Title: Florida monthly bulletin
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00022
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: August 1, 1905
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text





VOLUME 15
NUMBER 3


FLORIDA

MONTHLY

BULLETIN.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


AUGUST 1. 1905.


B. E _
COIuMfISSI0Pff!*eI RICULTURE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.

Part 1--Crop. PLr(2U eRkeport
Part 3 -Fcrtji rs ond Feeding-! tuff.
/ ,
Y P. 103 C. 7 -
Entrd i'edjJ~anary 31,1003, at~aIoahol;mas~;r -1 r i Ia
sece.d-c.ass matt, usder Act of


Thee'Bulletins are Issued free to those requesting themn.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
* APiTAL PUBLISHING CQ., STATE PRINTERS


I


3~6






County Map of th'6 State of Flotida.



















PART I.
CROPS,













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
-j)
B. E. McLiN, Com H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.

ALACHUA CoUNTY.-Crops are doing very well at pres-
ent, but should rain continue the effect on cotton will be
had. Cor-n, cai.c ~nd other field crops are doing : we!l.
Fruit trees a~e growing nicely and all live stock igs
good condition.
BAKER COUNTY.-The condition of cotton is very poor
at this time; in some parts of the county there is too much
rain, in other parts no rain at all, and very little since
the middle of May. Sugar cane is holding out very well.
Sweet potatoes will hardly make more than half a crop;
other crops are about the same. Live stock is generally
in good condition, but there is some sickness among hogs.
BRADFORP COUNTY.-All crops are in a general good
condition, and if no unfavorable change in seasons take
place, the yield of all of them will be good. Live stock
is in. good condition, and pastures are fine.
BREVARD COUNTY.-The few field crops' grown in this
county are in a fine condition; the seasons have been fav-
orable, and the fruit trees are growing finely, though the
crop will not be as good as last year. Live stock in good
condition and ranges fine.
CALHOUN COUNTY.-Crops are all good except cotton,
which is suffering from too much rain. Live stock is in
good condition; fruit trees doing well. The honey crop
this year has been fine, good season, make many flowers.
CLAY COUNTY.-All crops in fine condition and if sea-
sons continue good farmers will have a full yield. Fruit
trees in fine condition, also live stock of all kinds.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.-Farm crops. generally doing well,
but seasons not favorable as they should be and some
crops are failing. Live stock is in fine condition and the
pastures are fine.








DADE COUNTY.-Only a few crops grown in this county
except vegetable crops, but those that are are doing well.
Fruit trees and plants of all kinds are growing finely.
Live stock also in fine condition.
DESOTO COUNTY.-As a whole the field crops are prom-
ising an average yield. The orange and grape fruit crops
will be considerably below last year's crops. The old
seedling grape fruit trees which produced large crops are
having a resting spell, 'and then the cold of last winter
did some little damage to the tender wood.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY.-All crops are doing well except
cotton, and it is shedding and rusting fast; the crop will
he short. Corn crop is "par excellent;" little tobacco is
raised, and that will be only about half a crop. Wool will
fall about one-fourth short of the average clip. Live
stock in good condition.
GADSDEN COUNTY.-The tobacco crop is the finest and
largest ever grown in this section. About five and a half
million pounds is the extent of the crop. A little of it is
grown in Liberty County, and a small quantity is from
Decatur County, Georgia, but all of it is brought here
Sand cased and packed. Other crops are also good except
cotton, which is poor. Live stock is doing fine.
HAMILTON COUNTY.-The crops of this county are in
fair condition; cotton is not doing so well as some other
crops. Live stock is generally in fine condition. Sea-
sons have not been as favorable as desired.
HERNANDO COUNTY.-The crops of our county are as a
rule very fine, the seasons have been favorable and all
are doing well. The pastures are fine and all live stock
is in good condition. Fruit trees doing well, but crop
will be small.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY.-Crops are all doing well, and
if the seasons continue favorable, good yields will, be the
result. Fruit trees are doing well, but crop will be
smaller than last year. Live stock in fine condition.
JAcKSON COUNTY.-Crops are growing well, and sea-
sons up to this time favorable, unless it is a little too wet
for cotton. All other crops will be fine. Live stock of
all kins in an unusually fine condition.
JEFFERSON COUNTY.--The crops of this county will
average up well, cotton not quite as good as some other









crops, owing to unfavorable weather. All live stock is in
fine condition, pastures good.
LEE COUNTY.-Field and fruit crops are doing well, sea-
sons have been very favorable; will be a good fruit crop
this year; citrus trees growing fine. Live stock all
through the county is in splendid order.
LEON COUNTY.-Crops of all kinds except cotton doing
very well. Cotton is losing fast from caterpillars, rust
and shedding fruit; the heavy and continuous rains are
doing much damage to cotton all over this section.
LEVY COUNTY.-Nearly all crops are good and will
yield a large return; cotton is being much damaged by
heavy and continuous rain, causing it to rust, shed and
a good deal.to rot in'the bolls. The rains have made the
pastures fine an dlive stock generally is in fine condition.
MADISON COUnTY.-Crops, except cotton, are growing
well, and will yield fine; cotton is not doing well, both
Sea Island and Upland cotton, have an unusually fine
stalk, and now and then you see a field or patch well
fruited, but generally the bottom crop is very deficient,
and the middle crop is only tolerable. The top crop bids
fair to be fine, but this is not to be depended on. Live
stock is generally in excellent condition.
MARION COUNTY.-Crops are growing fast and promise
good harvest; the seasons have been very favorable to this
time, but if the rains continue cotton will be badly injur-
ed. Live stock is generally in fine condition, but there is
some disease that is affecting the horses in some parts of
the county. Fruit trees are doing well, and crops are
likely to be short.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-Crops are doing fairly well, though
we are having too much rain, which is injuring the corn,
making it rot. Fruit trees are growing nicely, but the
crops will be short, owing to cold last winter. Live
stock is doing well.
PAsco COUNTY.-All crops. are doing well, seasons are
favorable. Live stock is in much better condition than
usual, on account of the fine pastures. Fruit trees doing
well, but crop will be light.
POLK COUNTY.-The average condition of crops all
through the county is fine; the yields of most crops will
be large. Live stock is doing well and in extra fine condi-








* tion. Fruit promises a good crop, the trees are in good
shape, and growing nicely.
ST. JOHNS COUNTY.-All the crops of this county are in
excellent growing condition, and if these conditions con-
tinue there will be an abundant yield of all crops. Orange
and grape fruit trees are in fine condition and promise a
good crop. Live stock of all sorts is in unusually good
condition.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-Crops of all kinds are looking
well, except cotton, which is being affected by the rains,
a continuance of which for much longer will do much dam-
age. Live stock is in better condition than for a number
of years, owing to the fine pastures, produced by *the
rains.
SUMTER COUNTY.-The standard field crops'are in fine
condition and indicate a full yield, vegetable crops are
over. The fruit trees are doing well, but the crops will
be short owing to last springs cold. All live stock is in
fine condition.
WAKULLA COUNTY.--Cotton is being damaged by too
much rain, which prevents it fruiting well, and also causes
rust. Other field crops are doing well. Live stock is
thriving on the fine pastures made by the rains.
WALTON COUNTY.-Cotton is being injured considera-
'bly by the continued rains, but other field crops are doing
well, and the pasture grasses on the ranges were never
more luxuriant, in consequence of which the great ma-
jority of the live stock is in first class condition. Crop
prospects are fine, except for cotton.








REPORT OF PERCENTAGE OF CONDITION AND
PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS FOR JULY,
1905, AS COMPARED WITH AN AVERAGE.


Up]
Co


COUNTIES






Alachua... ....
Baker ..... ...
Bradford.. ...
revard.... ...
Calhoun.... 90
Clay........ ..
Columbia.. ....
Dade. ...
DeSoto..... ...
Escambia.. 75
Franklin.......
Gadsden.. 60
Hamilton......
Hernando ....
Hillsboro'h .....
Jackson... 95
Jefferson... 96
LaFayette......
Lee...........
Leon....... 72
Levy........
Liberty .... 80
Madison... 75
Marion. ..
Nassau .... ..
Orange ........
Osceola... ...
Pasco..... ..
Polk ..........
Putna ... ...
St. Johns.....
Santa Rosa 86
Bumter..... ....
Suwannee.. ..
Wakul a... 70
Walton ... 85
Washingt'n 80


Sea
and Island
ton Cotton


70



75

50



90

70

75
76







85


75
85
80
....


0





90 80
oo3





50 53
9090

85 60
100 80
100 90
... ...


Corn




o i



85 95
75
90
10C 100
120 100
90 90
100 85
...... .
95 90
100 100
80 90
100 100
60 60
100 125
100 100
100 100
100 100
85 85
109 100
190 100
100 100
95 95
65 65
100 100
100 100
100 110
100 100
98' 100
100 120
100 100
100 110
100 100
100 100
90 90
100 100
90 90
90 85


Gen'l a'v'ge i -
per cent 80 77 86 88 91 96


Sugar
Cane





e ^

u
70 90
100 100
95 95
100 100
90 90
100 100
90 90

70 95
100 100
80 95
60 60

100 70

100 110
100 100
75 75
100 100
100125
75 75
100 100
110 110
80 80
100 100
100 100
100 100
90 95
90 100
100 109
110 11b
100 10(
85 90
100 100
90 90
95 95
85 90


92 92


Rice













10C 100
i. .




1 85

100 100
1 100
80 90
100 100
60 75



9090
100 100

100 100

100 100







.
.... I66
100 100



50 945


Field
Peas


a)





S95

100( 100
125 100
90 90
100 100
100 100
100 100
10( 110
75 100
80 85
100 100
7 75
10( 80
60 60
11C 120
10( 90
9( 95
109 100

10 100
77 75
105 100
80 80
100 100
9u 90
100 100
80 75
100 120
100 100
100 100
90 90
90 90
85 90
75 75

98 90

93 93


-------


.I


i__i I-I







10

CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


VelvetI
Beans


COUNTIES
0.o


ou

Alachua... 90 100
Baker...........
Bradford.. 100 100
Brevard.........
Cathoun..........
Clay.......100 100
Columbia.. 100 100
Dade....... 100 100
DeSoto....... 95 10
Esscambia.. 100 100
Franklin ... .. ...
Gadsden ... 100 100
Hamilton .. 75 75
Hernando.. 100 60
Hillsboro 'h 60 6
Jackson.... ........
Jefferson 100 100
LaFayette.. 90 95
Lee......... 100 100
Leon......... 100 100
Levy........ 100 100
Liberty... .90 90
Madison... 100 60
Marion .... 100 100
Nassau..... 100 100
Orange .... 100 100
Osceola .... 110 120
Pasco........ 75 160
Polk....... 110 120
Putnam..... 100 109
St. Johns... I..
Santa Rosa 100 100
Sumter.... 85 85
Suwannee.. 100 100
Warulla... 100 100
Walton.... 100 100
Washingt'n 1001 95

Gen'l av'ge
ner cent 91 95


Alfalfa





n o
0
'A -4


Sweet

s Peanuts

U .1 a4





70 75 70 80
780
50 50 90 90
100 125 100 100
S75 75 .... .
100 100 100 100
S100 100 90 100
75 70 100 95
100 100 ........
95 110 90 80
1 100 100 100 100
90 10 90 100
125 126 110 110
60 75 75 75
.100 125 100 95
180 100 70 60
S105 120 120 125
100 100 98 90
75 90 75 75
95 10 90 100
85 80 90 80
S 0 30 90 90
. 95 95 95 95
95 9 105 100
90 90 80 80
125 125 .. ....
100 110 .... ....
90 100 ........
5 60 75 40 50
S100 1001 100 110
100 100 100 100
110 110 .... ..
S90 90 100 100
95 75 96 100
S85 90 100 100
100 100 100 109
. 100 100 .. ..I....
. 100 100 9 10


5 911 96 92 983


Cass



0


0
0...







90
75
90
100
-





io












95



90
90
90
eoo
I....
p....





100
90


. .



1002


ava Hay


o 6)






3 100

100 1 00




90 100 110
100 100 75
100 90 10a
1.... 00 100


... 125 1ioo0
... 100 100
. .. . . .


....100 100
95 100 100
S.. 75 72
... 110 110
.... 100 100
.... 100 100
90 109 110
100
90 110 120

0 100 100

... 100 100


.... 100 100
... 8 90
.11 110
.... 1 110


87 91 99


r . . . -- --


Ir-~~uw.aJlr I~- ,







11

CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


Egg
Plants


COUNTIES







Alachua...
Baker .....
Bradford ..
Brevard ...
Calhoun...
Clay .......
Columbia
Dade. .....
DeSoto. ...
Escambia...
Franklin...
Gadsden ...
Hamilton..
Hernando..
Hillsboro'h
Jackson....
Jefferson...
LaFayette..
Lee.......
Leon.......
Levy.......
Liberty....
Madison...
Marion ....
Nassau....
Orange ....
Osceola....
Pasco.....
Polk. .....
Putnam...
St. Johns..
Santa Rosa
Sumter.....
Suwannee..
Wakulla...
Walton. ..
Washingt'n

Gen'l av'ge
pnr cent.


Tobacco IBananas


0


0'0
0)~ ..^
2
fr


a .0




o ..


0
S.





75







80



















60



85
.....0















7'5


.. ..7.9. .7


Pine-
app'es


Guayas


0 -. ti


... .. 0 ..
o ', .

.-__


. i. . .



5050
90 90

. .. .. .. ..



