Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00018
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: June 1, 1904
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
LIBRARYY FLOtRDA AGRICULTURAk
EXPERIMENT STATION.


VOLUME 14
NUMBER 4




FLORIDA

MONTHLY

BULLETIN.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,


JUNE 1. 3904

B. E. M0LIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.

Part 1-Crops. Part 2-Weather Report,
Part 3-Fertilizers Part 4-Miscellaneous.


Entered January 3. 1ro3. at Tallahassee, Florida as
second-class matter, under Act of Congress.
uf June o19


These Bulletins are Issued free to those reasietting them.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA..
L B. HILSON, STATE PRINTER. a










County Map of the State of Florida.
(For the Bulletin )





















PART I.
CROPS,







I-.--



I q











" DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Hon. B. E. McLN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-All crops are badly damaged by the
long drought, and unless we get an abundance of rain
soon, the loss can not be made up later.
BAKER COUNTY-The dry weather is becoming a very
serious matter; all crops are greatly suffering for rain.
BRADFORD COUNTY-Considering the long drought, crops
are in a remarkable good condition. Cotton is suffering
from some disease similar to blight and wilt; in some
parts it is showing badly, crops need rain very much.
Fruit crops are very good.
BREVARD COUNTY--We have had good rains, and fruit is
holding to the tree well. It is notable that these are
much fewer insect pestA complained of than usual. All
crops are in good shape and nronect fine for large crop;
pineapple crop is a little short of last year.
CALHOUN COUNTY-The truck farmers are nearly ruin-
ed for want of rain; the drought has lasted eight weeks,
and the only rain we have had has been slight sprinkles
once or twice. Corn is standing the drought well, but can-
not go much longer without rain.
CITRUS COUNTY-Watermelons and cantaloupes have
suffered greatly on account of extreme dry weather. also
rJrish potatoes. Corn is standing the drought well, but is
also in need of rain.
COLUMBIA COUNGY-The continued drought has been
disastrous to nearly all crops; vegetable gardens have
suffered much; cotton has not suffered yet, and if rain
comes soon the corn crop will be an average.
DESOTO COUNTY-On :the whole, the season has been a
fair average for this section and all crops are doing well!
we have had no extremes of wet or dry, though .rain is
needed now.








EsCAMBTA COUNTY-Upland cotton is very much
troubled with lice,- but it is growing; there was an in-
creased acreage planted. The corn crop is large and do-
ing well, but needs rain; the peach crop is fine, but pears
are badly blighted.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-The weather is terribly dry. Un-
less rain occurs within a week, all crops will be damaged.
GADSDEN COUNTY-The stands of field crops are poor
ln' account of dry weather; virtually no grass has shown
up, therefore crops are in good condition; rain is badly
needed, and till we get it, prospective yield uncertain.
HAMILTON COUNTY-There has been, and still continues,
a long spring drought which has cut short all crops.
Friut-crops are good, particularly peaches.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-Early dry weather cut some
crops very short. Later rains have much improved condi-
fions and a few crops are coming out nicely. Red spider
has been quite prevalent on citrus trees, and drought is
beginning to affect orange trees.
HOLMES COUNTY-Irish potatoes have suffered severely
from drought; the weather is most favorable for working
crops. Rain is very much needed, and if it does not come
soon, some crops will be very short.
JACKSON COUrNTY-Crops are in good clean condition,
but needing rain very much. The vegetable and water-
melon crops did very well, and fruit crops are very good.
All crops need rain.
TEFFERSON COUNTY-On the whole, crops in this county
are doing well,' some of them are the largest for several
years; rain is needed and will. if it comes soon, make the
finest crops for a long time; the peach crop is very fine.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY-Field crops are suffering for rain,
the drought has 'been very severe. The peach crop is the
best for a number of years.
LAKE COUNTY-The weather is very dry; we are needing
rain very badly. Watermelons doing very bad, not more
than half of a crop, and quality inferior. The young
.oranges are dropipng on acocunt of dry weather.
LEE COUNTY-All crops in good condition and growing
finely; some of the crops are the finest and largest for
many years; pineapple crop is a little short.







LEON COUNTY-Owing to the long continued drought
cotton and corn are small, and growing slow; rain is very
much needed, and the lac kof it has caused the vegetable
crops to be short and products inferior in quality, ,'n the
average. The absence of rain is getting to be a very se-
rious matter with farmers.
MADISON COUNTY-Crops are in fair condition, consider-
ing the dry weather, which has prevailed for so long.
Some crops are turning out well, and later ones will be
failures unless we have rains.
MANATEE COUNTY-The drought is making itself badly
felt;, crops are suffering much for rain; fruit trees and
crops doing well.
MARION COUNTY.-Cantaloupes and watermelons are be-
ing shipped, and seem to be of extra fine quality. There
will be the largest crop of peaches and pears seen for
some years, but plums are off. Weather is very dry and
rain badly needed for most field crops.
NASSAU COUNTY-The weather is very, very dry and
crops are suffering badly. All kinds of truck crops will
be very light; fruit crops are fairly good.
PASCO COUNTY.-No rain at all, fruit trees, crops and
vegetables suffering greatly. Peach crop fine.
POLK COUNTY-Fieldi crops are doing very well but are
needing rain; vegetable crops, doing fairly well, and a
great many have been shipped to market. Fruit crops so
far are very good, with good prospect for oranges.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-The drought has had a bad ef-
fect on all crops ,and will cut many of them very short
unless rain comes soon; fruit crops are fairly good,
specially the peach' crop.
SUMTER COUNTY-The drought has lasted so long, that
it is having a very had effect on all crops; they will be
very seriously damaged unless we get rain soon; the,
melon and peach crops are good ,but the melon crop has
been seriously affected by the dry weather.
SUWANNEE ,COUNTY-We are passing through a very
severe drought, and all crops are needing rain very badly,
though crops look well considering they have had so little
rain. From an agricultural standpoint our county is im-
proving steadily.









WASHINGTON COUNTY-Crops are in fair shape consid-
ering the long severe drought; the only good from the
drought is that the farmers have been able to keep the
crops clean of grass. The melon and peach crops are very
good, but all need rain very much.











REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE
YIELD OF CROPS FOR MAY, 1904, AS COMPARED
WITH AN AVERAGE.


COUNTIES


Alachua........
Baker... .....
Bradlord .. ....
Brevard .....
Calhoun... 76
Citrus..... ..
Clay....... ..
Columbia..
Dade .... ...
DeSoto... ...
Escambia.. 100
Franklin......
Gadsden... 100
Hamilton......
Hernando......
Hillsboro.. 100
Holmes.... 95
Jackson 105
Jefferson. 100
LaFayette....
Lake....... ..
Le....... ....
Leon. .... 85
Levy....... ....
Madison... 90
Manatee.. ...
.Marilp.... 90
Nassau ... ....
Pasco ........
Polk....... ...
Santa Rosa 75
Sumter .... ..
Buwannee....
Washin'ton 100

Gen'l av'ge
per cent.. 98


E


6o o
go o SO
do







o 0 0
S O. .

60 80 40
85 75 50
100 90 100
.... 10 .
75 75 60
.... 10C 85
90 10( 80
100 9C 90

.... 125 100
.... 90 90
100 100 100
90 75 75
.... 80 120
.... 105 100
100 100
100
115 105 100
100 100 100
856 9'1 75
.... 75 50
.... 125 100

95 100 100
90 100 110
. 8( 80
90 8E .90
.... 9C 75
.... 80 100
.... 11 100
... 76 100
75 76 85
90 90 SC
90 9(10

90 92 88


o o
C 5

g R



85 80
o 0





.... 10C

... 10(
... 100
10C 80
100
96 95
106. 100

60 60

90 90

100 9
... 100
10 110



.... 90



80 50
.. 90
. 100

100

90 86


84 87


d aI


3 0 0 0 0
o o o



40 70 .... 70 ..0 0


95... 100 0 ..
100 .. ...
75 ........ 70 ... ....
100 ... 100 85 75 ....
100 0100 100 100
100 100 100 10 ......
100 ... 100 .
1001 00 10( 9 100 90
100 100 10( 125 1001 100
90 .... 90 ..i ..
100 100 9( 50 20 100
60 60 75 75 60....
.. ... .. ~2 ... .......
105 95 110 ... 100 ....
100 .... .... 100 .. ...
110 100 100 ..
80 .... 100 100 6 ...
90 ...... 90 .
so ... 100 ........
80.. 100
100 100 100 110 120 100
90.... 85 85 8( 100
100 90 100 90... .



100
100 75 75 7. .........
W0 80 W0 90 ...
100 100 75 10C, .. ..

60 40 50 9 ......
951 80 100110 .......

89 869' 9( 88 98






CONDriTON OFC


COUNTIES


. .-- -





.... .0 ... .......

.... .... .... ....

5 f ........
. .. .. ... ...
.... . ... ... ....
.... 110 105 110
100 95 95 99
100 .. 10.. ...
... 100 ....


. .. .. 10 100 . ...


.... 10 100 .

90 '120 100 110
.... 100 .. ...
. 100 8.
90 80 8C
100 100 10C
.... 100 . ... .
....100 100 ..

... . 8 .. .. .
.50... .......
5... .. .... ... .


85 97 98 9!


