Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00019
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: July 1, 1904
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text




VOLUME 14
NUMBER 5




FLORIDA

MONTHLY

BULLETIN.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,


JULY 1. 1904.

B. E. MCLIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.

Part 1-Crops. Part 2-Weather Report,
Part 3-Fertilizers. Part 4--Miscellaneous.


Entered January 3r, oo3. at Tallahassee, Florida as
second-class matter, under Act of Congress.
of June, iloq


These Bulletins are Issued free to those requesting them.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA..
I. B. HILSON, STATE PRIN1 ER. ;








County Map of the State of Florida.
(For the Bulletin.)


















PART I.
CROPS.















DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELuOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA CouNT.-We are having light rains but they
as too light, t set out sweet potatoes. Crops are very
backward and corn will be a short crop unless it rains
soon; cotton that is growing is in fair condition; stands
are bad on account of dry weather; so dry grass could
not make headway.
BRADFORD COUNTY.-With the exception of a little bad
stand in cotton caused by late planting and dry spring,
the prospects for all crops were never better, and the sea-
sons at this time were never more favorable.
BREVARD COUNTY.-The condition of citrus fruits is
better than since 1895, and the crop will be larger than
last; rain is plentiful, none too much, summer cool and
no moequitos. Insect pests on fruit trees, are less than
usual.
OALHOUN CouNTY.-Since last report we have had one
very good season which will enable the corn to make a
good crop if we can have rain from now on. It has been so
dry that peach trees in full fruit have died for want of
water; cotton has stood the drought well, but needs rain
very much.
CITRUS CouNTY.-The extreme dry weather has seri-
ously affected the watermelon crop; everything else has
held up well and since the-rains have fallen, have almost
eiifirey recovered.
.~,iAY CoUNTY.-Crops have greatly improved since the
ainh began to fall, and most of them have recovered. The
peacniand melon crops are fine.
OtaBiiA" COUNTY.-Since the rain. all crops except
the early corn, are recovering from the effects of the
drought; cotton is small but healthy; peanut crop prom-
ises to be the best for some years; sweet potatoes have
not growth enough yet to tell.










DAD CouPnTr.-We are having abundant ratmia ea
ine growing weather for citrus and tropical fruits.
Trees aie lii rne condition and fruit doing well; pineap-
ple crop not so large as last year.
EscAMBIA COUNTY.-Seasons have been extra good so
far. The season now on from present rains, will com-
plete corn crop; cotton is by far the best ever seen at
this season of the year; had bloom sgn the 15th; sugar.
cane is fine too.
FPANKLIN CouNTY.-The weather is yveM dry, an&~a:-
ess it rains soon all crops will be greatly damaged; tbli
Are barely holding their own.
GADSDEN COUNTr.-The condition of all crops where
we have stands is. good, but on account of excessive ani
continued dry weather since February, stands are poor,
the growth is small, and prospective yield of everything
is small unless we have ample and general-rain fall very
soon.
HAMILTON COUNTY.-Crops are all very backward and
cotton plant small on account of the long continued dry
weather; corn and cotton will both be short, in fact al
crops are suffering very much for rain.
HOLMES COUNTY.-There has been the least rain up to
the last day of Juie ever known; it has greatly hindered
the transplanting of tobacco and sweet potatoes; crops
have stood the drought wonderfully well.
JEFFERSON COUNTY.-The general average of crops in
this county is fine; some have suffered from the loig
drought very much but .considering the long dry spell,
they are all doing well.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY.-Considering the long dry spell
the crops are doing very well; corn will be a shortWasp
and cotton is small; sugar cane and sweet potat~es~ire
short. and it is getting too late to plant sweet 'pibtub!
to yield much. ; ,
LAKE CouNTY.-Orange and grape fruit tr g i
Well;. all crops looking well except corn; has been tbo
dry: for'its growth till the last -two weeks, since which
time we are having plenty of rain.








I


LmON COUNTY.-The crops of this county have lost very
much by dry weather; only two rains of consequence:
since February; cotton small and stands poor;' corn
erops very short; and seasons for transplanting sweet
potatoes the poorest in many years.
LEVY COUNTY.-The long drought has cut corn and
some other crops very short. We are having the worst
drought for a long time.
MADIsoN CovNTY.-Cotton is small but in very good
condition; corn is short on account of dry weather, sweet
potatoes and field peas the same; pears and peaches are
medium only ; watermelons good crop, also contaloupes.
MANATBE COUNTY.-We have had some rain, but not
enough to recover entirely from the drought; some crops
are very good and some are poor; fruit crops need rain
also.
NASSAU COUNTY.-Dry weather kept crops back till the
late rains revived them, and they will now give a faith
yield. Fruit crops promise a good y'!ed.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-We are having frequent showers,
but they are very light, sweet potato planting commenced;
crops are backward for want of rain; fruit trees need
rain badly.
PAsco COUNTY.-The long continued drought has been
very injurious to crops of all sorts; all crops need rain,
and fruit trees also. Some crops we'll be short in yield.
POLK COUNTY.-Droueht kept all crops back and dam-
aged corn and other crops some. ]'ut siuce the rain be-
gan the prospect is very good for aa average yield of
crops generally.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-Crops are generally in good
condition and the season favorable for growing; sweet
potatoes are being set out. Pears only about half a crop
but peach and melon-crops are fine. Field crops good.
SUMTER COUNTY.-Crops are not up to the usual
standard at this time of the year; the long dry spell of
weather has made them grow slow, and few of them will
yield full crops. Fruit trees and fruit are only medium.
SUWANNEE COUNTY.-It has been very dry in some sec-
tions and there crops have suffered for rain to some ex-










tent; light rains are frequent and as this is the usual
time for our rainy season perhaps they will continue;
crops will average very good; the peach and melon crops
are also good.
WAKULLA COUNTY.-It is too dry for any crop to make
satisfactory growth; conditions are very poor.
WASHINGTON COUNTY.-Crpps are in fair condition
.considering the unfavorable seasons; the long drought
has made them all very backward, specially.corn; cotton
has stood the drought well; average condition of crops
is good; melon crops are also good.









REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE
YIELD OF FIELD AND FRUIT CROPS FOR JUNE:
1904, AS COMPARED WITH AN AVERAGE.


0)

COUNTIES -----










Calhoun... 10( 100 1 7
0o 0 | 0






Citrus..... ... 8. 900
claye..... ... 85100 1 100
Columbia. .. 100 100
Dade .... ... .. ...
Deoto.......... 6 9 00
Escambia.. 100 .... 12 120
Franklin... ... .... 90 ..
Gadsden... 100 100 100 100
Hamilton. ... 80 60 75
Hernando.. .. 80 120
iUlsboro.. ....... 105 100
Holmes.... 85 .... 100 100
Jackson... 90 100 90 75
Jefferson .. 100 100, 100 100
LaFayette... .. 901 60 70
Lake...... ... ... 75 90
Lee .... ... .... 125 110
Leon...... ... 75 90
Lavy......... .. 801 75
Madison... 100 100 110
Manatee...... .... 100
Marion.... 90 90 85 90
Nassau.... .... .... 10C 100
Owsola... ........ 80 100
fPa%,sco .... ....... 100
Polk.... .. .... ..100
SantaRos 115 12 100
Sumter...... .. 90
Suwannee.. ... 90;
WakullUb .... 75 0 50
Washln'ton 0 90 100

Gen' e av'ge 9 i0
Ler cent.. 95 89 921 91


r


0 00 0 0 0 0






0 0 ...0 0 0 0 0..
9E 9( 100 ... ....8 0 '10,0,
10.... 10g
0 110 1 100... ....0 120 ..0


10c 96 100 ....... 100 g0
SC75 ....


7676f 1001.


..1 0 100 1...
9E 95 100 100 10( 9( 90 100
10( 120 120 100 10( 10( 120 120
.. .... 90 . 75. .
10( 40 60 .... ... .... 75 40
5( 40 60 .... ... .... 60 60
:...... i 5 5 ....... . 100
1590
S 80 100 ............ 9 .
.... 50 80 ... ... 10C 90
.... 70 100 100.... 100 10( 75
... 40 100 .. .... .... .. ..
.... 75 50 25 ... ... 75
100 125 100 100 100 120 101 120
.... 70 90 .... .... .... 9C 60
100 80 100 100 .... .... 10( 100
90 50 50 .... .... .... 10C ..
100 50 50 100 ........... 100
80 601 95 85 .... 7 90 80
.... 90 ... .... .... .... .... 100
100 100 1 100 .... 4 100 110
100 100 100 80.... ... ........
100IO 120 '751... 10 100...
100 5 .. ... 9 .
.. 90 8 .... .. ... 8 90
80 0 60 .... 801 i 1 0 ..
... 50 ... ... .... ... .. .. ..
100 76 10 C .... .... 1 100

91 76 72 891 955i 8 9 80


j~-i--L-










CONDITION OF CfQPS-CQ4ftlued.