60 80



...... 100
...........I:


75 ...



30 100
80 90



...... -...





100 100


......- ....



50 ....
40 80
50....


100
40









100
ioo














.....
-.. ''


69 76 61_ 92 65


. . .. . .



... . 50
70 90
80 ....

140 ....
50 ....


. . .. ....
...... .60




1i25 ....



...... ....


771 87


92' 70








12


CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.



Orange Lemon Lime Grape orss
Trees Trees e Fruit and
Trees Trees Trees Trees Mules


COUNTIES I

SC a


0 g 0 g P
o .o C


Alachua....
Baker......
Bradford ..
Brevard....
Calhoun....
Clay.......
Columbia..
Dade.......
DeSoto.....
Escambia..
Franklin...
Gadsden...
Hamilton..
Hernando..
Hillsboro'h
Jackson....
Jefferson...
LaFayette..
Lee ........
Leon.......
Levy.......
Liberty ../..
Madison....
Marion ....
Nassau ....
Orange ....
Osceola....
Pasco......
Polk. ......
Putnam ....
St Johns..
Santa Rosa
Sumter ....
Suwannee ..
Wakulla...
WHlton....
Washingt'n

Gen'l av'ge
ber cent.


75


50
100
111

105
90



10
60


50
85





8E
9C
25
9C
9C


75




......

50




50



80


60 75 ... ...... ....
100 110 .. .. .. ....

85 5. 75 5C ....



87 ... ..... 46 91


,......



100
60








80



















78
10...


80



100
100



..60
100
100







,.. io

100



100
75


.90 90
100
... 90
60 80
... 95
... 100
... 100
100 100
50 95
80
... 90
100
75
... 100
60 100
... 120
95
... 75
85 100
... 100
100
.. 90
110
75
100
85 100
90 100
25 95
90 100
25 100
110 100
100
50 100
..: 100
90
95
100


71 96


'


'''






'''
'''







""'








18

CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


Cattle Hogs Sheep Tobacco Honey Wool

COUNTIES

z2 *0 Yield in Yield in Yield in
SG Pounds Pbunds Pounds
0 0 0

Alachua...... 85 80 85 .........................
Baker ........ 10 85 100 .......... ........ 10,000
Bradford..... 1 95................. .......
Brevard ...... 0 .... ... ... ,000 ..
Calhoun...... 75 ...... ......... 157,000 1,845
Clay.......... 11(j 1
Clay.......... 11 ...... 100 ............ ......... ...... .
Columbia.., 10 95 90.......... 2,000 500
Dade......... 1 ......... .......... ......
DeSoto....... 9 95 90 1,000 20,000 3,000
Escambia..... 100 75 80. 2,000 20,000 15.000
Franklin.. ... 90 0 90.......... 175 1,000
Gadsden...... 10( 110 90 5,500,00 6,500 2,000
Hamilton.. 9.. 0 75 75 ........................
Hernando..... 100 100 100 ...... ... .......... 2,500
Hillsboroug. 100 100 90 .......... ...............
Jackson...... 150 100 100 ................. 4,000
Jefferson...... 100 100 ...... ............ .. ........
LaFayette..... 85 90 ..... .......... 5,000 ..........
Lee........... 100 ... ..... .. .. ... 1,000 .........
Leon.......... 100 C 100 150,000 2,000 1,009
Levy .......... 100 7 ............. ..... . ........
Liberty....... 95 C 95 .......... 48,000 8,000
Madison ..... 100 75 100 ......... .... .... ..
Marion ....... 100 10C 80 ........ .......' 5,000
Nassau ....... 100 9 ...... .......... ..
Orange ....... 100 10 100 ............. 2000
Osceola....... 110 10 110 ...... 5,00 20,000
Pasco......... 8 60 75 18,500 450 83,900
Polk.......... 100 9C 85 ............... ..
Putnam..... ... 1 85. ..... .... ..
St. Johns....... 11 110 110......... 201000 2,000
Santa hosa... 10 5 100 .......... 3000 30,000
Sumter......... 100 90 85 1,000 2000 3,000
Suwunnee... 100 80 74 .. ..... .. ....
Wakulla...... 9 100 75 .......... 1000
Walton...... 100 1 10 10 ....... .. 10,000....
Washington.. 100 8 95 .................. 25,000
General av'ge -
per cnt. 100 9C 91 5.672.000 20.000 152.045
















































6




















*~



















PART IL
WEATHER REPORT.


































































































*












U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE
OF IHE
WEATHER BUREAU.

Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
REPORT FOR JUNE, 1905.



SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 4 stations..... 29.96
Departure from the normal, 4 records............ .--0.08
Highest observed, at Jacksonville on the 24th..... .30.16
Lowest observed, at Jacksonville on the 8th ........29.76
Absolute range for the State ................. ... 0.40
TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean, as determined from records of 59 stations.... 80.2
Departure from the normal. 32 records............ -I-0.4
Highest monthly mean, at Key West............. 82.4
Lowest monthly mean, at Fort George............. 76.6
Highest recorded, at Orange City on the 8th....... 101
Loewst recorded, at Middleburg on the 6th ........ 48
Absolute range for the State .................. .. 53
2 Bulletin.









PRECIPITATION.
Inches.
Average, as determined from records of 58 stations. 4.96
Departure from the normal, 31 records........... .--2.18
"Greatest amount for any 24 hours at Fort Meade on
the 19th ......................... .......... 4.75
-'Greatest monthly amount ,at Orange Home. ......14.86
Least monthly amount, at Pensacola... ........ 0.93
Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell.. 9
*. WIND.
Prevailing wind direction.--Northeast and southeast.
WEATHER.
Average number of clear days.......................12
Average number of partly cloudy days.............. 14
Average number of cloudy days ..................... 4












COMPARATIVE DATA FOR STATE. JUNE.


Year Monthly lHio-


T mperature Preipi

e.st rDt.e Ir~nowet ID teMonthly


Average ] .. .. .. Average


1892........ 78.8 100 11* 62 14 9.00
1893. ..... 89.2 104 23 60 9* 8.02
1894......... 78.2 101 30 56 14* 6 39
1895 .......... 79.8 99 22* 57 20 4.46
1896...... 79.8 100 1* 54 3 10.78
1897...... 82.0 102 19 5' 4* 4.96
1898 ........ 80.9 101 16* 54 8 3 08
1899 ....... 80.4 104 16 53 18 5.43
1900 ........ 79.4 100 28 58 2 5 97
1901......... 79.4 103 27 50 2 9.77
1902......... 80.7 103 30 53 3 5.95
1903......... 78.6 99 30* 54 13 6.69
1904 ........ 79.2 102 19 52 13 6.19
1905 ...... 80.2 101 8 48 6 4.96

*Also all other dates.

PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.


Atmospheric Pressure
0





2o.08 4o 16 24 25 776
209o 30.14 24 298
20.95 3008 24 9-83
00 7"




209 30.11 2 2987
2996 30.14 24 2081
20.S 8 2 '.8


WVi,d Velocity in Relative
Miles Humidity



X4 >


8 c.820 80 n s 1 6 sio
8 .o88 26 se 2 3 bo 78
I 5.420 25 e 24 8y2 0 71
18 6162 31 SW 1b 0' 53 73
I 4.837 33 W 20 100 6 74


*B a. m. reading only


STATIONS




Jacksnvil e..
Kly West.....
Jupiter .......
Pensacola.....
Tompa........


I









CLMTLOIA DAAFRJN,10.2


STATIONS.


Northern Section,
Ar bcher...............
Federal Point........
Fernandina..........
Forit Geiirge ........
Gainesvill ..........
Huntington..........
Jacksonville .........
Jasper ................
Johnstown ...........
Lake City ............
Macclenny .... ......
Middleburg .......
Iinemount...........
St Augustine........
'Sumner. : .... ..
Switzerland ..........


COUNTIES.


Alachua ..... 92
Putnam..... 10
Nassau ...... 16
Duval ........ 15
Al chua .....175
PuMtam ..... 6C
Duval........ 48
Hamilton .... 15
Bradford ... 125
olumbia .... 201
Baker...... 141
Clay.......... 2C
Suwannce ... 108
St. Johns... 1C
Levy .. 22
St. Johns...


Temperature, in degrees Farh


)8 8* 60
)8 858
)7 8 65
)226 68
)817 61
) 9 60
)526 66
$6 8 60
)527 55
)7 9 58
) 12 52
)926 48
)0 9 50
)6 8* 60
33 7* 53
)626 h58


Precipitation, in inches

oh

sa 0 s
1 -" ..

o


9.69
3 22
2.32

8.62
4.67
2.72
2.86
3.30
5.84
4.36
8.59
3.86
1.42
5.87
2.02


+2.55
-3 44
-2.46

+1.79
--4 16
--2.73

-3.48
-1.10
--3.65


-3.46
-0.33
-4.13


15 6
12 11
7 15

14 21
8 20
7 .10
9 16
4.
16





9
9 1C


Sky.

a

:6



e e
3 B


0
a






i .
C.




2 se.
2 ne.
Se -se

8 ne.
3e.

4 sw.

6 sw.
22w.
15uw.
. ne.
5 se.
1 sw.


I^ ~`--~--


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JUNE, 1905:


20


20





CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JUNE, 195--Continued. 21
S ky.


STATIONS.


COUNTIES.


Central Section.
Bartow. ............ Polk.........
Broo'sville.......... Hernando..
Clermont............. Lake. ......
De Land ............. Volusia......
Eustis............... Lake.. .. ...
Fort Mead. ........ Polk..........
Fort Pierce .......... Brevard......
Grasmere........... Orange .......
Inverness ........... Citrus.......
Kissimmee ........ Osceola......
Ma'abar............ Brevard .....
Merritt's Island...... Brevard....
New Smyrna ......... Volusia .....
Ocala........... .. Marion ....
Orauge City: ... Volusia......
Orange Home ........ Summer ......


Temperature. in degrees Fahr.


81.2 0.01
80 2+0.21
81.4-0.31

80.6-0.1
81.6+2.7
79.5 0.6
81.2 0.3
79 5-0.1
79.4-0.9
80 8+0 2
80.5+1.0
78.8 -0.5
80.5+1.2
81.3+0.3
79.8 ....


97 16*
98 14*
97 8
921...
98 8
99 2*
9527
96 8
95 8
97 19
10026
9926*
10027
96 8*
931 8
97 18


5912
60 12
6312

5812
5913
6212
6212
6111*
5912
63 7*
69 7*
56 7
5911
55 12
60 [J*


Precipitation,in inches


0-


S
E3
0

o_
*1
no


5.




011
0


2.59 -5.48 0.93
9.83 +087 2.10
5.86 -0.31 2.31

4.49 -188 1.03
9.99 +0 73 4.75
2.62 -7.66 0.93
.. ..... . . .
7.65 ... 2.00
4.46 -2.65 2.25
2.51. ....... 1.28
4.38 -2.58 1.32
5.31 -0.79 3.00
6 19 -2.22 1.23
5.52 -1 61 1.25
14.86 ...... 4.44


Sky.
a '0
ih .1
U 0

a (U-0 (U
.0 .0 Z.
E E 0 E
"* iu
2 5. 5
Zz ^3


a .


8 12 18
11. .
8 10 20

o10 10 20
9 24 6
7 18 2
. 21 6
12 9 26
11 9 18
822 8
9 13 15
6 20 8
13 8 11
10 18 11
14 10 29


(e.
.. ne.
(je.*

9w.
Oe.
10se.
sw.
4 ne.
3e.
e.
2 ne.
2e.
li e.
11w
lwnes
0 ne-se















STATIONS. COUNTIES.





Orlando.............. Orange......
Plant City.......... Hillsbor'gh..
Rockwell............. Marion ......
St. Leo.............. Pasco.. ..
Tampa............ Hillsbor'gh..
Tarpon Springs...... Hillsbor'gh..
Titusville........... Brevard ....
Southern Section.
Avon Park.......... De Soto......
Caxambas.......... Lee..........
Flamimgo ............ Monroe ...
Hypoluxo........... Dade.........
Jupiter............... Dade........
Key West........... Mcnroe
Manatee ........... Manatee.....
M iam i ............... Dade ........
Myers ................ Lee...........
Nocqtee. ............. De Soto....


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JUNE, 1905


-Continued.


---~


82.1-1 (
79.7+0
80 4 1.4
82.4--0.1
80.2 0.(
80 6-0 .7
80.7 +0.
81.0-0 -


94 9
9329
9429
9027
941 3*
94118*
94 15
95 1*


661 7
65 7*
69 12
74 8
59 8
66 7
65 8*
6112


1.23!
2.7.)
2 08
2.40
5.13
7.61
5.78
*3 98


-8 15
-4.41
-1.60
-3.11
-0 53
--.96
i... ..


1.00
0.53
0.93
1.64
1.41
2.00
1.55
. .


Temperature. in degrees Fahr. Precipitation, in inches


0- 0






79.4--0 95 8 52 3 8.38 --.36 3.03 7

79.8 1 9527 602 3( 6.97 -0.141.1 13
-




80.5 94 2 6 2 8 -0 35 3.5 15
^ -^ E -' E1 ^

80.0 0 9727 59 12 34 8.07 +1.85 3.348 1.5 ...11

81.0-0.0- 96 9* 60 6* 36 6 96 ...... 2.05 ....
79.8-1 9527 6( 12 30 6.97 -0.14 1.13 13
80.5+0 f 94 23.i 64 6 26 8 .{& -035 3.50 15
80.2+0.4 95 9* 61 6 36 5.72 -3 48 1.52 11
80.2 1.t 9927 61 7* S1 4.67 -3.28 1 70 14


S0.4+0.7 96 26* 61 12 33 4.48 ...... 3.07 16
81.8-1-0 9624 6912 201 4.49 -5.99 1.75


22

Sky .

bn


E o 2E



n . . .
1 ' *-


I -..



