement
of the commercial values of these three essential ele-
ments; this information being taken from the published
market reports, and averaged, to make as fair a "State
valuation" as possible. These values are for ton lors.
purchased at sea ports for cash. lie also makes in addi-
tion to this a statement of the values of these ingredients
in larger quantities or car load lots. While these valua-
tions may not, at all times, be exactly similar to trade
values, they seldom vary greatly, and are made liberal to
meet such fluctuations; at no time during the past three
years have the State values been less than the market
values. At all times the farmer could purchase from re-
liable dealers the necessary ingredients at or below the
values fixed by the Agricultural Department.










It is unnecessary to go into details as to the various
sources of commercial fertilizers. They are largely com-
posed of waste animal, or vegetable matter; the refuse of
factories, fish scrap, blood, bone, tankage from slaughter
houses, garbage from cities, wool, hair, horns, etc.; from
nitrate of soda, mined in South America; from sulphate
of ammonia, a refuse material from the manufacture of
gas, cottonseed meal, castor pomace, etc., and most large-
ly from phosphate rock, mined in our own State (the larg-
est producer of high grade phosphate in the world), and
from phosphates mined in South Carolina and Ten-
nessee.
The bulk of the fertilizer sold in this and other coun-
tries is made from phosphate rock dissolved in sulphuric
acid; the predominant plant food in commercial fertiliz-
ers generally, is available phosphoric acid, closely fol-
lowed by the soluble potash; the smallest portion of plant
food in an average fertilizer is the nitrogen (or ammonia),
though it is the most costly of all the necessary elements.
The commercial values for the last year, 1906, as fixed
by the Agricultural Department of Florida, are as fol-
lows, and are published in each monthly bulletin of the
Department:

STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1904.

Available Phosphoric Acid .......... 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. .......... 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitro-
gen) .............................151 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ...... 5 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ............ .$1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............ .20 cents a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitro-
gen.) ...... ........................ $3.10 per unit
Potash ..... ...... ..................$1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or one per cent. of a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-









lating the value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this, take
for example a fertilizer which analyses as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid. .6.22 per cent. x 81.00-S- 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. .1.50 per cent. x .20- .30
Ammonia. ...............3.42 per cent. x 3.10- 10.60
Potash .................. 7.23 per cent. x 1.10- 7.95
M ixing and bagging ............................ 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. ..26.57
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid...8 per cent. x $1.00-$ S.00
Ammonia. .... ............2 per cent. x 3.10- 6.20
Potash. ............... ..2 per cent. x 1.10- 2.20
M ixing and bagging ............................ 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ................... $17.90
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida sea ports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this bulletin.
Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the addi-
tional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made on above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid .............90 cents per unit
Potash (K20). ..................... 99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) .... $2.70 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations are based on market prices ofr one tone lots.
I find it very largely the practice of Florida manufac-
turers and dealers, carrying large stocks in the sea port
cities, to deal direct with the consumer; that most of the
largest consumers, particularly in the fruit and vegetable
regions, order their goods direct from the factory, or the
general agency, at the sea port.
It is frequently asked, which is the most economical to
apply, large quantities of low grade goods, or a smaller
amount of higher grade, more expensive goods? "Are
two tons of an $18.00 goods not better or cheaper than
one ton of $36.00 goods?"
If the goods are sold on their merits, and the two
brands are commercially worth the price demanded. I
should certainly advise buying the high priced, or high








grade goods, knowing I should get, in either case, the
,same amount of plant food; have just half the freight to
pay, only one ton to haul from the depot to the field,
instead of two, and but one-half the labor in distributing
it on the field, with a certainty of equally as good results.
To illustrate, a ton of 8-2-2 goods has
160 pounds available phosphoric acid.
40 pounds ammonia.
40 pounds potash.

240 pounds of plant food.
1,760 pounds of useless matter, of no fertilizing or com-
mercial value.

2,000
The same amount of fertilizing material can be had by
using the following combination:
1.000 pounds 10 per cent. available acid phosphate.
200 pounds 20 per cent. sulphate of ammonia.
80 pounds 50 per cent. sulphate of potash.