SGuavas


COUNTIES






4Ae~lyu a a.. a...
Baker.... .
Bradford. 80....
Brevard... ... 100 10
Calhoun... .........
Citrus..... 95 .
Cly....... 110....
Columbia.. 0o... ...
Dade....... 100 10 10t
Deboto .... 100 ( 9
Emcambia. 120 ....
Franklin.. .. ... .
Gadsden... 25 .... ....
H~amilton.. O.,...
Hernando. 00..
Hillsboro.. 110 80 5
Holmes.... .....
Jackson .. 100
Jefferson .. 100...
LaFayette. ... ..
Lake....... ..
Lee ........ 1 120 120
Leon ..... ...
Levy ...... 100 .
Madison.. .
tnaetee. B0 50
M arion.... 90.... ....
Nassau .. ....
O~ceoa... 125 100 1
Pasco .... ..
Po k. ..... 100
Sant a Rosa .. ........
Sumter .... 60.......
S wannee.. 70 ......
W 1akUla .
*V rin'Vn 80......

Gen'l avrge
per cent 92 W 101


10D


100


70
...i..


97


110
6


100 100I
125 156 10(
100 20...

80 75 1W
100 100 10C
100 100 10(
95 60 99
100 1...
100 124 10

. . . . . .



94 '87 .98


Lime
Trees


a S
SS
Q I4?


* f .( .
110 11(. 110


7 80 7'
80 100 75s
60 95

i.. .i i






021 97


i I


Bananas Orange Lemon
Sanana Trees Trees


C.2 t;, 10
0'^ 2 0




.. ..... 60 00 .... ....

100 12. 100 120 100 125

.... ... 1 ... 1 1I.. I


-


'


.... ......









CONDITION OF CROP--Coatinued.


Aat....70 70 70 70 100
Ba r .... 40 40 75
Bradford ........... .. 100 100 1
Bi aard....... 100 150.... ... ...
Dldeoun...... ..
Citrus...... 10 100... 100 100 1 95100
lay........ 100 100 8080120
Columbia-. 100
Domde........ 110 115
DeSoto........ 105 110 90 9C 95 120 100 110 100
aeambla. .... ...... ...... 100 .. 100
Franklin.. ...... ...... ...... 90 90 90 0 90
Gadden ... ... ... ... 100 .. .. .
LHamilton............ . 75 75
Hernando...... .. ... ... 0. 0 100
Elsaooro .... 105 100 . ( 100 85 95
Holmes......... ......... 10( ... ... 75
Jackson... . .. . .. . .. .. 50 50 0
Je erson.. ... .... .. .... .. 70 75 75 75 100
LaFayette...... ........... .. .. . 75
....... 100 7 ... ... ... .. 50 50 100
........... 120 12f 100 100 100 10( 110 110 100
IOl.... ........ 100 11 100 100 5 0
Levy....... . ..9( 90 .... 90
Madison ..... ... ....... 6 25 2t 50
Manatee....... .. 75.... ... .. 8C
aon....... 100 100.... .. 80 100 12 10
assa .. ... .. ....... .. ..... 1 100 125 12 ..
Osceola........ 95 50.... .. 100 100 100 W0 100C
Pasco ....... . 100 75 . . ... ..
Ba ta Row. ... ........... .... ... .. 60 50 96
Bumter...... .. .... .... 95 100 100 110 80C
8wannee.... .. ... .. 80
W akulla ....... ...... ...... .. .. .... 7
Washngto.. .. .. .

Gen'l av'ge. .. 1
Ber ecnt... 101 98 921 901 9193 79 77i 1


76
10&

100,
lOS
100

119
14




1w
105


75
100
108




198
io
86

.. a
- i*- .









CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTIES






chua .........
o ... ........
aord.........

Calhoun ..........
01t ...........
lay. .... ......
Cambnu la........
ead ............
Deoto. .........
Bbcambla......
ranakfll ........
dadden .........
Hamilton.........
Hernando........
Hillaboro', ......
Holmes..........
Jackson..........
Jpfeireaon.......
LaFavette .......
LMke .........

L e e..........
Leon....... . . .
hoeyw.........
Madiaon..........
Manatee........
Marlion.........
Nawisau...........

Pasco .........
Poltk.............
Santa Rosa......
vIamter. ........
Bowannee. ......
Vakulla...........
Wasbngto ......

Geali av'ge.....
per cent........


Water-
melons









0 100
60 60
100 100

85 90
80 0
100 100
90 95

1 oo110
100 120
90 90
78 80
80 60

90 95
110 110
50 50
100 100
100 100
MC 50
110 110
9C 90
8C 80
10( 100
8( 75
9O 100
100 ,100
8( 80

9( 80
9f 86
9C 100
10( 100
81 90
100 100


88 89


Cantaloupes Pinea



0
Q 0

7 0^3 0


60 60......

.. .... ...... ... ...
...... ...... I 0M )




100 150 95
100. 0......
...... ...... ......


...... ...... ......6

90 905 ......
...... ..... 90.





100 150 5 95


900 90......
60 90 ......


900 9 00.....
100 100 100
90 90 ......
80 60..

100 100 100
900 0 ......
100 1 ......
80 50 80
.. ... ..... I ... ..
90 75 90
95 50......
75 90 ......

90 '90 .......


88 92 95


pples




i0



80


75




100









11o
.....)










ioo

80

75
...o..


Gra








1'







1
""75




100
100
100
100
100
100
75
100
100
100


100
75
100


100
90
100
90




Sto
90
60


pee





00
k t-



75.
100
. "..


...iOC
100
110
100
100
100
75
100
90
100


100
75
100
90


100
100
150
100

120
90
75


100


81 e98i 98





















PART IL
WEATHER REPORT,




















































































































LI.








U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE .

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE
OF IHE
WEATHER BUREAU.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.

FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.,
JACKSONVILLE, PLA.
REPORT FOR MAY, 1904.


SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 4 stations.. 29.95
Departure from the normal, 4 records .........-. --0.01
Highest observed, at Pensacola on the 11th...... 30.15
Ipwest observed, at Jacksonville on the 27th.. ... 29.76
Absolute range for the State .................... 0.39

TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean, as determined from records of 64 stations.. 74.
Departure from the normal, 30 records........... -2.7
Highest monthly mean, at Marco .............. 78.6
Lowest monthly mean, at Middleburg and Molino.. 70.8
Highest recorded, at Lake City on the 27th and Tar.
pon Springs on the 30th .....................1000
Lowest recorded, at Marianna and Molino on the 11th 44o
Absolute range for the State .....,............ 56

PRECIPITATION.
Inches.
Average, as determined from records of 60 stations 2.51
Departure from the normal, 28 records ......... -1.01








Greatest amount for any 24 hours, at Key West on
the 19th ........ ........ ....... .. ... .. 5.83
Greatest monthly amount, at Key West ..........13.01
Least monthly amount, at Lake City ............ 0.30
Average.number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 5

WIND.

Prevailing wind direction ...................... East

WEATHER.

Average number of clear days .................... 17
Average number of partly cloudy days ............1i
Average number of cloudy days .................... 3



WEATHER AND CROPS
During May.

The month, as a whole, was unfavorable for the germi-
nation of seed and growth of plants. For the greatest
portion of the time the temperature was lower than the
normal, which, in conjunction with a deficiency in pre-
cipitation, resulted in a marked deterioration in most
crops; more, especially, however, with those planted last.
The early planted cotton pushed forward fairly well,
although the cool nights caused many plants to die, and,
as a consequence, stands were unsatisfactory. With
regard to late planted cotton and corn, complaints of
retarded germination were general. The condition was
not so unsatisfactory on lowlands, where the soil was in
a better condition. The absence of rain enabled farm-
ers to push cultivation, and crops were kept free of
grass. Much replanting of cotton took place during the
last of the month. At the close of May the most advanc-
ed cotton was about twelve inches high and fruiting
nicely. Corn on lowlands was good, although the crop,
as a whole, will be below the average. As a result of
the drought, which, in some' sections, exceeded six
weeks, a large portion of the orange crop was lost. The







17

cantaloupe crop was short, and the setting of sweet po-
tato slips was delayed. The peach crop was large, but the
fruit was generally small. Cane did fairly well, and the
yield of vegetables was quite satisfactory; shipments be-
gan to decrease during the latted part of the month. The
shipment of pineapples began during the last week of the
month; this crop is materially cut off as a result of the
drought. The monthly precipitation was greatest-
exceeding 12 inches-on the southeast coast, and least
in northern and central portions, where some counties
had less than half an inch of rain.
S2 Bul.









18

COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR M,
WITH- DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST TH
TEEN YEARS.


Year 1802 803 804 1804 95 1896 1807 1808 18990 100 1o i 100 2 2 o13 1

leau 75-1 76.3 74-6 75-. 74,7 74.0 76.4 78 75 75.1 77-. 717
.Depr -2-.3 -1. -3 0 -1.7 +2.9 +3.6 -.2 +o 6 -21 -2.S plo. -3.9 -
Total 2.19 8.02 2-SI 4-46 2.78 .25 1.6 1.22 3.0 4.8 2.4 36
Separ -. +o.40-1.o0 +.9 -o. 1.27-1.92-2. 0 +o.31 +o.86 -.o07 po 80-


PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Atm c P e Wind Velocity in Relative
Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humiditv

STATIONS .-
Go S C|



Jaeksenville.. 2.097 3j15 12 276 I71 (5,59 1 S 31 93 48 74
.jplter ....... 2o05 3004 25 2984 8 7.404 30 W 1 98 51 77
ey West..... 29.94 30o2 25 2 981 6.18 32 sw 9q 99 57 76
Pesalola..... *3009 30.15 11 29.81 7,583 35 sw 30 97 33 71
Tinpa........ 29 05 30.09 13 2082 7 4, 24 he 5 loo 42 71

8 a. m. reading only.




CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1904.


