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 Title Page
 County map of the state of...
 Crops
 Weather report
 Commercial fertilizers and commercial...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    County map of the state of Florida
        Page 2
    Crops
        Page 3
        Page 4
        The bulletin as a quarterly
            Page 5
        Some changes
            Page 6
        Condensed notes of correspondents by divisions
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
    Weather report
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Salient climatic features
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
    Commercial fertilizers and commercial feeding stuff
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Regulations governing the taking and forwarding of fertilizer or commercial feeding stuff samples to the commissioner of agriculture
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Market prices of chemicals and fertilizing materials at Florida sea ports, January 1905
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Jacksonville prices current
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Factors for conversion
            Page 37
        State values
            Page 38
        State valuations
            Page 39
        Special samples
            Page 40
        Light weight-false statements
            Page 41
        Ashes, hard wood, palmetto, Canada ashes
            Page 42
        Summary of fertilizers
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Analysis of fertilizers
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Analysis of feed stuff
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
        Address by R.E. Rose, state chemist of Florida
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
Full Text
I ; /




VOLUME 16
NUMBER 2




FLORIDA

QUARTERLY

BULLETIN.

OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


APRIL 1. 1906,

B E. McLI N,
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


Part I-Crops. Part 2-Weather Report.
Part 3-Fertilizers and Feeding Stuff.



Entered January r. roo3, at Tallahassee, Florida as
second-class matter, under Act of Congress,
of June, ipoq.


These Bulletins are Issued freetothose requesting them.


TALLAHASSiE, FLA
CAPITAL PUBLISHING CO., STATE PRINTERS












County Map of the State of Florida.


^>__ .. .[. i ,


r
r
i
r
i

j
3
I

i




















PART I.
CROPS,










4














THE BULLETIN AS A QUARTERLY.



With this issue of the Bulletin the change is made from
a monthly to a quarterly publication. This change is
made necessary because of the increased cost of publish-
ing the Bulletin, due to the rapidly increasing amount of
material necessary to be published, in order that the fer-
tilizer and pure feed laws may be made intelligable to
the people of the State, and also to enable the Commis-
sioner to properly and efficiently enforce said laws. The
increased cost of this additional work is more than can be
met by the present appropriation, which was not expected,
when made. to cover the additional expense of putting intq
effect the pure feed law enacted by the last Legislature;;
for this purpose a special appropriation should have been
provided, but was not. On account of this extra expense
it becomes necessary to publish the Bulletin as a quar-
terly, or be unable to publish it more than three or four
months in the year. We do not believe however, that the
change will in the least militate against its efficiency or
value as a department publication, which will interest
the readers.
Respectfully,
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.











SOME CHANGES.


With other changes noted in the Bulletin we have
adopted the plan of dividing the State into sections. There
are five divisions, as near equal in the number of counties
assigned to each as can well be arranged, with due con-
sideration to their products and geographical position.
The tabulation of the county averages are as before, and
in addition the average of the acreages planted, or condi-
tions, etc., as the case may be, are given for each divis-
ion. This enables us to show with a greater degree of
accuracy the conditions, etc., of crops in the several por-
tions of the State. The State averages are made up from
the sums of the division average.
Following are the divisions of the State, and the coun-
ties contained in each:
DIVISION OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
FHamilton,
Jackson,
LaFayette,
Leon,
Liberty.
Madison,
Suwannee,
Taylor,
Wakulla-11.
Western Division.
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-7.
Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,


Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns-9.
CUentral Division.
Citrus.
Hernando.
Lake,
Levy.
Marion,
Orange,
Pasco.
Suniter.
Volusia-9.
Southern Division.
Brevard,
Dade,
DeSoto.
Hillsborough.
Lee,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Osceola,
Polk,
St. Lucie-10.















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


B. E. McLiN, Com- H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS-BY
DIVISIONS.

Northern, Division.-Planting of the principal crops is
practically over; the weather has been generally dry and
cool, but it has enabled the farmers to get in their seed
without any serious delays. There is quite an increase in
the acreage of cotton and corn in this section, in fact most
of the crops are considerably increased over last year.
There is a noticeable effort being gradually made in the
improvement of farms, and methods of farm work, over
the past; diversification of crops, and a more intensive
system of cultivation is being practiced than formerly.
In this division the reports show increased acreage as
compared with last year, and conditions of minor crops
that compare favorably with the same period. The fruit
crops in tlis division will be short, on an average, though
in some localities the crops will be fair.
TVcstcrnil Division-In this division the farm operations
are somewhat backward; being further west, ihe seasons
are later and the counties forming this division
are not yet through planting in some instances
but with a continuance of favorable weather the
acreage planted will be quite as full as indicated by our
correspondents, and soon completed. In this division
there is also a noticeable increase in the areage of general
field crops over 1905. There is also in this division, as in
the adjoining one a spirit of general progressiveness tak-
ing hold of the farmers, and much improvement in farm,
and methods of farm management is apparent in all sec-
tions. The prospects at present are flattering for fine
crops. The fruit crops are at present in fair shape,
peaches Ibeing better at present than at this time last
year.














Northeastern, Division-In this division our correspond-
ents report increase of acreage being planted in the main
field crops as well as in the vegetable crops; the condition
of all growing crops are reported an excellent acreage and
if no untoward event happens, and the seasons remain
propitious the result of crops generally will be fine.
In some instances the acreages are unusually large. The
acreage in melons is large and the conditions of both
melon and strawberries are very fine. Peaches and pears
are also in fine shape. Altogether, the crop situation in
this division is flattering.
Central Division-In this division a large acreage has
been planted to all crops, and all are doing well, though
rain has been much needed; over the entire district the
weather has been dry, and cool, and in localities some
crops have suffered considerably, the vegetable crops
showing the effects of drought more than field crops. In
this district many vegetables and small fruits have
already been shipped to market; good prices have been
realized, and on several crops large profits have come to
the growers. The large majority of the farmers and
truck growers are making money and if the remainder of
the season continues good the people will have had a pros-
perous year. Fruit trees are in most excellent condition
at present, and a large crop of oranges is to be expected.
Southern Division-Few field crops comparatively are
grown in this division of the State, the bulk of the farm-
ing being mostly confined to vegetable and fruit growing;
the field crops grown are generally in fine condition. and
the vegetable crops being marketed; some have about all
been shipped, recently the weather has been cool and dry:
from all counties in this division, comes good reports of
the condition of the fruit trees, and the prospect of large
crops of fruit, the rain of the past winter, and absence of
frost, adding much to the growth and healthy condition
of the trees; in all the counties of this division the orange
trees are reported as showing the most remarkable growth
of any year since the great freeze. A peculiar feature of
these rains has been the fact that while they were exceed-
ingly beneficial to the fruit trees, they were the source of
much damage to a number of vegetable crops, the tomato
crop in numerous localities being practically destroyed.








REPORT OF CROP ACREAGES AND CONDITIONS ON
APRIL 1, 1906, AS COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD
FOR 1905.


COUNTIES



Northern Di
vision.
Franklin....
Gadsden....
Hamilton....
Jefferson....
LaFayette...
Leon ........
Madison....
Suwannee ..
Taylor ......
Wakul a....


Ma (e a al .3





.00 .... 1 100 100 ...... .. .... ...
100 12 100 ...... 125 100
... 1 1 75 75 75 50 75 75
11 1 10 125 100 100 ... .... 75
8 110 1251 .. .. ....
110 ..... 11 10 110 ...... 125 100 100
100 10 100..



125 80 100 125 100 ......125 100
100 100 75 75 75 501 75 75
110 105 100 1 00.........75
85 110 125 125 80


80 100 100 100 ... ....
125 90 100 50 12 .
-0 I ... ... -... ~-


Div.Av prct| 1091 861 1011 96 100 87 100l 87 78
Western Division.
Cahoun.. 100 60 115 100 13 .......
Escambia... 110 ...... 125 100 110 ...... 1 .. 100
Holmes.... 75 ...... 10 100 100 ...... 90 100
Jackson.. 110 75 110 100 105. .
Santa Rosa 110 ...... 110 110 110 .... .
Walton 00. 100 100 110

PDiv.Av. pr cti 100 68 11 102 1121...... 95 100
Northeastern Di-
vision.
Alachua... ...... 75 1 1 1201 .. ....
Baker ...... ... 80 100 75 75'...... ... 50
Clay......... ...... 10 110 100 100 ...... .. ... ...
Columbia......... 75 125 100 125...... .

Div. 4v. prct ... 83 1091 94 105 .... 75
Central Division.
Hernando .. ... ..... 125 125 ...... .... 100
L ake .... ...... 80 70 .. .... .... ..
Levy. 1 90 100 100 100 ..... .
Marion. .. 11 90 100 105 90 100 100 .... 85
Orange.... ... .. 50 40 5 ... ... ...
Pasco.. .. 100 100 90 ... 125.
Sumter...... ... 0 100 90 100 .. ... .. .. ..
Volusia.. ... ........ 80...... 100........ ...

Div Av. pr ct 105 70 92 90 86 10 12 92
Southern Division.
Brevard..... .... 7. ...... .... ... .
D ade. ...... ...... .. ..... .. ... ..
DeSoto ..... ..... ...... 125 .. 95 ..... ............
Hillsboro'h. ...... ...... 100 90 110 ...... ... .
Lee ......... ..... .. ... 100 ..... ... .. .
M anatee............ 1 100 100 ........ .... 110
Osceola..... ...... ...... 100 10 100 ...... .. .... 100
Polk ........ ...... ...... 100 80 75 ... .. ... 75
St. L uci .... ..... .. .... .. .

Div.tAv prct 101 .. 104 926 94 ...... 8 95
StateAv. p et 1051 77 103| 961 99 31 861 87 88









ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS.-Continued.

Z I Irish
SCabbage Potato's
COUNTIES O '_

hob i s ht bl go I '
Northern Di- I 1 3
vision. j L s < I


Franklin....
Gadsden....
Hamilton...
Jefferson...
LaFayette...
Leon.. ......
Madison ....
Suwannee...
Taylor ......
Wakulla....

Div Av. pr ct
Weatcrn Div'sion.


100 100
100 100
75 75
100 100
80 .. .
110 100
100 100
90 100
150 100
125 125

103 100


50
100



70

100

80


100
125
75
200
75
125

60
125
125

112


751 50 100 601 1 K
100 100 100 100 85
100...... 100 50
100 loot 100 100; so
le0 .. 1 10.... o
100 100 100 100 75
110 ...... 100 &5
100 . 1 80
100 ...... ..
100 ...... .... 100 100

98 87 100 95 82


Calhoun.... 901 90 100 1 .......
Esscambia 150 100 10 1501 150 100 75 150 100
Ho'mos ... 100 .. 1251 110' 10) 10 100 100
Jackson. .... 110 100 100 100 ( ) 9U
Santa Rosa 110 100 ..... 115: S0 110 100 10 1W
Waaton ... 100 ... 110. 100 1(00 10 '-.)

Div.Av pr ct 112 98 100: 122 110 12 0, 110 .
Nortll laatcrn Di
yVISon
Alachu.... 20 iP2)i 100l 10i 12 (100 5O !0
Baker. 100 7;5 ..... 5 10I 4''
(C.ay... 10 10 .... 1 100 )
Columbia.. 100 12 ... 1 ) 12 ... ....

Di%.Av. [pc _5 _,i !W i 1t;1 1I' 7 '
Central Division.
clrnanddo. i.... I b !i :i," 10 '
Lake ........ ..... ... ... .
L vvy ..... .. 100 1 ( 0)() 11 0 0 11 i ]f' I
J arion ..... 100(o lo. 120 1 1 1 i0
Orange ..... 50: .. 50i .0 4
Pasco ... .0 100 10 100 ; 1 2' 1
Sumter ..... 100 100, 100i 1: 1001 125 10 10, 11i0
Volusia ... 100 100 100 70 bu 7 O

Div.Av p1r ct 961 100 81 10 1'i R.; !n 0'1 S4
Southern Division.
Brevard..... 80 ..... ... ..... .. .. .
)ade ...... 100 00 .1. j :
DeSoto .......... 100 0 200 Q .. .. 75 100 25 10)
Hillsboro,h. 100 110 100 90 ...... 11U 15 90. 110
Lee... ... 100 . ... .. . .. W 0
M anate ... 110 100 ..... ... .. lo( 100, 10 ) 100
Osceola... 110 120 100 130 ..... 100 110 100 120
Polk........ 25 75 75 90 80 120 100; 90 100
St. Lucie.... ... .. ... .... .

Div.Av. pr et 96 101 -89 125 80ol 101103 -841 101
StateAv. p etl 1021 1011 90j 1161 ICC( 96 9z1 bsI 89


--









ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS.-Continued.

English Beans
Tomatoes Cucumbers Peas Beans
COUNTIES -

0 a s a h a 0
a a I V
Northern Di- g g I
vision 3 0 U 0 C-
Franklin..... 40 90 40 80 50 85 50; 100
Gadsden...... 100 85 100 80 100 7 100 85
Hamiton... 75 50 75 60 5 50 75 50
Jefferson..... 80 50............ 1 70 100 80
LaFayette.... ...... .. ...........- -
Leon...... .. 85 50 100 80 90 65 100 85
M adison..... 90 75.............. ...... .. 100 0
Suwannee ... ...... ...... ...... ..... ..... 100 85
Taylo ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... .... .
Wakulla..... .............. .. ..... .....

Div. Av. pr et 78 67 79 75 78 69 89 81
West rn Division.
Calhoun ...... ..... ...... .... *
Escambia.... 100 100 100 7 100 12 150 100
Holmes ..... 100 1001 110 100 100 100 100 80
IJackson .... 100 75 100 90
Santa Rosa.. o; 9100 900 3 10 80 1 100
Walton ...... 100 8. .. .... ... ... 100. 80
Div. Av. prcl 100 91 103 8 .96 95 112' 90
Northeastern

Baker............ .... 100 I i o80
C.av I I 1() 100 100 10 10 0 10: 10( 100
Co uinhia ... .. . -. .... .

j)iv. .v, pr ctl 10(1 1l(;0 10 1,(( 110 100 10c! 93
Central D-vision. -
fHIf1nu1 dI..1. H 0 8) 1~10 O 1() -;1) 100
.Lake ....... 60 8"l ...... 8 lu 1 7" 50
Le ...... 100 10 8 I 0 100 1 90
rion 10( 0i 7i ]1 1100 100 105 8
Orange 0. (- 0 201 40' ..... ....... .I-
Pasct ........ i0 75: 10 60 60 100 7 8
Sumter .. 10l7 100 7 O, 9 0 90 100I 100
Volu.ia ... 100 90 100 0 75 60 0 80

Dir. \ '. pr et ( 87; 71 _76' 8 93 So 79
outhe 'n Dlvi-ion
B revar .. ... ........ 90
Dade. ....... .. 30 801 50 100 ........ .. 109(1 100
D)ade ........ 30 100 1! o
DeS;oto. 751 50 ..... ..... 50 50
Hillsboro'h.. 8 100 100 100 00 10 00 110
Lee .......... 100 100 ....... ...... ..... 100 100
Manatee .... 100 100 1(00 100: 100 100 100 100
Osceola... .. 100 10o 110 90 ...... 110 10
Polk. 7.5 100 7 100, 100 0 6 100
St.Lcie ... 00 100 ..... ................. 1 100

Div. Av pr et 79 90 86 8, WI 103 9 90
State Av 1) ctI 991 8N( m89 87 9 9 12 941 87










ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS.-Continued.


Lettuce Egg Plants Celery Beets
COUNTIES

c b 2.

Northern Di- :
vision. 0o I I -
Franklin.. 80 100 ...... ...... .... ...... 40[ 90
Gadsden .. 90 85 90 75 ...... ...... .... ......
H am i'ton .... 50 80 ...... ...... ...... ...... 50 80
Jefferson ..... .... ..... .... ... .. ....
LaFayette ... ............................... ...
Leon......... 100 90 75 7 ..... ..... 100 8
Madis n... .. ...... .......... ........... ..
Suwannee .... ..... .. ........... .
T aylor .. .... .. .. .... ..... .... .. .
W akulla........... .... ..... ..... ...... .... 100 100

Div. Av. pr ct 80 89 82 7(5 .... ..... 72 8
West ru 1)ivisi,,n.
C alboun ... .. .. ...... ..... ... ...
Escambia.... 100 100 1001 100 100 100 100 10X)
H o'm es ...... ............ ......... 110 0
Jackson ........... .. 1(0 5
Santa Rosa .. .... ... .
W alton. ..... ......... ....... i .. ....