U




a

a
0
0


a



0
a
a

a
0S
0


Alachua...
Baker. ....
Bradford. .
Brevard...
Calhoun....
Citrus .....
Clay.......
Columbia..
Dade .......
DeSoto ....
E cambia..
Franklin...
Gadsden.'..
Hamilton..
Hernando .
Hillsboro..
Holmes....
Jackson ..
Jefferson..
LaFayette.
Lake ......
Lee ........
Leon......
Levy.......
Madison..
Manatee...
Marion.'...
Nassau....
Pasco ......
Polk.."....
Santa Rosa
Sumter ....
Suwannee..
Washin't'n

Gen'l av'ge
per cent


* Irish

S toes




0 -0 .


.... 80 75
.... 75 76
.... 100 10C
110 100 10C
"85 9C
... 100 9C
.... 100 9C
100 .... .....
9C 100 12(
100 15(
.... 80 8(
.. i00 10C
.... 75 5(
.... 80 8
80 110 11(
7.. 5 6(
.... 90 9C
... 100 10(
100 5C
.... 50 5C
110 120 12(
.. 100 10(
... 100 10
.... 10 10(
80 5f 5(C
.... 50 5C
... 1 10
.... 7 7(
.... 10 121
.100 10(
.... 100 10(



95 .90 8


ii























i



g



j


. . . I . . . I
. .. ......

125 100


..... ..... I
75 ......
...... .....

105 .....1
95 90




105





.... ......
100 ......
100 90

.... ......
'80 100
100 ......

100
80 ......





971 98


--


I


.


roma-











100 100
toes


a c3












100 150
95 120
100 100
80 80
100 100


75 50

95 120
100 100
80 80


100 100

75 50
95 95


0C 100


85
100 100
100 100
50 50
75 75
90 100
80 80
100 120
75 75
85 8



89 91






CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTIES


lacba .....
Baker.........
Bradiord ......
Brevard......
Calhoun.....
Citrus .......
Clay...........
Oolumbia.....
Dade ..........
DeSoto.......
Escambia......
Franklin......
Gadsden.....
Hamilton......
Hernando......
HEllsooro ....
Holmes........
Jackson....
Jefferson.....
LaFayette......
Lake. .....
Lee..........
Leon.........
Levy. ......
MadAion... ...
Manatee......
Mario.......
Nabsau........
Pasco..........
Pout..........
Ianta ROt....
Bumer .......
Suwannee......
Washingto ....

Gen'l av'ge....
pcreent......


100
95
100







.i..o


100

100
9C
100








...ic
......



.....


90 80
100 100



110 110




90 90
...I1:...


75 50 50 50

75 70 80 70C
00 100 .... .. .
75 70 .. .... ..



88 84 83 83


.JvJ I --


10 .... ....
0. . ....
100 .....

100 ......
100 ..
80 .......
100 .....
100 95 100
100 100 100
85 80 80

60 60 60
50 .
100 90 90
110 .
50 100 100

100 100 190
100 100 100
90


99 90 90
75 .
70 100 100
100 100 80
100 100 100
95 .... ....



88 98 93


. . . . .
75 75 90
.. 85
.... .... 80
Sso
100 125 100
100 100 100
90 90 95



98. 93 89








CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.


COUNTIES


Alachua........
Baker ...........
Bradford ........
Brevard... ....
Calhoun ..........
OCtr ...........
Clay.. .. .... .
Date............
DeSoto.... .....
cambia......:
Franklin.....
Gadeden....
Hamilton.. .....
Hernando........
Hillsboro..' ......
Holmes..........
Jackson..........
Jefferson ....
LaFayette .......
ae.........
Lee......... ...
Leon .........
Levry.... .... :
Madison........
Manatee .......
Marlon.........
N aeas i........
Pasco ............
Polk...... ...
Banta Rosa...
Bunter......
itwannee. .....
Washingtox......

Gen'l av'ge.....
per cent ..


WBeans Water-
eans melons




a e a
C "P C
S--s U PI-


60
00
100

S85

100

100
100
80

80

90
110
100
100

50
100
85
100
100
50
90
90
100
100
76
100
100
100

89


60
50
100
100

"85


iio

... 75
110
125
85

75

90
110
100
100

150
90
90
100
110
50
90
90
100
100
75
100
100
100


911 85


Pinea


pples


Cantal



0









85

...i
100
100
80

80

105
80

100

90
80
100
100
50
80

100
75
75
100
I ....


oupes









40
50


85
*..ioo


100
185





100


85
105






100
100
50
90



125
75
75
100


89


o?












'i66 "i6o
95 100









90 90



'*io6"i66
97 98 ....
100 100











90 90









CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.



Peaches Pears Grapes Plums

C3:UNTIES. --


C F 0



Alachua ......... 50 50 7 70 90 100 5 40
Baker.. .. .... 75 75 40 40 75 75 ..
Bradford ........100 100 100 100 101 0 10( 10( 100
Brevard.......... ... .. ......
Calhoun..... . 90 85 90 .. 100 10.... ..
Citrus ........... 100 105 85 85 ........... 1 105
C lay .... .... ..... .. 6 . .. .. ...
Columbia..... 90 90... ..... 100 10 10o 100
D ade ...... ........ .
DeSoto.... ....... 100 110 100 110 10 110 10Ci 120
Escambia.......... 100 200 ......... 10 100 10 10C 100
Franklin........... ........ 80 90 100 l10 . ......
Gadsden ... ............ .. .... ...
Hamilton......... 60 60 60 60 60 6 6(1 60
Hernando.......... 100 120 60 60 100 1 ..........
Hillsborough...... 95 105 100 80 100 90 10( 90
Holmes............ 100 100... ..... 90 10( 100
Jackson ... ....... 100 100 100 100 100 10C 10( 100
Jefferson.... ...... 100 100 .... ..... 100 101 10C 100
LaFayette .......... 100 110.. ." .
Lake............... 75 75 50 50 100 1 .....
Lee ............... 100 100 100 100 100 10(C 9( 90
Leon ....... ... 100 100 70 30 85 7 8E 85
Levy.... .... 100 1 ......... 100 1 ..... ..
Madison .......... 50 50 ......... 100 100 90 90
M anatee ........... 80 ... 100 1 ..... ...
Marion............ 100 110 100 125 90 1 9C 90
Nassau ........... 100 100 75 100 1 ..... ..

Santa Rosa....... 90 90 50 ( 100 100 1 100
Sumter............ 110 110 .... 100 1 10r 100
Suwannee.......... .... .... ... ...... ..... .....
W ashington ....... 85 90 .... .... ......... ... .....

General Average
Per Cent........ 93 101 81 71 i9 97 93 98














I
















6


























PART II
WEATHER REPORT,










*












U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE
OF 'HE
WEATHER BUREAU.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director ,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
REPORT FOR APRIL, 1904.


SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES,

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 4 stations.. 30.03
Departure from the normal, 4 records........... .-0.01
Highest observed, at Jacksonville on the 4th..... 30.33
Lowest observed, at Jacksonville on the 26th.... 29.76
Absolute range for the State ................. 0.57
TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean, as determined from records of 60 stations.. 68.3
Departure from the normal. 30 records.......... -0.4
Highest monthly mean, at Key West............. 75.3
Lowest monthly mean, at DeFuniak Springs, Mari-
anna, St. Andrews and Wausau .............. 64.6
Highest recorded, at Ocala on the 2 ........'..... 95
Lowest recorded ,at M]acclenny and Marianna on the .
14th and Middleburg on the 9th................ 38
Absolute range for the State .................. 57
PRECIPITATION.
Inches.
Average, as determined from records of 60 stations 1.71
Departure from the normal, 29 records .......... -0.64
Greatest amount for any 24 hours, at Eustis on the
a Bul.








7th .................... .................... 2.73
Greatestmonthly amount, at Eustis ............. 3.88
Least monthly amount, at Marco ................ 0.36
Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 4
WIND.
Prevailing wind direction ..................Southwest
WEATHER.
Average number of clear days .....................19
Average number of partly cloudy days .............. 8
Average number of cloudy days................... 3


WEATHER AND CROPS.

The month was notably dry and during the greater
portion of the time it was colder than the normal. These
conditions were very favorable for farm work. At the
beginning of the month the soil was in a fairly good con-
dition for cotton planting which was pushed with energy.
As the month advanced, however, rain became less fre-
quent resulting in an abnormally dry month. The cold
nights militated against rapid growth, and favored the
increase of insects, which became sufficiently numerous
to damage some corn and cotton. At the close of the
month late planted cotton had not germinated, and a
large acreage was to be planted. Early planted cotton
was chopped and worked; a fair growth was made. Corn
on high land suffered much for rain; a fairly satisfactory
growth, however, was maintained. The early planted
corn in the southern portion of the State was in tassel at
the close of the month. The continued dry weather'
brought forth the red spider, which was very annoying
in many groves. A great deal of fruit dropped; not to
such an extent, however, to seriously reduce the crop
yield. Pineapples suffered from the dry weather, and the
crop will probably be much reduced thereby. The growth
of pineapples has been slow, owing to the cool weather
during thes pring, and there has not been sufficient rain
to fill them out. Vegetables were plentiful and shipments
large. The greatest monthly amount of precipitation
was 3.9 inches, in Lake county; a large section in the
State had less than an inch of rain.