1,280 pounds containing 240 pounds of plant food, the
same amount as contained in a ton of 8-2-2 goods,
saving the freight and handling of 720 pounds of
"filler."
The average amount of plant food in twenty-four
brands, taken from six of the largest dealers in the State,
for the years 1902 and 1903, was 340 pounds per ton, the
average of all mixed goods sold in the State during 1903
was 338 pounds per ton; the average of plant food in com-
mercial fertilizers throughout the United States is about
300 pounds, showing that Florida growers demand a bet-
ter average quality of fertilizer.
The average price was $33.00 per ton; the average
commercial value (or State value) was $27.00, showing
an average excess over State values of $6.00 per ton, not
including $1.50 per ton allowed for mixing and bags.
This was not the highest price, for the same class of
goods. by any means, one lot of brands showing 296
pounds of plant food sold at an excess of $10.30 per ton
above State values.
Another lot, with 327 pounds of plant food, sold at an
excess of but $2.05 per ton over State values; in one case











the dealer making the profit of $10.30 on 296 pounds of
plant food, in the other but $2.05 profit on goods having
327 pounds of plant food. In both cases the goods were
from reliable and trustworthy manufacturers, and made
from first-class materials.
In one case 296 pounds of plant food sold for 36G.00.
or 12 cents per pound for the actual food in the ton of
material; in the other case 337 pounds of plant food were
sold for $20.25, or 8.7 cents per pound for the actual
plant food in the ton of material.
The average profit per ton of goods sold in the Stare
during 1902 a4l 1903 was (including $1.50 for lags and
mixing) 8.00 per ton. Hence it is evident that the rela-
tive cost of high grade goods is less than that ,f low
grade goods.
In this connection, I quite from Bulletin No. 9. of the
Vermont Experiment Station, published in May. 19103. an
acknowledged authority on the subject. as follows:
"The high grade fertilizers for a third adcrnrc in price
over the cost of a low class goods, furnish.ed tw'o-thirds
more plant food, and five-sixths more coni mcrcial reluec.-
The average of a number of the most generally used
brands, by six of the most reliable manufacturers and
dealers in Florida, shows practically 4 per cent. of am-
monia, 6 per cent. of available phosphoric acid. and 7
per cent. of potash, or 17 per cent. of total plant food. or
340 pounds of a necessary fertilizing element in each ton.
For general use this is undoubtedly a good formula. The
general average of all mixed goods sold in the State dur-
ing 1903 was practically the same percentage as above.
Some crops demand larger proportions of nitrogen.
However, there are special crops that demand different
proportions of these essential elements. All succulent
crops, grown for their foliage, such as cabbage, celery.
lettuce, etc., require nitrogen (or ammonia) as the pre-
dominating element. Hence large quantities of blood and
bone, tankage, fish, scrap and the nitrates are used in
making fertilizers for these crops, nitrogen being the pre-
dominant element required for succulent foliage crops.
Plants cultivated for their starch, or sugar content.
require larger amounts of potash to insure a larger yield
of grain or fruit. Hence the predominant element for
such crops is potash.











Plants grown for fibre, cotton, flax, or hemp, or for ma-
turing the wood of fruit trees, to form cellulose or wood
fibre, require an excess of phosphoric acid in a properly
balanced fertilizer; hence, in cotton fertilizers, phosphoric
acid is the predominating element.
It may be broadly stated, that the necessary elements
are used by the growing plant as follows, it being under-
stood that all of them are absolutely essential to the
healthy growth of the plant, that each of them must be
present in the soil, in an available condition, and in suf-
ficient quantity to supply the demands of the crop:
1st. Nitrogen; to produce foliage, succulent leaves,
green stems and immature wood.
2nd. Phosphoric acid; to induce the formation of fibre,
woody tissue, cellulose, to mature the woody part of a
plant, or to make fibre, as in cotton, flax or hemp, to pro-
duce mature wood in fruit trees.
3rd. Potash; to assist in the formation of starch, or
sugar, as in the potato, grain, sugal cane, or fruit.
The cotton grower requires all three of these elements
-nitrogen, to give his crop a quick, healthy growth; pot-
ash, to harden the stems and mature the seeds, and phos-
phoric acid to grow the fibre.
Experiments made by trained investigators have shown
that these elements are required for cotton in about the
following proportions:
Ammonia, 3 per cent.
Potash, 21 per cent.
Available phosphoric acid, 7 per cent.
Or, 12 pounds of ammonia, 10 pounds of potash, 28
pounds of phosphoric acid, using bout 400 pounds per
acre of above formula.
A crop of 300 pounds of lint cotton requires 22 pounds
of nitrogen, 50 pounds of phosphoric acid, and 15 pounds
of potash. To supply all this amount, assuming there be
none of these essential elements available in the soil,
would require an application of not less than 800 pounds
of the above formula per acre. However, all soils have
more or less of these elements of fertility; some (though
very few soils) have all of them, particularly new lands,
not worn out.
Our cotton fields are rapidly being robbed of their ori-
ginal fertility. The lint is sold, as is the seed, taking