STATIONS.


Northern Section.
Archer ...........
Federal Point........
Fernandina..........
Fort Georget.........
Gainesvill ..........
Huntington ..........
Jacksonville .........
Jasper...... .......
Johnstown ........
Lake City............
Macclenny ............
Micanopy ............
Middleburg .........
Pinemount...........
St Augustine ......
Sumner ...........
Switzerland .......


COUNTIES.


Alachua .....
Putnam ......
Nassau ......
Duval.... ....
Al chua .....
Putnam ...
Duval .... .
Hamilton ....
Bradford ....
I'olumbia ....
Baker. ..... .
Alachua .....
Clay .........
Suwange ....
St. Johns...
Levy ... ....
,St. John.s...


- -


1 Temperature, in degree


0
0 I

.Q




22 7540.419528 15

3 73.4 ..... 95128 : 5;
19 75.1 +0.5 9027 61
18 74.9-0.7 95!28 6;
8 73.1--3.4 9629 41
34 73.0-1.9 9228 51
6 73.0-2 5 9628 41
9c71. --4.7 9j 28 U41
4 74 4 -1.8 10027 5
9 73:2-2.6 9827* 4
8a76. -0. a9828 `5
5 70.8..... 9728 5
2 7 .3.0.... 9l829 5
54 75.8---0 94 27 5
14 75.0--0.4 92282 4
8'73 4-2 3 ,96 28R 5


5,

I I
a-
i-
:c
-l~


5-d
eec


156 1.21 -2.570.83.
32 1 41--1.270.50...
286 50 .... 1.55 ..

33 0 88 -2.1o0 39 ..
31 2 18 1 000 90;
22' 2 90 -1.l10, 1.17
45 1 41-1.780.74 ..
c36 1.80--0.500.87...
37 0 3-2.540.30...
42 1.34 -1.380 53
38 1.75-2.191.00
37 6b ..... 26 .
37 3 17 .... 2.32. .
29 1 57-1.880 56 ..
39 0.471-1.330,34 1
h31 0 39--4.0001.82j ..


es Farh. Precipitation, in inches.| Sky.
es ~i Fah [ Sky.
5! o
be >1
ii a ~ &1
d cc 0


Oe.
2 se.
. l. ie.
ne
Snle.
lie.
81w.


. .... ......
1 ae.
2e.

6 e.
ne.
191ne,
'Osw
. I...1 .


3.
5 21 10
7 24 '5

5 21 2
5; 18 13
6 11 15
5! 191 4
31.. ...
1 71 23
7 23 6
8 ...
6 7 8
5 25 7
S8 4
2 18R 18
6i .. .


0
_g
*c.


p.
So:
*'sF

^*s












CLAIM .TOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY. 1904 -Continued.


STATIONS.


Central Section.
Bartow ...............
Broo. sville..........
Clermont ............
De Land .............
Eustis ................
Fort Mead. ........
Fort Pierce ..........
(rasmere ...........
Inverness............
Kissimmee ........
,Ma abar.............
.[erritt's Island ......
New Smyrna .........
O cala ...............
orange City:. ......
Orange Home........


COUNTIES.


Polk.........
Hernando.. .
Lake.........
Volusia.....
Lake. ....
Polk.. .......
Brevard......
Orange .......
Citrus.......
Osceola......
Brevard .....
Brevard ....
Volusia .....
Marion ......
Volusia .....
Sumter.......


0 Temperature. in degrees Fahr. 1Precipltati')n. in inches Sky. |
0
1- I** I I -' 3 ~ .
Cd Z ca v f a i -l 0



. 0 n 4 P Z Z
S g O a I


9 77.0+-1.2
12 b75. -0.9
12 78.1-LM 2
4 74.0 .. .
11 77.0-0.1
21 77.0+1.7
13 75.3-0.1
8 76 4+0.1
4 77.4 .... .
12 75 4-2.6
3 75 ..... [
23 76 5 +0 2i
16 C73.0--1.8
17 76.0+1.3
14 76 2 0.5
. 76.1 .....


21 34' 1.76 -0.81
1 36 3.12 +-0.1.1
1 1.24 -176
1 33 ...... .... .
1 32 1.69 -1.1


1 8 .... .....
4 c42 0 89
1 36 0 51 -2 47
21 30 151 ....
1 20 3.80 +0.23
I 34 1 89 -0.78
1 36 1.04 -1 87
1 40 2.43 -0.40
1* 37 1.28 -


0.89 ... 7
1.20... 3


0 55 6
^- ron 'i


14 Osw.
.. ...e.
25 Oe.
7 0e-ne.
22 4 e.
4 Oe.
6 5 se,
9 Osw.
... .. sw.
16 2se.
8 0e-se
2 3ne.

15 2.e.
. ... se,
15 0 .. ..






F- -



STATIONS.





Orlando. .............
Plant City...........
Rockwell...........
St. Leo.... ..... ...
Tampa. ............
Tarpon Springs......
Titusville... :......
Southern Section.
Avon Park... .....:.
Flaimimgo..........
Hypoluxo......... .
.lupiter,-..........
Key W est ...........
Manatee. ..........
M arco...............
Miami...... ......
M yers.... .. .....
Nocatee .. ...


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY. 1904.-Continued.


SI temperature, in degrees Fahr. Precipitation, in inches.



COU TIES. .:

.( E o . 'i .- *S tP o z >



Orange. 98 1 764-0.2 9027 56 1 35 2.16 -1.001.30.. 4
Hillixbor'gh 121 12 76.1-0 1.9728 50 1 39 3.95 -0.062.00. C
MIarion ......5 76 9728* 52 8 0.84 ......0 70.. 2
Pasco.. :.10 761-2 2 9628 1 84 1.51 -1.740.84... 6
Hillsbor'gh 20 14 766+ 1 -4 28 -62 .1 :27 4.17 +1 742.84 ... 6
Hillsbor'gh 20 20 77.0+2 0,10030 57 37 (1.66 ......0.41 2
Brevard.. 1 13 75 2+0 7 9731 54 6 34 1.07 -3.20 43.. c

rxl... o -, 0 I -. JiK K .l I R nQ 3 Q l9 0 O5 i


Monroe .. U 4 77 L'j
Dade ....... 8 76 4
Dade......... 2R 17 77.34
Mcnro 22i 34 77.
Manitev W 16 21 75.5,
Lee 4 7
Dade.. .. .. 8 79 01-
Lee......... 19 21 76 0-
De Sot" S 43 7 0 ,.


61 3 4
65 1* 22
6521. 19l
69 2 13
5521: 34
66 2* 26
6616 21
160 2 26
59 1* '80


6.47
3.58
2:42
13:0)
1: 71
1. 89
12.28
3.16
4.16


...... 2 08 ...
-3.210 68...
-2 87 0 77 ..
+9.855 83..
-1.570 88
. .. ..0 53 ..
1+6.164 60...
1+0.21 1 63
i .. .. 1.65 ..


Sir. Ia








219 --w

14 17 sw.
20 2e.

15 16 0 .
E -.2 E



21 9 1e.










13 13 5 .
18 10 .3ne.
12 1 2w.


15 7 9e.
15 16 (e

20 10 1nw.
26 3 2w.
ne-se.
24 4 s.
8 16 7e.


-










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY. 1904.-Continued.


STATIONS.





Western Section.
Apalachicola......
Bonifay.. ... :...
Uatrabelle.: ........
DeFuniak Sp'gs
Madison..............
Mariann ....... ...
M ilton ..............
Molino....... ... .
Monticello...... i...
Pensacola............
Quincy...............
St. Andrew...........
Stephensville. o......
fallahassee..........
Wausau .............
% ewahitchka ........


COTTNT1ES.


Franklin .....
Holmes ......
Franklin .....
Walton ....
Madison ....
Jackson......
Santa Rosa
Bscambia....
Jefferson.....
Escambia....
Gadsden.....
Washington..
Taylor.
Le n... ......
Washington..
Calhoun .....


J State Means ....


STemperatu

a2
0









.. 974.3 .....
8 a7 .4 .....
9 -78.8-2.2
8 .72.4-1.7
. 73.4 .....
5 72.4 .....

i 70.8 ....
.. 73.1 ..
25 72.8-0.8
4 ..... .....
7 72.0-3.4
5 72..
19 74.6+0 1
7 73.6-2.6
5 78.4 .....

.. 74.91-2.7


re. in degrees Fahr.pPrecipitation, in inches. Sky.


2.10 .....
8.49 ......
1,99 -0.69
4.29 +1.17
0.90 ......
1.84 ......

2.3 ...
4.04 ... ..
1.03 -2.80

1.82 -1.63
1.00 ......
1.05 -2.43
2.85 -8.17
1.88 ......

2 51 (-1.01


1.70 ...
1.26..:
1.
1.0.
3.01 ...
0.94.
0.76..


)..87 ...
0.53

91...
1.00 ...
3.50 ....
1 30...
).49 ...


... s.

5sw.
2s.
0ew.
2sw.

9s.
Oe.
1 ne.

Os.
Osw.
38.
2se-sw.
7s.


. I... 1 11 7 le.


-be
-n II
cs%
c
o
ir


" --




CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MAY, 1904.-Continued.


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature and
precipitation are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number of days missing from report.
tThermometers are not self-registering, and readings are made at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau.










































I



















I::



















PART III
FERTILIZERS,











I








































































































r









































r














i









BUREAU OP FERTILIZER.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. ER MC~IN,Cleirk.