15[

14 13 3w.
8 6 10 ne.


10 20 O ne
19 11 0 nw.
S18 10 2sw.
11 17 2e.
4 24 2e.
1 1011 *e.
12 17 1sw-se.
S 6I 10oe.








9 21 One.
20 10 2e-sw.
6 14 10se.




CLIMATOLOGICAL DVTA FOR JUNE, 1905. 23


STATIONS


Western Section.
Apalachicola ........
Bonifay ..............
Carrabelle ...........
DeFuniak Springs...
Madison ............
Marianna. ...........
Milton...............
Molino .............
Monticello..........
Mount Pleasant......
Pensacola ..........
St. Andrew..........
Stephensvile ........
Tallahassee.. ......
Wausau........t ...
Wewahitchka .......


COUNTIES


Franklin..... ..
Holmes...... 116
Franklin..... 12
Waltou...... 193
Madison...... ..
Jackson .... 85
Santa Rosa.. ..
E.cambia.... 49
Jcfferson.....207
(Gadsden......
Escambia... 5
Washington. 12
Taylor ....... ...
Leon ........93
Washington. 250
Calhoun...... .
State Means..


Temperatnre, in degrees r ahr. Precipitation, in inches Sky a


___ _____. ___ __








79 9 I 2 3 4.0 -.5. 1 .( 0 [ 19 2i s
S 5 4.3 ... 16 1 0se.
'0 49 .4 1 6 ,11 se

E0 =
0.8 o1 O 14 s




4 80.8,+1.6 97 8 6' 2 30 4.32 .......1 30 8 5 12 nw.
10 9+0.4 98 8 6 2 26 1.9 +1.70 0.71 22 6 2 w.
9 79,9+0.3 99 2 60 2* 30 4,04 --1.52 1.00 10 ) 19 2s
1 80.6 97 13 62 5 24 4.36 .5 1.5( 1016 14 se.
9.... ..... .. ... 60 2 4.95 .. 80 6 11 1 5s
2e78 4-0 8 e98 8*e56 2 e37 7.5S .. ....40 *6
1 .... 96 8* 59 6 31 3.76 ....... 17 1 3 17 Osw.
.1 80.8 ..9 6 3 431 1.82 10 17 2 1 s.
20 80.8+1.4 94 8 68 2 I1 0.9: -4.431 0.35 5 1 15 3sw.
80.8+06 9532* 61 2 32 2.2 -4.43 1.45 6 90 7 3w.
6 77+1.2 90 2 54 6 30 475.. 142 91 6 24 'Osw.
20 0+1.2 9413 64 5 21 3.5C -2.8o 1.20 8 17 9 4 w.
81.. ..........601 2 32 4 85. 3.16 4 4 21 2sw.
6 .. ... .
80 J+'0-4 .1 .... . 4.9e -2.1F' ..... 91 121 14 4 ne se.


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from the normal temperature and
precipitation are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station in licate number of days mi-sing from report. *More than one dax.
JWeather bureau. fThermometers are not self registering and readings are made at 7,a. m., 2 p. pi. and .
p. m. daily. Dat, notused in averages.











___



















PART IIL
COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS AND COM/
MERCIAL FEEDING STUFF.


































































































St








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS,

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.


STATE VALUES.
It is not intended by the "State' valuation" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufacturing
commercial fertilizers, at the date of issuing a bulletin,
or the opening of the "season." They may, but seldom do,
vary from the market prices, and are made liberal to meet
any slight advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid, and potash may be determined,
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements, and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which the
various ingredients necessary to use in compounding a fer-
tiliier can be purchasedfor cash in ton lots at Florida sea
ports.
These price lists, in one, five and ten lots, are published
in this report, with the "State values" for 1906 deducted
therefrom.
The valuation for 1905 being the same as for 1904, ex-
cepting in case of ammonia, which has been advanced to
151/2 cents per pound, or to $3.10 per unit of 20 pounds.









STATE VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season o1 1905.
Available Phosphoric Acid 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.10-per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
* With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes'as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid...6.22 per cent x$1.00 %622
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.. 1.50 per cent.x 20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per ccnt.x 3.10- 10.60
Potash.. ........ .. ..7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging.......... ...1.50

Commercial value at sea ports *.... ........... 26.57
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available phosphoric acid. .8 per cent.x$1 00-$ 8.00
Ammonia............ .... 2 per cent.x 3.10- 6.20
Potash .............. .. .. 2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging............... ......... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ...... ... ..... .. 17.00
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one,
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, ', e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid 93 cents per unit
Potash (K20) -99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) $2 79 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.









I
PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA PORTS,
JANUARY, 1905.


Less than 5 to 10


Ammoniates. 5 tons
Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent.
Ammonia .......... ..... $55.00
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent. Ammonia .......... 72.00
Dried Blood 16 per cent. Am-
..monia ................... 55.00


tons.


10 tons
& over.


$54.50 $54.00

71.50 71.00

54.50 54.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20)....
Low Grade Shlphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20)......
Muriate of Potash 50 *per cent.
Potash (K20) ..............
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot-
ash (K20) .................
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash......
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ......


52.00

32.00

46.00

82.00
14.00

17.00


51.00 50.00

31.00 30.00

45.00 44.00

81.00 80.00
13.50 13.00

16.50 16.00


AMMONIA' AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone, 10
cent. Phosphoric Acid...... 37.00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 61
per cent. Ammonia, 8 per
cent. Phosphoric Acid..... 29.00
Owl Brand Tankage, 5 per cent.
Ammonia ................. 20.00
Raw bone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid 31.00
Ground Castor Pomace 6 per
cent. Ammonia,, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid........... 23.00


36.50 36.00


28.50 28.00

19.50 19.00

30.50 30.00


22.50 22.00


x MARKET
ING









Bright Cotton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tations .................. 28.00'
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6 per -
cent. Ammonia, market quo-
tions ................... 22.00


27.50 27.00


21.50 21.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.


Double Super Phos., 45 per
cent. Available Phosphoric
Acid ......... ..........
High Grade Acid Phosphate,
16 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric Acid ..............
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid..
Boneblack 17 per cent. Avail
able Phosphoric Acid....*..
Odorless Phosphate..........


46.00


17.00

15.00

25.00
25.00


45.50 45.00


16.50 16.50

14.50 14.00


24.50
24.50


24.00
24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems,
3 per cent. Ammonia, 9 per
cent. Potash .............
Pulverized Ground Tobacco
Stems ...................
Tobacco Dust, No. 1 ,3 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 K20 Pot-
ash ......................
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1%2 per
cent. Ammonia, 1% per cent.
Potash ............. ...
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..
Land plaster in sacks........


25.00

.16.00


21.00


16.00
16.00-
10.50


24.50

15.50


24.00

15.00


20.50 20.00


15.50
15.50
10.25


15.00
15.00
10.00


The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging, any special or regular formula, is $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.








31

Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia Phphoric Potash
I Acid Potash
Nitrate of Soda ............. I 17 to 19 .....................
Sulphate of Ammonia........ 21 to 24 ...........
Dried Blood........ ........ 12to 17.......... ....... .
Sonoentrated Tankage....... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ........
Bone Tankage.............. 6 to 9 10 to 15............
Dried Fish Scrap............ 8 to 1 6to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal............ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal..... ...... ...... 13 to 1 1 to 2 .....
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.

Avaiable insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... .......... ........... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Pnosphate..... ......... ............ 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.... .......... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone............... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone................ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissoved Bone.............. 2 to4 13 to 15i 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

A Phos- I
Actua Am'nia phoric Lime
Pota h Acid I
M uriate of Potash........... .0 .. .. ......
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 52 ............... ..
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26 to 30 .....................
K ainit .................. 12 to 12 ....... ...........
Sylvinit............. ....... 16 to 20 ........ ...... .
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes...... 15 to 30 ........ 7 to 9 10
Wood A hes, uneached.... 2 to 8 .........1 to 2 30 to 25.
Wood Ashes leached........ 1 to 2 ...... 1 to 13 5 to 40
Tobacco Stems............... 5 to 8 2 to 4 .....
Cow Manure (fresh)....... 0 40 Ot 41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh) ... 0 53 0 to 60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)...... 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.83
Hog Manure (fr sh). ....... 0 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)........... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0 2-1
Mixed Stable Manure.. 0 R3 0 76 0.26 0.70










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0:824
Ammonia into Protein by...................... 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by......... 16.47
Nitrogen into Portein by...................... 6.25
Bone Phosphate into phosphoric acid,multiplied by 6.458
Phosphoric Acid into Bone Phosphate,multiply by 2.184
Murate of Potash into actual pofash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into Murate potash, multiply by.. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85-

For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen in it, multiply 95 per I
cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen isequiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and you
get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.










"The attention of persons sending samples of fer-
tilizers or commercial feeding stuff" fdr analysis is
called to the following:
-0-
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF THE LAWS.
Special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding
stuff sept in by purchasers, under Sec 9 of the laws,
shall bd drawn in the presence of two disinterested
witnesses, from one or more packages, thoughly mixed
and a FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT
OUNCES (ONE-HALF POUND), SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR
BOTTLE, SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT
LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL
BE ACCE TED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to se-
cure fair samples of sufficient size tomake the necessary
determinations, and to allow the preservation of a du-
plicate sample in case of protest or appeal. These du-
plicate samples will be preserved for two months from
date.of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special samples from the purchaser. The propri-
ety of the method of drawing a'd sending the samples
as fixed by the law is obvious.
/ The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or p.iper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very smallquantity (less than o since)
frequently thereare no marks, num bers or other means
of identification. The postmark in some instances being
absent.
I would call the attention of those ,who desire to
avail themselves of this privilege t S3ctions 9 and 10
of the law, which are clear and explicit.
Hereafter strict compliance with above regulations
will be required. The sample must be not less thaw one
half pound, in a can or bottle, sealed and addressed to the
3 Bul










Commissioner of Agriculture, the sender, name and ad-
dress must also be on the package. This rule applying to
special samples of fertilizers or commercial feeding stuff.

INSTRUCTIONS TO MANUFACTURERS AND
DEALERS.

.Each package of Commercial Fertilizer, and each pack-
:age of Commercial Feeding Stuff, (after August 22, 1905,
must have, securely attached thereto, a tag with the guar-
:anteed analysis required by law, and the stamp showing
the payment of the inspector's fee. 'This provision of the
law-Section 3 of both lqws-will be rigidly enforced.
Manufacturers and dealers will be required to properly
tag and stamp each package of Commercial Fertilizer or
Commercial Feeding Stuff under penalty as fixed in Sec-
tion 6, of both laws, tags shall be attached to the top
end of each bag, or head of each barrel.

INSTRUCTIONS TO PURCHASERS.

Purchasers are cautioned to purchase no Conimercbil
Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding .Stuff (after August
22, 1905); that does not bear on each package an analysis
tag with the guarantee required by law, and the stamp
showing the payment of the inspectors fee. Goods not
having the guarantee tag and stamp, are irregular, and
fraudulent: the absence of the guarantee tag and stamp
being evidence that the manufacturer or dealer has not
complied with the law. Without the guarantee tag and
stamp showing what the goods are guaranteed to contain,
the purchaser has no recourse against the manufacturer
or dealer, such goods are sold illegally and fraudulently,
and are generally of little value. Allreputable manufac-
turers and dealers now comply strictly with the law and
regulations by placing the guarantee tag and stamp on
each package.
The interest of the consumer, the farmer, or stockman,
.demands that they purchase no Commercial Fertilizers,
or Commercial Feeding Stuff (after August 22, 1905,,
that does not have securely attached, the guarantee tag.
and inspection stamp.










INSTRUCTIONS TO SHERIFFS.

The attention of the Sheriffs of the various counties
is called to Section 3 of both laws, defining their duties.
This department expects each Sheriff to assist in main-
taining the law and protecting'the citizens of the State
from the imposition of fraudulent, inferior, or deficient
Commercial Fertilizers or Commercial Feeding Stuff.
B. E. McLIN;
Commissioner of Agriculture.

The following tables of average composition of Commer-
cial Feed Stuff is compiled from the report of the Con-
neticut Experimental Station. They cover a large num-
ber of analysis and are fully representative of the stand-
ard composition of the various feeds in the tables. They
are given for reference, should a feed stuff vary material-
ly from these averages, its purity may be questioned. If
the "ash" content exceed to any great extent, sweepings
may be suspected. If the crude fiber be excessive, oat
hulls, corn cobs, or other liguous or fibrous materials may
be suspected. While the valuable constituents, "protein"
"sugar and starch," and "fat," should not materially vary
from these tables of averages, that are practically stand-
ards of comparison, for the feeds mentioned in the tables.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS. 86

R. E. Rose, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Ohemiat.
Analysis of Specid! Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


NAMK1 OR BRAND



Blackshear Cotton Seed Meal..
Special M'xture .......
Cocoanut Leaf Ashes..........
Ste med Bune Meal...........
Acid Phosphate ...............
Tobacco Dust ..............
F ertilizer ...................
F ertilizer.. ...............
FerLilizer No. 1...............
Fertilizer No. 2 (Bone Meal).
Fertilizer No. 3 (Potash Salt)
Fertilizer N o. 4................
Fert lizer...... .......
Fertilizer .......... ....
Fertilizer No. 551.... .........
Fertilizer No. 552.............
Fertilizer No. 553.........