from the land, with each 1.000 pounds of seed. 3S pounds
of ammonia, 13 pounds of phosphoric acid, and 12 pounds
of potash. Excepting the ammonia, these elements are
permanently lost, and must be restored by man, or the
field will necessarily become barren.
The sale of the seed from our cotton fields, with no re-
turn of the mineral elements, has removed millions of dol-
lars of actual wealth; while also the sale of each ani-
mal, each bushel of wheat, or ton of hay. las impover-
ished to a certain extent the fertile praries of the West.
That our farmers, the cotton planter, the corn and
wheat producer, and the stockman, have wasted the nat-
ural wealth of their lands, is best evidenced by the enor-
mous growth of the fertilizer industry. An industry,
practically unknown thirty years ago, is now one of the
most important in the country, with hundreds of millions
of dollars invested in the business. Besides the enormous
domestic consumption (approximating 4.500.000 tons,
worth $100,000,000.00), we exported in 1903, up to No-
vember 1st, $5,600,000 worth of fertilizers, and imported
$2,600,000 worth.
The question of maintaining the fertility of our fields
and pastures is certainly the most important one now be-
fore our farmers. Its importance is becoming greater
each year. Fields formerly said to be inexhaustibly fer-
tile, now demand assistance to produce average crops.
The question is, "How can we economically preserve
and increase the fertility of our farms?" As fertilizers
are known to be generally the waste or offal of our homes,
factories and cities, the answer is contained in the ques-
tion, and is simply, "Stop wasting." Don't sell off the
fertility of the farm, make more manure, return to the
soil all that is possible, feed your crude materials to your
cattle, care for and carefully husband the waste material
of all kinds, sell only the finished product, economize ;n
the purchase of the necessary fertilizers, pay for what
you need and don't buy things you do not need. Don't
sell a ton of cotton seed without buying back 1.000 pounds
of cotton seed meal. Feed this meal to live stock and
save the manure, mix it with acid phosphate and kainit.
and apply it to your field.
If the meal from the seed of an acre of cotton were
mixed in proper proportion with acid phosphate, and pot-












ash, and returned to the field each year, its fertility would
increase annually, the yields be greater each year, instead
of less.
That most expensive element of fertilizing, nitrogen,
that costs three times as much per pound as either potash
or phosphoric acid, can, by proper rotation and care, be
to a large extent produced on the farm. It is the only
one of them that can be so produced. Any soil supplied
with the necessary available potash and phosphoric acid
can be made to produce abundant quantities of nitrogen
by planting the various legumes, or nitrogen- gathering
plants, such as cow peas, velvet beans, beggar weed and
the various clovers. Such crops demand first, a supply of
available phosphoric acid, and the potash in the soil.
They will then produce large quantities of nitrogen from
the air, leaving the soil in better condition for the produc-
tion of other crops, such as cotton, tobacco, and grain,
that require, but do not produce nitrogen, as do the
legumes mentioned. These" leguminous crops make the
best of hay or forage and as such should be utilized on
the farm; all the manure should be carefully saved, and
reinforced by potash and phosphate, returned to the soil.
For general use under the conditions outlined, on our
ordinary cotton soils, I would suggest that acid phosphate
and potash (either kainit or the higher grade goods) be
used, with very little ammonia, if any. The lands to be
planted in peas, velvet beans or beggar weed, to be fol-
lowed by cotton, oats or corn, making a three years' rota-
tion.
One thousand pounds of 14 per cent. available phos-
phate, 1,000 pounds of 12 per cent. kainit, making a ton,
would analyze 7 per cent. phosphate and 6 per cent. pot-
ash, with a total of 260 pounds of plant food. This mix-
ture can be purchased at $14.00 per ton, mixed and sacked
for $1.25, making the cost at seaports, $15.25 per ton; 260
pounds of plant food costing less than 6 cents per pound.
Or, 1,000 pounds of 14 per cent. available phosphate,
500 pounds of 12 per cent. kainit, 500 pounds of 8 per
cent. cotton seed meal, making a ton, would yield 7 per
cent. available phosphate, 3 per cent. potash, 2 per cent.
ammonia, or 257 pounds of plant food, costing 7.4 cents
per pound; tiis mixture will cost $18.75 per ton, at
present market values, including mixing and bagging, and
will be sold under full guarantee. The guarantee is re-