Div. Av pr 10( 100 10() 100 10(0 L 1,1)i 00 C91
Norlheatern li-
vision.
Alachua.. 125 1001 ..... .. . .
B aker... .. .. .
Clay......... .... .... .. .. .. ..
Colui bia .. ............ .....

Div. Av. pr ct 12 1 ....... ...... 100
central Division.
Hernando... 1 100 0 100 80 ............ 1( 0
L ake..... .. .. ..
Levy......... 110 100 100 0 i ...... ... 10) I10
Marion ...... 100 100 100 100 100 100 0lo 100
Orange ...... 0 100 15 100...........
Pasco. ...... 8) 90 100 6 5 ... .... ...
Sumter..... 25 100 ...... ........ ..... 201 100
oolusia...... ...... ... ....... ..... 100 80. 100 100

Div Av pr t 78 98 100 9 116' 93 81 100
u.. t~ln ~ilrlll~l


B revard .. l..... ... .. .. .. 'I .. ....
Dade... ..... 100 ) 10 0 100. .
DeSoto....... 100 50 0 5it ....... .. ..
Hillsboro'h. 100 120 ...... ... 100 100 .
L ee ........ ... .
Mana ee. ..... 110 100 .. .. 110 100 100 100
Osceola.. .... .. ...... 100 100 ..... ...... ... 100 100
Polk. ....... 60 100 85 100 40 100 65 80
St. Lucie .. . ... 100 100 .... ... ......

Div. Av. pr et 94 94 87 90 83 100 88 93
StateAv. prct 95 961 921 711 100| 97 88 94


S( th n InVIS1011Y L








ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS.-Continued.
Water- Straw r- rLem'n
Water- aantaloup's auge
COUNTIES melons berries Trees Irees

< O ~ g, -. 2
Northern Di- a g
vision. < 0 Q c O 0 .)
1ranklin..... 90 100 90 100 75 100 ...........
Gadsden.... 100 90 10 85 100 100 ...........
Hamilton .. 7 80 50 75 50 7 ...........
Jefferson..... 10 85 100 85 .. ..
LaFayette... 100 1 ....... .... ..... .. .100 ....
Leon .. ..... 100 85 100 85 100 5 ...... .....
Madison..... 100 80 95 80 100 80.... .....
Suwannee... 100 90 100 90 ...
Taylor....... 125 90.... ... ............ ....
Wakulla... 100 90 100 85 100 100...........

Div. Av. pr ct] 99 88 92 86 831 100 ..
Western Division.


Calhoun...... 100 85
Escambia.... 150 100
Holmes. .... 11Q 110
Jack-on .. 110 100
Santa Rosa... 115 100
Walton ...... 100 100

Div. Av. pr et 1141 99


..... ...... .. ... ..... ... 1 ......
150 100 150 1 50 .... ......
100 1100 00, 95 ...... .....
ii... ioo...... .... .....
1 100o- . ...

120 ... 100. .12. 122 100..
120 100 125 1221 100 ..


Northeabteru Di-
vision.
Alachua ...... 12 100 100 100 1001 100 150 ...
B aker........ 100 85 . .. .. ..... ..
C ay .......... 100 100 ...... ... .. 100 100 110 .
Columbia .. 100 100 100 100 100 90 110..

Div. Av nr ct 106 96 10 00 0 100 123 ......
Cenitr i )ii ni-I 1.
Hernando 90 100 100 100 90, 1201 150 100
La e ... .. 80 75 ...... ........ 100 ........
Levy ..... 100 100 90 80 100 100 110 100
Marion ..... 5 90 80 901 80 110 105 110
Orange ....... ...... ... ..... ...... 25 50 100 50
Paco .......I 9( 100 110 60 70 100 100 ......
Sum ter. .. 10( 130 ...... ...... ..... .. .. 200 100
Volusia.. .. 8C 90 .. ..... 100 120 15( ....

Div. Av pr ct 8f 98 95 83 78' 100o 127 92


sOUtLIIei I)IVIMUInI.
Brevard.. 100 hC(...... ...... 0 90 ..
Dade........ .. .5 ... 100 100 10 80
DeOSto....... 120 10 75 9 7 100 12 ......
Hillsborougl 100 12C 1101 1 80 90 120 .....
Lee .......... 100 10 ... .. ...... 110 110
lanate...... 125 10C 1 .50 50 1101 100
Osceola ...... 120 10C 100 t 100 1 120 120
Polk..... 75 10 50' 91 90 90 11 90
St Lucie. ...... .. .. ........ 100 75
)iv. Av pr ct) 106, 1001 9!2 981 841 911 1111 96
State Av pr ct! 1031 f96 10CI 931 94 100 1121 94


,








ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS.-Continued.

Lime Pome Ba- ine Gua- Pea-
COUNTIES Frees Tre nanasl app's ches ar
COUNTIES reesvs



Northern Di- ,
vision. 10 0 0 0 0 Z
Franklin. .... ..... ...... ...... .... 90 90 .
Gadsden..... .. ...... ...... .... .. .... ... .....
J-lamiiton .... .. ........... ... ...... ... .. 5 ......
Jefferson .. .. ... .. 75 8.
L;Fayette. .......... ...... 7 50 ......
L eon ........ ...... ..... ..... 7 90 ..
M ad ison ...... ...... .. .. .. ... .... ...
Suwannee.... .. ..... ...... .
Taylor .... .... .. .. .
W akulla .... .... ... .o... 125 ....

Div. Av. p ct ...... ...... .. ...... 88 8 ....
Western Diviiou. _______________
Calhoun t . 10 .. .... .
Esca.bia .......... ..... ..... 100 50 ..

Jackson.. .. ..... ...... 95I .. .. .. ..
Santa Rosa.. ........ ... ......... 100 7 ..o .
W alton ...... ...... ... .. .......10..... ....... 0 ..

Div. Av. pr t ...... 10 ............ ...... 100.. ..
',. .tlei STern UI-
vision.
Alachua... .. ... .. 150 . .. 125 100 ..
Baker. .. ... ..... ... .. ...... 100 75.....
Clay ......... .... ..... .... .. ..... ...... 100 100 ......
Colui bia.. ....... .. .... ........ .. 100 .........

Div. Av. pr ct' .... 1 .. .... 106 .92 ...
Central olvision1.
Hernando .. ........ 150 100 .. i 130 100 ....
L ake......... ...... 100 .. .. .. .. 5 7. .. ..
Levy ......... .. .... 75 .....
Marion ..... 110 ...... .. .......... 105 105 100
orange..... ..... 10 ...... 50.. 50 .
Pasco .. ... 10C ...1 .100 80 50 ....
Sumter... ... ... .. 1 ..... 150 100 ..
Vousia... ......... 15C 100 .... ...... 100 100.

Div. Av. pr 1 116 100 50 100 93 7i p 100
Souttlern Di)visin__
Brevard ..... ...... .. .....
Dade......... 100 110 100 100 100. ..
IeSoto ...... .. ..
Hillsborough 110 120 125 90 120 110 LX; ..
Lee ... 110 ...... .110 110.
Manatee... 100 110 100 100' 10 100.
Os ola ........10 120 150 100 100 12 13(
Polk ......... 12 110 85 110 100 85,
St. Luci ..... 100 100 ..... .
DSi. Av. pr ct I 96 i 1101 110) 98j 10 10.1 u10...
StalAv pr ct 103i 1191 1051 741 1021 981 S 6 100




















PART 11,
WEATHER REPORT.




r












U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE

OF THE
WEATHER BUREAU.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

REPORTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1906.



SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 5 stations.. 30.12
Departure from the normal, 5 records........... + 0.02
Highest observed, at Pensacola on the 3d ........ 30.39
Lowest observed, at Jacksonville on the 27th.... 29.77
Absolute range for the State ............... 0.62

TEMPERATURE.

Degrees.
Mean, as determined from records of 55 stations.. 58.8
Departure from the normal, 33 records .......... -1.6
Highest monthly mean, at Flamingo ............. 70.0
Lowest monthly mean, at Molino ............... 48.9
Highest recorded, at Flamingo on the 26th ........ 85
Lowest recorded, at Molino on the 1st ............ 23
Absolute range for the State .................... 32
2 Bulletin.










LS

PRECIPITATION.

Inches.
Average, as determined from records of 53 stations 2.78
Departure from the normal, 40 records.......... -1.10
Greatest amount for any 24 hours, at New Smyrna
on the 12th ...... ........ .................. 3.63
Greatest monthly amount, at Jupiter ............ 6.44
Least monthly amount, at Eustis ................ 0.76
Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 5

SUNSHINE AND CLOUDINESS.

Average number of clear days....................... 14
Average number of partly cloudy days ................ 8
Average number of cloudy days .................... 6

WIND.

Prevailing wind direction ................... Northeast.











19

COMPARATIVE DATA FOR STATE, FEBRUARY.

Temperature -tation
Year
MonthlHighest Date Lowest Date Monthl
Average oe Date Average

1892......... 61.9 89 7 27 13 1.56
1893. ...... 64.9 88 27 64 28 3.92
1894......... 62.6 86 14* 28 6* 2 03
1895.......... 52.1 85 2 11 8 3.19
1896......... 59.0 85 5* 24 18 3.06
1897.........I 63.0 90 21 27 27 6.57
1898 ........ 57.5 89 19 20 1 2.04
1899 ........ 58.9 87 26 -2 13 5.69
1900......... 58.5 68 10* 16 18 4.42
1901......... 55.8 88 9 20 24 4.44
1902......... 54.4 87 2 21 10 4.88
1903......... 62.7 90 16* 20 18 5.67
1904 ........ 60.8 89 19* 23 2 3.03
1905.......... 58.1 89 12* 10 14 3.45
1906. ... 58 8 85 26 23 1 2.78
*Also on other dates.

PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

SP Wind Velocity in Relative
Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humidity

STATIONS .0 j |
Scc U r 4 -,U L'* 4 4)0
VO = 0 w M o


J acksonvile.. 30.14 o04 18 29.7" 27 7,080 44 n. 12 100 31 8I
J piter ....... 30.10 o 21 20 208- 8 7,180 3 w 27 97 -2 87
ey West..... 30. 8 301 17 2993 8 6,090 42 nw. 27 o1 54 81
Pensacola..... 3o.18 30o.3 3 2991 0.5 7 .'I nw. 27 10o 43 76
Tampa........ 30 2 3.27 17 2084 8 8 5,637 34 w. 2 1oo 41 81













FLORIDA SECTION.

Average Temperature, Computed from Stations having a Record of ten
years, or more including 1903.


District. : i

Western .. 52.0 55.7 l.4167.3 74.0 79.180.6 80.) 1 77.1 .5 59.0 52., 7.
Northern 55.3 57.31(3.11 68.1 74.9 79..5 81.281.1!7s.i 70.9 62.5 5(6.9 19.1
Central ...58S.8 61.3 65. 70.1!75.9 79.8 81.4 si1.2 7.3 73.5 66.1 60.5 71.1
Southern 64.4 G66.1 68.6 72.6177.3 S0.4 81.8 S1.9 So.., 175.7 71.2 '65. 73.
Averages. 157.6160.1i64.1]69.5175.5317.7 81.21S1.0178.7|72.'264.7159.: 70.3

Average Precipitation, Computed from Stations having a Record of ten
years, or more including 1903.

Western 4.10 4.82 5.52i2.74|3.4015.86:S.30i7.)0 4.72 2.3.8 3.1S 84.0 7.0
Northern .. 3.04 3.76 3.69|2.94 1 .29 6.39' .69i;.72 6.8'2 4.07 2.60 3.12 5::.
Central ... 2.63 3.36 2.65-12.30 3.20 7.9417.48 T7.6 8.11 4.23 2.l1 2.29 .3.9
Southern .. 2.82 2. 2 2.52 2.1 '3.77 7.39 7.50 ',.4 8.17 5.11 1.92 2.21 53.2
Averages ..13.153.6813.592.92.413.42 6.90 7.4917 T.: .0.9, 4.2u 2.45 2.90 54..

Greatest Monthly Precipitation. Data from all Stations being Considered
from 18,2 to 1903. inclusive.




Year. .


1892.... 8.71 4.2 3.8 4.4 4.6 23.27F .4'13 7 7iT-67f'i--9-l9
1893 ... 5.4 9.5 10.0 6.0 8.0 14.1 12.6 11.1 12.5 11.7 .' 0
1894 ........ 4. 11.2 7.51 4.0 6.9 13.6 15.3 13.7 19.8S 7.4! 7.6 3.3
185 .......... 6.8 49. 6.8 7.6 9.3' .8 13.0 9.9 210 5 .3
189!) ........ 8. 7.3 10.0 3..5 9.0 42.9 20.0 14.6 11.1' 7. 13.2 ..
1897 ...... 5 q 106 11.0 9.4!14.8 12.4 2 .0 19.3 ..5 0.5
18 )7 ...... 2.1 6.0 3.3 7 4 6.2 9.1 27.9 31.3 17.9 17.0 7.. 11.
189 ........... 8.7 11.5 7.6110.SI 4.0111.0 24.4 11.8'11.3'29.11 5.01 6.0
191 .......... ,2 12.6 12.4 1 .0) 9.3 17.9 15.4 16. 1105'114.1 3. S. 3
1900 ...... .. .611.311.21 7.410.421.7 13.4!19.8 17.61 7.1' 2.2' 5.2
102.......... 3.3106116.3 2:.8 7.815.011.7 91120.21. 7. 14.
1902 ........9., 1). 1.5118.0|14.5 13.0119.0 10.0 6.6 11.5 .6
1903 ..........I 9.1 112171 9'31 1511813019 .,
Greatest 9-6117.2 116.313.0118.0123.2127.9131.3123.0!29.1 132 14 9










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR FEBRUARY, 1906.


STATIONS.


COUNTIES.


Northern Section.
Archer ............... Alachua .... 9223
Federal Point........ Putnam ... 1014
Fernandina.......... Nassau ...... 15 5
Fort Georget........ Duval........ 1521
Gainesvill .......... Al. chua ..... 7520
Huntington .......... Putnam ..... 5010
Jacksonville ......... Duval........ 4335
Jasper ............... Hamilton ... 165
Johnstown........... Bradford ... 125 10
Lake City............ (olumbia. 201 1
Macclenny ........... Baker....... 14011
Middleburg ......... Clay.......... 010
Pinemount .......... Suwannee .... 103 3
St Augustine........ St. Johns..... 1056
Sumner............. Levy... ... 23 6
Switzerland .......... iSt. Johns... : 1010


Temperature. in degrees Farh. |Precipitati( n, in inches Sky.

9- E 0 .i >

0 a 0 a C

0 E 4-
oO U 00
C ^ a l 4) 1 l I I




57.4 3 83 32 1 38 2.41 -1.47 1.3. 4 10 14 4ue.
57.3+0 2 7,824 3928 31 3 51 -0 44 2.97 4 13 11 4 n-ne.
54.2+) 8 7725 3428 25 4.61 -0.88 3.10 9 15 8 5ne.
52.5--1 4 7425 3428 ....... ....... .. .. ... n
56.7-03 8024 28 33 1 73 -1.90 0.99 5 15 4 9...
58.00 1 7825* 3528 37 3.1 --0.80 2 45 4 14 6 811.
54.3-3 1 7524 338 24 3 06 --0.07 2.41 711 8 9ne.
...... 1 8 76 -1.85 1.11 .. nw.
54.4-2.4 c78 24 c 2 41 2.77 --2.60 1 49 12 110 6 .
544 2.4 c7824 31&82
55.1-13 824 3128 3.45 -1.08 1.98 4 98 lin.
538 -1 26 31 42 3.32 --1.67 1.96 3 17 6 5e.
54 1-05 7925 261 40 3.77 --1.39 3.13... 2 9 e.
56 0-2 9 78 1 3428 9 320 0 7 44
56.8 00 7920 30 37 2.19 -2.11 72 317 6 5ne.
55.4+1.4 7824 2 32 2.82 -1 37 103 5... ...
I-* .









CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR FEBRUARY, 1906-Continued. 22


STATIONS.


COUNTIES.


Central Section.
Bartow. ........... Polk.......... 17
Broo'sville. .........Hernando.. .328
Clermont............. Lake. ......110
De Land ............ Volusia...... 32
Eustis................ Lake .. ... 180
Fort Mead. ........ Polk.......... 125
Fort Pierce ......... .t.Lucie..... 2
Grasmere ........ Orange.. 17
Inverness ............ Citrus .. ...... 43
Kissimmee ......... O)sceola ..... 65
M aiabar............. Brevard ..... 24
Merritt's Island ...... rcvard ..... 20
New Smyrna ......... Volusia ..... 20
Ocala ............... M arion ..... 150
Orange City:. .... Volusia..... 50
Orange Home........ Suuter 75


Temperature, in degrees Fahr.


3
C ,


P~ a i l -
1 d 0 1F'
a ^

a) a)- -a Q ~


11 62.44-0 4
14 60.6 +1.9
14 62.6+1 3
6 61.4+2.6
16 59.2 1.9
23 61 8 0 2
15 63 8 0.41
1 60.0 -1 3
6 5 8 8- 2 5
14| 59 9 -1 2
51 6 --1 3
25 61 8 -25
18 601.0 1 9
191 59 2- 0 1
101 60 -0.5
2 59.8


79 25* 40 28
83 20* 3528
8425 40 28
81 24" 35 28*
79 24 3528
81 24* 3828
80 25* 43128
77 24' 3828
80 24 37 28*
77 25 38s 8
83 25 40 28
7925 4IJ 28
84 25 3i 28
8221 3328
8.H 21 3 128
81 22* 34 28


Precipitation,in inches


-4
0



2.41
1.52
0.85

0.76
3.17
2.851

0.81
1 49
3.18
2.22
4.02
1 05
1.05
1.05


E
as
01


C3 z
5M2
pPh
a)


-1 37 0.79
-244 1 06
-3 14 0.36

. . . ..
-2.75 0.42
+0 52 1.50
-1.13 081

-3 58 0.53
-3.01 0 56
--0.36 1.04
-0 58 1.08
-10.80 3.63
--1 78 0.53
-2.01 0 36
-2.171 0 56|


Sky.


oat -
0







4 18 9
3 23 0
4 1311
.... 12 8
2 16 11
4 21 6
5 16 7
.... 20 6
4 7 13
4 .
5 16 8
5 15 4
4 .
4 13 11
4 20 7
S14 1 2


0g


o o
U






1 sw.
5 ne.
4 ne.
8 ..
I ne.
5 e.
5ne.
2 ne.
1 ne.
2 ne.
4 n.
9 ne.
.. n .
4 e-ne
1 n.
8ne.
2.ne.










CLIMATOLOGICAL DAl


STATIONS.





Orlando..............
Plant City............
Rockwell ............
St. L eo........... ...
T am pa...............
Tarpon Springs......
Titusville ...........
Southern Section.
Avon Park...........
Caxambas..........
Flamimgo ............
Hypoluxo ...........
Jupiter...............
Key West ............
M anatee ............
M iam i ...............
M years ................
Nocatee.............


COUNTIES.





Orange....... 98
Hillsbor'gh.. 121
Marion...... ...
Pasco .. .140
Hillsbor'gh.. 20
Hillsbor'gh. 20
Brevard..... 11


De Soto......150
Lee .......... 6
Monroe .. 11
Dade......... 8
Dade......... 28
Mcnroe .... 22
Manatee ..... 16
D ade......... ..
Lee........... 19
De Soto...... 43


Tem]








60

a60.3


10 62.7
6 66.5
6 70.0
10 66.2
19 64.9
36 68.4
28 62 7
10 68.2
23 63.9
7 63.6


TA FOR FEBRUARY, 1906-Continued. 23

perature, in degreesFahr. Precipitation, in inches Sky.










+0.9 a8025 3728 30 0.84 --2.22 0.30 5. ......
3 S 1....
0 v 0 .9'a








-4.6 7824 4028 27 .69-1.45 0.74 6 12 5 ne.
c) ca 0C e 0
P"=- bk t Po C)



8 37 2.03-1.5 0.95 w.
-0.9a 825 a37228 8 2.28 --2.59 1 06 ... ... ... n.


0.2 81 24 2 2 14-0.5 1. 12 60 1 10 5 ne.
-4.6 78 24 4028 27 [.69 -1.45 0.74 6 12 5 line.
-215 8120 38 37 2.03 1.50 0.95 5 15 8 5 w.
-lC c 8225 c3628 28 2.28 -1.59 1 06 8.........n.




+2.1 8526 45 1 32 ... .......... .... .
-0.2 817 45 2 27 4.67 -+0.47 1.90 6 14 7 7 a-ne.
--2 7825 4528 25 6.44 1-3.67 3.62 9 3 20 n.
--3.0 7820 5828 13 3.78 +2.15 2.06 7 7 12 9 ne.
+0. 8124 4128 29 2.96 -0.15 1.24 5 15 8 5nw.
+0.8 8124 48 2 24 3.78 1.04 1.21 6 8 15 7e-ne.
0.7 7920 4428 24 2.18 --1.05 0.83 4 20 7 1 -ne.
0.6 8124 412* 28 260 0.50 1 2 1 7 8 e.


I


,


,












STATIONS COUNTIES 2 a a .- t bi
0 0 U 0 ba -i
|i D C E|i |
a a B z


Western Section.
Apalachicola ........ Franklin .. 2 2 a51 6 .. .. .
Bonifay .. ...... Holmes .. 116 5 ..... 2.2 a 7325 "30 1* 37 2.89 4 i7 1.10 5 ne
Carrabelle........... Franklin. 12 11 50.4 . ... ... ......
DeFuniak Springs.. Walton ......193 981. -1.8 74 221 26 1* 38 3.341 -4.63 1.20 7 12 9 7 n.
G ait ................. Santa R osa ... .. .. -. .. .. .............. .. 18 2 ;s.
Madison............. Madison... 2 . .... 3027 .. 2 88 -2.62 1 70 7 24 C 4 n nc.
Marianna..... Jackson...... 85 7 53 8+ 2 78 24 30 1* 38 4.65 --1 01 1.50 5 19 ( 0 e.
Molino .......... Es bia. 4 3 48 9 6 7 74 22 23 1 44 5.05 -3.66 1 651 6 19 0 0 n.
Monticello .......... Jefferson.. .. 207 2 53 4 ... 7320 3028 32 2.99 ....... 1 27 7 19 6 3 e.
M ount Pleasant. .. Gadsden...... 1 .. 5,02 .... . .. .. ..
Pensacola .......... Escambia. 56 27 52 0--4.8 7225 33 3 25 -1.0 0.83 8 Ii 10 7 n.
Perry............... Taylor....... .. ..... .. ...... 2 90 ... ..
St. Andrew........... Washington.. 12 9 52 -06 73 20 32 1 36 -1.23 2.22 7 22 2 4 n.
Stephensville ........ Taylor. .... 7 55 2-1-0.7 70920 e30 1 40 3.42 3.: 9 1.51 2 ......
Tallahassee.. ...... Leon. .... 193 21 ,2.3 -2 5 74'24 31 '8 27 1.87 --1 77 1.45 5 1 7 8 .
WVausau........ t ... Washington. 250 09 52.71--0 7 7621 3028" 37 2 05 --2 L.25 6 11 13 4 1.

LATE RI'ORT,Jan. 19006 itSta ans.. .. --
Apalachicola ........ ........... ....... 5 75 1 3224 27 5.18 1 01 1.95 l .
DeLand .............. .. ...... I (10 9 1 3 .s 851 22 :5129 331 .. .. I 5| i ,v.
All records aire used in (deteriniiiiing stilte'nicn ls, I II I lti nitn de(l );rtures froin the normal teI perIatltie i t111(
precipitation ;are laset only on records ['frim sIat ioiis that have ten or imonle years )f observali mo.
Thli letters a, 1), c, etc., inilicate nmiinl,' o' days mi-sin I from report. llore tll;1n one day
WvVeather bureau. 1''Therlioonieters are not, self r.egisteriting and readings are midi- at 7 a. in., 2 p. in. ;id 9
). in. daily.






















PART III,
COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS AND COM-
MERCIAL FEEDING STUFF.















REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.
Special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding
stuff sent in by purchasers, under Sec. 9 of the laws,
shall be drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from'one or more packages, thoughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE HALF POUND), SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL
BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to se-
cure fair samples of sufficient size tomake the necessary
determinations, and to allow the preservation of a du-
plicate sample in case of protest or appeal. These du-
plicate samples will be preserved for two months from
date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special samples from the purchaser. The propri-
ety of the method of drawing and sending the samples
as fixed by the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very smallquantity (less than ounce)
frequently there are no marks, numbers or other means
of identification. The postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to
avail themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10
of the law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The sample must be not less than one
half pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
Commissioner of Agriculture, the senders name and ad-
dress must also be on the package. This rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.











INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each pack-
age of Commercial Feeding Stuff must have, securely
attached thereto, a tag with the guaranteed analysis
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. This provision of the law-Section 3
of both laws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6, of both laws, tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Commercial
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not
bear on each package an analysis tag with the guarantee
required by law, and the stamp showing the payment of
the inspector's fee. Goods not having the guarantee tag
and stamp, are irregular, and fraudulent; the absence of
the guarantee tag and stamp being evidence that the man-
ufacturer or dealer has not complied with the law.
Without the guarantee tag and stamp showing what the
goods are guaranteed to contain, the purchaser has 1o
recourse against the manufacturer or dealer, such goods
are sold illegally and fraudulently, and are generally of
little value. All reputable manufacturers and dealers
now comply strictly with the law and regulations, by
placing the guarantee tag and stamp on each package.
The interest of the consumer, the farmer, or stockman,
demands that they purchase no Commercial Fertilizers,
of Commercial Feeding Stuff that does not have securely
attached, the guarantee tag and inspection stamp.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of the Sheriffs of the various counties
is called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting the citizens of the State










from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior, or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff.
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

The following tables of average composition of Commer-
cial Feed Stuff is compiled from the report of the Con-
neticut Experimental Station. They'cover a large num-
ber of analysis and are fully representative of the stand-
ard composition of the various feeds in the tables. They
are given for reference, should a feed stuff vary material-
ly from these averages, its purity may be questioned. If
the "ash" content exceed to any great extent, sweepings
may be suspected. If the crude fiber be excessive, oat
hulls, corn cobs, rice chaff or other ligneous or fibrous
materials may be suspected. While the valuable consti-
tuents, "protein" "sugar and starch," and "fat," should
not materially vary from these tables of averages, that
are practically standards of comparison, for the feeds
mentioned in the tables.

COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.

Citizens interested in the fertilizer and stock feed laws
of the State, and desiring to avail themselves of their pro-
tection, can obtain copies free of charge by sending for
same to the Commissioner of Agriculture.












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFF.


NAME OF FEED.


Cotton Seed Meal...............

Linseed Meal.....................

W heat Bran....................

Middlings,....................

Mixed Feed, (wheat)............

Corn Meal......................

Corn (Grain).....................
Corn Cobs........................

Corn and Cob Meal.............

Corn and Oats, equal parts.....

W heat ............ .............

O ats....... .... .............

Soja B ea,,s........ .................
Velvet Beans and Hulls.......

Rice Hulls.... ..... ...... ....

Gluier Meal ....................

Gluter Feed ... ...............

Hominy Feed ..................

Rye Products (bran)...........
Barley Sprouts ...............
Distillers Grains................

Oat Feed........................
Provinder.......................

Victor Feed ...................

AXX Corn and Oat Feeds......


rnle'Pro- Starch ,
/CreJPr- ani(t Fat i Ash
I F ibie teinl Sugar I


S7 05 43 16; 24 59 9 22 6 60
8 76 34 70 35 91 5 :4 6 12

39 15 93 54 6 4 5 33

6 36 17 14 5060 4 26 4 30

7 801 16 86 54 44 4 79 5 30

164 8 73 71 32 3 14 1 20

2 10 10 50 69 60 5 40 1 50

30 10 2 40 54 90 0 50 1 40

6 60 8 50 64 80 3 50 3 50

580 9 60 66 10 4 40 2 20

S80 11 9071 99 2 10 1 80

9 50 11 80 59 70 5 00 3 09

4 80 34 00 28 00 16 501 5 40
9 20 19 70: 51 30I 4 50o 3 30
35 70 3 60 38 60 0 70 1320
1 25 37 06 46 52 3 27 6

7 31 24 17 54 30 3 44 1 80

4 05 10 49 65 27 7 85 2 54
4 53 15 57 61 28 3 02 3 80

10 94 27 20 42 66 1 56 6 34

12 90 32 23 33 34: 1209 1 86

20 57 7 91 54 58 3 26 5 34

3 91 10 62 67 34 4 03 1 83

1063 8 83 62 4 02 8 64
9 94 9 66 64 66 5 09 3 24










31

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL FEED
STUFF-Continued.
Crude Pro- Starch
NAME OF FEED. F te r Fat Ash
Fibre their Sugar F Ash

Corn and Oat Feeds............. 12 09 8 78 61 73 3 73 3122

Proprietary Horse. Feeds........ 9 57 12 48 60 54 4 27 2383

Molasses Feeds .................. 8 49 16 34 51 72 1 79 618

P
Beef Scrap............................ 44 70 328 14 75 29 20
Quaker Dairy Fed..............15 53 14 42 52 12 4 05 5 31

Crepmer3 Feed.................. 1007 20 06 51 00 5 3 3 5









32

Composition of Fertilizer Materials,

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia Phosphoric Potash
Acid

Nitrate of Soda........ ..... 17 to 19...
Sulphate of Ammonia........ 21to24 .. ... ..
Dried Blood ................. 12 to 1 .
Concentrated Tankage....... 12 to 15 1 to 2............
Bone Tankage ................ 6 to 9 10 to 15; ......
Dried Fish Scrap............. 8 to 11 6 to 8...... ..
Cotton Seed Meal............ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1i to 2
Hoof Meal.... .............. 13 to 17 1 to 2 ... ..
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
____ Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... .......... ............ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Pnosphate..... ......... ........... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.... .......... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone............... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone................ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissoved Bone.............. .2 to 4 13 to 15' 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred


Phos-
Actual Am'nia phoric
Pota h I Acid


Muriate of Potash........... 4 0
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 5
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26 to 30
K ainit ....................... 12 to 124
Sylvinit...................... 16 to 20
Cotton Seed HullAshes...... 15 to 30
Wood A hes, uneached ..... 2 to 8
Wood Ashes leached.........1 to 2
Tobacco Stems............... 5 to 8
Cow Manure (fresh).......... 0.40
Horse Manure (fresh) ..... 0.53
Sheep Manure (fresh)........ 0.67
Hog Manure (frFsh) .......... 0.60
Hen Dung (fresh)............ 0.85
Mixed Stable Manure.. ..... 0 63


...... ....... 7 to 9

::::::: ~:to
........ l to 2
...... 1 to 14
2 to4 ...
0tV41 0.16
Oto 6 0.28
1.00 0.23
0.55 0.19
2.07 1.54
0 76 0.26


Lime


10
30 to 25
35 to 40
3j
0.31
0.21
0.33
0.08
0 21
0 70


-------


.












MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZE
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA PORTS,
JANUARY, 1905.


Less than 5 to 10


Ammoniates. 5 tons
Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent.
Ammonia ............... $57.00
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia .......... 72.00
Dried Blood 16 per cent. Am-
monia ...... ............ 56.00


tons.


10 tonF
& over.


$56.50 $56.00

71.50 71.00

55.50 55.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20)....
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20)......
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ...............
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot-
ash (K20) .................
Kainit 12 per cent. Putash......
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ......