6 55


Phosphoric Acid



~v 4
'-4
*s ^a
.5 :3 -
I I


3.45


13 10

7.52

6 5


1 64


4.75

2.02

1 25


t.50 ...... ..... .. ....
651 .... 6 76 0.33
652 .... ..... ......
653 ...... ... .. .
651 ... 6 61 0.42
65 647 -0.40
6561 ... 7 14 0.40


6.56
5.09 8.14
8 30 ... .
24.67 3.59
17.80 .
.... .* 1.60
9.54 2 24
15.96 3.90
7.83 2 51
2344 4.20

7.09 4.66
21.52 4.50
17 051 2 72
7 03 4 31
6.87 4 15
7 54 4.25


10.18
1.31


1.58
11.35
11.92
9.34

27.64
12 87
0.24
13.66
12 22
12.80
11.82


BY WHOM SENT


Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
(ieo. W. Ruple, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
Wise Perry, Munyon Island, Fla.
Manatee Fert. Co., Palmetto, Fla.
Lockhart Little, South Jacksonville.
E[ A. Carlson, Hollendale, Fla
J. F. Walden, Dover, Fla.
E. B, Rowland, St. Petersburg, Fla.
N. A. Perry, tomona. Fla.
N. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
N. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
N, A Perry, Pomona, Fla.
N. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
Herbert Fleming, Kissimmee. Fla.
J. 0. R. Varn, Lilly, Fla.
J 0 R. Varn, Lilly, Fla.
J. O. R. Varn. Lilly, Fla.


--






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME Oi. BRAND


Fertilizer No. 1 ..............
Pertilizer No. 2 .............. .
Cotton Seed Meal............
Cotton Seed. Meal.............
Cotton Sted Meal... ..........
Cotton Seed Mtal .............
Cotton Seed Meal............
Cotton Seed Meal. ..........
Cotton Seed Mea .............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Cotton Seed Meal............
Cotton Seed Meal.............
Cotton Seed Meal.......... .
Cotton Sepd Meal...... ...
Cotton Seed Meal..............
Fertilizer............ .......
Fertilizer (Potash Salt) .......
Fertilizer............ ....
Fertilizer (Tobacco Dust)......
Cotton Seed Meal. .. ...
Cotton Seed Meal. ..........


Phosphoric Acid








660 s . . . ..
061 .. 3.
66258..... ... 0. . 07.


661 ....... .... .... ...

664 ..... ...... ...... ... :
6635.. ...
666 ..... ........... .....
66 .. ...... ...... .....
668 .... ... ..........
669.
667 ... ...... .. .... ......


670 ...... ...... ...... ... .
671 . ........... ....
672 ...... ..
673 7 1C 6 89 0 44 7.83
674 .... ...2.
675 8.29 388 12.17
76 ...... ...
677 ... .. ........ ... 2.56
679 . ... . . . 2 .13


0



5.68
5.91
7.61
7.57
7.61
7.42
7.12
7 48
7.48
7.45
7 62
7.27
7.48
7.55
7 69
7.49
4.35

4.24
2 82
7.51
6 84


11.26
a






10 22












8.06
46 84
11.77
9.60
1.81
1.42


--------


BY WHOM SENT



F. W. Mathis, Miami, Fla.
F. W. Mathis, Miami, Fla.
Ta lahassee C. O. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C O. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O Co., Talahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. 0. Co., Tallahassee, Fla
Talahassce C. O. Co Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O. Co., Tallahassee Ila.
Ta lahassee C. 0. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O. Co Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O Co, Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C 0. Co., allahas-ee, Fla.
Tallahassee C. O. Co, Tallahassee, Fla.
Tal ahassee C. O. Co., Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee C O. Co, Tallahassee. Fla.
W. A. MacWilliams. St. Augustine, Fla.
J. E. Smith, Lakeland Fla.
R. H. Rouseau, Boyton, Fla.
J. E. Smith, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
H W. Ellis Caryville, Fla.
O B. Gawse, Astatula. Fla.


---~----








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued


NAME OR BRAND



Fertilizer.... ......
Acid Phosphate ..........
Hard Wood Ashes..........
iruano ........ .....
Fertilizer.,. ...... .... .....
Fertilizer. . ..............
Cotton Seed Meal..........
Cotton Seed Meal
Fertilizer...............
Fertilizer .............
Fertilizer...................
Ashes No. 1, Light.........
Ashes No. 2, Dark............
Fertilizer No. 1............
Fertilizer No. 2.... ........
Fertilizer No. 3 ...............
Fertilizer No. 4............
Fertilizer No. 5 ...... ....
Cotton Seed Meal .........
Acid Phosphate........ ...
Bright Cotton Seed Meal......
H. G. Rlood and Bone


a



10.80
13 30

16.00



75
.95
0.60

9.50
6.25
8.55
7.10
9.75


Phosphoric


8 94
14 52

7.53
8.4C
7.21


3.29C

7 7e

6.01
7.54
4.61
5.80
6.51

13.42


0.70
0.52

1 64
1.69
0 20

2.79

0 76

0.67
0.50

0.50


0.42'


Acid "

BY WHOM SENT
0 0 .
a


9.64 2.03 1.52J. D. Clark, Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
15 04 .......... J. D Clark, Mt. Pleasant. Fla.
0 98 R M. Brumby. Dunedin, Fla.
9.17 9.30 1 66 R. M. Brumby. )unedin. Fla.
10.09 2 78 7.20Louis R. Chazelle. Ocala, Fla.
7 41 3.4 8 50 Louis R. Chazelle. Ocala, Fla.
4.16 ... J. Van Peet, Pensaco a, Fla.
.... 8.56 ...... Union-own C. O. Co.. Uniontown, Ala.
6 08 4.03 6.03 F L. Tenbroke, De ray. Fla.
12 10 2 65 24 60 Schroeder & Auguinbau, Quincy, Fla.
8.52 2.50 3.06H. A. Perry, Pomona, t la
2.61 C W. Spring stead, St. Petersburg, Fla.
2.26 C(. W. Springstead, St. Petersburg, Fla.
6.68 3.94 6.85N. A Faulkner, Arcadia Fla.
8.04 4.00 13.00 N. A. Faulkner, Arcadia, Fla.
4.61 4.4 13.67 N. A Faulkner Arcadia. F a.
6.30 4.82 11.48 N. A. Faulkner, Arcadia, Fla.
6.51 5.53 6.88 N. A. Faulkner Arcadia, Fla.
8.50 ......W H. Towles, Ft Myers, Fla.
13.84 ..... .. . G. Johnaon, Tallahassee, Fla.
7.32 .....oardman Ltimher Co Ro man, Fla.
4.89 9.73 ..J '. Almstead, West Paln Beach, Fla.






SBURE'AU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 6


NAME OR BRAND.



Special Mixture .............
Fertilizer ........ .....
Fertilizer .. ..
Disolved Bone and Potash ..
Fertilizer No. 1........
Fertilizer No. 2..............
Fertilizer No. 3..............
Fertil zer No. 4 ........ ...
Cotton S ed Meal No. 1......
Cotton Seed \leal No. 2......
Cotton beed Meal No. 3......
C tt n Seed Meal o. 1......
Cott n Seed Meal No. 2 ... ..
cottonn Seed Meal No. 3 .....
Cotton Seed % eal No. 4......
Cotton Seed \Veal .. ..
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1.....
Cotton Seed Meal No 2......
Fertilizer (Potash Salt)......
Fertilizer (Bone).............
Marianna Home Mixtnre.....
W G.Acid Phosphate & Potash


Pho


o c -



70 1 ...... ...
702 ...... 6.6
703 ..... 7.7(
704 .. 10.4:
705 ... 12.8(
706 .... 12.9
707 ...... 14.6
708 ...... 13.37
709 ...... .....
710 ...... ..
711 .. ... ...
712..3 . .
714 .....
715 ......
716 ..... .....
717 ...... ... .
718 .
719.... ..
720 ..... ...
721...... 6.93
722 .. 10.14


sphoric Acia

5 9 BY WHOM SENT.

= .


1734 3.7( 9.28 J. F. A instead, West Palm Beach, Fla.
S1.18 7.78 2.4 9.88 Geo. M arshll, Pomona, Fla
0 1.97 9.67 3.1P 11.91 Geo. W. Blackburn, Sarasota, Fla.
2 4.45 1487 2.44 6 33 J. E. Crow, St. Petersburg, Fla.
0 1.29 14.09 2.8: 4.77 Mrs. W. R. Coo ey, Dania, Fla.
4 0.78 13.72 4.0o 4 44'Mr .. W. B. Cooley. Dania, Fla.
7 3.00 17.7 2.5 4 28 Mrs. W. B. Cooley Dania. Fla.
0 83 14.0 2.61 4.84 Mrs W. B. C oley, )ania, Fla.
....86 ..... Campbell & Butler, Chipley, Fla.
.... 8.94 ...... Campbell & Butler, Chipley, Fla.
..... ..... (ampbell & But er, Chipley, Fla.
..4C ..... florida Tobacco Co Quincy, Fla.
S7.46 ...... orida Tobacco Co Quiney. Fla.
7. 99 ...... Florida Tobacco Co Quincy, F'a.
8. .19..... lorida Tobacco I o., Quincy. Fla.
... 7.2 ...... Stringfellow Bros., Jaoksonville, Fla.
... 339 8.54 1 7 A Chaffin & Co Mi ton, Fla.
.. 2.62 7.73 1 74 J. A. Chaftin & Co., Mi ton, Fla.
28.08 N. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.
21.87 4.30.... N A Perry, Pomona, F a.
0.46 7.39 2.88 3.Marianna Manufac'ng Co., M4arianna Fla.
0.78 10.92 .... 4.091Marianna Manufac'ng Co., Mariadna. F a.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 40

Phosphori Acid -

NAME OR BRAND BY WHOM SENT
40 0
01 < 1 - -


Fertilizer No. 1, Coarse......
Fertilizer No. 2, Fine ....
Fertilizer ..................
Fertilizer No. 1 ............
Fertilizer No. 2 .............
Fla Tobacco Co'sFormula....
Fertilizer ................. .
Fertilizer .......... ......
Fertilizer .....................
Fertiliz r .. .... .. .. .......
Dissolved Bone...............
Blood and Bone.............
Fertilizer ......................
Fertilizer .............. ..
Fertilizer ......................
Fertilizer .. ....... ..........
Phosphate.................
Guano... ...............
Cotton Seed Meal..............
Hickory Ashes ................
Guano... ....... .......
Fertilizer No 9..............


6.00


7.40
9.20


. . .


7.25
11.55



5.34
4.37
4.45
6.5M
9.81

9.91.
3.44
6.22
11.48
9.05


2.32
2.23



0.71
.18
2.43
0.67
3.52


2.66
1.94
3.45
0.98
0.76


:... .. "8.28 1.21
.... 5.85 1.87


9.5" 3.04 8.83
19.78 1.95 6.12
15.20 3.03 17.98
14.8h 2.80 17.80
12.15 3.15 14.37
18.34 2.79 14.77
6.47 5.05 12.15
6.55 4.15 5.34
6.88 4.17 5.48
7.25 3.98 5.07
13.33 1.51 .....
16.21 6.45 ......
6.28 5.50 5.51
12.65 1.83 1.91
5.38 2.30 7.14
9.67 3.80 8.90
12.46 ..... 1.43
9.81 2.24 1.92
7.56 .....
1.98
10.0O 0.24 2.10
7.7: 4.08 1.86


A. B. Harrington, Winter Haven, Fla.
A. B. Harrington, Winter Have ', Fla.
Fla. Toba' co Co., Havana, Fla.
J. D Scott, Quincy, Fla.
J. D. Scott. Quincy, Fla.
E B. Shelfer Co., Quincy, Fla.
F. E Waldrop Wauchula, Fla.
G. H. Haymans, Wauchula, Fla.
A. W. Carlton, Wauchula, Fla.
E S. Bostic, Wauchula, Fla.
L. B. Woods, Gainsvile, Fla.
L. B. Woods, GainsvR e. Fla
John L. McFarlin, Quincy Fla.
J J. Payne. Bonifay, Fla.
J-. T. Evans, Youmans, Fla.
Ed. L. Hudnnl, Wauchula, Fia.
B. F. Glass G ass, fla.
B. F. Glass, Glass, Fla.
fH. S. Cummings, Rodman, F a.
J. A Hanson, Leesburg, Fla.
C. E. Byrd, Graceville Fla.
D. G Harvard. Arredondo. Fla.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 41


NAME OR BRAND



Fertilizer ........ .. ........
Special Mixture No. 9.......
Spec at Mlixtare No. 21. .....
Special Mixture No. 23 ......
Fertilizer ...
Fertili er..............:.....
Fertilizer ....... .... .
Fertilizer ..... .......
Fertilizer
H. G. Blood and Bone ....
Fertilizer No. 1........... .
Serti izer No 2
Sulphate of Ammonia..........
Bright Cotton Seed Meal.....
Custo, Pomace ..............
Blood and-Bone .. .........