STATE VALUATIONS, 1904.
For AvailabletWnl Insoluble Rhophoric Acid. Ammonia
and -otash for the Season of 1904.
Available phosphoric Acid 5 ents a pound
Insolublq Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonip(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 eentsr pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5+ cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $8.00 per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.25 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer wbichiaalises as follows;
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per enut.x$1.00- 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. -1.50 per cent/x .20- .80
Ammonia ................ 3.42 per ccnt.x 8.00- 10.26
Potash......................7.8 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging ...... 1.25
Commercial value at sea ports ... ........... .. 25.98
Or a fertilizer analyingaas follows :
Available phosphoric aid... .8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia................... .2 per cent.x 3.00-- 6.00
Potash.. ......... .'...... per cent:x 1-4O- 2.20
Mixing and bagging......... .............. 1.25
ConmgerciaL value at sea ports,-... . ;.... ..1745
tie above valuations are for cash for materials deIlv-
ere atlFlorida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lotsat these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added.









If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid - 9' cents per unit
Potash (K20) 99 cents per unit.
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) 2. 70 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT, SEA PORTS, JAN. 4, 1904.


: .. .'.: Less thah 5
Ammoniates. 5 tQns
Nilrate of Soda 17 per cent. Am-
monia ..................... $50.00
Sulphate. of Ammonia 25 per
cent Ammonia; ............. 71.00
Dried .,Blood.16 per cent. Am-i
monia .................... 54.00
POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per e'nt. Potash (K20).... 52.00
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26.
per cent. Potash (K20)..... .: 32.00
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ...... ........ 46.00
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot-
ash (?20) ..... ........ 82.00
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash....... 14.00
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ...... 17.00


:.foj0, :'-10 tons-
tons. & over.

$49.00 $49.00

70.60 70.00

53.50 53.



51.00 50.00


31.00


30.00


45.00 44 00-

81.00 80.00-
13.50 :13.00

16.50 Ig'o,0


S.AiMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.
High Grade Blood 'and Bone, 10 ...
10 per cent. Ammonia 7 per ...
cent. Phosphoric Acid ......... 35.00 34.50.. 34,00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6
ikr cent.' Amnnonia,8.8 r cent,
Phosphoric. Acid. .... ..,.. '.27.00 26.50 ,.-26.00
'Owl Brand, Tankage, 5 per cent. '
Ammonia ................ 20.0( 19.50 : 1.00


N' , ,


':: :'~:.:::~r~


~;d ;
t,
L'".
''''









Raw Bone/4 per cent. Ammuula
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid.. 29.00
Ground Castor Pomace: 6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid ........... 22.00
Bright Ooton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia market quota-
tions .......... ............ 26.00
Dark Coton Seed Meal, 5 per
cent Ammonia, market quota-
tions .................. ..... 18.00


28.50 28.00


21.50 21.00


25.50


25.00


17.50 17.00


PHOSPHORIC.


Double Super Phos., 45 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid ... 45.00
High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16
per cent. Available Phosphoric
Acid ...... ... ...... 16.00
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 14.00
Boneblack 17 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid ............ 25.00


44.50 44.00


16.50 15.00

15.50 13.00

24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems, 3
per cent. Ammonia, 9 per cent
Potash ...... ....... ...... 25.00
IPulverized Ground Tobacco Stems 16.00
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per cent.
Ammonia, 2 K20 Potash...... 21.00
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1l per cent.
Ammonia, 1 per cent. Potash. 16.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..... 16.00
Land plaster in sacks .......... 10.50


24.50 25.00
15.00 15.00

20.50 20.00


15.50
15.50
10.25


15.00
15.00
10.00


Any formula will be mixed at the price of $1.25 per
ton, in addition to the cost of the materials used.









FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into Nitrogen, multiply by..............0.824
Ammonia Protein by ............................5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by..............1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........... 16.47
Nitrogen, into pIotein by ..........................6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by..0.458
Phospheric Acid into Bone Phosphate, multiply by.2.184
Muriate of Potash into actual potash, multiply by..0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by.1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by.0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. .816
For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen in it, multiply
95 per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent nitro-
gen; you want to know how.much ammonia this Nitrogen
is equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214
and you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.

CHEMICAL EQUIVALENTS.

Under the law and the regulations of the department
chemical equivalents of the three essential elements,
Ammonia. Available Phosphoric Acid, and Potash, are
not allowed in the guarantee. A few instances have been
noted, particularly in cotton seed meals, when the Am-
monia is guaranteed, and followed by a statement of the
protein contents:
As. Ammonia ..........................5 per cent.
Protein .......... ..........25.75 per cent.
Or Ammonia ...........................8 per cent.
Protean ............ ..... .......41.18 per cent.
Such a guarantee is misleading, as the terms "Ammo-
nia" and "Protein," are equivalent, and only represent
the "Nitrogen" (or ammonia) content of the goods.
Multiplying the nitrogen by 1.21 gives the ammonia
thus, 3 per cent. nitrogen X1.21 gives ammonia 3.63 per
sent. or nitrogen 3 per cent. X625 gives "Protein" 18.75
per cent.











Composition of Fetilizer Materials

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia APho c Potash

Nitrate of Soda.............. 17 to 19 .....................
Sulphate of Ammonia ........ 21 to 24...................
Dried Blood...... ........ 12 to 17 .....................
Concentrated Tankage....... 12to 1 1 to 2 ...........
Bone Tankage ............... 6to 9 10to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap ............ 8 to 11 6 to 8 .......
Cotton Seed Meal........... 7 to 10 2to 3 i to 2
Hoof Meal..... ............ 13 to 17 to 2 ...........


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per.Hundred.

Ava i able insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
I Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Thosphte............ -.......... 26to 82
Florida Rock Pnosphbte .. ........... 3 to 85
Florida Super Phosphate........... 14 to 19 1 to .A
Grouned Bone ............... 3 .to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone................ 2 to4 6 to 9 10 20
Diss ved Bone .............. 2to 4 13 to 151 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

i jPhos-
Actua Am'nia phonic Lime
Potach Acid


Muriate of Potash........... 60
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 52
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26 to 30
Kainit .................... 12 to 121
Sylvinit....................... 16 to 20
Cotton Seed Hu Ashes...... 15 to 30
Wood Ahes, uneached..... 2 to 8
Wood Ashes leached.........1 to 2
Tobacco Stems ............. 5 to 8
Cow Manure (fresh).......... 0.40
Horse Manure (fresh)........ 0.53
Sheep Manure (fresh)........ 0.67
Hog Manure (frPsh) ......... 0.60
Hen Dung (fresh)............ 0.85
Mixed Stable Manure. ...... 0.63


....... .........

........ to.
........ to 2
. ..... to 2
2 to 4 ...
Ot' 41 0.16
Oto60 0.28
1.00 0.23
0.55 0.19
2.07 1.54
0 76 0.26


10
30 to 25
35 to 40
St
0.31
0.21
0.83
0.08
0.24
0.70









SPECIAL NOTICE,
The attention of persons sending samples of fertil-
izers for analysis is called to the following:
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER SAMPLES TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF.LAW.
Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers,
under Sec. 9 of the law approved May 22, 1901.. Shall
be drawn in the presence of two disinterested witnesses,
from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed and a
FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES
(ONE-HALF POUND), SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO THE COM-
MISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT LESS
THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE AC-
CEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure fair
samples of sufficient size to make the six necessary de-
terminations, viz: Moisture, available and insoluble
phosphoric acid, ammonia and potash; and to allow the
preservation of a duplicate sample in case of protest or
appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for
two months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special samples from tht purchaser. The propriety
of the method of drawing and sending the samples as
fixed by the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases isin compliance with law. Samples are frequently
'sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce)
frequently there are no marks, numbers or other means,
of identification. The post mark in some instances be-
ing absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to
avail themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of
the law, which are clear and explicit.
COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.
Citizens interested in the fertilizer law of the State,
and desiring to avail themselves of its protection, can
obtain a copy free of charge by sending for same to the
Commissioner of Aericulture.









CAUTION TO PURCHASERS OF COTTON
SEED MEAL,
'he attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either
for stock feeding or fertilizing purposes, is called to the
analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per
cent. and above in ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of avail-
able phosphoric acid, and 1l per cent. of potash. Such
meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its
Commercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $8.00 $24.00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00 2.00
11 per cent. potash @ $1.10 65

$27.65
The commercial value being in excess of the market
value.
There is a quantity of adulterated cotton seed meal
sold in the State, These goods are guaranteed as fol-
lows:
4* to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1 to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1i to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as
follows:
4k per cent. ammoma $13.50
1 per cent. phosphoric acid 1.75
1j per cent. potash 1.65

Commercial value $16.90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than
prime meal. Their relative value is $10.75 less than
prime meal. There is no economy in the use of such
goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the
planter, the value of the meal depending only on its con-
tent of ammonia, phosphoric acid and potash in both
cases. Purchasers should buy accordingto the analysis
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements
only.
8 Bu),








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS. BM
R. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


Phosphoric Acid,

NAME OR BRAND. O- 4
0 CZ S
*S 0 0 0
o o



Special Mixture ......... 473 ..... 7.351 2.261 9.61( 4.61) 9.03
Fertilizer .... .... .... 1474 ..... 8.(62 0.461 9.08 1.64113.32
Bone Compound (No. 1).. 47611i0l)00 9.75t 2.67112.421 2.20) 1.02
Acid Phosphate (No. 2)..1477 22.45 12.611 2.51122.45 ..... .....
Special Mixture ......... 4781..... 6.08 0.761 6.841 .31i 7.86
Kentucky Brand-Pulver-j I I
ized Tobacco Stems.... .479]. .. ...... ..... '2.89110.14
Cotton !Seed Meal ....... 4801..... ...... .. .. . 7.021 .....
Fertilizer .... .......... I81]14.25 4.90 0.321 5.221 3.57112.99
Sulpliate of Potash ...... 1483 .... .... ..... ..... ..... 150.48
Fertilizer ...... ...... ..4841 9.85 .78 1.701 8.481 6.151 6.77
1 11 I I I I


BY WHOM SENT.