52.00

32.00


51.00 50.00

31.00 30.00


46.00 45.00 44.00


82.00
14.00


81.00 80.00
13.50 13.00


17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


Hig-h Grade Blood and Bone,10
cent Ammonia ........... 36.00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6j
per cent. Ammonia, 8 per
cent. Phosphoric Acid..... 28.00
Owl Brand Tankage, 5 per cent.


Ammonia ................
Raw bone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid
Ground Castor Pomace 6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid ..........
3 Bulletin.


20.00

33.00


23.00


35.50 35.00


27.50 27.00

19.50 19.00

32.50 32.00


22.50 22.00












Bright Cotton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tations ............ . .
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6 per
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tions .................. .


28.00


21.00


27.50 27.00


20.50 20.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.
Boneblack 17 per cent. Avail
able Phosphoric Acid......
Odorless Phosphate.........


15.00

14.00

25.00
25.00


14.50 14.50

13.50 13.00

24.50 24.00.
24.50 24.00


MISCELANEOU.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash ..............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stem s ...................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1 ,3 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 K20 Pot-
ash ......................
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 11/2 per
cent. Ammonia, 11/2 per cent.
Potash ..................
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land plaster in sacks ........


25.00

16.00


21.00


16.00
16.00
10.50


24.50 24.00

15.50 15.00


20.50 20.00


15.50
15.50
10.25


15.00
15.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging, any special or regular formula, is $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.













JACKSONVILLE PRICES CURRENT.



FEED STUFFS.

Pure wheat bran, per ton, $23.50.
Pure middlings, per ton, $25.00.
Purina feed, per ton, $26.
Victor meal, per ton, $23.
Cotton hulls, per ton, $9.00.
Other quotations are:
Gluten food, for cows, per ton, $27.
Jersey cow feed, per ton, $22.
Purina stock food, 100 sacks, 175 lbs, $25.50.
Purina stock feed, less quantity, 100 lbs., $26.00.
Atlas stock feed, per ton, $28.00.
Atlas sugar feed, per ton, $25.00.
Southern seed rye, per bushel, $1.25.
Texas rust-proof seed oats, per bushel, 85c.
May or Burt seed oats, 32 pounds to bushel, per bushel,
80 cents.
Cotton seed meal, bright, 100 sacks, per ton, $26.00.
Cotton seed meal, bright, less quantity, per ton, $26.50.
Cotton seed meal, dark, car load, per ton, $18.50.
Cotton seed meal, dark, 100 sacks, per ton, $19.00.
Salt, 200-lbs sacks, per sack, $1.
Rock salt, for stock, per pound, 1c.
White corn, car load, per sack, of 110 pounds, $1.30.
White corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 110. pounds, $1.33.
White corn, less quantity, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.35.
Mixed corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.28.
Mixed corn. 100 sacks, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.26.
Mixed corn, less quantity, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.24.
White oats, car load, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.65.
White oats 100 sacks, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.68.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.70.
White oats, car load, per sack of 100 pounds. $1.30.
White oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.33.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.35.
Fancy white clipped oats, 125 pounds, 8c per sack
Ligher.











Fancy white clipped oats, 100 pounds, Ge per sack
h i gher.
Mixed oats, car load, per sack, of 125 pounds, $1.6C.
Note-Consumers are urged to compare the current
prices with the "Feeding Value" as shown in the tables of
analysis of feed stuff. It will be noted that Middlings
and Bran at the prices quoted are more economical than
other feeds, which sell for more per ton and are far be-
low the standard in value. Low grades feeds, mill otfall,
and similar feed, are largely advertised and sell for higher
prices than standards, though of much less value.
A comparison of these prices and the tables, will show.
that prices does not govern value or quality; that some of
the highest priced feeds, have less value than others that
can be purchased for less money. The effect of the
"Stock Feed Law" has already been of marked benefit to
the State. A number of low grade feeds, with fancy
brands, and largely advertised. have been to large extent
withdrawn from the State. If consumers will carefully
steady the tables of analysis of various brands, and com-
pare them with the market prices, and purchase only
those that compare favorably in quality and price, in-
ferior feeds will soon disappear from the State.











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into Protein by ..................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............. 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 16.47
Nitrogen into Portein by ..................... 6.25
Bone Phosphate into phosphoric acid,multiplied by 0.458
Phosphoric Acid into Bone Phosphate,multiply by 2.184
Murate of Potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into Murate potash, multiply by.. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by ...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen is equiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and you
get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.











STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers, at the date of issuing a bulletin,
or the opening of the "season." They may, but seldom do,
vary from the market prices, and are made liberal to meet
any slight advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit apd Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash mhay be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss un
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which the
various ingredients necessary to use in compounding a fer-
tilizer can be purchasedfor cash in ton lots at Florida sea
ports.
These price lists, in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1906 deducted
therefrom.
The valuation for 1906 being the same as for 1905.









STATE VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1906.
Available Phosphoric Acid 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.10 per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. 6.62 per cent.x$1.00 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.1. 50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. A.42 per cbnt.x 3.10- 10.60
Potash.... ..... ..........7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging..... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. 26.57
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available phosphoric acid ... .- per cent.xl1 00-$ 8.00
Ammonia................. .2 per cent.x 3.10- 6.20
Potash .......... .... 2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging ............... ... ....... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports .................. $17.90
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in" one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid -93 cents per unit
Potash (K20) 99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) $2 79 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.








40

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

It is shown by the number of "Special Samples" (those
sent in direct by the purchaser of fertilizers) that the
law is becoming more generally understood by the farmer,
fruit and vegetable grower. Purchasers who have any
reason to doubt the correctness of the guarantee on the
goods furnished them, do not hesitate to send in samples
for analysis.
This right to have a sample of the goods purchased
analyzed by the State Chemist, under Section 9 of the law
-without charge-the inspection fees covering the cost of
analysis, as well as inspection-has doubtless had a di-
rect influence upon the increased quality of the goods sold
in the State. When properly drawn, sealed, witnessed
and transmitted, the "Special Sample" has proved a safe-
guard to the consumer, legitimate dealer, and manufac-
turer, and a check upon the careless, ignorant, or fraud-
ulent vendor or manufacturer.
It furnishes the consumer with the same protection de-
manded by the manufacturer, who buys his materials only
upon the guarantee, and pays for them according to an-
alysis.
By far the largest amount of commercial fertilizers used
in Florida, are manufactured or mixed by factories in
the State. Large amounts of fertlizing materials are im-
ported direct by factories, and dealers located at our sea
port cities; cargoes of potash salts direct from Germany
are now frequently received by Florida importers, while
large amounts of acid phosphate are manufactured at and
exported from the various Gulf and Atlantic ports.
Florida consumers may now purchase their fertilizers
and chemicals at Florida sea ports as cheaply as at any of
the sea ports of the country.
On a preceding page a table of the "Average Composition of
Commercial Feed Stuffs" will be found. Consumers should
study this table, select the food best suited to his demands-
price of course considered-see that the "Guarantee" on the
package he purchases compares favorable with the average in
the table, and if doubtful of the truth of the statement on the
"Guarantee' send at once a sample of the suspected material to
the Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Send one-half
pound in a "tin can sealed," as provided by law.










LIGHT WEIGHT-FALSE STATEMENTS.

Some complaint 'has been made recently as to failure to
furnish full weight as guaranteed.
In one case of light weight cotton seed meal, discovered
by the Inspector, the goods were sold by the sheriff, as
provided by law.
Other cases have 'been reported, particularly "Kainits."
The public, dealers, and consumers, are cautioned to
examine their purchases, and in case of doubt, have the
sacks weighed at the railroad station, or at the ware-
house-reporting deficiencies in weight if found to exist,
with names of sellers, manufacturers and witnesses to the
weighing and other facts, and circumstances. This
applies to fertilizers, and feeding stuff-(also to grain
and other articles).
The department is desirous of maintaining the standard
of both quality and quantity as expressed in the gauar-
antee. and to this end requests the active co-operation of
all citizens.
A false statement of weight on grain or feed, is a misde-
meanor, and subjects the seller to fine or imprisonment,
or both, under (Chapter 4976 (No. 92) Acts of 1901. Also
the sale of light weight fertilizer and feed stuff, subjects
the seller to a fine and forfeiture of the goods, under the
Fertilizer and Feed Stuff Laws'.










ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO. CANADA
ASHES.

The attention of purchasers, ldaler, and( consumers. is
called to the analysis of various ashes, hard wood and
otherwise, in this and other reports, seldom do these ashes
cantain more than 3 per cent of potash-frequently less
than 1 per cent; as the potash content is the only fertil-
izing ingredient (excepting a very small amount of phos-
phoric acid) it becomes a very expensive source of potash.
Most of the ashes examined by the department have evi-
dently been leached. Ashes should be purchased strictly
upon guarantee (as should all other fertilizers and feeds)
and the seller held strictly to his guarantee.
There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this
State. When they can be purchased at a price compara-
ble with their actual value they are doubtless a most val-
uable source of potash. The average price of these goods is.
however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained
from this source generally costs much more than from
other reliable sources-Sulphate, or Muriatp of Potash.
Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory, Map!e. Palmetto
and other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0.57 to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth
from $0.62 to $4.66 per ton at seaports. The average of
four samples shows 2.56 per cent. of Potash. Guarantees
are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The mimimum is ihe
actual guarantee. The best unleashed ashes contain but
8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. RosE, State Chemist. L. HEIMBURGER, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


NAME OR BRAND


Pine Ashes ..... .. .....
Fertilizer No. 3 (Sulphate of
Potash)...........
Fertilizer No. 4........... ..
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Hard Wood Ashes.. ..........
Fertilizer ...................
Fertilizer.................. ..
Hard Wood Ashes ............
Fertilizer. ... .................
Dissolved Bone Black.........
Ground Ky. Tobacco Stelms....
Fertilizer... ........... .....
Fertilizer ...... ....... .. ....
Fertilizer ............ ........
F ertilizer......................
Cotton Seed Meal...........


8.35

31 2(
9 0
4.75


54.5



5 0:
i' .


Phosphoric Acid


-





8.36 0 93 9.20 4 30
..... ...... 8 .25
6 . . . . .
S3. 9 0.61 4 63 2 099
5 11 52 1.35 12.87 0 25

S 5.6.S l 1.8' 7.55 2.70
8 16.97 0.401 17.37 .
.... ... .. .. .. 3 .06
8 26 0 19 8.45 4 02
S8.87 0.2 9 1( 247
3 2 5.14 7 06 5 2,
S932 0.08 9.40 3 9'
S .. . 7 .6 :


BY WHOM SENT

-4-

7.98 B. S. Ashley, Lakeland, Fla

47.32 F. T. Dorsey, Pebb'e, Fla.
6.97 F. T. Dorsey Pebble, Fla.
..... A. Hargrove, Quincy, F a.
O 68 J. E. Page, Sanford, Fla.
15.56 V. H. Meynardie, Jaeksonville, F a.
10.95 Johnson & Co., Leesburg, Fla.
1.85 S. A. Bravo, j iami, F a.
6.74 II. Hicks, Galloway, Fla.
... Willson & Toorner Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
10.07 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
11.95 T G. Albritton, Gardner, Fla.
2.57 r lorida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
7.16 J. S. Smart, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
12.00 W. E. Wilder, Arcadia, Fla.
..... F.orida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee, Fla.


--1-1









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND



Cotton Seed Meal......... .. 856
Fertilizer No 1................. 857
Fertilizer N o. 2 .............. ,58
Fertilizer ...................... 859
Acid Phosphate No. 657........86
Fertilizer .... ..... ....... .. 861
Fertilizer (R. I. B. 35) .... .... 862
Fertilizer.. ........ 868
Cotton Seed Meal ..... ...... s i4
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 865
Fertilizer ..... 866
Fertilizer .. ........... 867
Orange Fruiter............ 868
Fertilizer.. ....... .... 869
Tankage. ................... 70
Tankage ..................... 1 871
Fertilizer. ................... 872
Fertilizer No. l (Sulphate ofi
Potash)........ .. .. 873
Fertilizer No. 2 (Sulphate of
Potash) .. ............. .. 4
Fertilizer No. I ... 75


Phosphoric Acid 0

.3 BY WHOM SENT
o 0
c o i o

.. ... 8. .. Florida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
.... 9.75 1. 1 10.94 2 01 5 10 W H. Meynardie, Jacksonville, Fla.
... 4.46 3.1( 7 62 4 6S, 8 94 W. H. Meynardie, Jacksonville, Fla.
8.54 0.7-1 9 28 2.551 2.73 Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
11.1 16 4( 1 17.55 ..... ......E Painter Fert Co., Jacksonvil e, Fla.
8 72 0 8, 0.6( 6.44 3.41 10.63 E. H Morgan, Fort Ogd n Fla.
9.23 8 77 0.21 9.03 4.51 11 80 W. Graves, Ocoee, Fla
..... 5.1 2.6 7. 3 08( 9 92 Joseph Duncan, Lilly. Hla.
.. .... ...... 95 Florida Cotton Oil Co., Tallahasee, Fla
S ... ... 1 97 4 69 1.45 Florida Cotton Oil Co Jacksonville, Fla.
...... 8 4- 0.85 9 33 5 26 4.91 E R. Parker, Pebble, Fla.
...... .25 0.27 8 52 3 1! 12 04 J. II. Soaler, Oakland, Fla.
10.94 8 47 0 15 8.62 3.(8 11.10 A rmour Fert. Works, Jacksonville Fla.
...... .25 0.90 7. 5 2 9, 9 S9 Lee Lofton, Arcad a. Fla.
... 471 9 95'i .. Sander's Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
S. . 6.92 9 75 .ander's Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
10. 2 0.:3 10 51 3.21 11 69 R. M. Brumby, Dunedin, Fla.

.... .... 49. 96H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla

. .. . 49 48 IH. A. Perry, IPomona, Fla
9 61 3 48 3.9 7i 7 4 6 33 3 65 A. II. ilarrington, Winter Haven, Fla.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR BRAND



Fertilizer No. 2............. 876 9.57
Fertilizer ......... ...... .. 878 .....
Fertilizer ..... ... ......... 879 ....
F e tilizer ........... ......... 8 0 ....
Ftrtiizer .... ......88' 9 6"
Fertilizer N,. 12... .......... 882 4 92
Nitrate of Soda ... ........... 83 .. .
Ctorn Seed Meal .... ..... 84 ......
Acid Phosphate................ 8 ......
Sulphate f Potash ........ .... 6 .
Fertil zer................ ... 887 ..
Fertilizer No. 1 . .. ....
Fertil zer No. 2 .......... ...
Cottu Seed leal ......... 890 ......
F rtilizer .. ... ......... 8 1 .
Cotton See Meal .. ...... 892.....
Velvet Beans and Hulls .....S3
Fertilizer .... .............. 94
Cottoa Seed Meal.............. 895
Cotton Seed Meat ............ 96
Ashes No. 1......... ..... 897
Ashes No. 2... ............. 89


Phosphoric Acid






6.93 0 81 7.74 3.21
1.66 1.34 3.00 5.80
5.54 1.67 7.21 3.13
5.28 2.62 7.901 3 68
5.42 1.12 6.541 3.27
4.83 1.46 6.291 3.40
S...... ... 18.60
8.00
13.06 1.46 16.52 ......

5.48 0.43 5.91 3.88
6.45 1 05 7.50 3.38
4.27 2 52 6.79 462
7.56
7.13 1.07 8.20 4.04
...... .. .8.23
.. ::.. 0.871 3.33
7.39 0.44 7.82 2.28
...... .... ..... .. 8 .13
.:::::: ::::. : ... .. 8.13
.. .... .... .... ..


SBY WHOM SENT

0

13.38 X. B. Har ingoon, Win er H ivn, F.a.
7.20 W. Howard, D er Fie d, Fla.
9 02 Se nder's Fert. Co. J .cksonville, Fli.
10.51S.C Gate,, Wim uma, Fla.
9 09 N. H. Platt, L lly, Fla.
104. .4. B. Graham, Pebble, Fla.
...... FranKlin Tylir, Arcadia, Fla.


49.1e
10.9 V P. Cowburn. Crescent CIy. Fla.
9 O0 C. L. Ealdy, Lindpii. Pla
9.91
.... Fl rid Cotton O I C .. T ll aliuW.1 Fia.
8.78S- M. Alsohbook. D,,nia, Fia.
..... J. B. HuLgins, Bluff Springs, Fla.
0.89 W. A. T rr-ll, Bushnell, Fla.
9.93 B. J. Lohmeyer, Seven Oaks, Fla.
...... I. W. Eliis, Caryvi le, Fla.
...... Florida Co ton Oil Co., Tallahassee. Fla.
2.64 L.Tedder, Boynton, F a.
3.86 L. Tedd. r. Boynton, Fla.









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OR


BRAND.


Fertilizer .......................
F ertilizer.............. .......
Cotton Seed Meal ..........
Fertilizer ....... .... ........
Acid Phosphate ...............
Fertilizer No. 1................
Sheep Manure.................
Fertilizer.... .. .............
Fertilizer No. 4... ..........
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Fertilizer .. ...................
F ertilizer .....................
Sea Bird Guano ..................
K ainit ................. ...
Fertilizer ....... ....... .. ..
(otton Seed Meal. .. ........
Kaini t ................... ....
Acid Phosphate ..............
N itrate of So a ................
K a in i t, .............. .. ...
lF'' tijliz i r No. 1..................
Pert ilizi r N o. 2.............. .
IlF tilizer No :3 ..... ......


O





900 ..
901 .
902 .. .
90 ..
904 ..
905 ..
906 ......
907 .....
908 ...
909...
910 .. .
911.....
912 ...
913 ..
914 ......
915 ......
916 .....
917 ...
918 .. .
919 ......
920 ....
9211 ... .


P


hosphori


I


--~--


4.97
3.02

3.63
12.54
5.99

4.74
6.41

6.03
2 61


4.73


15.84


6.003
7.7T
8.32


ic Acid

0 BY WHOM SENT.



8 6.15 5.4( 5.12 L. Tedder. Boyton, Fla.
70 6.72 2.3- 10.47 Iux Umatilla, Fla.
8.64 .... I. L. Alexander, Blounts Town, F a.
2 6.25 6.7F 10.99 J. S. Smart, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
1t 12.88 ..... M B Anderson, Edwards, Fla
59 7.58 3.34 8.71 Sander's Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
1.76 2.9( 1.96 W. S. Ross, Sanford, Fla.
2 5.66 4.0( 7.04 R. Christiensen. Ovedio, Fla.
0 7.51 3.79 7.68 C. L. Eaddy, Linden, Fla.
S 7.94 .... N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs, Fla.
i5 6.48 3.6' 11.52J R. Leatherman, Delray, Fla.
*1 7 32 4.05 7 48 C. T. Brown, Dilray, Fla.
13 00 10.33 2.10 John T Hi 1, Tarpon S!pings, F a
.... 12.51 J. W. O'\eal, Lamontp, Fla.
6 6.49 4.64 6.75 A. S Nelson, Dunedin. Fla.
7.65 ...... Florida Cotton Oil Co TIllahassee, Fla.
............ 12 65 M. F Horn, Jasper, Fla.
S16.69 ......... I.H. Anderson, Edwards, Fla.
S17.80 ..... TS .Page, Iartow, Fla.
..... 12.54 S. C Counce, Lalie Citv, ''ia.
'8 6.81 4.27 11.9 Bariorius, Senminiole, Fll .
3 7.92 3.95 11.63 Plartorius, Seminole, Fla
31 8.651 4.0 11.73 Sartorius, Seiniltol. I'la.









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 47
For values see heading Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of Special Samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample"' sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and sonul potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (f pound), is required for a "Special Sample.'
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal---thougb the guarantee is but 4. per cent. of
ammonia---it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of
prime meal.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY. 48
R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1905, L. HEIMBURGER ASSISTANT ( CHEMIST.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1. Act approved May 22 1901.


NAME OR BRAND


Cotton Seed Meal.......


Cotton Seed Meal........


Cotton Sei Mal ...

Armour's Sp c al I ri'.,
Tree Crow r .....

A mour's Or'ginil Mix-
ture No. 1............


*0
S
z
B

I

C)
>>
2
% \
\
\ 1-


PHO-PHORIC ACID






0
m *
-3 n3


602 Guarant'd Analysis. .. .. 2.10
Official Analyss. ... ...... ...... 1

603 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... .50
Official Analysis.... ..... ..... ..... .

604 Guarant'd Analysis. ....... .. ..... 50
Official Analysis.... .. ... ....... ....
604 IGuarant'd Analysis....:.. :.;. i .-


i05 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00l 5.00I 1.00 .....
Official Analysis.... 7.79 4.82 0.69 5.51

;00i iGuarant'd Analysis. 10.00 5. ........
Official Analysis .. 8.!97 5 18 0.96 6.14


BY WHOM AND WHERE

MANUFACTURED


7.50 2.00 Alabama C. O. Co., Mo-
7.66 ..... bile, Ala.

7.50 1.50Florida C. O. Co., Talla
7.09 ...... h:ssee, Fla.

8.00 ..... F P i' a ().C, ,Jackson-
8.15....... ville, la

4 00 G.00(Arlmoturs F'rt. Works,
4 02 6 63 ,Jackslonvill, Fla.

5.00 5.00 A armour's "e'rt. Works,
4 66 5.87 .lJiac soiivillh, F'la


-----











Armorrr's Practical


Armoilr's Practical
Trucker .............


Armour's C.lery Gr wer


Akm ur'.sOrange Fruiter

Armour's Blood Bonm
and P. tash .......

Armour's L rg Sple al
Fruit and Vine .

Armour's Fruit and .oot
Cr p Spec al.........


Armour's Fruit and Vine


Armou 's L ttuce Spcci'l

Armour's St r a wbe rry
Fruiter............ ..

Armour's Irish Potato
Special ........

4 Bulletin,


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


607 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 8.17

60s Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 8.12

609 Cuarant'd Analysis., 10.0C
Official Analysis.... 10.94

610 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 8.56

611 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 7.60

612 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 10.72

613 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 9.34

614 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00'
Official Analysis.... 7 06

615 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 6 98

616 "uarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Ifficial Analysis.... 6.981


6.00
6.22

5.00
5.32

8.00
8.47

8.00
7.77

6.00
5.61

8.00
7.281
1
6.00'
5.21'

3.00
3.74,

5.00;
6 3Ii

5.10
6.17


2.00 ......
1.30 7.52

1.00 ..
0.68 6.00

0.00 .....
0.15 8.62

1J 00 .....
1.07 8.79

0.50 .....
1.91 7.62

1.00 .....
1.17 8.45

1.00 ....
0.72 5.96

2.00 ....
0.781 4.5.1

2.00. .. .
1.19 7.50(

0.50 ......
0.35 6.521


3.00 10.00 Armour's Fert Works,
2 85 9. 1 Jacksonvillc, Fla.

8.00 4.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
7.35 5.22 Jacksonvil:e, Ila

4.00 12.00Armour's Fert Works,
3.80 11.40 Jacksonville, Fla.

5 00 7.00 Armour's Fe t. Works,
4.97 7.27 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
3.97 10.18 Jacksonville, Fla.

2 00 5.00 Ar," our's Feet. Works,
2.35 4.87 Jacks. nville, Fla.

2.501 11.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
2.55 10.39 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.0 4.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
6.30 4.871 Jacksorville, Fla.

2.00 10.00 Armour's Fert Woiks,
2.68 9.92 Jacksonville. Fla.

3.50 8.5( Arnliur's Fert. Works,
3 40 9.2P Jacksonvil e, Fla














Airmour>s Spncial Mji\



Ideal Foert lizol .


SilawbeI'! ~loecial.




Ideal Ixl: cw et Fttilizel





(Coltton Sc-od le, I.



C(,11 S2e('1N ic:I


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


617 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 5.00 0 25 ... 3.00
Official Analysis.... 8.57 5.28 0.79 6.07; 3.4S

618 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0 6 00 1 00 5.
Official Analysis.... 7.87| 6.07 0 79 6.86 4.95

619 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0 5.00 100...... 4 00
Official Analysis.... 8 4 5.62 1.12 6.74 5.62

620 Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00 6. .. .. 3.50,
Official Analysis.... 9.21 7.98 1.92 9 90 3.99)

621 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 6.00 ..... ... 3.00
IOfficial Analysis.... 7 56. 6.25 0.40 (i.65 3.6

. 622 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 6.0 0 ...... 6 00
Official Analysis.... 11.24 6.57 0.95 7.52' 6.06

623 1Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0 6 00 1.00 I.... 4. 00
Official Analysis.... 9.08 6.80 0.77 7.57 1.03

624 |Guarant'd Analysis. ....... ..i 2.10 7.50
Official Analysis.... ......... 7.0.

625 Guarant'd Analysis. .... ..... 2 10 .fOl
IOfficial Analysis....... .. .. .

626 Guarant'd Analysis. .. ... .. 2. .
Offclial Analyals. .... -


S 0lArm(ur's Fert. Works,
8 74 Jac sonl 1 e. Fla.

5.00 Arlmour's F it. Works,
3.27 J.cksonvillk, f la.

0.00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
l0." (o. .,cl-soniville, Fla.

.00 \\ill.on & Tnomer Fert.
3.32 ('o., .1;:(:k sonville, Fla.

10.00 Willso, & Toolwer Fert
9.76G ('o., ;( ksonville, F]a.

6 00X \\il]son & Toomer Fort.
5.5!1 Co., JaI:ksonvule, FILa.

S.(l \Will.'n &3. Tiomer Fert
S 32, (o., JlIckl onvi'.le, 1; a.

2.00 .\a1;. C. O Co Montgonm-
i. Ala

1 ..() soutlu r (. O. Co., P'onsa-
col ., Fla.

0.75 1'li. '1 1nf Co Madison,
.. .. la .











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Cott(


Cotton


(>otto


CoW.


Spec

Arm,
Fri





Arim




\it


mn Seed MeAl......... 627 Guarant'd Analysis. ........
Official Analysis..............

>n Sed Meal. .. .. 628 Guarant'd Analysis. .....
Official Analysis......... .

m Seed Meal......... 629 Guarant'd Analysis.. .
Official Analysis.... .....

in Seed Mean....... 630 Guarant'd Analysis..
Official Analysis.... - -

i1t Mixture No. 1 .. 631 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.00
r's tra b r r Offcial Analysis. ... 9.76 6.60
jur's Stra w be rr
liter....... ...... 632 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 5.0
Official Analysis.... 7.9 4.84

m Seed M a. .. .. 633 Guarant'd Analysis...........
Official Analysis.....
,u r Practical
c............... 634 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6 0(
Official Analysis.... 8.24 4.94
our'ss Largo Special
iiL and Vine........ 635 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6 00
Official Analysis.... 7.46 6.0
Dur's Fruit and
e.. ............. 636 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00] 6.0:
Official Analysis.... 6.66j 5.8;


.... 1.50



. . .






1.00 .
I 0.97 7.57i

2.00 ..
2.60 7.44

.. 2.50


2.00
2.59 7.53:

0 50 ....
S0.i7 6.75

1.00 ......
3 2.22 8.05


7.000 1.01 Bradley C'. O. Co., Brad-
8.13 ....... ley. S C.

5.(0 ... ... lorida C O. Co., Jack-
4.85 so.ville. Fia

8.00 .. Florid C. 0 Co, J; ck-
8.35 .... ,onvile, FIa

7.00 1.0 .'Independelnt C. O. Co.,
7.78 l arlingt n, S. C.

5.00 5.00 Willson & To mer Fert.
4.76 5.04 Co., Jlacsouvile, I la.

2 00 10.00 Armour's Fcrt. Works,
2.03 10.35 Jacksniille, Fla.

7.50 1 5( Florida C 0 Co., Talla-
7.15 ...... hasse Fla

3.00! 10.1 i\rmour's Fert Works,
2.77 10. i Jacksonuvic, I la.

3.00 10.00\Armour's F. rt. Works,
3.06 12.99 Jac sonville, Fla

2 50 11.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
2.95 10.18 Jacksouui:le, F1l.


----~










Armou 'S Vegetable
M a ure ...............

Armour's Orange Tree
M nure..... ......

Armour's Blood, 11 )n
and Potash. ........

Armour's Largo Special;
Tree Grower .........


Cotton Seed Me 1.......


K ainit ........ ..... ...


K ain't........... .. ...


H. G. Blood and Bone. I


Cotton Seed Meal ...


Simon Pure No. 1.......


637 Guar
Offic

638 Guar
Office

639 Guar
Office
640 Guar
Offic

641 GOuar
!Offic

642 i `nal
'Offic

61;3 Guar
Office

(144 Guar
Office

64-) (iar
Offlc

1H;6 Guar
Office
i i U Til


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 52

ant'd Analysis. 1000; 7.CO 2.00...... 4.00 6.00Armour's Fert. Works,
ial Analysis.... 8.07 6.57 1.84 8.41 3.93 6.48 Jacksonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10 001 8.00 2.00 ..... 3.5C 4.00Arm-ur's Fert. Wor s,
ial Analysis.... 9.891 6.29 2.82 9.11 3.23 4.24 Jacksoivile, Fla.

ant'd Analysis. 10.()i 8.00 1.00 ...... 5.00 7.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
ial Analysis ... 8.4 7.32 1.73 9.05 4.73 6.92 .acksonvi ]e, Fla.
ant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.00 1.00.. 4.50 6.00Armours Fert. Works,
ial Analysis... 7.62 5.70 0.55 6.25 4.10 6.55 Jacks nv lie, F.a.
Sant'd Analysis .
iantd Analysis. .. .. .. 50 7.50 1.50Florida C. (. (o., Jack-
ial Analysis..... .. .. ... 7.17 . sonvill Fla.

ant'd Analysis .. .... 12 00...... American A\ r'l Clin. Co.,
ial Analysis. ..... 12.78 ....... JacIksonville. Fl.

ant'd Analysis. ...... .. ....... 12.(X) .. Sandrs F rt. Co., Jack-
ial Analysis.... .... .12 83...... sonville, Fla.

ant'd Analysis 10.00 3.0 1.50 ...... 10.00 ...... Sanders' F rt. (Co., Jack-
ial Analysis.... .. 3.03 3.79 6.82 9.55 ...... sonville, i'a

ant'd Analysis. 2..10 8 00 1.76 Amieriean Agr'i( hem. ("o.
lal Analysis ... 8.20 .... acksolnv I Fl.a.

ant'd Analysis. 8.00 ) 6.0! I .00 .. .. .00 11 O0E (. I', r. ,' .lck-
ial Analysis.... 8..)i ( 26 0.84 7.10 1 51 12.89, sonville, Fla














Gem Fruit and Vine. .. 647


Simon Pure Tomato.. 648

Sinmon Pure Die Backl
Fertilizer ............ 649


Simon Pure No. 2....... 650

Bradley's Florida Vege
table........... ...... 651


Cott n Se' d Meal ....... 652


Cotton Seed Meal.......... 653


Acid Phosphate........ 654


K ai,.it... .... .. ..... 655

A A. Special Bone ad
Potash .............. 656


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 53


Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0( 6.0( 1 00
Official Analysis.... 8.23 6.3i 0.62

Guarant'd Analysis. 12.0C 4.0( 3.00
Official Analysis.... 8.64 4.S1l 3.45

Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0( 8 00 ....
Official Analysis.... 7.46 7.62i 1.76

Guarant'd Analysis. 8.00 6.00 2.00
Official Analysis.... 8 08 6.7i 2.53

Guarant'd Analysis. 13.0 C 6 X 1.OL
Official Analysis. ... 10.76 7 03 1.0,
Guarant'd Analysis ... ..... ....
Official Analysis.......... .. .......

Guarant'd Analysis.; ........ ...
Official Analysis... ... ..... ...

Guarant'd Analysis ...... 14.) ..(..
Official Analysis... .... 14.37 0.74

Guarant'd Analysis ........
Official Analysis. .... ...... .. .. .....