10.80
605
4.80
5.35
7.70
10.80
14.60
8.05
9.30


Phosphoric Acid

.-e- -- --

C 0
E-1

5.73 1.60 7.33
5.04 0.25 5.29
4.89 2.03 6.92
5.90 ...... 5.9C
8.43 1.11 9.54
7.59 1.14 8.73
5.76 2.57 8.33
5.17 2.28 7.4E
5.36 0.64 6.0(
.... ...... 8.09
...... ...... 10 .12
... .. .. .. 20.26

...... ... ......2

..... ...... 9.2C


0
.M




4 99 5.51
5.75 6.02
2.89 10.88
5 44 16608
3.15 3.61
4.92 6.19
3.16 4.60
2.06 15.05
4.90 2.05
9.90 ......
9.48 5.68
3.18 3.60
25.60 ..
7.86 .....
5.81 ......
9.21 .....


TO WHOM SFNT


H. J. Thomas, (No address.)
W. D. Griffin, Komoka, Fla.
W. D. Grittin, Komoka, Fla.
W. D. Griffin, Komoka, Fla.
Owen & Watkins, Knights, Fla.
C. t. Philips, Fulford, Fla.
F. R. Coker, Ona, Fla.
Geo. A. Spross, Winter Haven, Fla.
W. R. Varn. Lily, Fla.
J. G. May, Ft. Pierce, Fla.
J. W. Sample, Bartow, Fla.
J. W. Samp'e Bartow, Fla.
Sanders Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville Fla.
Sanders Fertilizer "o., Jacksonville, Fla.
Sanders Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
wanders Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Contlnued. 42

Phosphoric Acid
-
NAME OR BRAND BY WHOM SENT

S ci 0 20
Raw Ground Bone........... 76 I ..... 21.41 4.78 ..... dels' Fertilizer Co., .Jacksuville, Fla.
Standard t'ukes, Special.... .. 762 10.10 5.83 365 9.68 4.49 7.24 SaHndeir' Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville,, Fla.
Standard Tomato, Special... 76 9.30 5.77 2.87 8 64 3.90 9.4 ('. W, Stalls, Gminesvillp. Fla.
Fertilizers........ .. ........ I 10.42 0.00 10 42 2 80 11.81 David'H. BHrrick, Braidento 'n, Fla.
Soft Phosphate (?)............ 765 ...... I.. .. .. Tra .. ...... H. C. Push, Huf ,on, Fla.
Fertilizer............ ...... 766 10.90 9.03 1.90 10.93 2.44 1.9f U. H. Gilbert, Monticello, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1 ........... 767 ...... 7.35 035 8.70 3 2 10.4( J. E. Rawlinso.n. Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 2.................. 76 ....1 7.67 0 33 8.00 3. 10.41 J. E. R.wliisoi. Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 3.............. 769..... 5.7 0 90 6.60 4.7E 6.7: J. Rawlinson, Lilly, Fla.
Fertilizer ....... .. ........ 77 6.00 5.2 2 67 7.99 .78 7.C( G. E. Pirdyv,Bualnill, Fla.
H. G. Blood and Bone......... 771 .... .. .. ...... 4.0 10.8( .... Florida Fert. .lanu ac. Co, Gainesville, Fla.
Nitrate of Soda.............. 18 54 .- Florida Ftrt Ma-nfac. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Liquid Plant Food...... ..... 77: ............ .. 94 1 44 (Griffingi Bro., Jacksonvil e. Fla.
Fertilizer...... ................. 774 9.00 4.66 2.43 7.09 2.54 6 95 E. .-..Vinuig, B.Ehnell, Fia,
Fertilizer (A)........... .. 775 8 75 5.63 2.80 8 4 2.8 5.42 K. Vin ng, Kushliell, Fla.
Ground Bone ............. .. ... 22 08 4.5 .. J. E Crow, Laryo, Fla.
Raw Bone and Potash........ 77; .... 6.84 3.95 10.79 1.97 13.71 J. E. Crow. Laigo, Fla.
Bone and Potash........... 77 .... 780 2 47 10.27 1 50 9.66 J. E. ('ow, Lig >, Fli.
Fertilizer.... ................ 779 10.60 7.02 1 67 10.60 4.10 4.57 Ch;,s Merce(r, Ona. Fla.
Fertilizer ............ ...... 780 8. 6.26 0.00 6.26 3.19 14.2 hs. M rer, Oa, Fla.
H. G. Blood, Bone and Potash. 781 ....... 6.2 7.86 10.63 y. Fort Pierce, Fla
Dried Blood .............. 782 ...... ........ 16.89 .. J. W. W'k-, Punta Gorrla. Fla








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OB RRAND


Pure Ground Bo i ...........
Fer iiizer........... ...........
Fertilizer ...................-.
Special Mixture ..............
Export Super Phosphate ..
Fertilizer ........... .........
Fertilizer ....... .............
Fertilizer No. 1 ..... ......
Fertilizer No. 2 ...........
Fertiliz r .... .. ...... ......
Ferti izer .......... .... .....
Fertilizer ..... ...............
Fertilizer ...... .. .........
Fertilizer .... .... .........
Fertilizer .. . .. ..
H G. Blood and Bone ......
Special Mixture .............
Fer ilizer ...... ..


14.10


i2. 10
9 60
10 00
9.80


10.15
9.90
10.401
7 35
12 00


Phosphoric Acid


CS:

2 S g
4 E-4
.. 22 30
1004 0 25 10.29
7.33 2.720 05
10 16 0.25 10 41
18 63 0 61 19 24
5 84 0 65 6.49
15.51 5.21 20.72
8 09 0 87 6.96
7 24 1..78 9 02
6 10 0 8( 6.99
4.58 1 8. 6 4(
5 78 0.5F 6.36
8 36 2 6C 5.96
6.88 1 67 8 55
6.93 1.60 8.53
..... 8 2
.. 882
6 84 0.39 723
6 84 0(.39 723


0
a -

3.92
2 70
2.10
2.38

3.95
9 15
3.26
3 69
4 92
3 88
3 88
6.56
3.'24
3.33
9.54
6.69
4.52


BY WHOM SENT


0


3.65
1 89
2.09

14.02
13 94
5.69
12 04
5 17
5.68
13.67
6.59
5.75
5 74

11.75
6 95


43


------- ------ - ------- ---- ---~


i. kV. Wt.. s. Pimta (fwd L. Fia.
a'alLr r H ImI, Jr.. CoIIcordl, Fia.
Walt.r \V I-h. .Jr.. Ctme H, Fla
Walt r \V;1.i41. Jr., CG mIcurd. FIa.
Goulitinvr Prt. C,-.. ,-.nstcola. Fin.
J. W. Wbiieburst, Sutlierland. Fla.
Walt-r (Uifr, I riscent Ci y, Fla.
G. E. Prd' B-islihnell. Fli.
G. E. Pizadv, u-iIm It. FlI.
W. E. WIlol', A8cadi i. FIa.
J. M. Farr. tl Hauhu'a. Fia.

D Hemry Ehilick, For, Pierce, F'la.
.1. W. Sli, pird. Wpbgt,-r, F n.
R. K. Aiddlu-t r, WeI'ster.,Fli.
J. G. aN, Fort F- Pierc.. Fin.
J. G. May. F'orr Pierce, V1I-.
I, F. Peters. Wauch'la. Fin1


- ,






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 44
For values see heading Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of Special Samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample' sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric.acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (I pound), is required for a "Special Sample.'
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal---though the guarantee is but 4. per cent. of
ammonia--:it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of
prime meal.







)EI'ARTMEINT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTi7Y.
R.,,E. HUiSE, Sr'..'1E (C'EMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1904, MARION G. DONK, ASSISTANT ( EMIST.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1. Act approved May 22 1901.


9
z
o
a
3


f.
rt
c,


NAME u1{ BK AN 1






Dark (Cottuo i ed Meal.

Bradley's Fruit and Vine
F ert ....... ...........


Farmer's Favorite Fert.


Baker's Veg. Manure...

Williams & Clark's Nur-
Ssery Stock..........


444 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

445 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

446 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

447 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

448 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


13 00
9.C5

13.00
2.25

13 00
6.90

13.00
8.30


PHOI-PHORIC ACID





a P-
^ S |


5 50
6.35

8.00
7.44

4.50
5.55

8.00
8 25


7.75


'10.52


8.49


9.59


BY WHOM AND WHERE

MANUFACTURED


...... Florida C O. Co, Jack-
...... sonville.

10.00 American Agr'l Chem. Co.,
9 41 New York.

1.00 American Agr'l Chem. Co.,
1.63 New York.

10.00 American Agr'l Chen Co.,
9.42 New York.

3.00 American Agr' Chem Co.,
4.30 New York.


- ----


-- -------


0d
a







ANALYSIS OF FERTIL1ZERS-Continued. 46


Baker's Fruit and Vine
Manure...............

Williams & Clark's Stan-
dard .................

Williams & Clark's Veg-
etable .................

Williamq & Clark's Spe-
cial Fruit and Vine....


Special Bone and Potash

Williams & Clark's Or-
ange Tree............


Strawberry Fertilizer...


H. G. Blood and Bon-..


Blood, Bone and Potash.


Fruit and Vine Fertilizer


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


13.00 6.00
8.75 6.78

13.00 6.0
8.95 6.99

13.00 6.00
8.0C 6.54

13 00 5.50
7.90 6.00

13.00 12.00
8.35 12 99(

13 00 6.00.
8 40 6.40

8.06 6.00
12.80 7.01;

5.00 5.00;
5 90 4.38'

8 (10 6.00,
13 90 6 031

8.00 6 00
6.551 6.901


1.00
1.12

1.00
1.58

1.00
2.36

1 00
0.84

100
1.78

1 001
1.64

2.00
1.75

1.0C
2 83

3.00
3 29

1.00'!
2.171


..... 2.00
7.90 2 36

.... 3.00
8.57 3.40

..... 4.00
8.90 3.73

4 50
6.84 4.56


13.77 ...:

350
8.04 3.75

... .50
8.76 2.58

..0. I0.00
7..11 10.20

. 4.00
9 4.25

. 2.CO
9 .07 2.15


10.00 American Agr'l Chem Co,
10.16 Ncw York.

6.00 American Agr'l Ci.em. Co..
6.01 New Yor!..

5.00 American Agr'lChem. Co.,
5.09 New York.

10.00 American Agr'l Chem. Co.,
10.70 New York.

12.00 American Agr'l Chem. Co ,
11.13 New York.

5.00 Arneric n Agr'l Chem. Co.,
5.60 New York.

8.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
7.76 Tampa, Fla.

...... Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
...... Tampa, Fla

4.00 Tampa Fertilizer C6.,
4.68 Tampa, Fla.

12 00 Tampa 1crtilizer Co,
12.74 Tampa, Fla






ANALYSIS OF FERlTILIZE RS-Continued. 4


Orange Tree Special...

Pineapp'e Manure.......

Florida Fruit Grower's
Formula ..............


Georgia State Standard.

Tropical Vegetable......

Strawberry Special....

Southern States Special.

Tip Top Tomato .......

Lettuce and Cuke Special

No. 1 Peruvian and Fish
Mixture...... .....


459 Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00
Official Analysis.... 4.50

4 60 Guarant'd Analysis. 8.0
Official Analysis.... 6.70
461 Guarant'd Analysis. ..
Official Analysis.... 3 35
462 Guarant'd Analysis. .....
Official Analysis... 13.15
463 Guarant'd Analysis. ....
Official Analysis.... 11 15

464 Guarant'd Analysis. ...
Official Analysis.... 14 70
465 Guarant'd Analysis....
Official Analysis.... 3 70
466 Guarant'd Analysis. .
Official Analysis.... 9.80
467 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00
Official Analysis.... 9
468 Guarant'd Analysis. 12.00
Official Analysis.... 9.55


6 00 1.00 ....
6.86 2.16 0.02

5.32 1 96 7.28

7.00 .. ..
7.81 0 68 8.471

8.00 ....
8.46 1.47 9 93

8 00 .. ......
8.88 0.50 9.301

6.00 . . .
7.4 0.50 7.94

6 00 I .... .
5.90 0.75 6.6

7.00 .. .
7.78 0.75 8.53

5 00 .. .. ..
6.3C 0.92 7 22

5 o0 1.00
6 61 1.22 7.83


2.00 16 (O Tampa Ferti'izer Co.,
2.60 16.28 Tampa, F a.

6 00 4.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
4.84 8.79 Tampa, Fla.

3 50 4.00 Va.-Oar. Chem. Co., Sa-
5.60 5.97 vannah, Ga.

2.00 2 00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
2.12 2.12 vannah, Ga.

3.00 3.00 Va -Car. (hen Co. Sa-
2.74 4.06 vannah, Ga.

3 00 5 00 Va -Car. Chem Co., Sa-
3.13 5.98 vannah, Ga.

4.00 5.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co, Sa-
4.52 6.59 vannah, Ga.

4.00 5.00Va.-Car Chem. Co., Sa-
3.48 4.41 vannah, Ga.

7.00' 4 00 Florida I'ert Co., Gaines-
3.33 4.00 ville, Fla.

4.50, 5.00 Florida Fert. ( o., Gaines-
4..341 4.49 ville. Fla.






ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 48


No I Peruviiin and Eish
Guauo, doable strength
of Potash.............

Blood, Bone and Potash

No 2 Orange Tree Mix-
tu e. double strength
of Potash ...........

'Lettuce Special ........

Early Trucker ......

Vegetable Fertilizer.....

Fish and Potash ....

Cabbage Fertilizer......

Cotton Seed Meal.......

Day Break Fertilizer....


469 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

470 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

471 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

472 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

473 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

474 Guarant'd Analysis.
SOfficial Analysis....

475 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

.476 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

477 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
478 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...


12.00
' 765

12.00
10.00

10.00
8.90

9.00
5.50

7.00
6.50

8 00
6.50

10.00
10.90

8.00
7.45




11.88


5.00 1.00
6.41 1.64

4.00 2.00
6.72 1.77

5.00 1.00
6.79 1.22

5.00 2.00
5.05 4.74

5.00 3.00
5.73 5.65

5.00 0.00
5.80 5.21

3.00 1.50
4.31 1.87

5.5C 2.50
5.63 5.54



8.00 ..
8.38 1.46


8.05

8.50


8.01

9.79

11.38

11.01

6.24

11.17


9.84


4 50 10.00 Florida Fert. Co., Gaines-
3.90 9.40 ville, Fla.

4.00 4.00 Florida Fert. Co, Gaines-
3.96. 6.42 vil e. Fla.


1.50 10.00 Florida Fert. Co., Gaines-
2.17 9.66 ville, Fla.

6.00 6.00 Florida Fert Co., Gaines-
5.00 6.76 ville, Fla.

5.00 5.00Standard Fertilizer Co.
4.09 5.24 Gainesville, Fla.

4.50 6.00 Standard Fertilizer Co
4.23 6.00 (ainesvil e, Fla.

7.00 6 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
7.96 5.71 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00 6.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.
4.46 6.47 Gainesville, Fla.

8.00...... Standard Fertilizer Co.,
8.01 ...... Gainesvil'c, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Federal Chem. Co., Nash-
1.86 1.74 ville, Tenn.







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Goulding'., Bone Com-
ipoun . ......

Gou dingo 4 per cent.i
Potash Acid Phosphate

Mlapt's Pineappe !'ertil-
1i er . ...

Mape's Orange Triee Per-
tilizer ............ .

Mape's Voge'iabe Ma-
nure . ....

'Yape's Fruit and \ine
Manure ...... .....


P tato Speci, ......


Simon Pure No. 2.......

Gen Orange-Tree.......


Simon Pure Tomato.....


4 Bu etia


479 Guarant'd Analysis. .
Official Analysis....

480 Guarant'd Analysis .
Official Analysis....

481 Guaraut'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
482 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

483 Guaraut'd Analysis
Official Analysis....

484 1uarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis....

485 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

486 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
487 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

4:48 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


13.75


13 80

10.00
12.80

12.00
11.20

12.00
10.20

10. Ou
11 45

10.00
6.95

8.00
9.00

8.00
7.75

12.00
9.15


8.00
9.44

8.00
7.73

4.00
4.66

6.00
6.82

6.00
7.06

5.00
5r70

7.00
5.32

6.00
7.48

5.00
5.21

4.00
5.791


2.42 11.86


2.16 9.89

2.00 .. ..
3.30 7.96

2.00 : ....
1.96 8.78

2.00....
2.03 9.09

2 00...
1.75 7.45

2.00 .....
0.60 5.92

2 00......
0.92 8.40

3.00 ......
1.68 6.89

8.00.
1.26 7


2.00 2.00 Goulding Fert. Co., Pensa-
2.31 2.32 cola, Fla.

..... 4.00 Goulding Fert. Co., Tensa-.
..... 4.06 cola, Fla.

5.00 5.COMape's F. & P. Guaro Co.,
4.52 4.61 New York

4.00 3.00 Mape's F. & P. Guano Co.,
4.89 5.33 New York.

5.00 4.00Mape's F. & P. Guano Co.,
4.67 5.40 New York.

2.00 10.00 Mape's F. & P. Guano Co.,
2.47 11.49 New York.

3.00 10.00E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
5.24 12.18 Jacksonvil:e, -la.

4.00 6.00E. 0. Painter Feit. Co.,
4.71 7.52 Jacksonvil e, Bla.

4 00 6 00E 0. Painter Fert Co.,
5.81 8.28 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 9.00E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
6.30 8.89, acksonville, Fla.


~---~--~


49









Gem Pineapple ........


Simon Pure Garden.....


eGem Fruit and Vine....

Gem Potato Manure...


Simon Pure No. 1.......


Gem Vegetable Manure.


H. G. Blood and Bona..


Ideal Lettuce Fertilizer.


Special Fulit and Vine..


Ideal Potato Manure....


ANALYSIS OF FERTIL1ZERS-Continued 5)
P _______~-~ - -


489 IGuarant'd Analysis.


.490


491


492


493


494


495


496


-497


498


Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis..
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

itlarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis....


10.0(
7.5(

12.0(
7 61

8.0(
8.11

10.0(
6.65

8.00
7.95

8.00
6.40



10.0C
9 9

12.00
8.60

8.00
9.55


1.5 ?

5.0(
5.47

6 0o
6.34

4.0(
4.8

6 0
6 1C

5.0C
4.87



6.00
i6.98

6.00
-.56

6.00
6.85


0(.62

2.0C
1.24

1.00
1.27

1.00
1 04

1.0'
0.40

3.00
1.92




0.62


0.2.5 6.8!

1.00
0 7 7 60


9?.5f(
2 It


6 71


7.6


5.9:


6.50


6.8'-


5 2i


7.6Ci


I I I


5 0
5 5(

5.0O
5.47

2.5(
2.65


3.515

4.1 (
4.4(

4.0(
5.71

10.0(
10.3

6.0(
6.9;

3 U(
3.8!

4.0(
3.71


6.00 E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
6.79 Jacksonvii e. Fla.

6.00E: O Painter Fert. Co..
7.41 Jacksonv 1 e, Fla.

10.0( E. O. Patater Fertilizer
11.71 Co., Jacksonville.

Sr.Ot E. 0. Patnter Fnrtlizer
12.6 Co., Jacksonville.

1.0 E. O. Painter Fertillzei
12.91 Co., Jacksonville.

6.0( E. O. Painter Fertilizer
7.87 Co., Jacksonville.

..... E. O. Painter Fertilizer
... Co., Jacksonville.

6.00Wil]snu & Toomer Fert.
5. 3 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

13.00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
13.32 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

8.n0Willsn- & Tnonicr Fert.
975t Co., Jacksonvi le, Fla,


- ~--- -- ----





ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS Continued. bl


Ideal Bluod, buuu and
Potash.............. 499

Ideal Fruit and Vine.... 500

Florida Bean Special... 501

Ideal Vegetable Manure. 502

Florida Special Pine-
apple................... 503

Ideal Fcrtlizer......... .04

"Speci I Mixture No. I .. 505

Cotton Seed Me d ....... 506
Mape's Orange Tree Ma-
nure ........... ...... 507
Mape's Fruit and Vine
Manure................ 508


Suarant'd Analysis.
Offlclal Lnalysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

O arant'd Analysis.
Official Analysia ...
Giuarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Offical Analysis....

G'arant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...
Glarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
nblarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


8.00
6.98
10.00
8.40

10.00
11.18
8.00
9. (i5
6.00
4.70

8.00
9.15
8.00
8.5 i




11.10

9.85


4.00 2.00
4.09 1.62

6.00 ......
7.-0 o0.0

6 00 1.CO
5.73 11.92
6-.00 1.00
6.75 0.75
4.00 4.00
5.00 3.78
5.00 1.00
6.83 0.50


6 61

7 70

6 65

7.50


8.781


o.U0 1. 01 O..UU
6.84 0.50 7.34 5.93
. 7.50
. .... .. 7 .83

6.00 3.00... 4.00
6.85 2.76 9.91 3 53
5.00 2 00..... 2.0
5 56 1.8 7.42 2.42
I 357


6.00Willson & To mer Fert.
7.47 Co., Jacksonville, Hla.
10.00iWillson & Toomer F rt.
10.35 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
6.00 Willson & Toomer Fert
6.32 Co., :1acksonvi'le, Pla.
8 00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
9.80 Co., Ja-ksonville, Fla.
7.00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
7:59 Co., Jacksonville Fla.

6.00 Willson & Toomer Pert.
8.14 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
5.001 Willson & Toomer Fert.
4 61 Co., .Ja ksonville, Fla.
..... Cuthbe't Oil po. Cuth-
bert. Ga.

3 00 ape's F. & P. Guano
3.5 *, o New Yerk.
10.00 ,Mape'3 F & P. Guano
10.67 Co, mewYork.
10.67lto' P un


ANALTSIS OF FERTILIZERS Continued. t)l









ANLSSO ETiIZR-o'nw.5


Id- al V. getable Manure


Florida Bean Sppcial ..


Speci l Mixture No. 1..


Strawb rry Spei al.

PrerlessPi e A- 'l Pro-
d ic r..... ..........


Friut and Vine .........


F,.1ida Fluit Growes
F ,rulula ..............


T', T'opl Tolbt .......

Chamnpion Ci us CU M
p un .t ...... ..

O'd -D.mimllon Po t,.
M ,.u e..


59 Official Analysis....
Suarantd' Analysis.
5:0 Official Analysis...-.
Guarant'd Analysis.

511 Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.

512 Official Analysis...
Guarant'd Analysis.

513 Offlcial Analyss....
Guarant'd Analysis.
514 'If-'ipI Analysis...'
Guarant'd Analysis.

515 Official Analysis...
Guarant'd Analysis
516 Official Analysis...
Guarant'd Analysis.

517 Official Analysis. ..
Guarant'd Analysis.
518 Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.


8.00
12.50

10.00
9.05

8.00
8.20


10.20


8.85

8.00
9.05

8.00
6.35

8.00
10.85

8.00
6.18

8.00
14 10


6.00

6.55

6 00
6.27

6 C .
6.88

5.00
5.52

600
6.79

700
7.85

7.00
8.28

6 00
6.35

7.00
7.48


A NILYSIiS OF FERTI-LIZERS-Continuvill.


52


1 .00 .... .


1.00 ..
0.50 7.15

1.00 ...
0.50 6.77


0.60 6.88


0.25 5.72

1.00 .
0.2.5 7.04

1.00 ......
0.75 8.60

1 00 .
0.25 8 40

1.00 .. .
0.50 6 85

1 00 ......
0.75 8.18


4. 0
4.18

3. (o

5.00
4. i7

8.50
3 50

5.00
4.88

2.50
2 .-4

3 FC
3.66

4 00
3.82

3 00
3 64

5.00
4.99


8.00 Wl.sr1 & Tjo, >mr Fer.
-.( ( C ., Jacl s mvdile, Fla.

6.0 Wi'lson & T or-r FYr'.
7.; Co.,'Jacks nvill., Fla.

5 00 Wi'lsoi & T.oomer Fert.
5.17 C J cinmvill., Fla,

8.(C Wllson & To-.mer Fert-
4.0: Co., Jack-oivill>, Fla.

6 00 Va-Car Chem C0., S vr:nah,
6.0O Ga.

10.00 Va Car Chem. C >., Savanai
8.41 G

4.0C0 Va Cr. Ch m CJ., Suvan-
3.81 io Ga

50 CVa C r. Chm Co.,Sitvan-
4 83 ai, (}t.

14 OC V;. Cqr. C(um C ., Savwn-
1.12 .ah, Ga

8 Of V -C .r Ch.m. *'o., S.van-
7;.2 ai. Ga.






ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continu-d. I 5


Map's V-g.table. Ma-
Ill ure .............. I ..

Manis Pin Apple MAa-
nure ....... . ...

Map"R Orange Tree M -
liiir .... ....... ......

Map-s F iit inl Vin-.


hto d, I mII .nl P tNshl


Simon Puro. Tooairt,'....


Cotton SPI d Mfal.......


Nit.- te o Sod ........


Cott in S> ed Meal.......


Official Analysis.... 12.0 C
Guarant'd Analysis. 11.8
Official Analysis... ......
Guarant'd Analysis. 17.55
Guarant'd Analysis. 12 .0
Guarant'd Analysis. 14.85

Guarant'd Analysis 1l OC
Official Analysis.... 12.0C

Guarant'd Analysi .......
Official Analysis.... 4.70

Guarant'd Ana'ysis. 12.09
Official Analysis..: 8.85

Guarant'd Analysis .....
Official Afialy-is ........

Cuarant'd Analy is ......
Official Analysis... ......

Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official A alysis............


6.00
7.42

4.00
5.87

6..00
7.83

5.00
0.35

5.00
3 35

4 00
(5.64


,


2.25 6.: 63

3 001
0.90 7.54




..... . ... .


8.89


7.19


U. 14


7.47


5.0f 4 00M ''s F. & P. Cu::no Co.,
4.4' 5.6, New Yo t,

5.00 5 00 Mpes F. & r. Gu mno Co.,
4.27 4.82 Now York.

4.00 3.00 MipeR F. & '. Guano Co.,
4.05 3.67 NewYok.
2.( 10.00 Mapes F. & P. Guano C',.
2.47 12 78 N'-w Y rk.

7.00 10.0" E 0. Painter F.r'. Co.,
7.15 13. 9: Jacks;mnv:lle, l'ia.

5.00 9 00 R. 0 Painte-, F'rt. C .,
6.50 9.54 Jacks mvillp, Fla.

7.50 ...Foi'-C O. C JUacksn-
7.03 ...... vill, Fa.

17 00 E.O. Pnit,- F-r'., Jack-
18.44 .... sonv 'e, Fla.

7.50 .. Biin'rige 0. O. Co., Bain-
8.34 .. bridge, Ga.







ANALYSIS OF FER ILIZERS.-Continue 54


C.iton -erd Meal...... 529


C tVon S d M al...... 530


Cotton S *ed Mal]....... 531


Acid Phosphate........ 532


H. G. Acid Phosphate 533

Gouldinls H. G. Acid
Phosphate........... 534


A id Phoshate........ 535.

A L. Willaons Acid
Phosphate........... 536

4 per ci nt Potash, Acid
Pho, phate........... '537

4 twr cent Potash, Acid
Phospl,ate :......... 538


Official Analysis...... .....7.5u
Guarant'd Analysis. ...... ..... ..... 7.44

Official Analysis.... ...... ... ...... 2.50 8.00
Guarant'd Analysis. .. .. ...... .. 8.20

Official Analysis.... .... ...... .. .00
Guarant'd Analysis. ............... 7.36

Guarant'd Analysis. 15.00......
Official Analysis.... 14.65 15.68 1.36 17.04 .
Guarant'd Analysia. .18.00 ..
Official Analysis.... 13.70 18.98 0.00 18.98 .....
Guarant'd Analysis. 16.00 15.00 1.0 ....
Official Analysis... 14.50 15.58 1.0O 16.60 ......

Guarant'd Analysis. .. 13.0 .....
Official Analysis.. 9.20 13.40 1.67 15.07.
Guarant'd Analysis. MO.0 14.00 1.00....
Official Analysis... 14.O 14.92 1.72 6.64

Guarant'd Analysis. .... 8.00..
Official Analysis.... 12.30 8.41 2.04 10.45 ...

Guarant'd Analysis. 16.00 8.00 1.00..
Official Analysis.... 12.10 7.64 .91 9.60.


4.00
3.63

S00
3.79


Cllhtiert C. O. Co.. Cuth-
lhr1i, G .

Mariana Manufacturirg Co
Marianno, Fla.

Pen-a, ola '1. O. Co., Pens-
acol., Fla

Goulding Fert. Co Pens-'
a, -la. Ha.

Gou'ding Fert Co, Pens-
a ~ a. Fla.

Go-i'ding Fert., Co Pi s-
ic ,I.. Fl.,

Oinmbera nd Bnle Phos. Co.
;lalie o ., S C.

G,'-,diL; Frt. Co. Pens
a;tln, Fla.
G livingg F-rt. Co.. Pens-
'co' FPa.

G ,ldino Fert. C. Pens
HCa'la, Fla.







AN ALYStS OF FERTIIAZER--Conti neul.


Armour's King Cotton..

Standard Disolved Bone
and Potah ..........

Standard Cotton Fortili
zer.......... .........


Bone C,,upoun I.........

Gouldings Vegetable
Compound ...........


H G. Meal Fertilizer..


Guarantd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis
Official 'Analyas....


10.00
12.45

12.00
10. 0

10.00
10 15


13.55


14.101

16.00
16 30


8.00
8.77

10.00
9.78

8.00
7. 9:

8 00
9.82

7.00
10 14

10 00
10.77


55


1.00 ....
0.75 9.52

2.00 .
1.14 10.92


1.02 8.95

2 48 12.90


1.28 11.42


0.8' II11.15


2.0C
1.83



2.00
1.76

2.00
2 18

4 00
3.48

2.00
1.57


2.00 Armour's Fert. Works,
1.34 Jack.ionville Fla

2.)00Co-'etn Feit Co., New
1.77 man, Ga.

2.00Southern C. O Co.,
1 78 Mo'utgoiinry, .A .

2 00 Goull 'io F. it. Co., Pans-
2.18 acola, Fla.

4.00 Gohllinri Fert. Co., PoIR-
3.24 ico a, Fut

2.00 Gooii:lins Fert. Co., Pen--
2.l i acola, Fla.








ANALYSIS OF FERTiLIZEi~S-Continu(d.


Goulding's Bone Co-n
pound ..................

CumderlanIl Boie Supei
Phosphate........ ..

A. L. Willson Co. Guano


Gem Pineapp!e.........


Gem Orange Tree......


Simon Pure No 1......


Simon Pure No. 2.....


Gem Fruit and Vine......

Armour'd Vegetable Ma-
nure ..................

Larigo Sp -cal Tree
Grower...........


Guarant'd Analysis
545 Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
546 Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
547 Guarant'd Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
548 Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
549 :Official Analysis
Guarant'd Analysis
550 Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
551 Official Analysis
!Guarant'd Analysis
552 Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
553 Official Analysis
Guarant'd Analysis
554 Official Analysis


16.00
13.00

12.00
12.90

16.00
12.70


7.70

8.00
8.30

8.00
9.35

8.00
8.45

8.00
11.05

10.00
7.85

10.00
6.80


8.00
9.95

9.00
5\R/


1.00
2.04

1.00
2 1i


8.00 1.00
8.90 3.13


2.42 0.66

"5.00 3 00
5.56 0.89

6.00 1.00
6.36 0.25

6.00 2.00
7.74 0.72

6.00 1.00
7.72 0.25

7.00 2.00
6.77 1.00

5.00 1.00
5.69 1.31


11.99 2.23

20(
16.66 1.3;3

2.00 2.0(
12.08 2 2:

5.00 5.0(
3.08 5.6f

40
6.45 5.57

4 0(
6.61 4.7C

4.0C
8.46 5.1:

3.0(
7.97 3.2

4.OC
7.77 4 23

4 00
6.00 4 23


2.00 Gouldin Fert Co., Pensa
2.19 cola, Fa,

1.00 Cumberland. Rone Phos.
1.42 phateC .. Chailesttn,S.C.

2 0 Goulding Fifrt. Co., Per sa-
2.17 ccl ,Fla.

6.00 E. 0 Painter Fert. Co.,
6.87 Jaclsonvi'le. Fla.

6 00 E. 0 Paintr F. rt.. C.,
6.07 Jacksonv]lle, Fla.

11.09 E O. Painter Fert.' Cu,,
11.37 Jcksos vill, Fla.

6.00 E. O. Pauitr Fert. Co.,
5.97 Jacksonville, Fa.

'10.OC E. G. Painter Fart. Co,
10.68 Jacksonville, Fi'.

6.0 Armour's Fert. Works,
6 39 Jacksonvlle.

.60CArmour's Fert. Works,
5 7 Jacksonville


I







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Gontinued a7


Sweet P dato Special ... 535


Largo Fu t and Vine.. 556

A r'nrur'-. 'orn nnd CGt-
tol Grower........... 557

Map-'ri OIHIrange fr. 11i
nur ..... .558


M 'p.'s Fruit Hani Vnr.. 559

M;p 's Vegetable Mn-
nur,.... .. . ........ 5 0


M ipe's Pinvapph .. ... 51l


Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysib

Guarant'd Analysis
Official Analysis


j 6 50
5 7.23

) 6.00
O 6.58

7.00
S7.41

6.00
) 6.48

S5.00
5 5 77

6 B 00
6 7i

S4.0C
S 4.7(


0.50 .
1.19 8.42

1.00 ......
1.44 8.02

1.00
2.19 9,60

200
3.78 10.26

2 .0 ......
2.0.
2.28 8.03

2 00
1.93 8.65

2.00 .
2.22 6.92


2 50
2.43

3.00
3.20

2 00
1 98

4 00
4.19

2.00
2.5

5.00
4.58

4.00
4.12


3.50 Armour's Fert. Works,
3.75 Jacksonville.

10 00 Armour's Fert. Works,
10.02 Jacksonville.

2 00 Armour's Fert. Works,
2.09i 'Jacksonville.

3.00 MaRNp' TV:I'rmula& P. (. Co.,
3.30i New York.1

10.00 Map&s' Formnla & P C ,
11.46 New York.

4.00 MIape'- Formula & P. G. Co.,
5.98 New York.

5.00 1a.p-'s Formula& P. G. Co.,
4.90 New York.








COMMERCIAL STOCK FEFD.

BY R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST.

The Florida Legislature of 1905 enacted a "Commercial
Feeding Stuff Law," which went into effect August 22,
1905, and was published in full in the Florida Monthly
Bulletin for July 1905. This was in response to a gen-
eral demand by the consumers of and dealers in such ma-
terial .throughout the State, who demanded relief from
the large proportion of adulterated and inferior stock
food sold throughout the State, at prices far above their
real value, commercially or as feeding material.
The fact that a number of States had passed stringent
"Stock Feed Laws" requiring the guarantee of the feeding
valuef o the various feeds, with severe penalties for mis-
representation, by manufacturers and dealers, caused
such states as had no such laws to become the dumping
ground for the inferior feeds that could not be legally, or
profitably marketed in the states having laws to protect
the consumer, the dealer, and the honest manufacturers
of pure and wholesome feeds from this unfair competition
and misrepresentation.
Floirda purchasing as she does a very large amount of
the stock feed consumed in the State, was a favo-
Srite field for these inferior, and frequently harmful so-
called feeds; in fact pure feeds, brans, middlings, shorts,
ship stuff, and all ground feeds were frequently difficult
to procure; while numerous patent or proprietory feeds,
with high sounding names and little value were sold at
prices far above their value, commercially, or as feeding
stuff.
In this connection I quote from a recent Bulletin of
the Florida Experimental Station by Prof. A. W. Blair,
on "The oCmposition of Some of the Concentrated Feed-
ing Stuffs on Sale in Florida."
"The fact that Florida is largely a vegetable and fruit
growing State, has seemed to render necessary the impor-
tation, from other states, of large quantities of concen-
trated feeding stuffs. I have no means of verifying the
statement, but I believe that I am safe in saying that in
proportion to the population, and the number of farm







animals, no other State in the Union imports such large
quantities of these materials for home consumption.

THE NECESSITY FOR A FEEDING STUFFS IN-
SPECTION LAW.

"The question as to the quality of these goods seems
never to have troubled us seriously. We have been con-,
tent to take what the manufacturer is pleased to send us,
and if the quality has been poor, either the animals have
suffered or we have been compelled to buy an additional
quantity to compensate for the inferior quality, or both.
On the other hand we have not been content thus to ac-
cept what the manufacturers of fertlizers were sending
us, but have required them to state the ingredients used
in the manufacture of the goods, and guarantee that they
will, on analysis, show a certain percentage of the fer-
tilizing constituents-plant food; and we have further
clothed the State Chemist with power to collect and
analyze samples and publish to the State the results of
his work, in order that the farmer and fruit grower may
be protected from the sale of adulterated goods.
"But a large quantity, perhaps the largest quantity of
commercial fertilizers used in the State is manufactured
here, and to say to the fertilizer manufacturers of this
State, 'You must make your fertilizers, which you furn-
ish us for growing our crops, come up to a definite guar-
antee,' while we say to the manufacturers of concentrated
feeding stuffs in other states (for practically all the
ground products on the market come from other states),
'you may send to us for feeding our stock whatever grade
of goods you choose,' does not seem entirely just to the
manufacturer of fertilizers.
"It is, perhaps, true that greater loss would result from
the use of inferior fertlizers than from the use of inferior
feeding stuffs, and that it is easier to practice deception
with the former than with the latter, still this does not
make it less important that he who buys feeding stuffs
should be protected from inferior and fraudulent goods.
The great variety of mixed feeds, and proprietary feeds,
makes it comparatively easy to deceive, even those who
have had considerable experience in handling such goods.
How many of those who buy feeding stuffs can say that
they do not contain ground corn cobs, rice hulls, corn







bran, etc.; any more than the farmer can say that his
fertilizers do not contain low grade materials, worth but
'little more than half the price asked for them? The fact
that the following States, viz: Maine, Vermont, Massa-
chusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New
Jersey, North Carolina, Maryland, Tennessee, Indiana,
Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and Ohio, now have
feeding stuff laws in operation, would seem to indicate
pretty clearly that there is need to guard against adulte-
ration and fraudulent practice. This fact in itself ought
to be sufficient to bring us to our senses; for we need not
think for one moment that the manufacturers will stop
placing upon the market inferior'goods, so long as there
are places -like South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and
Alabama to be used as dumping grounds for what more
than half of the states east of the Mississippi will not
have.

CLASSIFICATION OF FEEDING STUFFS.

"In a general way, feeding stuffs may be classified as
.protein (nitrogenous) feeds; and starchy (carbohydrate)
feeds; though this distinction is only relative, since
there is no distinct dividing line -between the two classes.
"Nearly all contain both protein and carbohydrates,
but those high in protein, like cotton seed meal, linseed
meal, gluten meal, and a number of others, are usually
classified as protein feeds; while those low in protein and
high in carbohydrates. like corn, corn and cob meal, oats,
barley and others, represent the starchy or carbohydrate
feeds.
"Each class of substances has a distinct office to per-
form in the animal organism, and it is important that
the purchaser should understand something of the uses
of these two classes, and have a fair knowledge of the
amount of each contained in the various feeding stuffs, so
that be may purchase that which he most needs, and at
the same time that which is most economical.











TERMS USED IN DISCUSSING FOODS AND FEED-
ING STUFFS.

"By chemical analysis, feeding stuffs are separated into
six classes of substance, viz: Water, ash, protein, fiber,
nitrogen-free extract and fat.
"Water is contained in all feeding stuffs, even the dry-
est hays and grains, and varies from 8 to 15 per cent. in
this class to 80 per cent in silage, and 90 per cent in some
roots.
"Ash is left when the combustible part of a feeding
stuff is burned away. It consists chiefly of lime, magna-
sia, potash, soda, iron, chlorine, a ad carbonic, sulphuric,
and phosphoric acids and is used largely in building up
the bony structure.
"Protein (nitrogenous matter) is the name of a group
of substances containing nitrogen; Protein furnishes the
material for the lean flesh, blood, skin, muscles, tendons,
nerves, hair, bones, wool, casein of milk, albumen of eggs,
etc., and is one of the most important constituents of
feeding stuffs.
"Crude Fiber (cellulose) is the frame work of plants,
and is, as a rule, the most indigestible constituent of
feeding stuffs. The coarse fodders, such as hay and
straw, contain a much largen percentage of fiber than
the grains, oil cakes, etc.
'Nitrogen-Free Extract includes starch, sugar, gums,
and the like, and forms an important part of all feeding
stuffs, but especially of most grains.
"Fat, or the materials dissolved from feeding stuffs by
other, is a substance of mixed character, and may include,
besides' real fats, wax, the green coloring matter of
plants, etc. The fat of food is either stored up in the
body as fat or burned to furnish heat and energy. The
crude fiber and nitrogen free extract, taken together,
make up :what are known as the carbohydrates. Fats
and carbohydrates perform the same ffice/in the body-
those of the production of heat and force, or energy--
that is, they keep the body warm and the machinery run-
ning. For this purpose one pound of fat is considered!
equivalent to aboit two and one-fourth pounds of carbohy-
drates. (Starch and sugar.)











NECESSITY FOR HOME-GROWN FEEDING MATE-
RIALS.

"Feeding stuffs suppliyng _these starchy substances;
such as corn, oats, velvet beans, cow pea, and beggarweed
hay, can be successfully grown in Florida; and when it be-
cones necessary to supplement these, as in many cases it
does with imported feed stuffs, only those should be im-
ported which are much higher in protein than the home-
grown products,
"Obviously, then, it is poor economy to import from
other sections of the country feeding stuffs low in pro-
tein--the most expensive and important ingredient--
when they can be produced at home at less cost.
"But that is just what Florida is doing. Many thou-
sans of dollars are being sent out of the State for feeding
stuffs, the equivalent of which can and should be pro-
duced within our own borders; and many more thous-
ands are being spent for materials, which, when true to
name, are fairly rich in protein, but which come to us be-
low the standard quality, and which should, therefore, he
subject to a law similar to that which prevents the sale
of inferior fertlizers in the State.

INVESTIGATION OF FEEDING STUFFS NOW ON
THE MARKET.

"Believing that this condition existed, the Chemical
Department of the Experiment Station began, last No-
vember, an investigation with a view to ascertaining the
exact extent to which low grade and adulterated feeding
stuffs are being placed upon the market.
"Samples were secured frdm the various sections of
the State, largely through students of the University who
went to their homes at the Thanksgiving and Christmas
vacations.
"They were instructed to secure samples of the differ-
ent concentrated feeds, which should, so far as possible,
represent the whole lot from which they were taken, and
also to secure the trade name, name and location of the
manufacturer, and the selling price per sack of 100
pounds, or per ton, in the case of wholesale dealers. The
names of dealers are reserved, since it is not intended to










work any hardship to the wholesaler or retailer, so long
a there is no law requiring them to maintain a certain
standard.
"As a result of this, forty-three samples, representing a
considerable variety of feeding stuffs, and collected from
different parts of the State, have been analyzed. It
would have been much better could the number of sam-
ples and localities represented been greater, but the limi-
ted time and pressure of other work did not permit this.
"It is believed, however, that the work represents, fair-
ly well, the feeding stuffs on sale throughout the State.

BRAN.
"Taking up first the brans and comparing their protein
and fat content with the standard, we find that all of
the samples examined fail to come up to the minimum
standard requirement in protein-15 per cent.
"Number 1799 is very low in protein and fat, while the
fiber-the indigestible part-is over 17 per cent, whereas,
in good wheat bran it should not much exceed 9 per cent.
This sample was highly adulterated with ground corn
cobs and screenings.
"Number 1714 contained wheat chaff, corn bran, and
various pieces of foreign matter, indicating mill sweep-
ings. Numbers 1726, 1730, and 1731 contained corn
bran; 1807, dirt and oat chaff, and 1831, chaff, corn bran
and other foreign matter, probably mill sweepings. The
average retail price for eight of the twelve sample is $1.38
per sack of 100 pounds, ($27.60 per ton) which is un-
doubtedly excessive when it is remembered taht not one
of the samples comes up to the minimum standard for
pure wheat bran.

CORN AND OAT FEEDS.

"Rix samples of Pdrina. four of Victor and one each
of Boss, Parcell and Mack's Mule Feed, are corn and oat
"feeds. and are composed of cracked corn, ground or
crushed oats and oat hulls, the oat hulls in most cases
predominating. These are no doubt, the product of
cereal food mills, and furnish a means of disposing of the
oat hull at a good profit. They have a fair feeding value,
thouir in most cases this is not in proportion to the price
asked for them.










"The average protein content of the four samples of
Victor Feed is duly 7.62 per cent while the' fat is 3.05 per
cent, and in this connection it is interesting to note that
fiv:y samples of Victor corn and oat feed manufactured
by the American Cereal Company and analyzed at the
New Jersey Station, gave an average of 8.64 per ceht of
protein and 4.50 per cent of fat, and five samples analyzed
at the Connecticut Station gave 8.26 per cent protein and
3.93 per cent of fat, and sold at an average price of $25.40
per ton. Both New Jersey and Connecticut have inspec-
tion laws.
"The sample of Mack's Muel Feed is very low in protein
and fat, and high in crude fiber and ash, indicating clear-
ly the predominance of oat hulls.

MISCELLANEOUS FEEDS.

"Number 1895, sold under the name of Yellow Meal, is
cotton seed meal adulterated with hulls, making the pro-
tein content about 13 per cent-lower than it should be,
for the price asked--27.00 per ton.
"Atlas Dairy Feed, number 1738, is a product of the
sugar factories, and is made by drying and grinding the
bagasse, soaking in molasses, and again drying. Its
value, as a feeding material, is probably not yet well es-
tablished in this State.
"Marsden Food, number 1829, is ground straw, proba-
bly oat straw, and has about the feeding value of oat
straw.
"The wire grass hay which grows abundantly in the
pine woods of Florida, contains more protein and more
than twice as much fat as does this material, and would
no doubt be about as easily digested. But either beggar-
weed, cow pea, or velvet bean hay contains anywhere
from two to five times as much protein and would cer-
tainly not cost any more,. if as much, as does this high-
sounding 'Marsden Food.'

SUMMARY.

"Judged by the samples examined, a large proportion
of the concentrated feeding stuffs on the Florida market
is of an inferior quality.








"All of the samples of wheat bran examined are below
the minimum standard for good wheat bran.
"Some materials, as 'Marsden Food,' are sold at unrea-
sonably high prices.
"The adulterants found where rice chaff, wheat chaff,
oat hulls, ground corn cobs, corn bran, screenings, weed
/ seeds, dirt and other foreign matter, indicating mill
sweepings.
"Practically all the concentrated feeding stuffs used
in this State are imported, and this constitutes a con-
stant drain upon the wealth of the State.
"Florida can and should produce much more of her
feeding materials than she is producing, and thus save to
the State thousands of dollars. When the farm crops
furnish sufficient carbohydrates, only feed stuffs rich in
protein should be purchased., The mixtures of corn and
oats, containing,-as they do, large quanties of oat hulls,
are not economical protein feeds.
"There is so much profit in selling ground corn cobs,
wheat chaff, oat hulls, corn bran, rice huls ,etc., at the
price of wheat branfi that the consumer must ever be on
he watch. A careful examination with the eye or with
he help of a small magnifying gla.s will often reveal
these adulterants.
"Those who buy feeding stuffs should have the same
protection as those who buy fertilizers. Such protection
would promote the interests of the honest manufacturer
and dealer, diminish the sale of worthless materials, and
instruct the people in regard to the composition of feed-
ing stuffs and their comparative value."
Numerous analysis of all the various feeding stuqs have
been made in numbers of State Experiment Stations and
by the various State and United States Agricultural De-
partments. The average composition of such foods/are,
therefore, well established. On the following page is a
table of the average composition of the most commonly
used feeds. Consumers are advised to purchase no feed
that does not bear the guaranteed analysis, showing the
percentage of protein, fat, sugar and starch on a tag at-
tached to each package this gaurantee should be approxi-
mately near the average for the feed stuff as is shown by
this table. There will of course be sight variations, how-
5 Hnlletn.








ever the averages given are those from a large number of
careful analysis of standard feeds.
A careful study of this table and a comparison of the
same with the "analysis on the tag" will assist the con-
sumer in choosing the feed he requires for his purpose.
Purchasers having reason to doubt the truth of an
"analysis on a tag" should draw, a sample as provided in
the law, place the same in a can (baking power box), seal
it and send it to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis.
The method of drawing the sample, and senidng it is
fully set out in the law. It should not be sent to the
State Chemist, and it must be in a can, drawn and sealed
in the presence of two witnesses and sent to the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, properly marked with the senders
address and identified by number and name if more than
one package or sample is sent.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Tallahassee, August, 1905.


k









67

AVERAGEE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFF.


NAME OF FEED.


Cot*dn Seed Meal...............

Linseed Meal...................

Wheat Bran...................

M idilings .....................

Mixed Feed, (wheat)............

Corn Meal.....................

Gluter Meal....................

Grluter Feed ................ ...

Hominy Feed..................

Rye Products (bran)...........

Barley Sprouts .................

Distillers Grains................

Oat Feed.............. .....

Provinder....... ... ....... .....

Victor Feed......................

XXX Corn and Oat Feeds......

Corn and Oat Feeds............

Proprietry Horse Feeds.......

Molasses Feeds .................

Pcultry Feeds...................

B eef Scrap........... .........

Quaker Dairy Feed..............

Cre-mer3 Feed...............


'rude
Fire


7 05

8 76

8 39

6 36

7 80

1 64

1 25

7 31

4 05

4 53

1094

12 90

20 57

8 91

106

9 94

12 09

9 57

8 49

4 62


15 53

1007


Pro-
tein


43 16

34 70

15 93

17 14

16 86

8 73

37 06

24 17

1049

15 57

27 20

32 23

7 91
10 62

8 83

9 66

8 73
12 48

16 34

15 81)

44 70

14 42

20 0


Compiled from report of Conneticut Expermntal.' Station. 1904.


arch
and Fat
Sugar I


24 59 9 22

35 91 5 F4

54 62 4 70

50 60 4 26

54 44 4 79

71 32 3 14

46 52 3 27

54 30 344

65 27 7 85

61 28 3 02

42 66 1 56

33 34 12 09

54 58 3 26

67 34 4 08

624 46 ,4 02

64 66 5 09

61 73 3 73

60 54 4 27

51 72 1 79

60 27 5 32

8 28 14 75

52 12 4 05

5100 5 38


Ashi


6 60

6 12

5 33

4 30

5 30

120

0 68

1 80

254

3 80

6 34

1 86

534

1 83

864

824

3 22

2 83

6 18

27 63

29 20

5 31

8 57









JACKSONVILLE PRICE CURRENT, AUG. 26, 1905.

FEEDSTUFFS.

Pure wheat bran, per ton, $22.50.
Middlings, per ton, $23.
Purina feed, per ton, $26.
Victor meal, per ton, $26.
Cotton hulls, per ton, $9.75.
Other quotations are:
Gluten food, for cows, per ton, $27.
Jersey cow feed, per ton, $22.
Purina stock food, 100 sacks. 175 pounds, $25*50.
Purina stock feed, less quantity, 100 pounds, $26.00.
Southern seed rye, per bushel, $1.25.
Texas rust-proof seed oats, per bushel, 65c.
May or Burt seed oats, 32 pounds to bushel, per bushel,
80 cents.
Cotton seed meal, bright, 100 sacks, per ton, $26.
Cotton seed meal, bright, less quantity, per ton, $26.50.
Cotton seed meal, dark, carload, per ton, $24.
Cotton seed meal, dark, 100 sacks, per ton, $24.50.
Salt, 200 pound sacks, per sack, $1.
Rock salt, for stock, per pound, 1 1-2c.



HAY AND GRAIN.

Hay, No. 1 Timothy, per ton, $18.
Hay, No. 2 Timothy, per ton, $17.
Hay, No. 1 clover mixed, per ton, $17.
Choice Timothy, per ton, $19.00.
Hay.in 100-bale lots, 50c less per ton.
White Flint corn, fancy Tennessee, 100 pound sacks,
$1.35.
Mixed corn, 100-pound sacks, $1.30.
Oats, fancy, 100-pound sacks, $1.40.
Oats, white, 100-pound sacks, $1.35.
Corn and oats, 100-sack lots, 3c less per sack.
Other quotations are:
White corn, car load, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.37.
White corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.43.
White corn, less quantity, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.46.








White corn, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.41.
Mixed corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.32.
Mixed corn, 100 sacks, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.38.
Mixed corn, less quantity, per sack of 110 pounds, $1.41.
Mixed corn, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.35.
Mixed corn, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.30.
Mixed corn, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.32.
White oats, car load, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.69.
White oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.71.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.72.
White oats, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.35.
White oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.37.
White oats, less quantity, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.40.
Fancy white clipped oats, 125 pounds, 8c per sack
higher.
Fancy white clipped oats, 100 pounds, 6c per sack
higher.
Mixed oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.69.
Mixed oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.71.
Mixed oats, less quantity, per sack of 125 pounds, $1.73.
Mixed oats, car load, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.35.
Mixed oats, 100 sacks, per sack of 100 pounds, $1.37.




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