T. Kimball, St. Petersburg, Fla.
F. S. Hickock, Hastings, Fla.
SJohn M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
R. D. Knight, Little River, Fla
Willson & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Schroeder & Auguinbaw, Quincy.
J. F. Adams, Winter Park, Fla.
Thos. W. Williams, Tampa, Fla.
J. G. Powers, Terra Ceia, Fla.
1






BUREAU OF FERTILIRERS-Continued. 85
o Phosphoric Acid

NAME-OF BRAND.' BY WHOM SENT.
o '2 -i -s -5
0 a

Sea Island Cotton Seed... 485 ..... ... ......... 4.141..... Florida Mfg. (J ., Madison, Fla.
Sea Island Ootton Seed M'11486. ........... ..... 4.92| ..... Florida Mfg. Co., Madison, Fla.
Sea Island Cotton Seed M'11487..... ............ ..... 5.62i .... Florida Mfg. Co., Mhidison, Fla.
Fertilizer .... .......... 1488...... 5..20 0.771 5.9)7i 1.8(i13. 15 II. 0. Wordenhoff, Plant City, Fla
Fertilizer (light) ........ 4891..... 7.5G 1.59 9.151 4.(i51 7.61 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Fertilizer (dark) ........ 4901 ..... 6.121 0.66 6.78 4.281 7.2-14 rs. E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Dried Blood ............ 141 4 ................. .185 ... T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Raw Ground IBone ...... 921 ..... 9.5:: 1: .9281 .50( 4.51 ..... J.. ST. liiauly, J.eIInl], Fla.
W ood Ashes .... ...... 4 3 .... . 1 ....|... .... .. ... I 0.21 .. T. lauly, reinsen, Fla.
Gr(oundl Tob1acrlo Stems .. 194 ..... ........... ..... :.1. SI 9.2.' J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 149.5 ...... 7.. ...1 . I 7 1 ..... Scliiler & Auguninhaw, Quin;cy.
Cotton Seed Meal .......14961... ......... ..... i 7.711 ..... James B. ]ours, 1Jacksonville, Fla
Acid Phosphate .........1497i.....118.741 0.75|19.491............. Golding ert. Co., Pensacola.
Fertilizer (acid phosphate) 1498114.4)0 13.64| 0.5'114.171 0.001 0.01 1. D. Clark, Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1.......... 1499111.301 7.051 1.011 8.061 4.601 8.42 B. G. Hewet. Pebble. Fla.







.BURAAUT OF R'ERILIZEk--CONTINUED.
------- L ---- r ;I" ..........----


NAME OF BRA]


ND. 4
o
.0
1.


Phosphoric Acid.


?cl
Yd~
m
cJ
c
O
PI
1


t oI -- -
Fetilizer No. 2 .......... 50011L35 7.101 1.161 8.361 4.51 8.49
Fertilizer ...... ........ 501 .. 0.00] 0.001 0.001 4.42 0.0(,
Guano ................ 502 ..... ...-.....126:131 3.711 3.14
Acid Phosphate ......... 503 ..:... 13.68 2.05 15.78 ..... .....
CGrde Oarbonate of Potash 504 ...... ... ..... 1 ..... 38.8
White Carbonate of Potash 505 ..... ... .... .... ..... 62.62
Fertilizer ............... 506110.85 7.38 1.26 8.561 3.18 3.52
Fertilizer ........ ......15071..... 9.71 1.5611.271 5.361 7.68
Fertilizer ...... ........ 5081 7.35 8.12 1.2 9.32 4.011 8.71
Ootton Seed Meal ........ 509 ..... ......... .... 7.13 .....
Fertilizer ...... ........ 15101..... 6.101 5.57|11.67 2.08 8.46


BY WHOM SENT.


B. G. Hewet, Pebble, Fla.
Peter Gardener, Palatka, Fla.
James Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
Prof. O. J. Moore, Lisbon, Fla.
J. Hirachburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
J. Hirschburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
W. M. Girardeau, Monticello, Fla.
P. L. Fiveash, Alliance, Fla.
C. B. Robbinson, Corno, Fla.
J. E. Wirick, Jr., Lloyd, Fla.
R. L. McMullen, Clearwater, Fla.


I-- {


{





BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


S Phosphoric Acid

NAME OR BRAND. 0 3



Fertilizer ..... ...... 511 10.45 9.99| 1.961 8.95 4.631 4.86
Fertilizer No. 1.......... 5121 .10 7.87 0.731 8.601 2.24 1.28
'Fertilizer No. 2.......1. 51311 .15" 9.11 3.00112.11 2.12 1.84
.Fertilizer No. 3.......... 1514 10.101 8.43 2.6811.11 2.13 2.15
'Ferilizer No. 4.......... 1514 11.30110.521 3.26113.781 2.471 1.89
Blood, Bone and Potash.. 516114.201 9.91 2.951 9.86 3.801 4.44
Dark Cotton Seed Meal and I I I
Potash ...... .........1518 .25).......... 2.03 5.021 3.81
II I I I
Ground Tobacco Stems .. 5191...... ..... .. . .. ... I 2.921 9.24
Fertilizer ...... ........ i ). 14.61 7.75j 2.76110.511 2.291 2.23
Fertilizer No. 3 ........ 1521i 6.95 8.491 1.95 10.441 2.15113.71
Fertilizer No. 2 ........ i221 .95 7.22 1.39 8.611 4.461 8.07
Fertilizer No. 1..........152314.25 8.171 3.02111.191 2.221 2.26
Fertilizer ........... 524; 9..25 81G31 0.72 8.75j 4.44111.44
Rock PhOsphate .........525 ...... .. ... 37.161.......


BY WHOM SENT.


Johnson & Co., Leesburg, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. H. Dishong, Dover, Fla.

R. L. Goodwin, St. Pierce, Fla.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
J. H. Hinton, Dover, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
H. Price Williams, Miami, Fla.
T. D. Hawkins, King's Ferry, Fla.


_~








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric






7.741 2.96


NAME OF BRAND.
0o
1

Fertilizer .... ......... 52610.90
Armour's H. G. Tobacco.
Dust ....... ......... 527.
Fertilizer ............... 528 14.00
Fertilizer ................ 52! 110.20
'Dark Cotton Seed' Meal... 530 .....
Bright Cotton Seed Meal. 531...
Rock Phosphate.. ..... 532...
Ashes .... .......... .533 .... .
Fertilizer ...... ........ 534...
Fertilizer No. 1......... 535 .....
Fertilizer No. 2 (Sulphate
Potash). ............ 53 ....
Fertilizer ...... ........ 537 ....
Fertilizer ...... ........ 538 ...
Rock Phosphate ........ 539 .....


1.63
6.08


9.72
7.22


3.01
3.00


0.77
0.85


3.12
4.12


Acid






10.70


8.61
10.12
1.94
2.91
34.05

2.40
6.93


12.84
11.34
33.46


0
cN
BY WHOM SENT.

Is

4.87 13.79 S. B. Rob'binson, Seven Oaks, Fla.

2.60 3.91 Armour Fert. Wks., Jacksonville.
4.43 5.65 H. J.,Drane, Lakeland, Fla.
4.37 15.56 F. G. Sampson, Boardman, Fla.
4.99 1.49 N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs.
8.37 1.81 N. 11. Fogg, Altamonte Springs.
S......... John S. Flanagan, San Antonia.
..... 0.60 A. J. Rosetter, Enterprise, Fla.
4.00 7.08 W. J. Dyer, Stuart, Fla.
4.20 9.34 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.

..... 47 24 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.
2.00 1.69 L. A. Adams, Luanna, Fla.
2.25 2.37 R. L. West, Plant City, Fla.
........ John D. Philips, Bailey, Fla.


j


5.61
7.12


~ _~_







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. 89


NAME OF BRAND.




* Iot9l "....." ...* .
Cotton Seed Mtal.........
Tobacco Ashes ..........
Muck Soil ..............
Fertilizer ....... .. ...
Cotton Seed Meal .......
Fertilizer ..............
Wood Ashes ............
Fertilizer ..............
Fertilizer ...............
Fertilizer ..... .........
Fertilizer ..............
Fertilizer ...... ........
Bright Cotton Seed Meal.
Dark Cotton Seed Meal..


. ..
3, ... .






. . .


5.281



7.(60

11.08

7.94
10.55
5.3!)
9.25
7.31


1.381 C. (i
..... 2.29
. . . 2.53
. . 0.3!l
9.05 15.05

2.67 13.75

1.86 9.80
0.61 11.16
0.371 5.76
1.66 10.91
..... 7.31


BY WHOM SENT.