Guarant'd Analysis. 13.00 12.00 1.00
Official Analysis ... 4.37 11.96 1.45


7.0(


8 2C


7.38


9.23


8.1


2.5C
3 18

5.00
5.7



4.00
4.48

4.0(
4.03

7.00
8.34

8.00
8.95


13.41


I I


I
10.00&E. O. Painter I Fert. Co.,
11 69 Jacksonville, Fla.

9.00E. 0 Painter, Fert. Co.,
11.03 Jacksonville, Fla.

13.50E 0. Painter Fert Co.,
14.52 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.
8.38 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 American Agr'l Chem Co.,
5.31 Jacksonv.lle, Fla.

..... Maria na Mnfg. Co., Ma-
..... rianna, Fla.

...... Marianna Mnfg. Co., Ma-
.... rianna, Fla

..... Marianna Mnfg. Co., Ma-
...... rianna Fla.

12.40 Marianna Mnfg Co., Ma-
12.00 ianna, Fla.

.2.00 American Agr'l Chem Co.,
11.53 Jacksonvi.le Fla


I i -









ANALYST F FERTILIZERS Continued.


Bradley's Ora ge Tree.

Americui Florida Ve.e-i
table ................. .

raker's Corn ,ete Vege-
table.................


Baker's Fruit and Vine.,


Fav rite Fruit and Vine

Favorite Fruit and Vin
N o. 1............ ... .

Favorite Sp ci 1 Pin-
A pple .... ... '

Fav.'ite Sp cial Cal-
bage .. .... .....

Favor t Straw b rry
SI )pe i al .. .


Favorite V\egetab!e ...


657 I 'larant'd Analysis. 13.00!
lOfficial Analysis.... 10.07

i;3 quarant'd Ana'ysis. 13.00
Official Analysis.... 9.70

059 (iarant'd Analysis. 13.00'
Official Analysis ... 8.1i0

6;U0 iOuarant'd Analysis 13 00
Official Analysis... 7.71

601 ianarat'd Analysis 10 (00
Official Analysis... 8.;5

;62 Ovarant'd Anat'sis.' I'.140
Official Asaiysis... 1i.31,
60:; Guarsnt'( A.Lalysis 1I IO('
Otficial Analysis.. 5.)S

(i,1 'luarant'd Analysis 0.0 0!
officiall Analysls... 11 .72
(10 lunarant'd Ana!ysis. I 0.9
Officlctl Analysis.... 8.0i

; inarant'di Analysis. I.(.
)fflelal Analysis .... s. 10


6.00
6.61
6.01

4 50
-5.01

0.00





G. 01)
6.629

6.001




4.001
2.s82

8.00

( 7.5 i

5.07:

7.0()
7.15


------ ---~-------


1.00 3.50
1.5" 8.20 3.60

1.00 .... 4.00
189 '8 4.18

1.00 ...... 3 50
1.74 6.75 3.40

1.00 ... 2.
1.6:3 825 2.38

1.00 .. 2.50
1.36 7.51 2.80

1.00 ..... 3.00
1.17 6.86 3.33

4.00 ...... 4.0
3.30 6.12 5.80

1.00 3.00
1.18 8.73 3.86

2 00 .. 2.00
3.81 8.88 2 35

2 00 1.00
2.181 9.33 3.71


54

5.00 American A gr' Ci em. Co.
5.31 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 American Agr'l Chem Co,
5.22 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Anmeric nAgr'l (hem. Co.,
10.34 Jacksonville, Fla.

10 00 American Agr'l Ch m. Co ,
9.80 Jacksonville. ila.

11.00 Sanders' Fert. Co.. Jack-
13.01 sonvi le, Fl .

10 00Sanders' Fert Co., Jack-
10.86 sonville Fla.

7.00 Sanders' Fert. Co., Jack-
7 72 sonville, Fl,.

5 00 Sanders' Fert. Co., Jack-
5.39 sonville, Fla.

12 00Sanders' Fort Co., Jack-
12.64 sonville, Fl;j.

6.00SSndlers' F' t. (Co., .Jack-
6.32 sonville. I a,.












Wi iani'~CI rk'~, A 'er-


\'lli;am&iC rk's Aner-
icus Fruit & Vine Gi \ er


Simon Pure No. 1.


Ideal Fruit and Vinp ....


Fruit and Vine ....... .


Tip Top Tomato .......

O'd D nnimon Po0'lI
Manure ..... .......

FlIida Fiuit Growers
Formula......... .......

Mape's Orange Tree Ma-i
nure ........... ......

Champion Citrus Com-
pound


Colton Seed Meal.....


A N LY'-IS OF FERTILIZERS-Con inued.


667 Gunarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

608 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

669 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

670 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

671 ,narant'd Analysis.;
Official Analysis....
072 '-narant'd Analysis.
Official Analvyss....

073 Guarant'd Analysis.
)Ofnfie l Analysis....

674 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

675 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

676 Guarant'd Analysis.,'
Official Analysis....


13 00 5 50U; 1.001.
s.03 6.17 1.36

8.00 6.00 1.00
8.43 0.40 0.35
10.00 6 00......
9.97) 6.u3 0.26

8.00 6 00 1.001
8 601, 6.51 0..19

8 00 7.00 1,00
8.062 6.6i, 1.12i
S.00 7 001 1.00
9.02 7 00 1.021

8.00 7 00 1.00
9.;i38 7.78 1.12

12.00( 0.00 2 00
15.29 5.05 4.45


7.0I 6.22 0.3

. .. . .


7.53


6.75


6.30




7.80










7 0
8.0







7' 05

2 50


2.251
2.481

4.00
4.60

3.00
3.23

2.60
3.10

4.00
3.88

5.00
4 61

3.50
3.66

4.00
3.70

3.00
2.98

7.50
8.10 .


American Agr'lChem. Co.,
New York.

E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
Jacksonville, Hla.

Wil'son & Toomer Fert.
Co., Jacksonville Fla.

Va Car Chem. Co., Sl vanah
Ga.

Va.-C r Chem. Co., S ivan-
nah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Savan-
ah, Ga.

Va.-C ir. Ch"m. Co., Savan-
ah, Ga.

Mape's F. & P. G. Co., New
York.

Va.Car. Chem. Co., Sivan-
ah, Ga.

Florida C. O. Co., Jack-
sonvil'e. Fla.


... ~


----------








ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Cc ninued. 56

Sulphate of P,,tash...... 677 Guarant'd Analysis...... ..... ........... 48. VCar Che. Co., Savanah
Official Analysis.... .... ..... ..... .... 49.7 G
(otton Seed Meal ... .. 678 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... .. ...... 2.50 7.50 1 50 Florida C. O. Co, Talla-
Official Analysis.... .......... 7.18 .... hassee, Fla.
Georgia State Ammoni--
ated Superphoshate.. 679 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 S..O 1.00 ... 00 2.00 Va.-ar. Chem. Co, Sa-
Official A alysis.... 10.99 7. .06 10.US 2.1.7 1.98 vannah, Ga.
H. G Florida Fruit i ..
Growers Form1ila..... 6S0 Guarantd Analysis 800 7.00 1.0..... 3.50 4.00Va.-Car Chem. Co., Se-
Official Analysis .. 9.75 7 08 1 .28 8.96 3.02 2.23 vannah, Ga.
DeSoto Brand Frunt and
Vine.... ............ Guarant' A alysi 10 00 6.00 ...... ...... 4.0 12.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co. Sa-
Otllcial Analyis .. 6.08 6.70 0.09 6.85 4.82 12.25 vannah, Ga.
IeSoto Orange Tree 682 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 6.06 ........... 5.00 6.50 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
Grower. .............. OIUlniial Analysis ... 7.97 6.06 0.67 6.17 5.38 8.07 nah. Ga.

683 Guaranteed Analsis 8.00 600 1 00 ..... 2 50 10.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co.. Sa-
Va.-'. r. Fruit and Vine Oflicial.Analysis 8.1 6.23 0.1 6 40 2.5 10.45 vannah. Ga.
Southern States Spec.al 684 Guaranteed analysiss 8.001 6.00 1. ...... 00 5.00 Va.-Car. Cher. Co., Sa-
Veg-etable .. Oiial Analysis 8 57 6.89 l.: i 8.22 3.11 3.30 vannal, Ga.














R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


BUREAU OF FEFD STUFFS.
C. G. HELLMAN, Assistant Chemist.
Analys's of Special Samples under Sec. ). Act approved May 24, 1905.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


NAME OF BRAND
S.\

B ran ...... ... ....... ............

Shorts (Corn Meal).......................

Cotton Seed Meal ...................... 7
I ran ..... ..... ....... ............. s
(round Velvet Bean and IIulls...........
(G'ound Velvet Beans and Iulls .......... 1 1i
I lirina F eed .......................... 11
Ilurina F eed .......................... I
Cotton Seed M eal. ..................... 1 3
l.ran No. 1 .............................. 1 .
B ran No. 2 ................. .......... .. 15.


7.

01 .951

12.171
16.431
1 .51
12. 27
10. 90
-0 721
4..,82
4..S |


12.64 71.21
S.1lI 25.9-
11.41| 52.38
17.111 ,2..:4
21.24, .50.19!
9. )2 58.53
111.35 57.X4
20.3;6i 3D. 12;
Ill.GO 5S1. 7
I II. li .17i .S


BY WHOM ISSUED.



3.20i ..o.15 The Alger Sullivan Lumber Co., Century,
Fla.
1.05 0.75jThe Alger Sullivan Lumber Co., Century,
7 IFla.
7.53 5.6.1i The Perry Grocery Co., Perry, Fla.
1.85 4.53 The Perry Grocery Co., Perry, Fla.
4.10t 3.25 W. H. Terrell. Bushnell, Fla.
4.5i8 [67 Geo. HI. May, Grandin, Fla.
4.20 3.65 B. E. McLin. Tallahassee, Fla.
3. )S;.08s Consolidated (Grocery Co., Pensacola, Fla.
..(0) 4.20 Wells, Kaln & Co., Pensacola, Fla.
4.-S| 3.97 (:eo. I. Davis, Tallahassee. Fla.
4.231 4.07 G(lo. 1. Davis, Tallahassee, Fla.


NOTICE-Tile especial attention of coisullmers and dealers is called to the following paragraph:
(Consumers ldesiring to avail thImselves f (II. priivisiilos of Set- i). I. of the Laws. providing for "Special Samples" drawn by
consumers, are rlequlested to read care.l1 tlly Cc !1.. Iof the i,:i\s and tile "Ilules land Itegllulations Governing the taking and for-
w'arding Specinl Samoples of Feed Stuff and Fertilizers" found on: a preceding page of the report. Also to compare the "otlicial
analysis." and the "linrket value." of various feeds sold in the Stale.
It will he found that in a 1111number of cases. tHe "mllaker va.le'." or price. is no criterion of the actual feeding value, of the
g ools. 'Tlt i il several instancel s tli hlilghest "lnlark1et v;lll ie" it; Ilaced oin hle mI slt inferior goods.
Consnllumelrs sihoulld (colmpalre Ithe l.;uarateilid tl Ih tohe Ibag. \withl thie ab:le of ''average cOlnilmsition of feed stuff." In case of
(ldoult as Io thel truthliflness f the gi l'uaranle dr.i i a sample. :lcordin;'lg to Ilav. aild regiulatlions, and send in a tin box sealed,
to the Comnlmissioner of Agriculturle." Preserve tlhe "nuarlauteed tags" oil" thie lpalkages, to compare with the result, of tile
Ianalysis (of the sample by the State Chemist.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRIl CULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist-ANALYSIS 01'OF FEED STUFF, 1905-C. G. HELLMAN, Assistant Chemist.

Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 24, 1905.


NAME OF BRAND. .



Diamond "C" Corn and Oat Clions... S01 ;iriil Analysis. 11.40'10.00f61.20 4.60
i)fl iiial An l\sis... 14.80! 7.02 61.41 2.10

Peerless Mixed Feed- Pulre Whieait'
Bran ........ ........ .... .... .1..Analysis l .. i6. 6|.5 .10 4.83
l i;l An lsis ... l .192 111 (37|55.74 3.65

I I I
Itleor C. & 0. Feed................ u n'i i \ ii ialyis. 9.00|(12.00 4.00
| h ii Anilysis. 1 .07 7V6 2 97 ; .3.35

aMake Fat" Mixed lBran .......... 8 ;Gu:irl:,W Analysis. 1.1.75114.9,8 40..: 2.07
ifli' i] .\na!Y ,:is.. 'i.: 12 11.41 ,55.3 2.00

Wllobe Gllter Feed ................ 84 1 1 a; n'1 : *<1 .\d nalysis l ..... '(1.001!,5 .00 2.50
f! iii .\n:]lysis... : 7 1l 27.20 3)1.231 3.87

r n Feed ...................... .... 85l A l 1.5r315 .07 2.03
tli l i \i IA ,lx i .. 1i .021111110 5. .M 1.33


I I I
[Ilamnond "C" Corni and Oat Ch( ps.)S (; (:i:n ranl'd A.\ :iliysis 11.1110 .0(01| .20| 4.00
)Ili.al \h;m y ... ::IIn 7.2S 5s.77 1.95
Stock Feed ................ 87 Inurnam n i 11.12 18.001
| il [ll,.l.il \ n.l v i; I I 2 3"7 I 9) 1:1 5 1 .25 3.10


ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS.



.....The Como Mills Co.. East St. Linis,
3.67 11i.

..... Crescent Milling Co.. flopkinsrllle. C.
4.92 Ky.

..... American Cerial Co., ('hiiaio, Ill.
3.45

.... Dahnke-Walker Mllling Co Union
4.00 City, Tenn.

..... New York Glucose Co., New York.
2.70

..... City Grain and Feed Co., Columliln,
3.i62 Tenn.

..... The Como Mills Co., East th. Louis,
4.25 Ill.

..... Atlas Feed l'roducts ai d Milling C'o.,
(i.H5 New Orleans, I.a












B ran Feed .......................

Shorts ........ ..............

Red Cross. Corn and Oat Chops....

Peerless Mixed Feed. Pure Wheat
Brun ........ ................

Bran Feed ............ ..........

M ill F red .......................

Pure Wheat Shorts ........ .......

D, i mon C. Feed ..................


Bran Feed ......................

Purina Feed .. ....... .........

Pure Wheat Midalings ............

Royal Stock Feed ................

Pure Wheat Midalings .............


881 nuarant'd Analysis ...11.53163.97
lOfficial A2n lysis... 18..37I 9.56 54.07

89[ uiirant'f Analysis. 16.75 58.95
| l'lii:il A nal sis... 5.87 16.50 50.48
0 ;nnr 'in('d Anl:nlyss.|11.40 10.00 61.20
I'fllc.id Analysis ...4. 1 .5 6.84 61.11


91(l:i rant'd Annlvsis ..... 16.1 58.10
Offili ial Anialysis ... 7.2' l6.23 56.10
[I I
92, ;uai;rni dl Annlsis. I .. 11.53153.97
l)'irl inl Anal.y.isx... 19.27 9.04154.04

093 r un. t'( Analysis 0.13 l'5.2l!
ofilcial Analysis.. 1..75 115 .09 4.63
94 CIn irn t'd An:ilvsis. 6.42 1 (.00 48.00
official Antlysi... 4.47117.72151.761
95 in:r iiit'd Aiilvs s i 10. 00 61.20I
)t' ihi l Anal: Vsis... 114.80 7.72 54.08
90 liuarnt'dl Annlysis. ..... 11.53 53.971
officiall Analysis ... 2.5.. 13.34 64.331

97 i:unr,!nt' .' q1 "vsis I11 90 10.30 03.10
ifilicial Analysis... (.I00 7.90 61.96

99 ':i li'u t'd .x lalysis .. 15.75 4(0.00
'[licinl Analysis... 4.2 5110.58 59.56

89 ':iran!'d Analylsis. 1110.00] 9.0 48.00
(fliiial Analysis... 10.571 9.48 59.24

100(1 ; iln r,ii <1 An.nalsis.. .. 16.94159.02)
,fliicial Aniilysis.... 5.46117.38156.29|
I __ .... I I I


2.68 ..City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia,
1.20 4.00 Tenn.

3.50 ..... Blair Milling Co., Atchenson, Kan.
3.78 4.15

4.60 ..... The Como Mills Co.. East St. Louis,
2.30 4.10 Ill.

4.83 ..... Crescent Milling Co., Hopkinsviile.
3.08 4.77 Ky.
2.63 .... City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia,
1.88 2.63 Tenn.

2.33 ..... Capital Grain Co., Nashville, Tenn.
3.43 2.41

4.00 ..... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn.
5.40 3.50

4.60 .... Como Mills, East St. Louis. Ill.
3.03 3.571
2.63 ....City Grain and Feed Co., Columbia.
2.78 4.30 Tenn.
4.40 ..... Ralston Purina Co.., St. Louis, Mo.
4.13 3.84

4.00....Hunter Bros. Milling Co.. St. Louis,
3.93 3.88 Mo.

1.00 .... Alton Feed Products and Milling Co,
3.35 6.10 New Orleans, La.

47 ..... Phoenix Flour Mills, Evansville, Ind.
4.73 4.35









ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


NAME OF IBR.


ill0ll' ranl............

I1lnun11ll F1evd11......




ItalianI]. Ship st nfl...







Dalllard S al I.....


II S. I li

11 o . . .I


ND. L.-AI)DDRESS OF MANUFACTURERSE.



..... ..... -A], '1 lyi 8_01 15.50157.104 4.5011. T... illie 'Mills Co., Franklin. Te~nn.
Wfical nalsis... 7.111 11.15 54.46( 3.6;51 5.461
........ l0iilt rintf~ .ilysis.i 4 25, S.:34 05.17 7.751. 1merican Hlominy Co.. Iiidianapjelis.
Aflj:i1Vl lli ... 52 11.2 ;4.S.5 1.581 :12 Ind.

.0:...........'n~lwi 9.111 4.0 Thle American Cerial ('o.. Chticago,

.... ...... 14j(lllvli~t~ l'(I Amlvyis 8: s1! i T.:t T I -1 .5S 4.41 Ba1311ard and Ballard Co., Laouisvillo.
i 101ftical An~lysks...j 4.71j17.81 5G.5014: ., .0 1y
........ 11 i~lilI .\!llly ~. .125.7[............Florida C'. 0. Co., Trall alia,*w,e Flai.
Hlk iill Anol Isis.. 1G97 G. il Q711 i.I 4.'5
..1...... ;iit D l\i 1 5 11 5-l1. SI 110 .,....Anierivan -Milling Co., Philaidelphiat,
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6 .,011 \lHi II 12: 1 191.:17 4.:8S 7.17 la.
...... l... 10 1, iwm tl ,iml~si, S. 11) 1.2.-,:1 tS.1 .! : Il a nd nO ilalird (o., L~onIsvillo.
jIl Nij0dvs1s I5 1 912 511.111 2.8 .1 K .

I 111 Iinl !lI-l 18 2l>! 5.:5 (ImI( M' ro. Co., Moi1111is, T(t.111
I ~~1 II, 1t .ll 4.0)1

A y is 1 ;
....... I A I i ; I \.' ill..:; 97_' I :;: Cily (11*1111 & vod Co Colum bia


~~__~ _











Diamond "C" Corn and Oat Chops..

Victor Feed ......................

M iddling Feed ................... .

Mixed Feed, Bran .................

Hominy Feed .....................

No. 3 Sugared Feed ................

Globe Gluten t'eed ................

Victor C. & 0. Feed ..............

Bran Feed ......................

Purina Feed ................ ....

Lillie B ran ......... .......... .

Sucrene Dairy Feed ..............

Pure M idalings ...................


111 G(;uiiai'd Analysis. 14.73 7.62161.2S 3.151..... The Como Mills Co., ast St. Louis,
Official Analysis. 17.13 7.72 56.3 2.80 4.30 111.
112 ';in 'l Analsis. ..... 0 62.00 4.01 .... American Cerial Co., Ch.,.igo. Ill.
Official Analysis... 1-1.08. 7.20 61 5 2.33 3.45
113 Guarantfd Analysis ..... 12.29 111.092 3.2S ..... City Grain & Feod Co., 'olunmbia.
Official Analysis... 16.67 10.53 55.35' 2.13 2.57 'enn.
114 Ginirant'd Analysis.. .. 12.01 154.02 4.00. .... IHardy Grain Co., I-nion City.. Tenn.
Official Analysis... 1 .ill 7.99J 53.96 1.70 3.45
115 iiarniiIt' AIllysis. .1 1O 5l.50.10.00 0 ....0 Cumberland Mills. Nashville. Tenn.
T 6licial Anal.ysis... 9. 15 1.676 0.88 8.65 2.8.5
116 ;niriat d Analvyis.l 2.00 7.5 5..0l 1.00..... Atlass Feed Pro,.ncts & Mill Co..
Ofli inal An\al\ysis. 1i.2. 6.84 50.290 1.60 iJ.07 New Orleans, La.
117 Guar;Int Anil.is. ..... 2(.0051.011 2.50 ... New York G(luecose Co.. New York.
Ififfill Analysis... 7.47 28.0I.,...361 1.63 2.70
118 (ll ranlt'i Analsis. ....! 7.7.'i62.00 3.00 ..... American Cerial Co.. Chicago. Ill.
Oflficil Analysis ... 11.15! 0.21' 59.57 4.90 3.72
119 (;niran l An:Tvsis. .... 11.3 53.97 2.R ....City Grain & Feed Co.. Columbia.
Oflilcil Analysis... 20.i5| S.78153.05 1.00 3.47] Tenn.

120 ;arant'ld vslis.l !.0l 10.3 63.1 4.41 .i. lialston I'rina Co.. SI. Li, is. Mo.
Ol'i.i.il Analysis... I (l.2ll 11.41 58 311 4.11 3.2S
121 imr.u '1d Analysis. 8.50 15.50157.001 4.5I ...1 lillie M1ill Co.. Franklin. Toni.
|o!'li i:'i] Analysis... ;.,IIl! 17.201 53.6:3 ...25 5.24'
122j[illinr: il'd Aon lysis. 11.750 1;.5(1 48.541 :..3.- .. American Milling C(o.. 'hiludl,lphii..
Ofi,ciAl Analysis... S.37 17.55 49.31 4.15 7.12 Pa.
123.1 Gunranird Analysis. ..... 10.00 5S.0 4.75 ..... .Columlia Mill & Elevator Co., Col-
lici;ll Anal sis.. 5. l 1S.78|155.00 4.65 4.171 luliia, T ienn.
I i I I I i











ANALYSIS OF FEED STUFF-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND).




l r, Whn:: ? ;;lalig ..in .s ............


Q :tkier 1 :iiry oFeed ..............


H,! 'i F eI l . . ..........


]i;!imn "-"' Corn and Oat Chops...


.0
&cz
sX

ga


Guarani
Official

Guarani
Official

Guarani
Official

Guaran
Official

Guaran
Official


I t
t'd Analysis. .... 10.00
Analysis... I 4.87 17.20

t'd Analysis ..... 14.00
Analysis... 18.00 9.04

t'd Analysis ......112.20
Analysis... 6.00116.50

t'd Analysis ... 11.53
Analysis... 18.50 O.65

t'd Analysis. 11.40110.00)
Analysis... 16.501 7.72
I1


0 a ADDRESS OF MANUFACTURERS.

eJJ '
rL) &a I *


40.00 4.00....
56.71 4.03 3.97

52.00 3.50 ....
55.07 2.88 5.32

61.92 3.28 .....
56.20 4.43 4.45

53.97 2 03 ... .
54.581 1.05 4.07

61.201 4.60 ....
57.881 3.00 4.40


Geo. P. Plant Milling Co., St. Louis,

The American Cerial Co.. St. Louis,

City Grain Feed Co C ,lumbi:i.
Tenn.

City Grain & Feed Co.. Colimbini,
Tenn.

The Comno Mills Co.. E:st St. Louis
ill.


SI'i'l.\, NOTICE( The attention of dealers and consumers, is called to tlie table of "average compisitlon of Fc-"' Stlffs" on
I:t Ir liil p:i'. 'l'lTis table shows approximately the composition of the various f(d stluffs sold th1ro1ugiiou1 th (oIIuntry. Any
l;li.' i:11 v\;ll'tinll' f romI these averages, is p)resulniptlve evidence of Impu)rity or adulteration.
\A c:ifu1l (.\:inoi'atiojn off th1 foregoing tables is recommended to both de(ilers anld consumller. '111Tw ;'11:rI'IC t' o"f tI' mann
fI:ltilr' sh li Iotl V iary materially from this table of average while tlh "offielal aIa lys-is" s 'oulI I l'n\w ; ':l!i .i tho' s:io'
-- i :s t. iallnte. )alers and collmers. are requPeted in all c:ifs's of suspected i! trilorit '. or Itilllclration lit
si]wl :i ;intwI- :it IIonce to the Commissioner of Agrlncllture for analysis.














ADDRESS BY R. E. ROSE,


State Chemist of Florida.



Read Before the Inter-State Cane Growers Association
Convention at Mobile, Ala., Feby. 7th, 9th, 1906.



THE PRODUCTION OF SUGAR IN THE SOUTH.



Practically Condensed.

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:

It is unnecessary. for me to attempt to add to the tes-
timony of such men as Dr. Stubbs, Professor Wiley, Pro-
fessor Ross and others, as to the quality and quantity of
sugar cane grown per acre in the Sugar-Belt, nor to that
of practical growers like Messrs. Roddenberry, McQuar-
rie, Porter and others to the cost per acre to plant, fer-
tilize, cultivate and harvest the crop. These facts are
now well established, not only by the testimony of these
eminently ca.pble men, scientists and practical farmers,
'but also by the results of the careful, practical, scientific
and technical work of the United States Agricultural De-
partment, the problem is reduced to a practical business
proposition: The successful and profitable conversion of
cane into a marketable product.
That we can produce Sugar Cane averaging twenty tons-<
of cane per acre, witi an average of t,- per cent of availa-
ble sugar, at a cost not to exceed twenty dollars per acre,
I think has been fu'1v demonstrated.











Can this raw material be converted into a commercial
article profitably? Is there a commercial demand for it?
Can a manufacturer pay for this cane a price sufficient to
induce the farmer to produce it?
If not, why has the culture of beets, and manufacture
of beet sugar in Europe, and in the West made such phe-
noniinal strides? I claim that far more sugar can be
made. for a given expenditure of time and money from
cane, than from beets; that, if the facts as to the cost of
production, and sugar content of cane, as has been so
definitely and positively fixed by eminently qualified men,
were made known to the farmers and manufacturers of
the beet growing sections, that a. vast development of the
industry would occcur.
I have for many years maintained that it was only nec-
essary to ascertain these facts, .as they exist, and have
been stated here, of the cost to produce the cane, the
yield per acre in sugar, and to publish them authorita-
tively, to induce an enormous development in the com-
mercial production of sugar in the Gulf States.
The American people are the greatest (co-unmurs of
sugar in the world. Our market for foreign sugar is ac-
knowledged to be the best known.
We import annually practically t4..iI00l.0h.000 pounds,
or 2.2,0(,000 lons, (excluding the sugar -70.(000 tons im-
ported from our Island possessions of which 2,0110(1.00
tons is raw, or unrefined cane sugar, and :)i9.000 tons re-
fined beet sugar.
The importation of strictly foreign sugar for 1904-1905
was .,400,000,000 pounds, or 2.25.0,000( tons of 2.240
pounds each.
From the American Colonies. Porto Rico. Hawaii and
the Philippines, 470,000 tons. Total imports including
the Colonies, 2,720,000 tons. We produced in the States
of beets 209,000 tons. Of Sugar Cane in Louisiana,
330,000 tons. A total consumption jn the United States
proper of, 3,236,000 tons.











Recently the production of American sugar has been
very largely increased by the establishment of the beet
sugar industry in the West and Northwest, and by the
annexation of our island colonies. Hawaii, Porto Rico
and the Philippines; still with this enormous s increase in
the American production, we produce but thirty per cent.
of the sugar consumed within the United States proper.
While on this subject, I wish to call your attention to the
fact that with the exception of 389,000 tons of beet sugar
from Germany, and 170,000 tons of Western beet sugar,
this vast amount is cane sugar only. The total cane sugar
produced in the world is, 4,908,000,114 tons, of which the
United States consumes 2,685,000 tons; more than 50 per
cent of the entire cane sugar production of the world.
The increase in beet sugar production during the last
twenty years, under the fostering care of Germany,
austria, France and our own Government, has been phe-
nominal. Two thirds of the world's sugar was produced
from beets in 1901-2. While in 1904-5 little more than
half the world's supply was made from beets. Cane
sugar production having increased proportionately, that
Sis, while beet sugar has not decreased in quantity, cane
sugar has increased nearly 50 per cent in amount, pro-
duced. While beet culture has had the intelligent, fos-
tering care, of our own, and the various European Gov-
ernments, bounties, rebates, traif's and drawbacks, cane
sugar has had neither, on the contrary, legislation has
always been adverse to cane sugar production, in our own
country, and in England; the two largest sugar consumers
in the world.
Scientists and trained agriculturists, men eminent in
their professions, have been retained in the interest of
beet culture, to breed up a plant from six, to fourteen per
cent, sugar content. Vast sums have been expended in
this, and other countries, to promote the industry, with
wonderful results. Until very recently, no intelligent
effort to improve the quality of tropical cane, nor methods
5 Bulletin.












of manufacturing cane sugar has been made. No effort
was made to encourage or educate the cane grower, to
improve his methods, decrease his cost of culture and
manufacture. Recently, I am glad to say, the Louisiana
Sugar Planter's Associatior, at their own expense, estab-
lished a sugar experimental station, and placed a compe-
tent man in charge-a practical man, as well as a most
eminent scientist. The results have justified their faith,
and the Louisiana sugar planters have reaped a rich re-
ward for their investment. The improved methods of cul-
ture, fertilizing and manufacture, to say nothing of the
improvement in cane, has repaid them many fold. I am
pleased to say that our general Government and the State
of Louisiana now contribute liberally to the support of
the Station.
That cane sugar can be produced in the cane belt in
the South for less cost than beet sugar in the West, or
in Europe, can certainly be proven. I believe that but a
small part of the sum expended in the effort to establish
the best sugar in America, intelligently used, not in ex-
periments, we have passed that stage years ago, but in
demonstration of the facts, as to cost of production and
manufacture, would have long since made America the
principal sugar producer of the world.
Mr. President, I believe the time so long hoped for by
yourself and your associates has come. That a new era
in the history of cane sugar production in America is
upon us. When I note the interest shown by the head of
the United States Agricultural Department, that emi-
nently practical farmer, broad minded agriculturist, and
far seeing statesman, the Hon. James Wilson, Secretary
of Agriculture; Dr. H. W. Wiley, Chief of the Chemical
Bureau of the Agricultural Department and Prof. W. C.
Stubbs, director of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Sta-
tion, T feel that the long period of waiting for recognition
of the intrinsic value of this peculiarly Southern produc-
tion has passed and that the sugar cane of the Gulf
States will now receive that careful, scientific care, and
cult-ire, and official recognition of its value, that has so
long been given to its humble relative, the beet. which has












for years enjoyed the protective care of our own and
European Governments, and had the consideration of the
most eminent scientists, agriculturists, and statesmen of
both continents, to assist in its development. Now that
cane has attracted the attention of statesmen, scientists
and business men, I have no fear of the result.
Though the beet has been wonderfully developed, and
the business has grown to enormous proportions, I believe
that recent results in cane culture, justify me in pre-
dicting a far greater development in cane culture. That
sugar cane is suspectible of vast improvements, by careful
selection, and intelligent culture, has always been my
contention. Though in its natural state it has always
been, and is now, superior to the most improved varieties
of beets for sugar making.
Recent results in Louisiana under the practical and
scientific direction of Dr. Stubhs, have demonstrated the
correctness of these claims made by myself, that, with
less cost and labor, and in far shorter time, greater im-
provements could be expected from intelligent efforts to
improve a natural plant, than one not originally a true
sugar producer. The results of the work at the Louisiana
Sugar Experiment Station, covering a period of Jnly ten
years, in\cane breeding and selection, have recently been
published.
In a recent statement, Dr. Stubbs says: "To the lay
public there is nothing exceedingly significant in those
words, 'D 74.' but to the sugar planter they will be noth-
ing less than startling. This cane produces thirty-eight
tons to the acre. The juice yields 16 per cent of sugar.
Under a nine roller mill, 81 per cent is obtained without
saturation.
If you will compare these figures with statistics of cane
now grown, you will realize that this new cane will revolu-
tionize the sugar industry in Louisiana. The old cane
gives an acreage of thirty to thirty-one tons, with a 12
per cent yield in the juice. Under the roller it gives a
percentage of 71.









68

The new cane is long jointed, green, perfectly healthy
and beautiful in appearance. It has an excellent stubbile.
and remarkable vigor. It withstood the terrific gale that
swept over the city on September 9th and 10th. It is
deep rooted and strong, and was the only cane in the
field that was not blown either flat, or partly down to the
ground. It was not damaged the least bit by the strmn."
In the Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer of
February 20, 1904, appears the report of Prof. R. E.
Blouin, Assistant Director of the Louisiana Sugar Ex-
periment Station, of the results of this work, in the devel-
opment, and distribution, of these two seedling canes.
selected from hundreds of seedlings with which they have
experimented; not only the results obtained at the Sta-
tion, scientifically and experimentally, but the field re-
sults of numbers of our foremost sugar planters, who
have cultivated these canes on a commercial scale under
ordinary field conditions.
These results are truly phenomlinl., and prove beyond
cavil, the truth of the assumption that the tonage and
sugar content of the cane plant can, and has been in-
creased, in as great a ratio as ever the beet has. and that
the continued strife for excellence will gi e us a p Int as
far superior t tile original cane ;,lant as coinmonly
grown, as the sugar beet of the lpre~ nt day, is to the
original tye.. This report is of too great length to be
quoted here. All those interested should procure the re-
port and study it. I simply sumnmarize the results as
given by Prof. Blouin, and follow his figures to the final
results. He says: "The canes are known as 'D 74' and
'D 95,' and have been under culture at the station some
ten years, and throughout Louisiana but a few years."
The summary of the report taking a field of 500 acres as a
basis of comparison, the field to consist of 250 acres of
plant cane, and 250 acres of first year's stubble. and com-
paring it with an equal area of domestic, or home cane,
under similar conditions of age and culture, is as follows:
Five hundred acres seedling canes D 74, compared to
500 acres of domestic, or home canes:











D 74, tons of cane 18,187 averaging 36.33 tons per acre;
home cane, tons of cane, 15,020, averaging 3*. tons per
acre; increase 3,167 tons, averaging 6.33 tons per acre.
D 74, pounds of sugar, 3,203,875, averaging 6,407.75 per
acre; home cane, pounds of sugar, 2,234,546, averaging
4,469.09 per acre; increase, 969,329, averaging 1,938.66 per
acre.
D 74, value 3- cents, $112,135.63, average $224.27 per
acre; home cane, value 31 cents $78,212.44, average
$156.42 per acre, increase $33,922.19, average $67.85 per
acre.
Average increase in tonage, 20 per cent in value, 43 per
cent.
This, gentlemen, should dispose of the plant, its tonage,
and sugar content, and show to the world that we have a
plant, now the superior of all others for sugar production,
with a soil and climate eminently adapted to its culture;
in fact, its natural soil. A plant that will doubtless be
much improved by further work along the lines pursued
by Dr. Stubbs, with the assistance of the Department of
Agriculture, which I feel assured will be heartily given.
This question, this agricultural question, is certainly
disposed of.
The manufacture of sugar, commercially and profita-
bly: Here I fear I shall cause a vigorous protest on the
part of syrup makers present. While I do not discredit
the syrup business. and know theee will always "'h.e room
at the top," that many will succeed in making large re-
turns from their cane fields, and syrup factories, I main-
tain that until we produce commercially, scientifically,
and economically, a pure granulated or crystalized sugar,
as do our friends, the beet sugar manul'acturers, we will
not become a factor in furnishing tie sugar of America.
The American consumer demands, and wil! accept noth-
ing but a pure white sugar. The price does not come into
the calculation at all. It is well enough to say we like,
or even prefer, a nice, "yellow clarified" sugar, or a raw
sugar, better than a pure white; the facts are we don't
use it. We can today purchase first class 96 per cent










centrifugal sugar at 3 cents per pound ; still. we pay 4 to
4- cents for the same sugar with but a trace of coloring
matter awd the four pounds of water removed.
A carload of choice, pure. open kettle. or 9i6 per cent
centrifugal sugar. or syrup, could not be readily sold to-
day to the trade, while tons of granulated, or pure sugar
would find a ready sale.
We should be willing to recognize this fact, as has the
American Sngar Refining Company, the so-called trust.
They simply understand the American demand, and meet
it. They buy raw sugar (or syrup), for as small a price
as they can procure it, he it of foreign or domestic pro-
duction, properly refine or :lean it, and sell it to the
American public for the highest price they can obtain.
This is not peculiar to the sugar refiner. It is the busi-
ness of all manufacturers to buy cheap rawy materials. and
sell the finished product at a profit. This applies to all
raw products, particularly agricultural products: hides.
wool. beef, pork, colon, tobacco or whart. The coimmer-
cial value of syrup. or raw siuar. depends solely on its
sugar content, and is fixed by the refiner. Hence T ro-
dunce large qnanil'ies of raw suar,. o'r syr-1i. w O 1ul Ie
simply to chlaponl Ilie cost of lrnW' m1;ileri:i tn tile refilnr.
and by no nmeann eOc,,t lihe priice or refined ,ir c.lnn'i
goods, oi the Amnerican public.
There is practically but one buyer of raw sugar. or
syrup, in An'eric ; that is the "Amerinan ug;ir PRfinery
Company," who fix the price of raw sugars (or syrupsi. as
low as possible, and also fixe the price of refined sugar at
the highest figure possible.
I have no reason to change my opinion; lhat the only
method to produce sugar, commercially. economically and
practically. is to establish central factorie- at convenient
points, equipped with the latest and most improved ap-
paratus of large capacity; the grower selling his cane
direct to the factory, at an agreed price per ton. based on
the market value of pure sugar, and the sugar content of
the cane. This is the only way by which sugar industry
can be made profitable and successful. The same system
as is employed in all sugar growing countries, and univer-










sally adopted by the beet sugar manufacturer. Make
none but the pure granulated goods, such as the American
public demands. Cease the insane effort to produce a
cheap raw article, in competition with the raw sugars of
Cuba, and other foreign countries. Understand that the
tariff is wholly in the interest of the American refiner.
Accept the situation as have the beet growers, partic-
ularly since the "Sugar Trust" has become largely in-
terested in American Beet Sugar growing. The tariff is
so arranged that raw sugar is cheapened, and refined, in-
creased in value.
I do not desire to discourage the manufacture of first
class syrup. There will always be a demand for a really
first class table syrup, well made, and neatly packed, in
convenient packages. However, the majority of our
farmers have neither the means, nor the skill, required to
produce such an article, and must expect to dispose of his
crop to the central factory (or refinery'i, either as cane.
or syrup. If he makes his crop into syrup by the ordinary
process, just one half the su'ar will be lost in 1the milling
and manufacture, and lie will be paid for but one half of
his c;-op, after he has grown it, hauled it to his factory,
and made it into syrup, or raw sugar; in fact, less than
half. as thb cost of manufacture and packages, will have
to bel deducled from Iie price he receive. In other words,
a lon of cane is worth more at a central factory, (well
equipped and modern in its constructionn, than the syrup
the average farmer will obtain from the same ton of cane,
by the ordinary methods now used in milling and man-
ufacture.
To illustrate: The juice of average, well ripened cane
required to produce one gallon of good sirup, say 40 de-
grees Beaume, cold, will under proper conditions, make
eight or more pounds of pure sugar; if first made into
syrup, under ordinary conditions, it will yield not more
than four pounds of pure sugar, particularly if it be what
is known as good syrup, "thick and not liable to crystal-
ize." I cannot better express my position than to repeat
statements made by myself in 1900.











The sugar planter, and manufacturer, will soon dis-
cover that by using modern methods, late improvements
in manipulation, with economical and labor-saving de-
vices, he can for less cost, make more refined sugar from
his cane, than he could formerly make of raw sugar, and
sell it direct to the consumer at prices 25 to 50 per cent
more than he can now get for his raw product delivered
at a refinery. The facts are that a modern central mill
can take the cane direct from the farmer, and by a no
means expensive or difficult process, thoroughly purify
the juice, and make a standard article of granulated
sugar, ready for the table, equal to any, at a less cost
than can the farmer make a brown sugar or syrup, with
his crude and wasteful apparatus, and methods. At the
same time this modern, central mill, will double the out-
put of granulated sugar from each ton of cane. as cnm-
pared to the output of the open kettle or steam train. The
beet sugar manufacturer hl;1 recogniz ed this fn.t. tend
uses none but the laiiestf improved appaVatus, n.1 1n.[ s
none but refined sugar. Re is indepeni'ent of the refi',er,
and sells direct lo the trade.
Louisiana is rapidly learning this ossoii, and nvw
building numerous center!: mills or refineries, to make re-
fined sugar only direct from the cane.
When the South, with her superior climate and scIl,
builds central mills or factories, she can produce sugar at
a profit, in spite of free raw sugar from Cuba; as she will
have the asisiance of the "Sugar Trust." and the Iiet
sugar grower, in maintaining the price of refinr-l sliar.
In other words, here is a large profit in mIlnufacturin,
a finished article, videe, the sugar trust), .while a raw pro-
duct finds slow sale, at reduced prices.
'lie South can make more refined sugar, direct from
her cane, for less cost per pound, than she at prc.s"nt
makes raw sugar; she can increase the yield fully 50 per
cent per Ion of cane. over present conditions, and increase











the value per pound fully 30 per cent. This is but a mat-
ter of education. When our farmers begin to think, and
then combine their practical knowledge, and labor, with
capital and skill, now seeking profitable employment, the
question of the American supply of sugar will be solved,
by the cane belt of the United States making the neces-
sary amount to supply the demand. The beet grower will
soon discover that he cannot compete with cane, and will
naturally gravitate into the cane belt, where his profits
will be greater, and his crops more certain.
A factory to turn out 50,000 pounds of granulated
sugar per day, can be erected for $75,000. Allowing the
raw material (cane or syrup) to cost 50 per cent of the
selling price of sugar; 50,000 pounds will pay the grower
$1,125; cost of manufacture (75 cents per 100 pounds),
$375; net profits of factory per day $750; gross daily pro-
ceeds, $2,250. These figures are based on present prices
of sugar, i. 41 cents for standard granulated. The fac-
tory should run one hundred days slowing a net profit of
$75,000 per season. Such a factory will require 300 tons
of cane, (or its equivalent in syrup), per day, and will
consume the product of some 1,500 acres of average cane,
paying the growers $112.500 for the season. There is not
a town or village in the "cane belt", from Mobile to Jack-
sonville to Tampa or Miami, that cannot furnish within a
short distance, twice the required acreage for such a mill.
A thousand such mills would be required to produce the
5,000,000,000 pounds imported annually.
The modern factory will make 175 pounds granulated
sugar per ton of cane; pay the farmer -L.00 per ton, and
net the factory "C ..11 per ton of cane. The product of the
modern house will find a ready sale wherever offered. The
open-louse sugar can only be sold to a refinery, as the
American public will use none bu the best granulated
sugar. A mill handling from 400 to 800 tons of cane per
day, requires no greater number of skilled employees,
engineers, sugar makers, etc., uses little fuel, the waste
of house is reduced to a minimum, the extraction is prac-
tically perfect, (80 to 82 per cent), practically no labor
is required after the cane is placed on the carrier, the










product is ready for immediate consumption. Such a
house should make none but granulated sugar. at a co.t
not to exceed that of crude sugar or syrup, wuith a much
greater yield. These mills or factories, purchasing their
supplies from the farmer, can afford to pay for the cane
delivered, a price equal to the sum now obtained for his
crude syrup, now made in a crude, and wasteful manner,
saving the farmer the annoyance and cost of manufacture
and packages, and at the same time make large profits
on the capital invested.
I advocate the central mill plan, purchasing cane from
the'farmers, that the best results may be had both in the
field, and in the factory, the farmer devoting his time,
skill and labor, to producing the largest possible crop of
high grade cane, the miller, to the most economical
methods of making the best sugar, receiving the greatest
reward possible for his skill in his particular line.
I believe the foregoing figures are conservative. based
on average conditions as they now prevail: intt those
profits can be largely increased by the intelligent coopera-
tion of the Agriculhanita Department and Experiiment
Stations working along the lines. and follovinT lhe lne1a
of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Stat ion, on 1he de-
velopment of the plant, and improvement in nmehods of
manufacturer.
While lihe ";-in" belt" extoen:s some o:! h iin hldd miles
north of lhe Mexican Gulf. and' fine crops :1!'1 m'ae t rihe
Northern edge of lhe belt. there are certii;i ''naw v l,,:
in sugar growing on an extensive scale ;n the N'ol;:r :
parts of the belt. The element of frosi d.-tr:'rs from the
fullest imaiurity, and limits the areas of 1he fit!td to a
large extent.
As to climate: Florida's climate is certainly supleriior
to that of any other State for sugar growing. Our "rainy
season" is during the growing months, when required. A
wet fall or winter is the exception. A dr: fall and winter
insures the ripeness of the cane and a quick lhrvest: a
wet fall or winter retards the ripening, and entails hearv
expense for harvest. A "killing" frost seldom occurs in
Florida before January. Grinding begin Ocober 1T. in











Louisiana, and seldom before November 15th in Florida,
insuring thirty additional days for maturing the crop. In
South Florida, killing frosts are of rare occurrence, and
grinding continues from December 1st, to February. In
tropical Florida, south of the 27th parallel, frost to kill
oranges, lemons, limes, or tropical cane is unknown. The
climate of west, north and middle lorida, has full thirty
days longer growing season than Louisiana, while South
Florida has forty-five to sixty. Further South, in Dade
and Lee counties, below the twenty-seventh parallel,
where vast areas of rich land, in large bodies can be had,
the plantation, or "gang system" will prove most satis-
factory, where the planter owns the factory, and culti-
vates the cane also. This system is applicable only where
there is no probability of killing frost, where large filds
can be safely allowed to stand till wanted by the mill.
North of the twenty-seventh parallel, the central factory
system, similar to the beet factory system of Germany,
Austria. and the West, will be found most satisfactory.
Where the acreage is made -up by numerous small fields of
ten to forty acres each; each farmer in case of threatened
freezing weather, can probably care for his crop by
windrowing, or mat laying. as is now practiced in Geor-
gia.. Mississippi, and frequently in LoL'-iana.
The crop can then be delivered as the factory requires
it. This process of securing the crop adds but little to
the cost, and keeps the cane perfectly for months. No
silos or bins are required for cane, as with beets. The
delay caused by a cold snap seldom retards the work of
sugar making to exceed three days.
That the sugar cane will, in the near future, replace the
beet as the most economical source of sugar, I have no
doubt. I am convinced that only the apathy. and false
security, felt by the cane grower, his neglect of scientific,
and economical methods, together with the careful, eco-
nomical, and aggressive methods of the beet grower,
backed by Government aid, and encouragement, in this
and European countries, has temporarily increased the
world's supply of beet sugar, as compared to cane sugar.
That the "cane belt of the South," can under the same
intelligent system of culture, and manufacture, produce
pure sugar at a profit, when selling at a price less than









76

the cost of producing beet sugar, under the most favora-
ble conditions, I believe can, and will be demonstrated in
the near future, and that the American cane grower, will
supply not only the enormous home demand, but a large
part of the foreign consumption.
That others besides myself are of the same opinion, is
best evidenced by this gathering of representative farmers,
cane growers, and business men, of the New South; from
the Brazos to the St. Johns; from the Carolinas to the
Keys; this gathering certainly shows that the "Cane
grower of the South," has awakened to the possibilities
of the profitable commercial production of sugar, in the
"cane belt" of America.




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