19

COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR APRIL,
WITH DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST THIR-
TEEN YEARS.


Year 1802 1803 1804 i85S

Meap 71 3 727 7 0 68.4
Depar +2.6 +4.0 +1 --o
Total 0.87 2.17 1.o- 4 75
Depar --.47 -'.18 -1.32 +2.40


1896 1897 I 1808 189o o 1oo 1901 1002 o003 1 04

71.0 70o-2 67.0 67.7 70.o 65.2 68.3 67. 68 8
+2.3 +1.5; 7 -1.0 +13 -35 -0.4 -1.6 -0*4
0.50 4.44 I.19 4o0 4-49 2.26 1.45 0.45 1.7I
-1.8~ +2.-09-0 6 +1 .05 Pl2-14 -0.0 -0O.0 00 -0.64


PRESSURE AND W1ND TABLE.

Wind Velocity in Relative
Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humidity

6S 6 f I I : r >
0|E I i 1 i
E c a ,: Q 0 I

: _t- a


0 04 3- 31 4 2 76 26 ;,86 36 S 26 1 33 68
'041 30 21 5 29 27 8217 60 s 97 52 75
o o0 30 r4 1 20.88 7 37 48 S\ 30 9 50 72
*30 07 30.o2, 4 20.86 2 8,(4 30 s 9 07 37 74
o 0o1 30 24 23 208 26 4j06 24 S 7 31 69


*8 a. m., reading only.


STATIONS





JacksTnvil e..
iupiter .......
Key West ....
Pensacola.....
Tampa........










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR APRIL, 1904


STATIONS.


COUNTIES.


1- 1- -


Northern Section,

Archer......... ...... Alachua ..... 9222
Federal Point........ Putnam...... 1012
Fernandina.......... Nassau ...... 15 3
Fort Georget......... Duval........ 1519
Gainesvill .......... Alachua ..... 1758
Huntington .......... Putnam ..... 50 8
Jacksonville......... Duval........ 434
Jasper .............. Hamilton ....165 6
Johnstown.......... Bradford .... 125 9
Lake City........... Columbia.... 20114
Macclenny ........... Baker..... .140 9
Micanopy............ Alachua..... 105 8
Middleburg.......... Clay....... 20 5
Pinemount........... Suwannee... 103 2
St. Augustine....... St. Johns .... 1054
Sumner............. Levy....... 2314
Switzerland .......... St. Johns... .. 8


Temperature, in degrees Farh.
6
be
o>
a I
P

ca 'q- W !
P A I I S
c)ac) +3 .n- 3 i
n Q 0 o


67.2-0.S
66.4-0.1
66.4 ...
67.6-0.6
67.4-0.3
67.0-0.4
66.4-2.5
65.8 +0 3
65.3-1.8
66 0-2.8
65.8-1 8
c68.81-2.2
65.1 .
66.0..
66.8-1.4
65.6-1.2
a66.6 1.3


Precipitation, in inches.




a ( c
I0 I W


-1.750.79
-0.890 86
.. 0.56

-0 620.96
-1 720.78
-2 060.3
-1.650.52
+0 12 1.22
-2.140 46
-2.820.36
-0.04 2.00
.. 1.65
.47
-2 300.93
--0.112.15
-4 000 72


Sky.

1 C
V
s'

4), d.,
Sa a 0
H
a, a 0

a s3 P
y- ia I


I





0
0













e.
ne.
,e.
se
sw.
SW.
a -














SWa
SSW.

SW.
e.

e-se.
sw.


SW.

)w.


" ` "'






CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR APRIL. 1904 -Continued.


STATIONS.






Central Section.

Bartow ...........
Broo' sville...........
Clermont.............
De Land .............
Eustis................
Fort Mead. ........
Fort Pierce ........
Grasmere.. ........
Inverness............
Kissimmee ........ ..
M alabar.............
Merritt's Island ......
New Smyrna .........
Ocala ..............
Orange City:. .......
Orange Home........


COUNTIES.


Polk..........
Hernando..
Lake. .....
Volusia .....
Lake ......
Polk........
Brevard .....
Orange......
Citrus .......
Osceola .....
Brevard ....
Brevard ....
Volusia ...
Marion.....
Volusia.....
Sumter ......


Temperature, in degree


s Fahr. Precil




C 0







12 3,s 2 39
11 38 1.50
11 34 0.97
11 35 ....
4* 32 3. 88
14 38 2.98

11 3.1 ......
11 d4o 1.35
11 33 2.25
10* 34 0.82
11 21 2 88
11 d38 1.10
11 41 1.20
29 44 2.01
5 938 1.44


citation, in inches.


2



ai

a




-0.08
-1.36
-0.79


0


'E







1 4 4
0.80 ... 3
1.50 ... 4


1.78 2.'73
+0.88 120


-0.04

-0.10
-0.84
-0 94
+0.03


o. 85

0.5(
L.12
0.85
0.87
1.15
D.71


Sky


V
'0

ai 5- 5
U 30 U
x L4., I
.0 flo .0
E E5o E
3 30 3
2 .2. 2


a
o












sw.
w.
w.
ne.
w.


. .
.. 27 3 w.
.. 3 .. ... ... sw .
4 19 6 5 se
.. 3 30 0 e.
... 4 22 6 2ne-e.
S... 2 ... ... ... se .
.. 3 16 12 2se-w.
2 21 9 Osw.
.1 ......... .....


-














STATIONS.





Orlando........ ......
Plant City............
Rockwell.............
St. Leo .......... ...
Tampa .............
Tarpon Springs......
Titusville........ ..
Southern Section.
Avon Park...........
Flamimgo............
Hypoluxo............
Jupiter...............
Key West............
M anatee ...........
M arco ..... .........
M iam i...............
M yers................
Nocatee. ...........


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR APRIL, 1904.-Continued.


De Soto...... 150
Monroe .. 11
Dade .. ..
Dade ....... 28
Mcnroe 22
Manatee.. 16
Lee ...... .
Dade. ........
Lee........... 19
De Soto...... 43


Temperature, in degrees Fahr. Precipitation, in inches.

Q0 a a o..z




Cs ^ 'i s I-
Qa a3L >- h
oP C L o
'E 4-; r-tl0
d Fd
rd0 E O, 0 z


71.8+0.2
73.31 ...
72.2+0.6
78.4 1.4
75.3+0.8
70.1 -0.8


71.3--0.8
71.8 .....


COUNTIES.





Orange......
Hillsbor'gh. .
Marion ......
Pasco..
Hillsbor'gh
Hillsbor'gh..
Brevard......


4511 36
4711 .
4610 45
4711 86
5414 28
4912 33
4711 33


4814 40
5029 30
5329 30
5411 22
6630 15
4712 34


501i 29
4810 35


2.20
1.55
1.15
1.50
0.66
1.14
1.81


+0.05
-1.27

-1.44
-1 67
-0.91
-0.22


2.42 -0.71 0.78
1.08 ...... 1.01
1.30 -1.190.25
2.85 +0 092 52
3.59 +2.382.15
0.37 -1.730.13
0.36 .... 0.28
2.04 -1.541.80
1.10 -1.531.10
0.60 ..... .0.41


,ky.




a
Ul
a c
a 5 -

.0 .0? .0
1- SBI *O
2) 5. 23

S cz2 E
1 30r 3
Z 7- 7IZ


I;
o
:.9
,.


IW.

Osw.
4w.
4w.
5 uw.
6 se.


"r


92 2*

94113
9120
8820
8920
9116


91 16
88 18*
8821
8921
84 8*
9020*
89 15*
9027
88 15*
9221


--i--


- - -





CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR APRIL, 1904.-Continued.


STATIONS.






Western Section.
Apalachicola........
Bonifay .............
Carrabelle..........
DeFuniak Sp'gs
M adison.............
Marianna ..........
M ilton ..............
Molino .............
Monticello.........
Pensacola..........
Quincy.............
St. Andrew..........
Stephensville. o.....
lallahassee .......
W ausau .............
Wewahitchka .......


COUNTIES.


II I 1 I 'Temperature, in degrees Fahr.


. ranklin..... ... ... 67.8 .
Holmes ...... 116 3 65.6 ..
Franklin..... 12 9 67.5+1.6
Walton .... 193 8 64.6+0.2
Madison .... 66.5... .
Jackson...... 85 5 64.6 ....
Santa Rosa ... ......
E scambia.... 49 1 65. .....
Jefferson..... 207 ... 64.9.....
Escambia.... 56 25 65.7-2.0
Gadsden ..... 260 4 .... ......
Washington.. 12 7 64. +2.5
Taylor. 5 65. .....
.Le n......... 193 19 66.8-0.1
Washington .250 7 64.6-3.3
Calhoun ..... ... 5 65.8 .....

SState Means ... ... 68.38-0.41.


a.
C










[8 4'7 4 2~
SA C A


18 47 4 2!
0~ O A* 0


Precipitation, in inches.



.

a P


2.51 ...... 1.60 ...
S 2.98 ... 1.58..
1 1.90 f0.331.80..
1 2.25 -1.551.25 ...
S1.75 .... 1.53...
3 2.26 ...... 1.11 ..

S 1.69 ...... 1.24 ...
) 1.90 .... 0.75 ..
2 1.08 -2.400.62..