3.41
6.84
2.82

5.28
1.85
2.65
1.50

7.57
6.82


_ I -
7.84 S. P. Lamb, Anthony, Fla.
1.71 .1. .Snow, East Lake, Flu.
12.12 Fames Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
Tr. %V. Lippencott, Lakeland, Fla.
12.3(6 C. Hefner, St. Petersburg, Fla.
..... Lewis Lively, Tallahassee, Fla.
1.87 Tas. B. Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
0.68(,hase & Co., Sanford Fla.
17.02 '. B. Robinson, Seven Oaks, Fla.
2.58 A. W. Turner, Coe's Mills, Fla.
10.90 I lorrace Prior, Como, Fla.
0.97 Alexander & Baird, Beresford, Fla
2.61C. C. Wills, Woods, Fla.
..... W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.
.....J. W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.







BURAUE OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND


*__ ___ AL
Ashes ............... 556 ..... ...
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 5571.... ....
Dissolved Animal Bone... 558 .... 9.8
Fertilizer ...... ........ 559..... 7.2
Raw Bone Meal........ 560....... ....


BY WHOM SENT


2.28 John J. Beers, Emporia, Fla.
1.73 J. W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.
..... Florida Fert. Co., Gainesville.
5.91 Rome Tinny, Ozond, Fla.
..... Jas. B. Holmes, Jensen, Fla.


__





BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS--Continued. 41
For values see heading "Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of Special Samples sent in by purchasers. D3alers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
aminat'on b.3for. purchasing. A Sp3cial Sample sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that the goodsare offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobaccq stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where 6nly the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces ( pound), is required for a "Special Sample."
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal---thougb the guarantee is but 4 per cent. of
ammonia- rit is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of
prime meal.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY. g
R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1904, MARION G. DONK, ASSISTANT CBEMIST.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1. Act approved May 22 1901.


z
NAME OF BRAND

0




Cotton Seed Meal....... 311 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Tobacco Dust......... 312 uarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Hprd Wrod Ashes... 313 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
H., G. Dissolved Bone
Black..... ......... 314 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Acid Phbspbahe......... 315 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10.00
11.30


13.90


PHOSPHORIC ACID


16.00
20.26

14.00
13.76


0.29


0.35


ce
0-
o
I



7.35
..... 8 .12

1.20
. 1.38




20.55....

3......
13.90 .......


2.50
2.80

5.50
4.60


BY WHOM AND WHERE

MANUFACTURED


Southern Cotton Oil Co,
Washington, Ga.

Tampa Fert Co, Tampa,
Fla

Blackshear Manufa'g Co.,
B ackshear, Ga.

Armour Fert. Co., Jack-
sonvillc.

Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
Fla.


' '


-----------






ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZE

Steamed Bone Flour.... 316 Guarant'd Analysis. ..... ......
Official Analysis.... 5.75 13.38
H. G egetab'e Manure. 317 Guarant'd Analysis. 1000 5 00
Official Analysis.... 12 10 7 64
Fruit and Vine Manure 318 Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00 6 00
Official Analysis.... 8 95 8 31
Ober's Fruit and Vine.. 319 Guarant'd Analysis. 11 00 6 00
Ober's Vegetable Ma- official Analysis.... 6 95 8 93
Ober's Vegetable Ma-
nure ................. 320 Guarant'd Analysis. 14 00 6 00
Official Analysis.... 13 70 7 87
Baugh's Special Orange
T1ec .................. 321 Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00 5 00
Official Analysis.... 6 0 8 18
Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
nure.................. 322 uarant'd Analysis. 12 001 600
Official Analysis.... 13 35 6 71
Double Strength of Pot-
ash .................. 323 uarant'd Analysis. 1000 5 00
official Analysis.... 7 55 6 65
Peruvian and Fish Gu-
ano ................. 32 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 5 00
Official Analysis.... 8 35 6 22
Potato Mixture........ 325 Guarant'd Analysis. 1000 5 00
Official Analysis.... 7 90 4 99


:RS-Continued. 43


I


13.46
200
2 05
1 00
0 64
2 00
1 54
1 00
1 78
2 (00
1 97
4 00
1 71
200
1 09
100
2 44
200
2 53


23.00 3.00...... Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
26.84 3.85 ...... Fla.
.. 4 00 6 00 Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
S69 4 16 5 98 Fla.

2 00 12 00 Pampa Fert. Co, Tampa,
8 95 2 42 11 09 kla.
.2 50 10 00 Oberr & Sons, Baltimore,
1047 3 27 9 36 Md.
... 5 00 600Ober & Sons, Baltimore,
9 65 5 43 5 96 Md.
...... 2 10 00 Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
1015 2 39 9 69 Md.
... 5 00 7 00 Baugb & Sons, Baltimore;
8 42 5 48 6 88 Md.
1 50 10 00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
7 74 2 05 11 40 Gainesville, Fla.
4 50 5 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
8 66 4 92 6 58 tainesville, Fla.
... 3 00 9 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.
7 52j 3 79 8 23 Gainesville, Fla.









ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Peruviau & Fish Guano
Doub e strength of
Potash ...............

Orange Tree Fertilizer..

Vegetable Fertiliz'r No 1


Fish and Potash .......

Bean Special............

Cuke Special-. ........

Early Trucker..........

Lettuce Special.........

Strawberry Special Fer-
tilizer........ .....


326

327

328

329

310

331

332

333

334


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Gtarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Giarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guaranty' Analysis.
Official Analysis....


7.00

900
5 20

8 00
8 80

9 00
9 90

800
4 90

900
4 75

7 00
6 80

9 00
4 95

8
9 8C


5.00 1.00......
6.35 4.65 11.00

5 00 200......
5 62 1 83 7 45
400 200 ....
3 95 2 76 6 71

3 00 2 00......
3 19 1 29 4 48

400 300 ......
4 24 3 04 728

350 200 ......
3 15 2 211 836

4 00 2 .....

400 2 ....
4 74 2 81 728

6 91 2 22 8 13


--


10.00
9.56

10 00
10 78
500
6 04

5 00
6 66
800
7 85

8 00
8 52

500
5 09

600
6 99

500
5 14


Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesvil e, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.


- ---------- --------- ---





ANALYSIS OF FERT1L1ZERS-Continued. 45


Champion Citrus Com-
pound ..............

Old Dominion Potato
Manure .............

Special Vegetable
Grower ................

Tiptop Tomato Trucker.

Fruit and Vine..........

Southern States Special.

Cotton Seed Meal.......

Sterns Ammoniated Raw
Bone ................

Baltimore Soluable
Bone.................

Cumberland Standard
Fertilizers ............


335 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

836 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

337 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
338 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis.. .
339 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

340 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
341 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

342 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

343 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

3441 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


1000
11 25

8 00
14 50

80(
12 11

8 X
12 5

8 00
11 35

1165



15 00
15 75
15 00
14 95

14 00
13 4


0 93

1 1


1 8C

1 7C

1i03

1 53



10C
1 OC
2 0e

1 0(
3 7(

1 OC
0 53


6 77

610

10 08
i6"o8

8 "93

'j"6i


io '.6

2 C5(


11 583

14 111


30C
4 03

5 00
5 09

3 00
3 01

40
4 59

2 5
3 09

4 0C
3 59

8 00C
8 68

20 C
2 1C

1 00
1 47

20 C
1 98


" 9 .i


I


14 00
11 50

8 00
8 42

300
3 06

5 00
5 16

10 00
9 81

5-00
5 98

1 50

200
1 48

100
1 11

200
1 91


Va.-far. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Crr. Chem. Co.. Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va -Car. Chem. Co, Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Southern Cotton Cil Co.,
Pens'acola.

Standard Guano & Chem.
M'f'g. Co., New.Orleans.

Georgia Chemical Co.,
Augusta, Ga.

Mutual Fertilizer Co., Sa-
vannah.


~'---


'' ---


L









ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS---Continued. 46


Scotts H. G. Acfd Phos-
phate................. 345

Champion Farmers'
Choice................ 316

Vegetable Compound.. 347

Baltimore Soluble Bone 348

Bone and Potash....... 349

HI G. Acid Phosphate 350

Hard Wood Ashes...... 351

H. G.Sulphate rf Potash 352

Acid Phosphat......... 353

Sulphate of Ammonia... 354


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


I
12 00 14 00
14 00 15 27

15 00 800
11 70 9 3,
16 00 7 00
14 05 9 82

15 00 10 00
13 75 10 06

15 00 10 00
12 30 10 82

16 00 15 00
13 20 16 92

.. .


14 25


14 00
14 75


200.
1 84

1 00 .
1 25

1 00.
1 93

1 00 .
2 04

1 00.
2 57

1 00.
0 43


17 11

10 6E

ii 7f

12 14


2 00
2 37

40 C
2 51

1 00
084


13 3 .... .

17 .....
17 s t 1....


1 i0 15 47


2400
25.09


... :.

200
2 7'1

40 C
4 52

100
0 93

200
1 84



5 5
5 06

50 0C
5028


Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
gomery, Ala.

Standard Guano & Chem.
M3f'g. Co., New Or-eans.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
1'ensaco'a.

Georgia Chemical Works,
Augusta, Ga.

Georgia Chemical Works,
Augusta, Ga.

moulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensaco a, Fla.

W. R. Fuller & Co., Tam-
pa, Fa.

W. R. Fuller & Co., Tam-
pa, Fla.

W. R. Fu' er & Co.,. Tam-
pa, Fla.

Manatee Fertilizer Co.,
Palmetto, Ila.


i' . . i . . . ...






ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Vegetable Fertilizer.....


Fruit and Vine No. 1....


II. G. Sulphate of Potash


Fruit and Vine..........

Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
n ure .................


Dissolved Bone Black..

H. G. Vegetable Fish
(iGuano .................


Acid Phosphate ........


Illood and Bone.........


Blood Bone and Potash.


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official -Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10.00
12 40

800
8 70



800
t1 20

12 00
9 85


7 50

12 00
i 15


9 35


1000

800
10 90


5.00
5 48

600
7 13



6 00
6 96

6 00
7 62

17 00
18 26

5 00
5 13

14 00X
15 47

6 00
5 71

6 00
6 26


2 00 .....
2 76 8.24

1 00 ......
2 51 9 64



1 00 .
2 26 9 22

4 00 ..
1 45 9 07


3 7422 0

2 00 ......
3 22 8 35


2 34 17 81

8 00..
9 79 15 50

3 00 ......
3 17 9 43


4.00 600
4 18 7 05

2 00 12 00
2 97 12 38

..... 49 00
.... 49 08

2 00 12 00
2 291 11 88

5 00 7 00
4 91 7 60


..... ......

4 00 8 00
4 00 705



6 50 ......
6 5 ......

4 00 4 00
3 93 4 20


W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla. -

Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.

Baugh & Sons, Ba'timore,
Md.

Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, Fla.

W. R. Fi:ler Co., Tama,
Fla.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.


-----








ALi bigYi OF PERTIL'IERA-Coiiinued as


Orange Tree Special.....

Dark Cotton Seed Meal.

H. G. Sulphate of Potash

L. G. Sulphate of Potash

Cotton Seed Meal.......


Cotton Seed Meal.......

H. G. Sulphate of Potash

Simon Pure Pine Apple.

Simon Pure Tomato.....

H. G, Blood, Bone and
Potash..............


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guamnt'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


I F


1200 800 200.
7 80 7 57 038 7 95

12 00 ...... ..... .....
...... ...... ...... ......





...... .... .. ......
00 . .. . .. .
.o.... . ...




8... 4.0 100 ..........
7 05 ...... ...... 2 4(




80( 4 0C 1 00
7 90 5 75 1 89 7 55

12 4 OC 200 ......
8 8r0 5 2 1 48 6 76

io..... 1 ... 83
6 10 221 181 888


2 50 12 OC
2 27 13 66

4 8 .....

..... 49 OC
.... 49 72

...... 27 0
...... 25 86

8 00 ......
8 25 ......

8 00 176
8 51 ......

.....49 00
...... 48 52

400 600
3 80 7 01

5 0C 900
65( 10 48

7 OC 10 00
7 91 10 11


Manatee Fert. Co., Palti-
more, Md.

Florida Mn'fg Co., Madi-
son, Fla.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, Fla.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, F a

H. E. Bridges, Memphis,
Tcnn,

Abbeville Cotton Oil Co.,
Abbeville, Fla,

E. O. Painter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.
E. Painter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.

E. 0. Painter Fortilizer
Co., Jacksonville.








Gem Bean Fertilizer..... 375 Guar
Office

Special Mixture No, 1... 376 Guar
Offlc

Ideal Fertilizer........ 377 Guar
Oftic
Mape's Fruit and Vine
Manure ............. 378 Guar
Office
Mape's Vegetahle Ma-
nure ...... ........... 379 Gua
Offic
Mape's Orange Tree Ma-
nure ................. 380 Gua
Office
Bradley's Fruit and Vine
Fertilizer ............. 381 Gua

Baugh's Fruit aud Vine
Manure .............. 382 Guar
Offic
Bradley's Vegetable
fertilizer ............ 383 Gua
Offlto

Bradley's Nursery Stock 884 Guar
Offlc


ANALYSIS OF PERTILIZERS-Continued.


ant'd Analysis. ......
lal Analysis.... 8.00
ant'd Analysis. 8 00
ial Analysis.... 9 50
ant'd Analysis. 8 00
lal Analysis.... 9 20

ant'd Analysis. 10 00
ial Analysis.... 15 95
ant'd Analysis. 12 00
lal Analysis ... 15 25

ant'd Analysis. 12 00
;ial Analysis..... 15 95
-ant'd Analysis. 13 00
ial Analysis.... 7 95
ant'd Analysis. 12 00
lal Analysis.... 6 75
ant'd Analysis. 13 00
ial Analysis.... 10 60

ant'd Analysis. 13 00
lal Analysis.... 12 50


---


2.91 7.91

1 00 ......
0 96 6 91

1 00
0 95 7 11

2 00 . . .
2 57 8 01

2 00 ....
2 49 8 89

2 00 .....
3 40 10 33

1 00 . . .
2 44 9 15

2 00 .....
3 16 10 39

1 00 .....
2 50 10 27

100 .. . .
2 95 11 6J


I


-


I


I '


2 00 E. O. Painter Fertilizer
3 26 Co., Jacksonville.

5 00 Willson & 'Toomer Fert.
5 95 Co., Jacksonville.

6 00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
8 26 Co., Jack-onvil e.

10 001Mape's Formula & P. G.
11 05 Co., New York.

4 00 Mape's Formula & P. G.
5 95 Co., New York.

3 OG6Mape's Formula & P. G.
4 09 Co,, New York.

10 00 Amerioan Ag'l & Chem.
10 15 Co., New York.

15 00Baugh & Son, BAltimore,
14 38 Md.

5 00 American Ag'l & Chem.
5 19 Co., New York.

3 00 American Ag'l & Chem.
2 92 Co., New York.










Fruit and Vine.........

Special Fruit and Vine..

Cotton Seed Meal.......

Cotton SeedjMeal......


ANALYSIS OF.FEiRTILIZERS-Continued.

385 Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00 6 00 1 (. .... 250 10 00
Official Analysis.... 7 60 622 0 38 65 2 68 8 73
886 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00 6 00 1 OC ....... 4 00 13 00'
Official Analysis.... 510 659 036 695 470 1370
387 Guarant'd Analysis. ..... ...... 2 50 7 50 1 50
Official Analysis.... ..... .......... 3 13 8 1 1 83
388 arant'd Anay. ..... ......... 2 00 7 5 1 00
Official Analysis....... ...... ..... 3 08 7 5 1 92


Va.-Carolina Chem, Co,
Savannah, Ga.
Willson & Toomer Fort.
Co., Jacksonville.
W. A. Brode & Co., Mem-
phis, Tenn.
A. A. Smith, Atlanta, Ga.


















PART IV,
MISCELLANY EOUS.




































I






























































I




















I










IRISH POTATO GROWING AT HASTINGS, FLA.
We reprint the following from the "Hastings Farmer
and Trucker," on the subject of potato growing, its cost,
yield, etc. As this industry has during the past year as-
sumed immensely enlarged proportions, the items in the
publication will be interesting to many.
One of the first things that a prospective settler would
naturally want to find oft, before locating in Hastings
or any other locality, where he proposed to gain a liveli-
hood by cultivating the soil, would be the character of the
products grown, and the cost of their cultivation.
As Irish potatoes is the main money crop grown here,
although many other crops are grown with profit, the
cost of planting, caring and harvesting this crop is of th<
greatest interest. Mr. W. H. Erwin, one of the pioneer
potato growers, and who has successfully planted here
for fourteen years, gives the following estimate of put-
ting in an average crop of potatoes in the spring, on one
acre of ground:
Seed at $3.00 per barrel ........................$12 50
Fertilizer ................ ........ ......... 25 00
Labor ...... ................ .............. 5 00
50 barrels at 25 cents ......................... 12 50
Harvesting and delivery to the depot 20c per barrel 10 00

Total ...... ...... ...... .... ...... .... .$65 00
The average price received by grower ranges from
$3.90 to $4.00 per barrel for No. 1 potatoes, and from
$2.00 to $3.00 per barrel for No. 2 potatoes.
The range of quantity is about 85 barrels of No. 1 to
15 barrels of No. 2.
The range of production is from 30 to 75 barrels, al-
though in many instances still better results have been
obtained. Growers generally, however, prepare to care
for fifty barrels to the acre. Mr. Erwin's crop last year,
which was an "off year," averaged him 50 barrels to the
acre in a crop of some sixty acres.
Mr. Erwin states, however, that it is not quite fair to
charge up the entire cost of the fertilizer to the potato
crop, as the ground without further fertilizer produces







54

a generous second crop of sweet potatoes, crab grass hay,
cow peas, corn, velvet beans, or other crops that can be
matured and taken out in time to allow planting the
same ground in the spring.
It is also of interest to know that Mr. Erwin has
planted Irish potatoes successfully on the same ground
for thirteen consecutive years, besides occasionally put-
ting in a fall crop of potatoes on the same soil, and there
appears to be no dimunition in the yield.











OAUTION TO BUYERS OF COTTON SEED MEAL.