quired of the manufacturer, and is just as essential to in-
sure the obtaining of the materials required. in the proper
amount, on a special mixture, made to order, as on a regu-
lar brand, and should be demanded and insisted on in each
case.
In conclusion, I would mention that our governments
both National and State, are spending vast sums of *
money in experimental work at the various experimental
stations. They are providing agricultural colleges. furn-
ishing lectures to thousands of farmers' institutes, and
publishing a large number of bulletins, all bearing on agri-
culture in its various forms. These are valuable paper'.
by eminent practical and scientific men. upon almost
every agricultural subject, all classes and kinds of crops,
soils, fertilizers, stock raising. poultry. hogs and cattle.
the best methods of feeding, of dairying. and the many
various industries allied to agriculture.
These bulletins are published for free distribution and
are available to every farmer, and every citizen in the
land. I particularly mention a few that are of great value
to those seeking information :s to the proper use of ferti-
lizers, to le had from lhe UIni ,d Shites department of
Agriculture.
No. 16 -Leguminous 'lanits.
21--Barnyaird Manure.
No. 44-C'oimmercial Fe ilizeis.
No. 36-Cotton Seed and Its Products.
There are many others it be had for the asking. A liit
of them is published in lie bulletins mentioned. Our Ag-
ricultural Experiment Station at Lake ( ity also publishes
a number of bulletins of peculiar value to our Florida
farmers. These bulletins should he in the hands of every
farmer in the State, being applicable to the crops. climate
and soil of the State. They are published for the benefit
of the farmer, and belong to him. As he pays for them.
lie should avail himself of them and procure those treating
upon his particular lines of agriculture, be lie farmer.
trucker, fruit grower, dairyman or stockman.

EXPLANATION OF FERTILIZER LAW.

There has been a great deal of difficulty in getting our
farmers to understand their privileges in regard to ferti-
lizer and feed inspection. When you get fertilizer, cot-










ton seed meal and feed of which yon are at all suspicious,
you should simply take a can and fill it with this fertilizer,
or cotton seed meal or feed stuff, in the presence of two
witnesses. Seal it and hand it to one of your friends and
tell him to send it to the Commissioner of Agriculture. If
this fertilizer or cotton seed meal or feed stuff, in any
point, falls below the guarantee stamped on the sack or
tag, you not only do not have to pay for it, but you get
damages to the amount of the value of the fertilizer
or feed. In buying fertilizers or feed it is the privilege of
the farmer to have the fertilizer or feed examined, and a
good many are taking advantage of it. Last year we
found not one sample deficient in all three ingredients.
There were 58 deficient in one ingredient, that is, having
less than four-fifths of the guaranteed per cent. There
have been fertilizers sold in this State for $16 per ton that
were worth 45 cents. I have analyzed goods for potash
that had less than a quarter of one per cent. of potash in
it. In one case a fertilizer, supposed to contain 3 per
cent. ammonia and 10 per cent. potash, was deficient 24
per cent. ammonia and 9 per cent. in potash.
Query: Do you think it would be advisable and
profitable for truck growers to buy and mix their ow;n
fertilizers, provided they did it intelligently.
Answer: Undoubtedly it would, or you can make your
own formula and send it up to the manufacturers, and
they will mix it for you for $1.50 per ton. This is perhaps
the most advisable. The law compels the manufacturer
in this case to guarantee the percentages you require, and
to state the materials used in making the goods.
Query: What per cent. of potash is there in cow drop-
pings?
Answer: From a quarter to one-half of one per cent.,
governed largely by what the animal eats. You would
have to mix acid phosphate and kainit with cow manure
to get a properly balanced plant food.
(See table of composition of fertilizer materials and
feed stuff in this and other bulletins.)














SUPER-PHOSPHATES.



DISSOLVED BONE VS. ACID PHOSPHATE.



By R. E. Rose, State Chemist.

These questions are frequently asked of chemists and of
Experimental Stations, "Which is the most valuable, agri-
cultarly speaking, 'Dissolved Bone,' or 'Acid Phosphate
Which is the most available form of Phosphate "
The reply if honestly given is. that the phosphate in
either, is identical in every way. The material used in
one case. being bones and sulphuric acid. in the other min-
eral phosphates-Florida. Carolina or Tennessee rock
phosphate-and sulphuric acid. The result being super-
phosphate, a mixture of Gypsum (Sulphate of Lime) and
Phosphoric Acid. In both cases tie original "bone" and
"rock" is composed of lime and phosphoric acid in com-
bination, and insoluable. The sulphpuric acid combines
with the lime in the bones, or rock. and frees, or makes
soluable, the "Phosphoric Acid." Though sulphuric acid
is used in dissolving bones and rock. to form super-phos-
phates, there remains no free acid. in the material after
combination. The sulphuric acid combines with the lime.
to form a neutral salt, Gypsum, or sulphate of lime.
Super-phosphate, made of bones, or rock, is a mixture of
Gypsum. a neutral salt. nnd phosphoric acid.
Much prejudice still exists as to the use of rock phos-
phates, hence the demand for bone phosphates has caused
many-if not most-manufacturers of "acid phosphates"
-as distinguished from "bone phosphates"-to call their
product "Dissolved Bone."
Probably ninety per cent. of all the super-phosphates
of the world are made from rock phosphates. Florida
ships a million of tons of phosphate rock annually. Prob-
ably, also, most of them are sold as "Dissolved Bone" or
"Dissolved Bone Black." which is generally "Dissolved
Rock" with a little carbon, coal or lamp black added to
give it color.











97

Most of the bone used for fertilizers, of which there is
comparatively a small supply, is used as "raw bone," or
"steamed bone," or bone meal. There is evidence that
considerable "Steamed Bone" is largely adulterated with
rock phosphate. Bone contains a certain amount of am-
monia, though thousands of tons of "Bone and Potash"
are sold which contain no ammonia-showing that no
bones were used in its composition.
While dealers and manufacturers charge from six to
ten dollars more for "Dissolved Bone," than for "Acid
Phosphate," the facts are bones are seldom used in the
manufacture of the super-phosphates.
This prejudice is widespread and is used by manufac-
turers and dealers to unfairly charge a greater price for
goods than the same goods can be had for when called by
a different name.
Excepting the ammonia content, which is the most
valuable ingredient of any fertilizer, there is no difference
in the value per unit of phosphoric acid made from bones
or rocks.
If farmers, and growers, will understand that "Super-
Phosphates," made from bones are practically unknown
to the trade; that thousands of tons of "Dissolved Bone"
are made by the various acid phosphate manufacturers
without bones, that practically all bones are sold as "Raw
Bone," "Bone Meal," or "Steamed Bone." and that the
phosphoric acid of bones and rock are identical, chemical-
ly and agriculturally, this imposition will be checked.
It has been suggested that the term "Dissolved Bone"
or "Dissolved Bone Black," should be allowed only when
bones are actually used in the fertilizer. Unfortunately
there is no means to detect the difference between super-
phosphates. made from bone or rock.
Many efforts have been made by agricultural chemists
of this and other countries to distinguish them, so far
without results.
"Dissolved Bone" and "Dissolved Bone Black" have be-
come trade names, for super-phosphates. They are in
most cases, if not in all, simply dissolved phosphate rock,
while in the case of "Dissolved Bone Black" a small
amount of carbon, coal or lamp black is added for color.
7 Bul.













From the same lot of suler -phosphates made by a fac-
tory-where no hones are used-'-Acid Phosphate." "D)is-
solved Bone" and "D)issolved Bone Black." i Ib adding a
little carbon) can be sold-the only difference heing in
the price to the consumer-as the mixer purchases it on
its "unit basis," and knows full well that no bones are
used in its make up. While a few tons of bones are some-
times used for advertisement, and a few tons of Spent
Bone Black from sugar factories are received. 90 per cenr.
of all the waste bones are sold as raw bone. and the Spent
Bone Black is generally used locally-by growers near
the factories, or on the sugar fields owned by the factory.

AVAILABLE PHOSPHATES, SUPER-PHOSPHATES,
DISSOLVED BONE.

The use of mineral phosphates, as fertilizer is of com-
parative recent date. The Carolina deposits for years
was the only sources of supply. Much prejudice had to
be overcome to induce farmers to believe that -rocks"
were as good as bones in the manufacture of "guano."
The result was that thousands of tons of Carolina rock
were sold, and are still sold as "dissolved bone," this pre-
judice to a certain extent still exists and growers de-
mand that their goods be made from "dissolved bone" or
"bone black." and pay larger prices therefore and get
simply "acid phosphate" or dissolved Carolina. Florida
or Tennessee "rock phosphates," in every way as good,
and as valuable as "dissolved bone," so far as the availa-
'ble phosphoric acid is concerned. This prejudice costs
our farmers thousands of dollars every year and causes
manufacturers and dealers to misrepresent one of the
,most valuable of our fertilizing materials.
The universal opinion of agricultural chemists, experi-
mental stations, and practical farmers is now. that avail-
able phosphoric acid, be it derived from "bone." Florida.
Carolina or other mineral phosphate. or from "Thomas
Slag," is identical, and of the same value chemically or
agricuturally. In this connection I am pleased to again
,quote from the report of the Hon. John M. McCandless,
Stale Chemist of Georgia, as follows:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valua-
tions are relative and approximate only. and are only in-
iended to serve as a guide. It is much to be desired that












farmers should study the analysis giving the actual per-
centage of plant food more, and ptay no attention what-
ever to names and brands. They should realize, for in-
stance, that in nine cases out of ten, brands known as
"Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle of bone, but
are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone,
the available phosphoric acid from "rocks" being just as
available and identically the same as the available phos-
phoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands are not
made from bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if
they were made from bone the percentage of ammonia
would be stated, and it would be charged for. This is
only one instance of the folly of being influenced by
names and brands-many might be given. Remember
that a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the man-
ufacturer. and you have to pay the cost in the long run.
Study the markets, select a time for purchasing when gen-
eral trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with some
of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or better
who have a little spare cash, and then order from a relia-
ble manufacturer, stiplating, if you have a preference,
just what materials the goods shall be made from. and
especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phos-
phoric acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything
he pleases. In this way you will be sure to have a first-
class goods bought at the lowest market price."
The generally accepted opinion of agricultural chem-
ists, experimental stations, agricultural colleges, and
practical growers, is that available phosphoric acid, from
any source is equally valuable, hence it is folly to demand
and pay for dissolved bone, or dissolved bone black,
higher prices, particularly when acid phosphate as such
can be purchased for less money.

FREE ACID IN ACID PHOSPHATE OR SUPER-
PHOSPHATE.

Some complaint has of late years been had from this
source, and much of the prejudice against "mineral phos-
phates" has doubtless arisen from this cause. In proper-
ly prepared acid phosphate, dissolved bone, or super-phos-
phate, there should be no free acid; all acids should be
combined with the lime of the "bone" or "rock" to form













gypsum or sulphate of lime, a neutral salt. beneficial and
not harmful to growing crops, frequently used as a top
dressing, particularly on meadows. Unfortunately in the
desire to increase the "availability" of the goods, an ac-
cess of acid is sometimes used; or goods still "wet" or
"green" that have not had time to "ripen" or chemically
combine the acid with the lime to form sulphate are sold
to the consumer, or mixed with other materials forming
"green" fertilizers. In most cases, particularly in "mixed
goods." time will correct this fault and the goods become
"dry" or neutral. In this connection it is well to call at-
tention to the well established fact. known to all practi-
cal farmers that fresh, undecomposed stable manure.
and particularly fresh hen dung will "burn" or "fire"
plants, is used without decomposing or compositing.
Peruvian guano, a most valuable natural fertilizer,
when applied in quantity or in direct contact with seed
or paints, will certainly "burn" and destroy them. com-
mercial fertilizers, are artificial guanos and have exactly
the same T :Tect as natural guano or fresh hen dung. they
should nol be applied direct to growing plants. nor in
contact wi", seed; nor should any crop be planted until
the commc fertilizer or stable manure has had tim,
to thoron, lecompose and assimilate with the soil.
Many dist have doubtless occurred from neglect o
this prec; .:, and frequently the fertilizer manufa
turer has '-n blamed for losses caused by the inexper-
ience and -e of grower himself.




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