1 3.13 -1.39 1.50 ..
9 1.26 ......0.68 ..
71.65 -0.340.75.
S2.00 -1.581.20..
S 2.47 ......1.40 ..

. 1.71 I-0.641 .....


Sky.
Ul I >
'U

4. 0
a "0



5)
.O .n ;0
2a 22 2 '
"S g"~ S.
u ~"o u


3 SO 3
Z1o 2


-


10


0
,ag

5
1w
b t
.4,


-lsw.


19 81s










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR APRIL, 1904.-Continued.


STATIONS.


COUNTIES,


Late Revort
March, 1904.
M icanopy............ .......... ..
. . . . .


temperature in d K'ees Faht.



I I I I-



9a 2 f2 *2 41



f67.3+l ( f94 22f42 9* 41


Preci pitation,in in


0
0


no
en


X ;
nt '

a)L a,


1.00--3.4411.f ..


[ch Sky.
4) d) 1)


I / L I .C


SE E E E
z a a a .
5 _E3E3.23


I *......


All records are used in determining 13tatemeans, but the mean departures from normal temperature and
precipitation are based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
a, b. c, etc following name of station indicate number of days missing from report.
tThermometers are not self-registering, and readings are made at 7 a. m,, 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau.




















PART IIL
FERTILIZERS.















BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS,
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN,Clerk.


STATE VALUATIONS, 1904.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1904.
Available Phosphoric Acid 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.00 per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.25 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. 6.22 per cent.x$1.00 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. 1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia.................. 3.42 per ctnt.x 3.00- 10.26
Potash......... .. ........7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging ......... 1.25

Commercial value at sea ports **.............. 25.98
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available phosphoric acid... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia .................. 2 per cent.x 3.00- 6.00
Potash........ .......... 2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging....... ................... 1.25

Commercial value at sea ports ................. $17.45
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added-










If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid 93 cents per unit
Potash (K20) 99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or e4uivelent in nitrogen) $2 70 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT SEA PORTS, JAN. 4, 1904.


Less
Ammoniates. 5
Ni rate of Soda 17 per cent. Am-
monia .................. ..
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent Ammonia ...............
Dried Blood 16 per cent. Am-
monia ......................


than 5 to 10 10 tons
tons tons. & over.


$50.00 $49.00


$49.00


71.00 70.50 70.00

54.00 53.50 53.00


POTASH.


High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20) ....
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20) ......
Muriate of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) ..............
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot-
ash (K20) .................
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash......
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ......


52.00 51.00 50.00


32.00

46.00

82.00
14.00

17.00


31.00 30.00

45.00 44.00

81.00 80.00
13.50 13.00

16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


High Grade Blood and Bone, 10
10 per cent. Ammonia 7 per
cent. Phosphoric Acid ........ 35.00
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 61
per cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid...... ...... 27.00
Owl Brand Tankage, 5j per cent.
Ammonia ................. 20.0(J


34.50 34.00


26.50 26.00

19.50 19.00









Raw Bone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid..
Ground Castor Pomace 6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid ............
Bright Ooton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia market quota-
tions .......... ............
Dark Coton Seed Meal, 5 per
cent Ammonia, market quota-
tions .................. ....


29.00


22.00


28.50 28.00


21.50 21.00


26.00 25.50 25.00


18.00 17.50 17.00


PHOSPHIORIC.


Double Super Phos., 45 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid ... 45.00
High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16
per cent. Available Phosphoric
Acid .......... ... ..... 16.00
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 14.00
Boneblack 17 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid ............ 25.00


44.50 44.00


16.50 15.00

15.50 13.00

24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS.


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems, 3
per cent. Ammonia, 9 per cent
Potash ...... ....... ...... 25.00
Pulverized Ground Tobacco Stems 16.00
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per cent.
Ammonia, 2 K20 Potash...... 21.00
Tobacco Dust, Nio. 2, 1 per cent.
Ammonia, 11 per cent. Potash. 16.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..... 16.00
Land plaster in sacks .......... 10.50


24.50 25.00
15.00 15.00

20.50 20.00


15.50
15.50
10.25


15.00
15.00
10.00


Any formula will be mixed at the price of $1.25 per
ton, in addition to the cost of the materials used.








FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into Nitrogen, multiply by..............0.824
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by..............1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by..........16.47
Nitrogen, into protean by........................6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by..0.458
Phosphoric Acid into Bone Phosphate, multiply by.2.184
Muriate of Potash into actual potash, multiply by..0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by.1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by.0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. 1.85
For instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen in it, multiply
95 per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent nitro-
gen; you want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen
is equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214
and you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.

CHEMICAL EQUIVALENTS.

Under the law and the regulations of the department
chemical equivalents of the thiee essential elements,
Ammonia. Available Phosphoric Acid, aid Potash, are
not allowed in the guarantee. A few instances have been
noted, particularly in cotton seed meals, when the Am-
monia is guaranteed, and followed by a statement of the
protean contents:
As. Ammonia ............................5 per cent.
Protean .........................25.75 per cent.
Or Ammonia ...... ...................8 per cent.
Protean .................. .......41.18 per cent.
Such a guarantee is misleading, as the terms "Ammo-
nia" and "Protean," are equivalent, and only represent
the "Nitrogen" (or ammonia) content of the goods.
Multiplying the nitrogen by 1.21 gives the ammonia
thus, 3 per cent. nitrogen X1.21 gives ammonia 3.63 per
cent. or nitrogen 3 per cent. X6.25 gives "Protean" 18.75
per cent.






31

Composition of Fertilizer Materials,

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia Phosphoric Potash

Nitrate of Soda............. 17 to 19 .......... .........
Sulphate of Ammonia...... 21 to 24 ........... ...........
Dried Blood................ 12 to 17 ........... ...........
Concentrated Tankage....... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ............
Bone Tankage. ............... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap............. 8 to 11 6 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal........... 7 to 10 2 to 3 11 to 2
H oof M eal................... 13 to 17 1 to 2 ........
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.

Ava i able Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... .......... ............ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Pnosphnte..... ......... ........... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate.... ......... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone............... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone................ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Diss ved Bone.............. 2to4 13 to 15 2to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

Phos-
Actua Am'nia phoric Lime
Pota'h Acid
Muriate of Potash........... 60 ...... ......
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 52 ........ .................
Double Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26to 30 ................. ........
Kainit ... ................ 12 to 121 .............. .......
Sylvinit ..................... 16 to 20. ............
Cotton Seed Hu Ashes...... 15 to 30 ........ to 9 10
Wood A hes, uneached..... 2 to 8 ........ to 2 30 to 25
Wood Ashes leached........ 1 to 2 ........ to 1 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems............... 5to 8 2 to 4 ..... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).......... 0.40 Oto41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh) .... 0.53 Oto60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)......... 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.83
Hog Manure (fresh)......... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fiesh)............ 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure....... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70








SPECIAL NOTICE,
The attention of persons sending samples of fertil-
izers for analysis is called to the following:
REGULATIONS .GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER SAMPLES TO
THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF LAW.
Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers,
under Sec. 9 of the law approved May 22, 1901. Shall
be drawn in the presence of two disinterested witnesses,
from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed and a
FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES
(ONE-HALF POUND), SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR BOTTLE,
-SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO THE COM-
MISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT LESS
THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE AC-
CEPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure fair
samples of sufficient size to make the six necessary de-
terminations, viz: Moisture, available and insoluble
phosphoric acid, ammonia and potash; and to allow the
preservation of a duplicate sample in case of protest or
appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for
two months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special samples from the purchaser. The propriety
of the method of drawing and sending the samples as
fixed by the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce)
frequently there are no marks, numbers or other means,
of identification. The post mark in some instances be-
ing absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to
avail themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of
the law, which are clear and explicit.
COPIES ,OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.
Citizens interested in the fertilizer law of the State,
;and desiring to avail themselves of its protection, can
,obtain a copy free of charge by sending for sameto the
,Commissioner of Aericulture.









CAUTION TO PURCHASERS OF COTTON
SEED MEAL,
-ihe attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either
for stock feeding or fertilizing purposes, is called to the
analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per
cent. and above in ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of avail-
able phosphoric acid, and li per cent. of potash. Such
meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its
Commercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00 $24.00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00 2.00
li per cent. potash @ $1.10 1.65

$27.65
The commercial value being in excess of the market
value.
There is a quantity of adulterated cotton seed meal
sold in the State, These goods are guaranteed as fol-
lows :
4- to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1i to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
11 to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as
follows:
4i per cent. ammonia $13.50
11 per cent. phosphoric acid 1.75
1l per cent. potash 1.65

Commercial value $16.90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than
prime meal Their relative value is $10.75 less than
prime meal. There is no economy in the use of such
goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the
planter, the value of the meal depending only on its con-
tent of ammonia, phosphoric acid and potash in both
cases. Purchasers should buy accordingto the analysis
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements
only.
3 Bul.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


S Phosphoric Acid

NAME OR BRAND. 3 2
o 3 G a-


Special Mixture ......... 4731..... 7.351 2.261 9.61i 4.(60t 9.03
Fertilizer .... ..... .... 474 ..... 8.621 0.461 9.081 1.(4113.32
Bone Compound (No. 1).. 476119.00 9.751 2.67112.421 2.201 1.62
Acid Phosphate (No. 2)..1477122.45 12.611 2.51 22.451 ..... .....
Special Mixture .........478....1 6.08 0.76 6.841 4.30i1 7.86
Kentucky Brand-Pulver-'I I I
ized Tobacco Stems.... .4791 ....... ..... ........ '2.89110.14
Cotton 'Seed Meal ....... 1480|..... ..... ......... 7.02 .....
Fertilizer .... ..........481114.25 4.90 0.32 5.22 3.57112.99
Sulphate of Potash ...... 14831 .... . .. .. .... ..: 50.48
Fertilizer ...... ..... .. j484 9.851 6.781 1.70 8.481 6.151 6.77
I I I I I I


BY WHOM SENT.



T. Kimball, St. Petersburg. Fla.
F. S. Hickock, Hastings, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
R. D. Knight, Little River, Fla
Willson & Toomer Fert. Oo.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Schroeder & Auguinbaw, Quincy.
J. F. Adams, Winter Park, Fla.
Thos. W. Williams, Tampa, Fla.
J. G. Powers, Terra Ceia, Fla.







BUREAU OF FERTILIRERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.


---I -


iPhosphoric Acid


Im
ao 3 a a
s-
*^l O (


BY WHOM SENT.


Sea Island Cotton Seed... 4851....... ...... ..... 4.14 ..... Florida Mfg. Co., M adison
Sea Island Cotton Seed M'1 4861..... ..... ..... ..... 4.92 ..... Florida Mfg. Co., Madison
Sea Island Cotton Seed M'114871................. ..... i 5.62 ..... Florida Mfg. Cb., Miadison
Fertilizer .... .......... 1488!..... 5.20 0.771 5.97) 1.86113.15 H. Wordenhloff, Plant Ci
Fertilizer (light) ........ 4891..... 7.561 1.591 9.151 4.651 7.61 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray,
Fertilizer (dark) ........ 490 ..... 6.121 0.661 6.781 4.281 7.24 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray,
Dried Blood ............ 4911........ ..... I.......114.851..... J. T. Stanley, Jensen. Fia
Raw 'Ground Bone ......14921.....I 9.5313.98123.501 4.501..... J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla
Wood Ashes .... ...... 493 ..... ....... ......... ....] 0.24 J. T. Stanley, Jensen. Fla
Ground. Tobacco Stems .494.......... ...... ... 3.181 9.28 J. T. Stanley, Jensen. Fla
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 495 .......... .......... 7.751...... Schroeder & Auguinbaw, (
Cotton Seed Meal .......14961..... ..... I.. .......I 7.711..... James B. Bours, Jacksobnvi
Acid Phosphate ........14971.....118.74] 0.75119.491..... ..... oulding Fert. Co., Pens
Fertilizer (acid phosphate) 1498114.40113.641 0.53114.171 0.0f1| 0.01 J. D. Clark, Mt. Pleasant.
Fertilizer No. 1..........1499111.301 7.051 1.011 8.061 4.601 8.42 B. G. Hewet. Pebble. Fla.


SFla.
* Fin.
ty, Fla

Fla.






F Ila.
Fuilay.
lie, Fla


----






BUREAU OF FERTILIZER-CONTINUED.


S Phosphoric Acid.

NAME OF BRAND. I
,a -


Fetilizer No. 2 .......... 500111.35 7.101 1.161 8.'61 4.511 8.49
Fertilizer ...... '........ 1501 .... 0.00 0.001 0.001 4.421 0.00
Guano ...... .......... 5021 ..... ....... ... 126113 3.711 3.14
Acid Phosphate ......... 5031...... 13.681 2.05115.73 ..... .....
Crude Oarbonate of Potashl504 .... ..... ..... ...... 138.8
White Carbonate of Potash 505 ................ I..... ... 62.6f
Fertilizer .............. 1506110.85 7.30i 1.261 8.561 3.181 3.52
Fertilizer ........ ...... 5071...... 9.71 1.5611.271 5.361 7.68
Fertilizer ............. 5081 7.35 8.121 1.201 9.321 4.011 8.71
Octton Seed Meal ....... 15091..... ..... ..... ..... 7.13j .....
Fertilizer ...... ........ 1510 .....I 6.101 5.57111.671 2.081 8.46


BY WHOM SENT.


B. G. Hewet, Pebble, Fla.
Peter Gardener, Palatka, Fla.
James Holmes, Jensen, Pla.
Prof. O. J. Moore, Lisbon, Fla.
J. Hirsehburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
J. Hirschburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
W. M. Girardeau, Monticello, Fla.
P. L. Fiveash, Alliance, Fla.
C. B. Robbinson, Corno, Fla.
J. E. Wirick, Jr., Lloyd, Fla.
R. L. McMullen, Olearwater, Fla.






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


i Phosphoric Acid

NAME OR BRAND. O 1-

0

Fertilizer .............. 511110.451 9.99 1.961 8.951
Fertilizer No. 1.......... 1512 9.10 7.871 0.731 8.601
Fertilizer No. 2.......... 151311 .15 9.111 3.00112.111
Fertilizer No. 3.......... 514 10.101 8.43 2.68111.111
Ferilizer No. 4.......... 1514 11.30110.52 3.26113.781
Blood, Bone and Potash.. 516114.201 9.91 2.951 9.861
Dark Cotton Seed Meal and I
Potash ...... ........ 15181 .25 ..... .... 2.031

(Ground Tobacco Stems .. 519 .......... ..... .....
Fertilizer ...... ........ j52 14.61 7.751 2.76110.51
Fertilizer No. 3 ........ 1521 6.951 8.491 1.95110.441
Fertilizer No. 2 ........ 52211(,95 7.221 1.39 8.611
Fertilizer No. 1...........523114.251 8.171 3.0211.191
Fertilizer ...... ........ 524; 9.251 81031 0.721 8.751
Rock Phosphate ........15251... ......... 37.16|.


0




4.631 4.86
2.241 1.28
2.121 1.84
2.131 2.15
2.47 1.89
3.80 4.44

5.021 3.81

2.921 9.24
2.291 2.23
2.15113.71
4.461 8.07
2.221 2.26
4.44j11.44
*. .. I


BY, WHOM SENT.


Johnson & Co., Leesburg, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. H. Dishong, Dover, Fla.

R. L. Goodwin, St. Pierce, Fla.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
J. H. Hinton, Dover, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
H. Price Williams, Miami, Fla.
T. D. Hawkins, King's Ferry, Fla.


---~






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.




Fertilizer . .........
Armour's H. G. Tobacco.
Dust ...............
Fertilizer ...... .......
Fertilizer ..... ........
Dark Cotton Seed Meal...
Bright Cotton Seed Meal.
Rock Phosphate.......
Ashes ................
Fertilizer ...... .......
Fertilizer No. 1.........
Fertilizer No. 2 (Sulphate
Potash). ............
Fertilizer ......... .....
Fertilizer ... .. .....
Rock Phosphate .......


o0

0 5



526110.90o

527 ....
528 14.00
529 10.20
530 ....
531 ....
532 ...3 .
533 ... .
534 ....
535 ... .

536 ... .
537 .... .
538 ...
539 ....


5.61
7.12


1.63
6.08


9.72
7.22


3.
3.




0.
0.


3.
4.


____~~_~


iic Acid

I BY WHOM SENT.




96 10.70 4.87 13.79 S. B. Robbinson, Seven Oaks, Fla.

....... 2.60 3.91 Armour Fert. Wks., Jacksonville.
01 8.61 4.43 5.65 H. J. Drane, Lakeland, Fla.
00 1.12 4.37 15.56 F. G. Sampson, Boardman, Fla.
.1.94 4.99 1.49 N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs.
.2.91 8.37 1.81 N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs.
.. 34.05 .......... Jo.n S. Flanagan, San Antonia.
.. .. .... .60 A. J. Rosetter, Enterprise, Fla.
77 2.40 4.00 7.08 W. J. Dyer, Stuart, Fla.
85 6.93 4.20 9.34 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.

. ..... ..... 47 24 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.
12 12.84 2.00 1.69 L. A. Adams, Luanna, Fla.
12 11.34 2.25 2.37 R. L. West, Plant City, Fla.
.. 33.46 ......... John D. Philips, Bailey, Fla.






MTREAU OF FEIRTtLIZEIRS-Continued,.


NAME OF BRAND.




Fertilizer .. ..... ....
Cotton Seed Meal........
Tobacco Ashes .........
Muck Soil ..............
Fertilizer ........ ..... .
Cotton Seed Meal .......
Fertilizer .. .... . ..
Wood Ashes ...........
Fertilizer ............ .
Fertilizer ...............
Fertilizer ..... ........
Fertilizer ... .........
Fertilizer ...............
Bright Cotton Seed Meal.
Dark Cotton Seed Meal.:.


Phosphoric Acid



0


540 ..... 5.28 1.38 6.66
541 ..... ....... . 2.29
542 ... ..... 2.53
543 .... .... 0.39
544 ..... 7.60 9.0515.05
546 ..... ...... .. ......
547 ..11.08 2.67 13.75
548 ... ..... .... .....
549 .... 7.94 1.8 9.80
550 ...10.55 0.61 11.16
551 .... 5.39 0.371 5.76
552 ..... 9.25 1.66 10.91
553 15.33 7.31 ..... 7.31
554 ...................
555 ...... ...............


~~..-- ---- -- ~--------~-_


6.84





2.82 .1.81
..... 120.68
5.28117.02
1.85 2.58
2.65 10.0
1.50 0.97
..... 2.61
7.57 .. .
6.82 .....


BY WHOM SENT.


S. P. Lamb, Anthony, Fla.
J. E. Snow, East Lake, Fla.
Tames Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
W. Lippencott, Lakeland, Fla.
L. C. Hefner, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Lewis Lively, Tallahassee, Fla.
Jas. B. Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
Chase & Co., Sanford Fla.
'. B. Robinson, Seven Oaks, Fla.
A. W. Turner, .Coe's Mills, Fla.
Horrace Prior, Como, Fla.
Alexander & Baird, Beresford, Fla
C, C. Wills, Woods, Fla.
J. W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.
J. W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.







BUREAU OF FERT'ILIZERS-Continued. 140
6 Phosphoric Acid

NAME OF BRAND S BY WHOM SENT
0 .3
A s e . .. .. .
Ashes ................. 5561 ..... .... 1.08.... 2.28 John J. Beers, Emporia, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 557.... . ..... 2.44 6.77 1.73 J. W. Scott, Quincy, Fla.
Dissolved Animal Bone... 558 ..... 9.861 5.85115.71 2.67 ..... Florida Fert. Co., Gaineqville.
Fertilizer ..............1559 ..... 7.22 0.361 7.581 4.36 5.91 Rome Tinny. Ozond, Fla.
Raw Bone Meal......... 5601........... ....125.86 4.141 .... Jas. B. Holmes, Jensen, Fla.





BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. -41
For values see heading "Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of Special Samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample' sent in by a dealer or mInufacturer hence is no t
an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (I pound), is required for a "Special Sample."
Special attention is called to the "Caution to Purchasers of Cotton Seed Meal" on another page.
This adulterated meal is sold as bright or prime meal---though the guarantee is but 4 per cent. of
ammonia--it is evidently adulterated with rice hulls, its value is but little more than half that of
prime meal.









DEPAIRMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY. 42
R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1904, MARION G. DONK, ASSISTANT OCEMIST.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22 1901.

PHOSPHORIC ACID



NAMEOFBRAND BY WHOM AND WHERE
NAME oF BRAND ; MN






Official Analysis........ ...... 8.12...... Washington, Ga.
Tobacco Dust........... 312 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... ...... ...... ...... 1.20 2.50 Tampa Fert Co, Tampa,
Official Analysis.... ...... ...... ............ 1.8 2.80 Fla
Hard Wood Ashes ...... 313 Guarant'd Analysis. ............ ...... .......... 5.50 Blackshear Manufa'g Co.,
S Official Analysis .... ........ .... .......... 4.60 Blackshear, Ga.
H. G. Dissolved Bone
Black ............... 314 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 1.00...................... Armour Fert. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 11 30 20.26 0.29 20.55 ............ sonvillc.
Acid Phosphate......... 315 Guarant'd Analysis. ...... 14.0 ......... ...........Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
Official Analysis.... 13.90 13.76 0.35 13.90...... ......Fla.




ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Steamed Bone Flour....

H. G. vegetab'e Manure.

Fruit and Vine Manure.

Ober's Fruit and Vine.

Ober's Vegetable Ma-
nure ..................

Baugh's Special Orange
T rec........ ..........

Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
n ure ..................

Double Strength of Pot-
ash ......... .........

Peruvian and Fish Gu-
ano ............ .. ..

Potato Mixture ........


316 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

317 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
318 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
319 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
320 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
321 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
322 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
323 Guarant'd Analysis.
- Official Analysis....
324 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
325 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


__


.............. 23.00 3.00 ...... Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
5,75 13.38 13.46 26.84 3.85 ...... Fla.

1000 5 00 200..... 400 6 00 Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
12 10 7 64 205 969 4 16 598 Fla.

800 6.00 1 00...... 200 12 00 ampa Fert. Co, Tampa,
895 831 064 8 95 2 42 1109 kIa.

11 00 6 00 200....... 2 50 10 00 Oberr & Sons, Baltimore,
6 95 8 93 154 10 47 3 27 9 36 Md.

14 00 6 00 1 00...... 5 00 6 00 ber & Sons, Baltimore,
13 70 7 87 178 9 65 5 43 5 96 Md.

1200 5 00 200 ...... 2 00 10 00 Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
6 20 8 18 1 97 10 15 2 39 969 Md.

1200 600 400....... 500 7 00Baugh & Sons, Ba'timore;
13 35 6 71 1 71 8 42 548 6-88 Md.

1000 500 2 00 ...... 1 50 10 00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
7 55 6 65 1 09 7 74 205 11 40 Gainesville, Fla.

1000 5 00 1 00...... 450 5 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
8 35 6 22 2 44 8 66 4 92 6 58 ,ainesville, Fla.

10 00 500 2 00...... 300 9 00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
7 90 4 99 2 53 752 3 79 8 23 Gainesville, Fla.











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Peruvian & Fish Guano
Doub e strength of
Potash ................

Orange Tree Fertilizer..

Vegetable Fertiliz'r No 1

Fish and Potash........

Bean Special...........

Cuke Special............

Early Trucker.........

Lettuce Special........

Strawberry Special Fer-
tilizer ...............


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ...
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysts....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analyss....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


7.00
9 00
520

8 00
8 80

9 00
9 90

8 00
4 90

9 00
4 75

7 00
.6 80
900
4 96

. 8
9


5.00 1.00 ......
6.36 4.65 11.00

500 200......
5 62 1 88 7 45




3 19 1 29 4 48

4 00 300......
4 24 3 04 7 28
350 200 ......
3 15 2 21f 5 36
4 00 2 .....
S52 1 98 550

400 2 00
4 74 2 81 7 28

6 00 . . . .
5 91 2.22 8 13


10.00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
9.56 Gainesville, Fla.

10 00Standard Fertilizer Co.,
10 78 Gainesville, Fla.

5 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
6 04 Gainesville, Fla.

5 00 Standard Ferfilizer Co.,
6 66 Gainesville, Fla.

8 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
7 85 Gainesville, Fla.

8 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
8 52 Gainesville, Fla.

5 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
5 09 Gainesvil e, Fla.
6 00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
6 99 Gainesville, Fla
5 00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
5 14 vannah, Ga.


------ -- ---- ~- - --


'




ANALYSIS OF FERT1L1ZERS-Contitnued. 4f


Champion Citrus Com-
pound..............

Old Dominion Potato
M anure ............ ..

Special Vegetable
Grower. ...... .......


Tiptop Tomato Trucker.


SFruit and Vine..........


Southern States Special.

Cotton Seed Meal......

Sterns Ammoniated Raw
Bone. ........ .......

Baltimore Solu able
Bone. ................

Cumberland Standard
Fertilizers .......... .


335 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

336 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

337 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
338 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
339 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

340 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
341 Guarant'd Analysis..
Official Analysis....

342 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

343 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

344 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10 00
11 25

800
14 50

8 0(
12 12

8 0(
12 51?

8 00
11 3.5


11 65



15 00
15 75

15 00
14 95

14 00
13 40


6 00 . . .
5 86 0 94

7 . . .
5 37 1 1I

R 00... ..
8 28 1 8C

7 00 ......
7 23 1 70

6 0(
5 8 1i 03

6 00 ......
8 49 1 53



80( 10 J
9 4; 2 06

10 0( 1 0X
10 32 3 7(

800 1 0C
8 65 0 53


6 77

I '6 51


10 08


8 93


6 91

i6o 2

2 50


1153


14 11


9 171


14 00
11 60

800
8 42

3 00
3 06

500
5 16

10 00
9 81

5100
5198

1 50


200
1 48

100
1 11

200
1 97


-- ---


Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-C r. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va -Car. Chem. Co Sa-
vannah. Ga.

Southern Cotton Cil Co.,
Pensacola.

Standard Guano & Chem.
M'f'g. Co., New Orleans.

Georgia Chemical Co.,
Augusta, Ga.

Mutual Fertilizer Co., Sa-
vannah.











ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS---Continued. 46


Scotts H. G. Acfd Phos-
phate. ...... .....

Champion Farmers'
Choice................


Vegetable Compound.:.

Baltimore Soluble Bone


Bone and Potash.......

H G. Acid Phosphate

Hard Wood Ashes......


H. G. Sulphate of Potash


Acid Phosphat..........

Sulphate of Ammonia...
,


345


346


347

348


349


350


351

352


353


354


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


12 00
14 00

15 00
11 70

16 00
14 05

15 00
13 75

15 00
12 30

16 00
13 20







14 25


14 001
15 27

8 00
9 3-

7 00
9 82

J0 00
10 06

10 00
10 82

15 001
16 92






14 00.
14 75


2 0O
1 84

1 0C
1 22

1 C
1 93

1 C
2 0

1 OC
2 57

1 0C
043







1i02


20(
2 37

4 OC
2 51

1 OC
084


2 00
2 77

4 00
4 52

100
0 93

2 00
1 84



550
5 0

50 000
50 28


17 11
.l...'

10 63


11 75

12 14


13 3S


17 &3t







15 47


24 00 ...... Manatee Fertilizer Co..
25.09 ...... Palmetto, Fla.


ANALYSIS OF FETLZR--otne.4


Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Mont-
gomery, Ala. .

Standard Guano & Chem.
M'f'g. Co, New Or eans.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensaco a.

Georgia Chemical Works,
Augusta, Ga.

Georgia Chemical Works,
Augusta, Ga.

Goulding Fertilizer Co.,
Pensaco a, Fla.

W. R. Fuller & Co., Tam-
pa, Fla.

W. R. Fuller & Co., Tam-
pa. Fla.

W. R. Fu'ler& Co., Tam-
pa, Fla.


1 -





ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS--Continued. 4C


Vegetable Fertilizer..... 355

Fruit and Vine No. 1.... 356

H. G. Sulphate of Potash 357

Fruit and Vine.......... 358

Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
Snure................ 359

Dissolved Bone Black .. 360

H. G. Vegetable Fish
Guano .............. 361

Acid Phosphate......... 362

Blood and Bone......... 363

Blood Bone and Potash. 364


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis.....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10.00
12 40

8 00
8 70



8 00
10 20

12 00
9 85

7 50

12 00
9 15

9 35

10 66

8 00
10 90


5.00
5 48

600
7 13



6 00
6 96

6 00
7 62

17 00
18 26

5 00
5 13

14 00
15 47

600
5 71

6 00
6 26


2 00 .. ...
2 76 8.24

1 00 .. ...
2 51 9 84



1 00 ......
2 26 9 22

4 00 ...
1 45 9 07

3 74 2200

2 00 ....
3 22 8 35

2 34 17 81

8 00 ...
9 79 15 50

3 00 ..... .
3 17 9 43


4.00 6 00
4 18 7 05

2 00 12 00
2 97 12 38

. . . 49 00
49 08

2 00 12 00
2 29 11 88

5 00 7 00
4 91 7 60



4 00 8 00
4 00 7 05

650

6 50 . . .
6 58 ......

4 00 4 00
3 93 4 20


W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.

Baugh & Sons, Haltimore,
Md.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.

Baugh &.Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
Md.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, Fla.

W.'R. Fu'ler Co., Tam a,
Fla.

W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
Fla.


--~-'









ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Orange Tree Special.....


Dark Cotton Seed Meal


H. G. Sulphate of Potash


L. G. Sulphate of Potash


Cotton Seed Meal ......


Cotton Seed Meal.......


H. G. Sulphate of Potash


Simon Pure Pine Apple


Simon Pure Tomato.....

H. G, Blood, Bone and
Potash ............. ..


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Offloial Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


12 00 6 00
7 80 7 57

12 00 ..





. . . . .



87 0. .....
7 ...




80( 400
S79 575

12 4 OC
8 8, 5 2'

. . I . . .
6 101 2 21


2 00 ......
0 38 7 95



. . . ..













1 00. . .

2 00 ....
1 48 76


1 61 3 88


2 50 12 00
2 27 13 65

5 00 ......
4 89 .....

S 490


8 5.27 00
...... 25 86

8 00 . . .
8 25 ......

8 00 1 76
8 51 ......

. .... 49 00
.... 48 f2

400 600
3 80 7 01

5 00 900
6 5( 10 48

7 OC 10 00
7 91 10 11


Manatee Fert. Co., Palti-
more, Md.

Florid'a Mn'fg Co., Madi-
son, Fla.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, Fla.

Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
metto, F a

H. E. Bridges, Memphis,
Tcnn,

Abbeville Cotton Oil Co.,-
Abbeville, Fla,

E. O. Painter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.

E. O. Painter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.

E. 0. Pinter Fertilizer
Co., Jacksonville.

E. O. Painter Fortilizer
Co., Jacksonville.


-----~--








Gem Bean Fertilizer.....


Special Mixture No, 1.


Ideal Fertilizer ........

Mape's Fruit and Vine
M anure......... ....

Mape's Vegetahle Ma-
nure ...... ..........

Mape's Orange Tree Ma-
nure ..............

Bradley's Fruitand Vine
Fertilizer ......... ....

Baugh's Fruit and Vine
M anure ..............

Bradley's Vegetahle
Fertilizer .............


Bradley's Nursery Stock


ANALYSIS O FlERftILZERS-.ohtinued.


375


376


377


378


379


380


381


382


383


384


Guarant'd Analysis ......
Official Analysis.... 8.0C

Guarant'd Analysis. 8 (C
Official Analysis.... 9 5C

Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00
Official Analysis.... 9 2C

Guarant'd Analysis. 10 0C
Official Analysis.... 15 95

Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00
Official Analysis.... 15 25

Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00
Official Analyss.... 15 95
Guarant'd...Analysis. 13 00
Official Analysis.... 7 95
Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00
Official Analysis... 6 75
Guarant'd Analysis. 13 00
Official Analysis.... IO 60

Guarant'd. Analysis. 13 00
Official Analysis.... 12 50


I


.4 -,. .' ~ ~ `i


'S


j-.
--
''


2 91 7,91

1 00 . . .
0 96 6 91

1 00
0 95 7 11

2 00 ... .
2 57 8 01

2 00 . .
2 49 8 89

2 00 . . .
3 40 10 33

1 00 .. ..
2 44 9.15

2 00 . . .
3 16 10 39

1 00.
2 50 10 27

1 00 .....
2 95 11 61


5.00
5 10

5 00
5 23

4 00
3 63

200
2 50

5 00
4 86

4 00
4 17

2 25
2:58

200
2 12

400
4 00

4 50
4 22|


41}

2.00 0. Palater Fertlllur
3 26 Co., Jacksonville.

5 00 Willson & _Toomer Ferti
5 95 Co., Jacksonville.

6 00 Willson & Toomer Fert.
8 26 Co., Jack-onvil e.

10 00 Mape's Formula & P. G.
11 05 Co., New York

4 00 Mape's Formula & P. G. '
5 95 Co., New York.

3 00 Mape's Formula & P. G.
4 00 Co,, New York.

10 00 American Ag'l & .Ohem.
10 15 Co., New York.

15 00 Baugh & Son, B limore,
14 38 Md.

5 00 American Ag'l & Chem.
5 19 Co., New York -

2 92 Co., New York. '
-1
~" ~ ~ ~~ ~-.




: ~~~ ~ ~ .-.1 ir-' '





j ~iWtr7tEStS OE''!TtILI~RS-Continued.'


~; i " ^

^ ** \


F


- 1. ..i


i;;

i.
:.i.

i 1


Fruit and Vine. ...... .385 Guarant'd Anmlsts. 8 80 6 00 10 2 50 10 00 Va-Carolina Chem, Go-
Official Analysis.... 7 60 6 22 0 3 6 55 2 68 8 73 Savannah, Ga.

Special Fruit and Vine.. 386 Guant'd Analysis. 1000 6.00 1 00 ..... 4 00 13 0 Willson & Toomer Fert,
Official Analysis... 510 659 036 695 4 70 13 70 Co., Jacksonville.

Cotton Seed Meal....... 387 Gua t'd Analyas. ... .. 2 50 7 5 1 50 W. A. rode & Co., IMem-
Otfcial Anayaly .... ...... ...3 13 8 15 1 83 .phis, Tenn.

Cotton Seed Meal..... 388 Guanftd Analys....... .. ...... 2 00 7 5 1 00 A. A. Smith, Atlanta, oa.
Otflcal Analysis................... 3 08 7 58 192


-I



7
I ~


I







I




r


V


PART IV,

MISCELLANEOUS.


/











A'
CC;


<7


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'`2




i'
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j. 'I ~
i'\l 'I
i
\


'` ''






.-.

,

~(-



;II

~.




-a




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:-I
'








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i-:



iFr
'' 1.


i,
i





,,,

.-







t;

r'



r'F

I1-
i
r*













Pure Food Laws.



The pure food laws of the State are in such demand by
manufacturers and others, that we herewith publish air
that are in force:

Section 2659, Revised Statutes. Selling Unwholesome
Provisions.-Whoever knowingly sells any kind of de-
seased, corrupted or unwholesome provisions, whether
for meat or drink, without making the same fully known
to the buyer, shall be punished by imprisonment not ex-
ceeding six months, or by fine not exceeding two hundred
dollars.

SSection 2660, Revised Statutes. Adulterating Bread,.
Etc.-Whoever fraudulently adulterates, for the purpose
of sale, bread or any other substance intended for food,
with any substance injurious to health, shall be punished'
by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or by fine not
exceeding three hundred dollars; and the articles so ndul-
-terated shall be forfeited and destroyed under the direc-
tion of court.

Section 2662, Revised Statutes. Selling Oleomarga-
rine.-Whoever knowingly and willfully sells or causes to
be sold as butter any spurious preparation purporting to
be butter, whether known as oleomargarine or by any
other name, shall be punished by imprisonment not ex-
ceeding thirty days, or by fine not exceeding one hundred'
dollars.

Section 2663, Revised Statutes. Hotel Keeper Supply-.
ing Same.-Any keeper of any hotel or boarding house
who shall knowingly and willfully, without giving notice '
to guests at the table, supply oleomargarine or other spu-
rious preparation purporting to be butter for the use of
guests, shall be subject to the same penalty.






S' / -
54

CHAPTER 4546- (No. 32.)
"l-

AN ACT to Prevent the Adulteration of Candy.

Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

SSection 1. No person shall by himself, his servant or.
agent, or as the servant or agent of any other person or
corporation, manufacture for sale, or knowingly sell or
Suffer to sell any candy adulterated by the admixture of
terra alba, barytes, talc or any other mineral substance,
by poisonous colors or flavors or other ingredients delete-
rious or detrimental to health.
Sec. 2. Whoever violates any of the provisions of this
S act shall be punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred
dollars ($100.00) nor less than fifty dollars ($50.00.)
The candy so adulterated shall be forfeited and destroyed
u nder direction of the court.'
S See. 3. This act shall take effect upn its passage and,
S approval by the Governor.
Approved June 4, 1897.



CHAPTEr 5170--[No. 65.]

AN ACT to Prevent the Adulteration of Food and Drugs,
and to Provide a Penalty for the Violation' of this
Act.

Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. That no person shall mix, color, stain or
powder, or order, or permit any other person to mix,
color, stain, or powder, any article of food or drugs with
any ingredient or material so as to render the article
injurious 'to health, or manufacture any article of f6od
which shall be composed in wholi or in part of diseased,
S decomposed, offensive, or unclean animal or vegetable
substance with the intent that the same may be sold in
the said State, and no person shall sell any such article
so mixed, colored, stained powdered, or manufactured.







55

Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a-
misdemeanor, and for each offense be finednot exceeding
two hundred dollars for the first offense, and for each
subsequent offense not exceeding three hundred dollars,
or imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both, in ahe
discretion of the court.
See. 2. Quality and Potency of Drugs.-That no person
shall, except for the purpose of compounding as hereinaf-
ter described, mix, color, stain, or powder or order or
permit any other person to mix, color, stain or powder,
any drug with any ingredient or material so as to affect
injuriously the quality or potency of such drug, with in-
tent that the same may be sold in said State, and no
person shall sell any such drug so mixed, colored, stained,
or powdered, under the same penalty in each case respect-
ively as, in the preceding section for a first and subee-
.quent offense.
Sec. 3. Ignorance of Adulteration.-That no person
shall be liable to be convicted under either of the two
last foregoing sections of this act in respect of the sale
of any article of food, or of any drug, if he shows to the
satisfaction of the court before whom he is charged that /
.he did not know of the article or drug sold by him being
.so mixed, colored, stained, or powdered, as in either of
thqse sections mentioned, -and that he could not, with
reasonable diligence, have obtained that knowledge.
Sec' 4. Fraudulent Additions or Adulterations.-That
no person shall sell any article of food or drug which is
not of the nature,.substance, and quality of the article as
represented by the vendor, and any person violating this
section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, add for the first
offense be fined not exceeding fifty dollars, and for each
.subsequent offense not exceeding one hundred dollars, or
imprisonment not exceeding six months, or both, in the'
discretion of.the court; Provided, That an offense shall
-not be deemed to be committed under this section in the
following cases, that is to say:
First. Where any matter or ingredient not injurious to
health has been added to the food or drug because the
-same is required for the production or preparation
thereof as an article of commerce, in a state fit for car-
riage or consumption, and not fraudulently to increase





S ' 56 /
56

t' he bulk, weight, or measure of the fopd or drug, or con-
ceal the inferior quality thereof.
Second. Where the drug or food is a proprietary medi-
cine.
Third. Where the food or drug is compounded as au-
thorized by this act.
Fourth. Where the food or1 drug is unavoidably mixed
with some extraneous matter in the process of collection
or preparation.
Sec. 5. Ingredients must be in accordance with put-
chaser's demand.
That n person shall sell any compound article of food
or compounded drug which is not composed of ingredi-
ents in accordance with the demand of the purchaser.
Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor and fined not exceeding fifty dollars; Pro-
'vided, That no person shall be guilty of any such offense
as aforesaid in respect of the sale of an article of food or
a drug mixed with any' matter or ingredient not'injuri-
ous to health, and not intended, fraudulently, to increase
in bulk, weight, or measure, or conceal its inferior qual-
ity, if at the time of delivering such article 'or drug he
shall supply to the person receiving the same a notice, by
a label, distinctly and legibly written or printed on or
with the article or drug, to the effect that the same is
mixed.
Sec. 6. Subtraction of Ingredients.-That no person
shall, with the intent that the same may be sold in its
altered state without notice, subtract from any article of
food any part of it so as to affect injuriously its quality,
substance or nature, and no person shall sell any article
so altered without making disclosure of the alteration,
and any person violating the provisions of this section I
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not exceeding
one hundred dollars.
Sec. 7. must prove conditions inder proviso, (Sec. 5).
That in any prosecution under this act, where the fact of
an article having been sold in a mixed state has been
proved, if the defendant shall desire to reply upon proviso
contained in this act, it shall be incumbent upon him to
prove \the same.


\ '

^ '









Sec. 8. Dealer Igdorant of Adulteration.-That if the
defendant in any prosecution under this act prove to the
satisfaction of the court that he had purchased the article
in question as the same in nature, substance, and quality
as that demanded of him by the purchaser, and with a
written warranty to that effect; that he hal .no reason to
believe at the time when he sold it that the article was
otherwise; and that he sold it in.the same state as when
he purchased it, he shall be discharged from the prosecu-
tion.
Sec. 9. Forging of Warranty.-That any person who
shall forge, or shall use, knowing it to be forged, any cer-
tificate or any writing purporting to contain a warranty,
as provided in section eight of this act, shall be guilty of
a misdemeanor and be punishable, on conviction, by im-
prisonment for a term not exceeding one year with hard
labor.
Sec. 10. False or Misapplied Warranties.-That every
person who shall wilfully apply to any article of food
or a drug a certificate or warranty given in relation to
any other article or drug, or who shall give a false war-
ranty in writing to any purchaser in respect of an arti-
cle of food or drug sold by him as principal agent, or
who shall wilfully give a label with any article sold by
him which shall falsely describe the article sold, shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction be fined not
to exceed one hundred dollars.
Sec. 11. Chemist.-That the analysis provided for in
this act shall be under the control of the Commissioner of
Agriculture under such rules and regulations as he may
prescribe.
Sec. 12. Demands for Aanlysis.-That any purchaser
of an article of food or of a drug shall be entitled to have
such article analyzed by such analyst, and to receive
from him a certificate of the result of his analysis. And
any health officer, inspector of nuisances, or any food
inspector may procure any sample of food or drug, and
if he suspects the same to have been sold to him contrary
to any provision of this act, he shall submit the same to
the Commissioner of Agriculture to be analyzed, who
shall with all convenient speed cause such analysis to be








made and give a certificate to such officer, wherein he
shall specify the result of the analysis.
Sec. 13. Purchase of Samples for Analysis.-That if
any officer mentioned in Section 12 of this act shall ap-
ply to purchase any article of food or any drug exposed
to sale or on sale by retail on any premises, or in any
shop or store, and shall tender the price for the quantity
which he shall require for the purpose of analysis, not
being more than shall be reasonable requisite, and the
person exposing the same for sale shall refuse to sell the
same to such officer, such officer shall have the right to
enter the premises where the same shall be so exposed
for sale and seize and take into his possession a suffi-
cient quantity of any such food or drug, and shall keep
same for the purpose of analysis.
Sec. 14. Definitions.-That the term "food," as used in
this act shall include every article used for food or drink
by man other than drugs and water. The term "drug,"
as used in this act, shall include all medicines for inter-
nal and external use.
Sec. 15. Exemption of Certain Articles.-That the
Commissioner of Agriculture may from time to time de-
clare certain articles or preparations to be exempt from
the provisions of this act; and it shall be the duty of the
Commissioners to prepare and publish from time to time
a list of the articles, mixtures, or compounds declared to
be exempt from the provisions of this act, in accordance
with this section.
Sec. 16. Previous Legislation.-That all acts and parts
of acts inconsistent with this act be, and the same are
hereby repealed.
Approved June 5, 1903.













d








CHAPTER 5231-[No. 126.]

AN ACT to Regulate the Sale of Certain Syrups and
Adulterations Thereof Within this State, and for
Other Purposes.

Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. That from and 'after September 1st, 1903, it
shall be unlawful for any person or persons, firm or cor-
poration, or agent thereof, to sell, advertise for sale, or
offer for sale, within the limits of this State, any adul-
terated or mixed syrups whatever; except at the time of
sale or offer for sale the percentage of such adulteration
or mixture is clearly stamped or labeled on the barrel,
can, case bottle or other receptacle containing such syrup.
The terms adulterated "mixture" or "admixture," as used
in this act is understood to apply to all mixtures of two
or more ingredients differing in their nature and quality,
such as sugar cane syrup, sorgham syrup, maple syrup,
molasses or glucose.
Sec. 2. That all packages of adulterated or mixed
syrups in barrels or other receptacles, shall bear the
name and postoffice address of the manufacturer or man-
ufacturers.
Sec. 3. All persons, firms, or corporations, or agents,
thereof, found guilty of a violation of this act, shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be punished for each
offence in a sum not exceeding $500, or imprisonment in
the county jail for a term not exceeding six months, or
both, at the discretion of the court.
Sec. 4. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this
act be and the same are hereby repealed.
Approved June 4, 1903.




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