Its Value as a Stock Food, and Fortiizef, Depends on
the Nitrogen Contents-Also Called Ammonia or Pro-
tein.
The value of Cotton Seed Meal, as a stock food, and
as a fertilizer, has become generally known during the
past few years.
Its use is now universal among stockmen, and particu-
larly among dairymen; its value-when pure and una-
dulterated-is greater as a flesh and milk producer, than
any other feed; it stands at the head of the list of con-
sentrated flesh, and milk, former; and in proportion to
its actual food value, it is the cheapest source of muscle
and milk.
This fact has lead to an enormous demand, not only in
America but in Europe. As the demand has increased.
to- has the price; at the same time this demand, and ready
sale, has caused more or less adulteration, and lowering
of quality.
The same ingredients that make cotton seed meal a
valuable stock food-that is the nitrogen-also- gives it
its value as a fertilizer.
The Nitrogenous elements in cotton seed meal and
similar foods; are classed Proteins. These Proteins, are
#imply the Nitrogen multiplied by 6.25.
The dairyman, and stockman, desires that the Protein
content of the feed be expressed in the guarantee; the
gardner and fruit grower desires to know the Nitroger
or Ammonia content of his fertilizer.
These terms, Nitrogen, Ammonia, and Protein, as here
used, are identical; and mean the same substance; they
are simply different expressions for the same substance
in different forms; just as, "one dollar," ten dimes, and
"one hundred cents, mean exactly the same amount of
money, and are each equivalent to the other.
The Nitrogen in cotton seed meal-or other substance
--multiplied by 1.22 gives the equivalent in Ammonia.
While the Nitrogen multiplied by 6.25 gives the equiv-









talent in Protein, or the Ammonia multiplied by 5.16
gives its equivalent in Protein. While multiplying Am-
monia by 0.814 gives Nitrogen.
Hence the terms, Nitrogen, Ammonia and Protein,
when so used, are equivalent and interchangeable.
This unfortunately, is not generally known, and leads
to much confusion of terms, and is frequently taken ad.
vantage of by some dealers and manufacturers, to mis-
lead, in fact to deceive the purchaser.
Proteins, are those Nitrogenous substances represent-
ed by the Albumins-the white of eggs-by Fibrin-
muscular tissue, lean meat, and Casine,-the curd of
milk, they are generally known as flesh or muscle form-
*rs. When they ferment or decay, they form Ammonia,
a most ill smelling gas.
The Nitrogenous substance multiplied by 6.25 gives the
Protein; thus, 3 per cent Nitrogen multiplied by 6,25
equals 18.75 per cent Protein.
Or 3 per cent Nitrogen multiplied by 1.22 is equivalent
to 3.66 per cent Ammonia; or 3 per cent Ammonia multi-
plied by 5.15 is equivalent to 15.45 per cent Protein.
Just as one dollar, equals ten dimes, or one hundred
cents, or ten dimes equals one dollar. I desire to make it
clear "that a guarantee, expressed in more than one of
these terms, is misleading; that but one, the Ammonia,
is permissable under the Florida Statute, and rules of the
Agricultural Department, and to caution dealers not to
handle goods having equivalents of the materials required
in the guarantee, expressed on the guarantee tag, or
package.
The fact that some dealers and manufacturers, still in-
sist on expressing two or more equivalents in their guar-
antee, is the reason for this lengthy explanation.
The facts are, but one term should be used in express-
ing the Nitrogen contents of a cotton seed meal or fer-
tilizer.
The Florida law says that it shall be expressed as Am-
monia.
The following is copied from a guarantee on a brand
of "Prime" Cotton Seed Meal:









Nitrogen ........ ........ ........ .... 6. per cent.
Ammonia ............................8 per cent.
Protein ........ ......... ..... .........41 per cent
The obvious intention being to lead the purchaser to
believe he is securing 55 per cent of food stuff, when in
fact he gets 6j per cent. Nitrogen, and nothing else. This
Nitrogen being equivalent to 7.93 per cent Ammonia; or
equivalent to 40.62 per cent of Protein.
Under the Florida law, and the regulations of the Ag-
ricultural Department; this guarantee should have ex-
pressed the 8 per cent. of Ammonia only; the buyer if
he desired to knqw how much protein he had, by simply
multiplying the 8 per cent by 5.15 would know he had
40.20 per cent. of Protein. (The factors used in this ar-
ticle are not carried beyond the second .decimal, hence
are not minutely exact.)
The State value of the above sample would be as fol.
lows:
Ammonia, 8 per cent multiplied by $3.00 equals...$24.00
Bags and Bagging ................ ............ 1.25
Or $25.25 per ton at sea ports; had credit been claimed
in the guarantee for the 2 per cent. Phosphoric Acid, and
1.50 per cent of Potash contained in the meal, a further
credit of $3.65 would be allowed making: a total State
value of $28.90 per ton.
Another brand sold as "Bright" or "Prime" Meal, has
the following guarantee:
*Nitrogen ...... ..... ...... ........ 4.12 per cent.
Ammonia ...... ...... ...... ........ 5.00 per cent.
Protein ....... ....... ........ ....25.75 per cent.
Implying, that there are 34.87 per cent of Nitrogenous
material guaranteed, when in fact the only guarantee un-
der the Florida law is the 5 per cent Ammonia, with a
State value of $16.25 as compared to the first example
$25.25, showing a value of $9.00 per ton less than the
8 per cent goods.
This low grade meal is sold as "Prime" or "Choice"
Meal, in color and texture it closely resembles "Pure
Bright Meal"; and is calculated to deceive the casual
obseerver. It however, is not guaranteed above 5 per cent









Ammonia,. hence there could be no recovery in case of
suit, if the, analysis shows 5 per cent Ammonia, though
the purchaser bought it for Prime Meal. Prime bright
cotton seed meal, carries not less than 7.50 per cent of
Ammonia, (equivalent to 38.62 per cent of Protein), and
generally as shown by analysis of this and other States,
8 per cent or more of Ammonia, which is equal to 41.20
pei cent of Protein.
Dark cotton seed meal, or Sea Island cotton seed meal
is guaranteed to carry 5 per cent Ammonia, 2 per cent
Phosphoric Acid and 1.00 per cent Potash, its State valge
is as follows:
Ammonia 5 per cent x $3.00 ....................$15.00
Phosphoric Acid 2 per cent x $1.00 .............. .2.00
Potash 1 per cent x $1.10 .................... 1.10
Bags, etc............ ....................... 1.25

$19.35
Its market value is very close to the State value, the
dark meals are far superior botl as a fertilizer and as
a feed, to the low grade or adulterated bright meals; and
sells for less per ton; it is a pure meal and sold upon its
merits.
This is not the case with adulterated bright meal with
41 per cent or 5 per cent Ammonia guaranteed. These
meals are adulterated with ground rice hulls, and similar
'valueless materials; not only useless, but in fact harm-
ful to the animal. Buyers should examine the tags on
their purchases, accept no "Bright Meal' with a guaran-
tee of less than 7.50 per cent Ammonia; -no dark meal
with less than 5 per cent Ammonia; make no allowance,
do not consider at all the Protein or Nitrogen if stated,
as it is all covered or expressed by the Ammonia guar-
antee.
You can convert the Ammonia into Protein if you de-
'sire by multiplying by 5.15; or into Nitrogen by 0.824 ex-
actly as you can convert your dollars into dimes by' nml-
tiplying by 10,. or into cents by multiplying by: 100 land
though the figures may be increased the values 'are at
,changed; : .. ,









-By the rules of the Cotton Seed Meal Orushers Asso.
ciation, "Choice" meal must contain at least $8 per cent
Ammonia (equivalent to 41.19 per cent Protein) and
"Prime" meal must contain at least 8 per cent of Am-
monia, or if from the South Atlantic States, 7.50 per
cent Ammonia, (equivalent to 38.62 per cent of Protein)
This is the standard fixed for Choice or Prime meal
by reputable manufacturers. If less than these amount
of Ammonia 7.50 per cent, or 8 per cent, are guaranteed
on "Choice" or "Prime" meal, it has undoubtedly been
adulterated.
I am pleased to say our Florida manufacturers, "The
Florida Cotton Oil Company" at Jacksonville and Talla-
hassee; "The Florida Manufacturing Company" at Madi-
son, (who make dark meal only) "The Pensacola Cotton
Oil Company," and the mills of the "Southern Cotton
Oil Company," generally, have been found to meet their
guarantee and frequently exceed them.
I also note that the proportion of hulls in most meals
examined this season is greater than formerly, reducing
the Ammonia content proportionately.
Most of the low grade, adulterated goods are offered
as prime meal, though not guaranteed above 4 per cent
or 5 per cent of Ammonia, are generally found in the
northern part of the State particularly in the northern
tier of counties; this condition is very largely due to the
indifference, or carelessness of the dealers and consumers
themselves. If the buyer insists upon pure goods 7.50
per cent. or 8 per cent Ammonia, refuses to accept adul-
terated material, demands the guarantee be on each sack,
and under our law, declines to pay for goods not meeting
the guarantee; the sale of such goods will soon cease.
Instances however are known where two lots of meal.
one with a guarantee of 8 per cent Ammonia, and other
with a guarantee of 4 per ecnt Ammonia were offered at
the same time and place at that same price, by a local
dealer to his customers, (for which he had paid the same
price per ton) and in many instances the consumer pre-
ferred the 4j per cent goods as it "looked better" in spite
of the guarantee on the tags, one offering 8 per cent the








00

other 4 per cent of food value. in both cases the guar-
anteed were upheld by analysis one lot was worth $24.00
per ton, the other $13.50 per ton relatively. Both sold
for $135 per hundred pounds at retail, or $27.00 per ton.
In this case the dealer and consumer were both defrauded
though the dealer would be liable in damages to the con-
sumer.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Tallahassee; July 29th, 1904.
*-*hA




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs