Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00017
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: May 1, 1904
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text




V OLUME 14
NUMBER 3- ,




SFLORI:DA


MONTHLY

BULLETIN.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,


MAY 1. 3904.

B. B. McILIN
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTUIRE.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


Part 1-Crop.. Part 2-Weather Report,
Part 3-Fertilizers. Part 4-Misellaneous.


Entered January,31, 1oM. at Tallahassee, Florida as
second-class matter, under Act of Congress.
of June. xvlo.


These Bulletiis are lssed free tothose requesting them.


STALLAHAESSE,.LA. 'A***
L B. HILSON, STATE PRINTER. "J
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S county Map of the State of Florida.

(For the Bulletin.)




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PART I.


CROPS,


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Hon B. E. McLiN, Corn- H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY.-The weather is so dry that some
crops have not yet come up, and those that have are suf-
fering greatly for rain; the stands of crops are nearly
all imperfect because of the dry weather. Furit trees
Are doing well.
BAKER COUNTY.-Crops that are up show fairly good
stands, but the weather is so dry that they are slow to :
come up, and also grow very slow, on account of coot
nights and no rain.
BRADFORD COUNTY.-Crops are doing very well, with
very good stands. -Vegetable crops are good. Strawberry
crop very fine also peaches.
AREVARD COUNTY.-The seasons have been gopd; orange
trees are looking very fine, and crops promises to be large.
Condition of field and other cropli about normal, and
stands are generally gcod. Oilher front trees are doing
well and, good crops in prospect.
CALHOUN COUNTY.-Owing to dry weather, stands of
crops are poor; some are just coming up and some are
dying for want of rain; corn is looking fairly well, but
oats poor on account of dry weather; sugar cane is poor,
and stand is bad; melon crops doing well, but must have
rain soon; cotton and late oats will be cut short.
CITRUS COUNTY.--Extremely dry weather has very ma-
terially affected oats. Stands of crops are generally very
good, but the condition is not so good on account' of
drought. Fruit trees doing well. Peaches and grapes .'
will be good crops.
CLAY CQUNTY.-Stands and condition of crops are
usually good, but nights are cool, and we are needing/,
rain very much.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.-All crops that are up show good -
stands, but it is rather too dry for late planting to come





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up; the soil has been given much better preparation than
Usual; labor is scarce and very hard to get on the farm.
SDADE COUNTY.-The seasons have been good, and stands
- and conditions of crops are also good; all fruit trees are
M: growing finely, and promise good crops.
DnSoro COUNTY.-Cool, dry, and windy weather,
seems to be the rule; rain will soon be needed. Stands of
S crops are good, also, conditions, and with fair seasons
S DeSoto county will produce both good field and orchard
crops.
ESCAMBIA CouNTY.-All crops that are up have good
stands and are looking well, there is an increase in
acreage generally of about one third. .Peaches and
grapes will be fine.
FRANKLIN COUNTY.-In sandy land, rain is badly
needed, all crops in low land are doing fine.
i GADSDEN CoUNTY.-There is generally a good stand of
crops that have:, come up, some are not up yet, and some
S not finished planting; condition of crops is fairly good,
; though it is getting too dry, and nights too cool for
S crops to grow well.'
S HAMILTON COUNTY.-Stands of crops will average fair,
S some are good and some are poor, and all need' rain; some
S seed planted that cannot come up till we have rain.
HILLSBOROUGH CouNTY.-Long continued drought is
cutting shdrt the cr~ps of beans, Irish potatoes, cucum-
Sbers, etc., crops have made well up to this time. Melons
are doing well, but need rain; fruit trees doing well.
HOLMES COUNTY.-At this timeconditions and weather
are favorable; stands of crops are very good; somb are
just being planted; peach and grape crops will be good.
J eACKSON COUNTY.-Most crops have very good stands
and are in fair condition; strawberries and melons doing
well, will have a pretty good peach, crop.
JEFFERSON COUNTY.-Stands of crops are' good with all
Crops so far, and 11 are in' gopd average condition, mel-
nuW are rather poor and peachP'ae a short crop; vegeta-
;:: ~ crop, are fairly go90, but weatfli is a little too
> U'dry. , ,
S..LAKR COUNTY.-Crops have generally done 'well- and
in average good. condition. Fruit trees doing,-well, and


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pea cheswill make a fine crop. Citrus trees have made' "
heavy bloom.
Ln COUcTY.-All crops are fine as could be reasona-
bly expected, stands are good,and conditions of crops *
could be little more satisfactory; all crops are turning
out fine, and gruit trees all have a heavy bloom on, and
are in extra fine condition; peach crop good.
LEON COUNTY.-The stand of crops that have come up
is good, but some planting has been very much delayed
on account of long continued drought; crops of all kinds
have suffered greatly for rain, and with the cool high
winds that continue to blow, growth has been practically
at a standstill; peach and plum crops are very good.
LEV COUNTY.-Stands of crops are about an average,
Sand condition has been good, but we are beginning to
need'rain. Melons are doing'well, and. peaches and grapes
will be a full crop; vegetable crops are also fine.
MADIsON COUNTY.-Crops will average a good stand,
but at present it is too dry for them to grow well, and be .
in good condition; melon crops are doing very well but
are also affected by dry weather.
MANATEE COUNTY.-Crops came up well, and have
grown well, but it is so very dry now that all crops are
suffering very much for rain; with ordinary good sea-
sons; there will be fine and full crops all around; peaches
will yield a fine crop, trees are loaded with fruit.
MARION COUNTY.-Stands of crops are good. The mel-
on crop will be very large in this ocunty and is now in
a splendid condition, but rain would help very. much. If
we do not have rain in a short time all crops will suf-
fer.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-Long continued drought hurting
tomatoes; rain would greatly benefit all 'crops. Some red
spider is seen on grape fruit trees. Peach crop will be
very fine.
POLK COUNTY.-The drought still continues, though '
in some sections-of the county good showers have fallen;'
'potatoes and beans have been cut short; early cabbage
did well, late cabbage were damaged by drought; crops
are doing as well'as couldbe expected considering -the
long dry :spell they have had to contend with.




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early planted crops are generally good; conditions 'only-
medium-; nights too cool and windy for crops to grow
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SANTA Rosa COUNTY.-It is verry ry here, and cropm
S that were planted late are iot coming up yell;'stands' f
early planted crops are generally good; conditions only
;;' mediums nights too cool and windy for crops to grow
mnch.
'.* :'. SUMTRR CouNTY.-It is very dry here, but corn, .toma-
toes, water melons and citrus trees are standing it very
; well; velvet beans aie very poor; several other crops
Shave been greatly damaged by. the long drought.
SUWANNEE Co0tNTY,-Crops pre not coming up as well
as they should on account of dry weather; some crops are
not yef planted. There will be an increased acreage in
S broom corn this year.
:' TAYLOR COUNTY.-Crops are slow to come up; corn is
good, and so is sugar cane; the dry cool weather is keep-
ing, all:ci ps from growing.
SWALTON CouN.TY.-Crops are very smali, and growing
pporely on account, of thi very unfavorable weather,
stands are indifferent afdki condition low for the same rea,.
son.
s WASHINGTON COUNTY.'-Crops stands are only medium
on account of unfavorable weather; some crops not yet
finished planting, and others not yet up; cool windy
nights and 'dry weather is keeping growth of all crops
back.




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REPORT OF STAND AND CONDITION OF CROP
IFOR APRIL, 1904, AS COMPARED WITH 1903
ALSO CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES.


COUNT


Upland
Cotton

IES


I 1


Alachua....
Baker. ..
Bradford .
Brevard...
Calhoun...
Citrus ......
Clay.......
Columbia..
Dade.....
DeSoto.....
Eccambia..
Franklin...
Gadsden...
Hamilton..
Hillsboro..
Holmes....
Jackson. ..
Jefferson..
Lake.......
Lee. .......
Leon. ....
' Levy.......
SMadiaon...
Manatee..
Marion ....
Nassau ....
Osceola....
Pasco .....
Polk.......
Santa Rosa
Sumter.....
Suwamnee..
Taylor.....
Walton....
Washin'tqn

Gen'l av'ge
per cent.,


100 100

90100


100 ioc
80 10C
90 10C


85 9C
.. 5.-.


100 100



50


807 5
90 8


92 9E


Sea
Island
Cotton

0


I -


4-
Co












1B
i



1
100
80




10C

90
110
100
100
100
100

100


100
1oc
o00c

100
100
9100
100

100
90



95


96


rn


0





11


.90

"C
1C
10C
.iC

bC

10C
75
90
50

100
110
100
100

120
8C
106
10C
10C

10l
120
10(
10C(
81
70
10C
90



9C


Oats Sug





a ca



90 70 30
100 75 -50
100 100 85
.... .... 10Cc
100 70 60
100 75 100

100 125 100

100 1005
100 75 100
80 70 80
110 125 80
76 50 50
... .... 75
90 90 110
100 100 100
100 110 100
50 50 50
100 125 100
100 75 85
100 90 90
100 100 110
120 100 120
80 75 100
.. .... 100
100 100 100
100 90 100
100 100 100
85 66 65
75 65 50
70 70 80
.... .... 100
90 90 80
80 90 100


96 871. .


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ne


o o






S .... ...
1.
1 ... ...
10 .... ...



1 100 ....10
61 .. ..


. ... . ...
100 90 10
100 100 8
80 ..
80 1001 10
50 ......
100 .... ...
11 .
,100 100 10
100 .......
50 . ...
125 100 10
80 .. .


10 .... ...
1 1 10


10 80 8

0 .... ...
10 .... ...
100 .. ...
75.. ...
50..
90 05
100 .. ...
80 .... .
7 75 7


88 91 8


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I COUNTIES
.,


Alachua...
Baker. ....
Bradford..
Birevard...
Calhoun...
Citrus.....
Clay.......
Coltmbia..
Dade .......
DeSoto ..'.
Esepmbia..
Franklin..,
Gadsden...
'- Hamilton..
; Hill boro..
S Hol es..:..
Jackson ..
Jefferson.'.
Lake.......
Lee.........
Lon......
Levy.......
Madison..
Manatee...
Marion....
Nassau....
Osceola ....
Pas6oo.....
S olk......
Santa Rosa
S.SnAer ....

, '" i'Suwannee..
,Taylor.....
Walton.....
Washin't'n

Gen'i av'ge
*,iper center


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C034D1TION OW CqROPS--ConMtir&--d


S_ -


sloe


0
Rice


.B 0


t, Fifeld .
Poto- Peas
toes



0 0
,I I 0
ono B


941 99


Caipa-
va





w Qg

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.... .. :. .
100 100



ioo8'i ,oo


100 100 100

80 ...I...
100 110 90
1 1001 85
.... 26 6o
100 100 100
80 .... ... .








97. 94 .2


,
5
~-


Velvet Cab-
Beans bage









.... .... .. *
70 70 .90 90 *

ik ioo :..:. .....
0100.
S.... .... 75 7
195 100 100 100
100 100 100 100

100 100ioo .... ...
110 100 110 100
100 100 100 100
~o 70 80 75
125 120 ... ...
50 50 .... ..
100 100 ........
.... .... 100 100
."iooi. 166 "8

100 100, 50 76
100 100 120,120
100 100 100 100
90 100 100 100






.... .. .
166' 2 100
100 10C 105 100
... .... 100 100
125 10C 120 125
110 10C 100 _-110
100 100 100 150.




.... .... .... ...


981 9 OF98,100


10


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CONDMTIbN OF CROfSOPMo-ttinued,


I Toma- Cucm- Beans English Egg
Potar toes bers Peas Plant
toes

COUNTIES 0 0 f g I
0 0 0 0 0

9a 2 g
0 0 o O OS W 0 4


Alachas...
Baker....
Bradford..
Brevard...
alboun.. .
Citias....
Clay. ......
OQhmbia.
ade ....
Deoto....
becambia.
Franklln...
*agedmen..
HaIpilton..


Jieffrson. .
Iake..,...
Lee.......
Leon.....
Levy......
Madison....
Manatee...

NTayra.....
Osoeola...
SPasco......
POUt......
enta RoaM


'Taylor.....
,Waton...
WMhingtoi

Gen'l av'ge
per cent.


7( 7C


19C 'ic

100 100

i6 i6s
100 100
100 90

6100 100"i
50 50

90 90

60 76
50 75
80 80
100 75
100 100
80 80
120 100
90 90
85 80
100 85
100 100
100 70
85 75
100 100

.... ....


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S.- I-


901 861 911 87 9 0 100


971


70 75 70

........ 100


*100 90 100
100 lo1 100


95 9 1301
100 8 100
/ ... .. 80
.... .... ....
150 90 "50
100 100 100
80 8C 110
*'60 '60 'i6o
... .... 100
100 10 110
... .... 100
75 90C 100
751 7 75 60
120 100 120
1001 90 90
.... .... 100

1 100
0 76 1007
100 10 80


. .. . . ..


I.


i61i66

100 100


90 95



.... ....
.... . .




100 75


100 100






01
.... ...
50. 100.


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Peanuts Hay Tob

COUNTIES
0 0

Sa s


.... 50 0 .... .. .
Baker.. .... .. ...
Bradfomi ... ....... .... :...
Bievari4 . ... . ...
Calhoun: .... .... .... .. ... ...
Otra ,.... 100 100 75 75..,..
Clay. .. .......
mila.. .......
D de. ... ... ..
DeBoto.... 9 0 1001 90
Becambia.. 100 85 100 80 100
Prankn... .... .... ....
Gadsden... 110 110.. .. 110
Bamilton. 0 50 75 50....
Hcllsboron ...............
Helmes.... 100 100......... 10
Jackson..... . ... ... ... ....
Jeferaosn.. 100 100 .... .... ....

Le ........ 110 110 150 150 100
Leon....... ....... .. 100
...l.y......100 100 ...........
M adison... .... ... ...... .....
Manatee .. .... 120 100
Marion.... 1 100...........


sco ...... 10100 00 .. ........
.O ola.. .. .. .... .... .... ....
^anta Rosa 100 75 .... ,.......
(t*nter.... 100 756.... .... ....
Buwannee. ..
Taylor ..... 7 .1iT(
WaSlhngtoi 0 .. .... ....

Gen'l av'ge 1
'_per cent.. 9 89 10 9 101


- .'.. .. ,. ,... .- .r .. m^ .:.4 .. .. -'r'-'r''' C;'., f,.
-' O -; ;.' I,** V..- p C". .. 1




ONDITION,'OF CROP -Contirned '


__~_


a


/
Straw- Water. Canta-
cco berries melons loupes.


.0 .0

I S 1l


.... 46 50 60 50 70 60O
....... .. .. ... ....... ...
.. 100 .............
.... .. .... 100 100 .... ...
.... .... .... 100 o90 .. ... .
.... .... ... 100 100 .... .. ..


90 110 10 0 10W 10
80Q 1 10 ,100 100 100 100 90
5 75 8C 80 80 70
110 195 125.... .... .....
... 0 0 C 0 ....
... 50 10 1010 ..
105 1001 12 80 80,
.... 11 110 10 100 .... ....
. 10 80 10 75 .... ....


.. 100 100 10
.. 100 100 50 100 0
... 110 95 95 100 9 100'
.. .. ...100 100.. ..
10 90 110 110 100 100'
.. .... 100 100 85 90
.... 70 100 70 120 10 100'
.... .... ..9. 90 75 60 50
... .... .... 80 75 .. ...


.... .. .... 65 65 .... ....
.... .. .. ... ... 80 75... ....

9 94 8 921 89 900 88


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ONDITI? OF CROPS --C nued.
CONDITION OF CROPS-Cmntlnued.


4) 10 (D W


COUNTIES.


o 0 0
.- .-

80 0
o
0Ye


Alachua ...........
B ake ..............
Bradford ..........
Brevard ..........
Calhoun.........
Citrus... .........
Clay.............
Columbia ... .....
Dade...... ...... ..
DeSoto ...........
Escambia .........
Franklin..........
*Gadsden. ........
Hamilton.........
Hillsborough......
Holmes...........
Jackson ....... ...
Jefferson.........
Lake.... .........
L ee ............. .
Leon .......
Levy .... ......
Madison ..........
M anatee...........
Marion ...........
Nassau ...........
Osceola ...........
Pasco.... .........
Polk................
Santa Rosa:.......
Sumter ...........
Suwannee .........
Taylor.............
Walton...........
WAshington .......

General Average
Per Cent........


100 ....


105 100
95 90



10 ....
100.




110 10C
75 ...
100..

1i20 i10
110 ....

100 ii1
150 ...
120 10(

101


1 ...


0 0 0 0


...... ........ 90 90
. .... .... . 0 ... I






103 I &0 ..... .0
0 o. o ,o.



100 .... ... .... 100, 1W0
...... .... .... .... ..... ......
.... .......... 110......

10. 100 100 100 ..... ......
10C 90 100 90 100 100
...... ... .. ... I 100
..... .... ... ... 90


...... ... .. .... .......
S.... .... ... .. 0 50

100.... .... .. 12 00
.. ... ... ..... 10 100

... ... .. .... 100
.... .... .... 0 ..
. 100 ... .. 10 100 100


110 100 10 12 100 100
........... .... .... 85 100 -
.... .. ... ... .. 110 100

-120 100 110 80 80 .80
110 .... .. ... ... 100 ,o1
..... .... .... .... 100 .... ..
110 110 100 100 120 100
100 .... .... .... 100 100
120 .... 70 .... 100 10
..... .... .... ... 100 100
100 .... .... .... 100 ......
...... .... ..... .... 1C0 100

. .... ... .... .. ... ..



105 100 97 89 98 95


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PART IIH


WEATHER REPORT


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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE
OF THE
WEATHER BUREAU.
Central Office: Washington, D. C.


FLORIDA SECTION:
A. J. MITCHELL, Section Director.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
*REPORT FOR MARCH, 1904.


SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 4 stations.. 30.05
Departure from the normal, 4 records.......... -0.01
Highest observed, at Jacksonville on the 17th.... 30.32
Lowest observed, at Jacksonville on the 7th:..... 29.77.'
Absolute range for the State ................. 0.55

TEMPERATURE.
Degrees .ra
S Mean, as determined from records of 61 stations.. 67.5
Departure from the normal, 29 records......... .-j-2.8
Highest monthly mean, at Miami................ 75.8 '
Lowest monthly mean, at Wausau ............... 62.4
Highest recorded, at Macclenny on the 22d....... :94 i
Lowest recorded, at Tallahassee on the 16th and
Wausau on the 5th ............................ 30
Absolute range for the State.................... 64

PRECIPITATION.
Inches.
Average, as deterniined from records of 58 stations 1.62 ',
SDeparture from the normal, 28 records/........., -1.76 '
2Bul





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18 '



Least monthly amount, at amingo..............
,- .


" .'*' Geatest amount Lor any 24 hours, at Jupiter on the-



: ';29th .... .. ... ... .... ... ....... :30 '
1 , GTeatest monthly amount, at Bonifay............. 4.00
;, >' Least monthly amount, at Flamingo.............. T.
S Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 5

WIND.

Prevailing wind direction ............... Southwest.

WEATHER.

.. Average number of days ..........:...... ........17
Average number of partly cloudy days ............10
Average number of cloudy days.................... 4

MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA.

(Dates of.)
Fog, Dense.-Federal Point, 19; Huntington,, 23; Pine-
mount, 3, 4, 13, 18, 20, 21; Sumn2r, 19; Eustis, 19, 24;
Fort Meade, 1; Titusville, 4; Manatee, 19; Molino, 12;
Pensacola, 1, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23,/24, 26; Stephensville, 22.
S Frosts, Light.-Gainesville, 15;' Jacksonville, 15; Lake
'': City, 15; Pinemount, 10; Apalachicola, 15; Marianna,
y, 29; Molino, 8, 15, 27, 28; Pensacola, 28; Stephensville,
15; Wewahitchka, 14.
Hail.-Fort Pierce, 5; Titusville, 28; Bonifay, 3, 14;
: Marianna, 14.
High Winds.-Jacksonville, 4, 5, 11; Sumner, 4; Gras-
mere, 4, 5; Titusville, 29; Avon Park, 29, 30; Pensacola,
S3 14, 26; Wewahitchka, 13.
Halo, Lunar.-Tampa, 1, 27, 28.
Halo, Solar.-Tampa, 6, 19, 27.
*' Thunderstorms were reported at voluntary stations as
''7 follows: On the 2d, 1; 3d, 4; 4th, 3; 5th, 1; 6th, 1; 7th,
3; 11th, 1; 13th, 1; 14th, 7; 17th, 2; 19th, 3; 20th, 2; 21st,
1; 25th, 1; 26th, 3; 27th, 4; 28th; 4. And at Weather
Bureau stations: 3d, 1; 4th, 2; 6th, 2; 7th, 1; 14th, 3;
S '15th, 1; 20th, 2; 21st, 1; 25th; 1; 26th,-2; 27th, 3.
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\ COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR MARCH,.
WITH DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST THEIR.
TEEN YEARS.


Year 1892 1893 I84- 1895 1896 1897 s898 1899ig 1900 1901 lo 1903 1w04


Mean 6v.o 63.9 66.9 63.4 66.0 70.6 67.5 66. 63.6 62.. 64.8 60. 67
*Dear -2.7 --0.8 +22 '+07 +13 +59 +2.8 +i.6 -1.1 -2.6 p1 0 p14-4 l 2 ,

Total i-55 4.90 1.77 2 I 2.41 2.06 I.-4 1-96 6.82 5.65 4.63 5.52 1.i. ,.
Depar -1.83 +1.52-ri.6i -1.28-0.95 -1.32 -1.84 -1.42 +3.44 +2.2; p1l.25 p12 14 -1.



PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Wi dTVl. it i R 4. l tive


STATIONS





Jacksonvil e..
Jupiter .......
ey West.....
Pensacola.....
Tampa ........


Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humidity


so H m -d t
0 01







*30 08 30.30 4 29.90 13 8,057 42 W 14 98 45 Sa
30o6 30.28 17 29.84 7 4.579 18 nw 20 97 a 7
______ 302 1I28 .M,3on 14 7


~,"

'* ;*



. "'i


'*,*i


*8 a. m. reading only.


T




.4


14


I


~~a.c
(bl


r
";















STATIONS.


Northern Section,
Archer...............
Federal Point........
Fernandina..........
Fort Georget-........
Gainesvill ..........
Huntington ..........
Jacksonville ........
Jasper .............
Johnstown...........
Lake City...........
Macclenny ..........
Micanopy............
Middleburg..........
. Pinemount..........
St Augustine ........
. Sumner ...........
Switzerland..........


.... iMAlOLOGICAL DATA 1'OR MARCf, 1904.


COUNTIES.


Alachua ....
Putnam.....
Nassau ....
Duval.... ..
Alachua ....
Putnam ..
Duval.....
Hamilton ...
Bradford ...
Columbia...
Baker ......
Alachua ....
Clay.........
Suwannee....
St. Johns.....
Levy......
St. Johns... :


I g. I Tenderature'-in degrees Farh. Precilitation, in ches..


'0 -1. L
H 3 M 0 .^


adBR21


1.65
2.38
2.1C

1.85
1.15
1.85
1.61
1.55
1.19
0.97


2.00
1.87
0.5
2.71


4 1

t4 z


0.56.. 8
1 92 ... 6
0.80 ... 16,

0.48... 7
0.62... 6
0.54 ... 8
0.05... 5
1.36 ... 8
0.40..; 7
0.48... 6
.... ... ...

0.75... 9
0.68 ..: 6
0.37 ... -
00 90. 7..


-2.34
-0.53


-2.63
-1 50
-2.08
-4.47
-4.54
-3.85
-3,96



-1.05
-3.15
-094


Sky.

' .~V

. 0.

* z


*


r


0
I,










SW.
e-w.
se.
se
e.
se.
SW.
sw.

sw.
e.
sew



eW.
se.
sw.
sw.


, -094


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e "~
I


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.- ^,, .




"* -'r?-







.- ;,.-
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* ' .


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0 '-
<- *

-'r*.^








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MARCH. 1904 -Continued.


'STATIONS.






Central Section.
B rrtow. .... ..
Broo'sville .......
Clermont. ..........
De ,and ............
E ustis................
Fort Mead........
Fort Pierce .........
Grasmere ............
InvernesS ... .........
Kissimpnee.......
M a: abar............
Merritt's [sland......
New Smyrna ........
Ocala...... .........
Orange City: ......
Orange Home,......


COUNTIES.


Polk.... .....
Hernando.. .
Lake .......
Volusia ....
Lake. .....
Polk..........
Brevard .....
Orang3.......
Citrus........
Osceola......
Brevard.....
Brevard .....
Volusia ....
Marion......
Volusia......
Sumter.......


u a85
10 b88
9 0
9* 3
15 85
9* 42
12 81
9* 29
10 41
9* 29

9 21
9 b33
15 40
16 8
15 38


17 1 89.a
328 12Wb6.4
110 12 70.2
32 4 66.7
1801 I 708
125 21 70.4
25 1 68.8
175 68 0
43 4 66 9
65 12 68.8
3 70.6
20 28 69.9
20 16a67.5
150 17 68.0
.50 14 99.2
75... 68.4


Precipitation, in inches.


0

I


SI Temperature. in degrees Fahr.
CI
a~ '-------------------- n-.r- .




o I4
r d
J 07
*S -s
*2 g .
8. sa g
1 <;C g cr5
cS SJ ^ '


0


i14
2.]4
0,20
2.18

0 86
1.67
8.27

0.34
0.80
0.46
1.83
0.84
0.15
1:12
0.16


Sky.

a I'

ti

C- C-b.,b>
S ^
E E,2
" ;
Z


. ..


0



W.











W.
SS.












es.
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8 sw.

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Is.
08.
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8e.

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' '. ;





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.


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-0.26
-2.48
--0.86

-2.21
--:0.78
+00.


-1.02

-074
-1.86
-2 32
-1.28


L.16 ..
).20 .
L.52 ...

).12
.00
.10 .


).60 .. .
3.28 .. .
).92 ...
).59 ...
).08 ..
).57-. .
3.14 .


g i~-T~ --- -- .--- ----- : ----


~-CC-- ---__Il-
I--L.-_T-t_-l-"_i--li













STATIONS.





Ork.ado...... .....
Plant City.. ... ..
"Rockwell. ...........
St. Leo... ..... .....
Tampa . ......
Tarpon Springs.....
Titusville ...........
Southern Section.
Avon Park...........
Flamimgo ............
Hypoluxo..........
. upiter.......... ...
Key W est ............
Manatee.. .........
M arco ...............
Miami ......... ...
Myers ........ ......
Nocitee ........


OLItMATOLOGICAt bAIA fI MWABltOH, 1904.-C6nt(nued.


COUNTIES.





Orange......
Elillsbo'gh .
Marion ......
Pfsco ..
iHi tsbor'gh..
Hillsbor'gh..
Brevard.. ...


De Soto.....150
Monroe .. 11
Dade........ .
Dade ....... 28
Mcnroe 22
\Manatee... 1
Lee ...... . ...
Dade ...... ...
Lee........... 19
i)e Soto...... 48


Temperature, in degrees Fa







o .... ..

6 8-3.0 9381 46 9*

8 0 .I 9 32 41 15
68 4+0.6 9026 44 10
69 2+3. 1 8822 50 9
68.0 4-2 4 8924 46 9
69.2 -3.7 89 21* 47 9*


70.4+3.. 9021 45 9
73.4 ... 8910 55 9
72.0+1 9 8513 54 9
72.1+4.3 8514 56 9
74.7+2.0 8322 65 9
69.4+3.8 8922* 43 9
72.6 .. 9123 5219
75.3+38 86 2 60 4
70.4+1.9 88283 52 9*
70.2..... 1 9021 4210


hr. Pr cipitation, in inches.

P
a a
0.

a a2~
0. 0-.
'VA
E* .d c -
0 zd Q ^ *
o ~sI k ~z


1.09

0.25
0.19
0.77
1.52
1.12


096
T
0.71
3.06
1.94
L.26
2.36
3.10
1.90
2.79


-0.98


-330
r-2 06
-2.85
2 88


-2.04 0.61
..... I. T
-2.010.86
+0 122.30
+0.751 46
-1.810.83
..... 1.13
+0.802.05
-k0.870.92
......1 81


Sky.

ax
a ~rv a
0





22 8

8 22 1
21 8 2
18 10
18 6 7
16 12 3


C

1
2
1
1
2
.0
8


~UIo~slliO~Yil*ri~'ii~Lr~


;\. .


s '.-.'


w.- ME

-W.-
@- E



sw.
SW.

se..


e.
se.
e-se
e.
se.
nw.
e.
e. -
e.
se _- . ,
e. 4;.

* :








CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR MARCH, 1904.-Continued.


STATIONS.





Western Section.
palachicola .........
onmfay..............
Carrabelle...........
DeFuniak Sp'gs
Madison ...........
Marianna .....
Mulino............ .
Monticello ........
Pensacol ...........
Quincy. ..........
St. Andrew ..........
Stephensville o......
rallahassee .........
Wausau ..........
Wewahitchka ........


COUNTIES.


Vrauklini.........
Holmes ...... 116 3
Franklin.... 12 9
WValton .,.. 193 8
Madison ... .....:
Jackson.... 85 5
Tscambia.... 49 1
Jefferson.....207
Escambia.. 56 25
Gadsden..'.. 260 4
Washington. 12 7
Taylor ...
Le n........ 193 19
Washington 250 7
Calhoun........ 6
State Means ...


Temperature, in degrees Fahr.]



o .4

PI o 45 ,i d
S pf h 0


64.8 .....
65.0. .
64.6+2.0
63.8+2.6
66 5...

65. .
63.0+3-.5
. . . .
88.8 +1.2
64.3 .....
65.2+6.0
a62.41+0.4
64.7 .: ..

,67.5 +2.8


44 4
3915
40 4
35 4*
3616
3.529
84 4*
4115
37 4
6 i15
3715
3016
30 5
3914

. . I- -


Precipitation, in inches.




So o


6-i a is ^ z


26 1.31 ......0.41 ...
40 4.00 ...... 1.10...
40 0.80 -4.010.40...
43 34 -3.260.90...
38 2.20. .....0.59..
39 2.91 ...... 0 88...
43 3.80 ..... 1.62...
34 1.77 ...... 0.62 ..
26 1.45 -4.010.52...

34 296 +1.64 1.42...
41 0.44 .. ..0.44 ...
40 1.55 -4.040.50..
453 70 -3.44 1.00...
39 804 ......1.00

..1 62 -1.76 ...


7 22
7 9
2 24
8 10
6 21
7 0
5 10
6 17
10 12

7 28
1 7
5 15
9 10
7 12

5 17


,Sky. 0



s3 ! >, .3
S bt
v

e E0 E 20g
3 s6 : 3
z z .z P1


I


L


S 6
10 12
0 7
18 3
2 8
26 5
4 17
10 4
11 8

4 4
18 6
11 5
15 e
2 17

10 4


se.
s.
sw.
s.
sw.
sw.
a.
W.
se.

s.
S.
s.


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CLMTLOIA DAAFRMR ,194-Cniud


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COUNTIES.


Late Report
Feb 1904.
Plant City........... .......... ..... . 65. 4.


temperature, in degrees Fahr.


s- 2
bc~be
rr
0 .



*0
'A
fe "00
d ID 3 g
a a' w Qj X -i p


Precipitation, in-inch e






0 3
.2 0.6 I. 1 j

0 o ; a





4.521- 0.6911.3C ... 4


Sky. c

U d
E E00

-0 ZZ =
z z m
i UI
S. S., I-

-3 .0 3 .0
6

Z 2. E


All records are used in determining State means, but the mean departures from normal temperature
precipitation are based only op records from stations that have ten or more years of observation.
a, b, c, etc following name of station, indicate number of days missing from report.
tThermometers are not self-registering, and readings are made at 7 a. m,, 2 p. mi. 4 1 p. m. d
*More than one-day. tWeather Bureau. .


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOB MARCH, 1904.-Continued.


STATIONS.


"- i



I 0


.o











and




d ., .-
^ * '*






-a l y ^ i ': -. : . :




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PART IIL

FERTILIZERS.


ci


" :'; .~Y: ?-L'Ti'~:
- il~~~~i~j
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I-.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E McLIN,Clerk.


STATE VALUATIONS, 1904.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1904.
Available Phosphoric Acid 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5+ cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.00 per unit
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.25 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per cent.x$1.00- 6.22.
Insoluble Phosphofic Acid..1.50 per cent x .20- .30
Ammonia ..................3.42 per ctnt.x 3.00-10.26
Potash... ...... ......7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging ......... 1.25

Commercial value at sea pots .................. 25.98
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available phosphoric acid.... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia .................. 2 per cent.x 3.00- 6.00.
Potash. ............ ...... 2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging........................ 1.25

Commercial value at sea ports......... .......17.45
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-. ,
Stin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the ,
additional freight to that point must be added.


I -
/ -. ',




-'I


* .*.1 _-- ;


I'
48 P

2&I


SIf purchased in car load lots, fouscasht i ai reduction of,
ten per cent. can be made irn above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid 93 cents per unit,
Potash (K20) 99 cents per unit,
Ammonia (or equiveaent in nitrogen) $2 79 per unit.
The valuations asd market prices in succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

MARKET PRICES OFP.OEMIICALS AWND FERTILIZE
SING MATERIALS AT SEA PORTS JBAN. 4,.1904i


Less '
Ammoniates. 5
Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent. Am-
mnonia ....................
Sulphate of Ammonia i5 per
cent Ammonia ............
Dried Blood 16 per Cept, Am-
monia. ...................

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate Potash'
S 48 per cent. Potash (KSO)....
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20) ....
Muriate of Potash. 0 per' cent.
Potash (K20) ...............
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 2 Pot-
j (K20) ..................
Kainit'12 per cent. Potash.....
Canada Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ......


than 5 to 10; 10 tone
tons tons. & over-


970.00



54.00


52.00


$49.00 $49.00

70.50 70.00

58.50 53,00


51.00 50.00'


32.00 31.00


46.00

82.00
14.00


80.00,


45.00 44.00'

81.00 80.00
13.50 13.00


17.00 16.50


16.09


AMMOflA AND PHOSPH D


S High Grade Blood and Bone, 10
10 per cent. Ammonia 7 per
S cent. Phosphoric Acd ....
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6)
per cent. Ammonia, 8 pr cent.
Phosphoric Aci. ......
' Owl Brand Tankage, 5* per cent.
,Ammonia ...,, ,,,


35.00


27.00

20.09


34.50 34.00


26.50 26,00

19.50 19.00.


1. (


.-- --







'I


diaw eone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid..
IGround Castor Pomace 6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid ............
Bright Ooton Seed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia market quota-
tions .......... ............
Dark Coton Seed Meal, 5 per
cent Ammonia, market quota-
tions ................... ..


29.00


28.50 28.00


22.00 21.50 21.00


26.00


18.00


PHOSPHORIC.


Double Super Phos., 45 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid ... 45.00
-High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16
per cent. Available Phosphoric
Acid .............. ...... 16.00
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 14.00
Boneblack 17 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid ............ 25.00


25.50


25.00


17.50 17.00




44.50 44.00


16.50 15.00

15.50 13.00

24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUSL


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems, 3
per cent. Ammonia, 9 per cent
Potash ..... ........ ..... 25.00
'Pulverized Ground Tobacco Stems 16.00


24.50 _25.00
15.00 15.00


'Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per cent.
Ammonia, 2.K20 Potash...... 21.00 20.50 20.00
'Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per cent.
Ammonia, 1. per..cent. Potash. 16.00 15.50 15.00'
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..... 16.00' 15.50 15.00
Land plaster in sacks .......... 10.50 10.25 10.00 ,
Any formula will be mixed.at the price of $1.25 per
ton, in addition to the cost of the materials' ued. i




Sr :


a-.r


I ; r-; Z- ... 1-i,:, ,r._- -'r -'_, -,,i- ' 1 q 11 7 Vr:9 jA.1-,:"' r, ,
.. -
r ~7~ili-r-~T:~.Ir ~ rp. 5..'~ :
I .I Ll~.5




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O3O

FAUIrO~I~ E'ORj CO1WE~R8ION.


To convert-
Ammonia into Nittogen, multiply by ......... ... 0.824
Nitrogen into amnimai, multiply by..............1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by..........16.47
Nitrogen, into protan by.........................6.25
, Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by.. 0.458
Phosphoric Acid ipto l~one Phosphate, multiply by.2.184
S turiate of Potash: ito actual potash, multiply by. .0.632
S Actual potash into mruiite of potash, multiply by.1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by.0.541
ActualpotAsh into sulphate of potash, multiply by.1.583
Fort instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know bomi much nitrogen in it, multiply
95 per cent. by 16.47 you will get 15.65 per cent nitro-
gen; you want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen
is equivalent to, then multiply 15.65' per cent. by 1.214
,and you get 18.99 per cent,, the equivalent in ammonia.

S CHEMICAL EQUIVALENTS.

Under the law and the regulations of the department
chemical equivalents of the three essential elements,
Ammonia, Available Phosphoric Acid, and Potash, are
not allowed in the guarantee. A few instances have been
noted, particularly in cotton seed meals, when the Am-
S monia is guaranteed, and followed by a statement of the
protean contents:
SAs. Ammonia ...........................5 per cent.
Protean ...... ...... ..........25.75 per cent.
Or. Ammonia ... ............. ... ...8 per cent.
Protean ................... ......41.18 per cent.
Such a guarantee is misleading, as the terms "Amano-
nia" and "Protean," are equivalent, and only represent
the "Nitrogen" (or ammonia) content of the goods.
multiplying the nitrogen by 1.21 gives the ammonia
,tl is, 3 per cent. nitrogen X1.21 gives ammonia 3.63 per
S st. or nitrogen 3'per cent. X6.25 gives "Protean" 18.75
;" r cent,


1 1'


-
:






i S.\



31


Composition of Fertilize Materals

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


I.,.


Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia Phosphoric Potash
I Acid Potash
Nitrate of-Soda............. 17 to. 19 ............ ............
Sulphate of Ammonia........... 21to ............ ......
Dried Blood........ ........ 12 to 17 ......... ...........
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1to 2.........
BoneTankage............... 6to 9 10to 15...........
Dried Fish Scrap............ 8 to 11 6to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal............ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal ................... 13 to 17 1 to 2 ............
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

SPounds per Hundred.

Avaiable Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... .... ............. 26 to 82
Florida Rock Pnosph te......... ...... 33 to 85
Florida Super Phosphate... .......... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone.............. 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 o 17
Steamed Bone ............... 2to4 6to 9 10 o20
Diss ved Bone...... ..... -t..o 4 13 to 151 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

Phos-
Actua Am'nia horic Lime
Pota h Acid
Muriate of Potash............ 50 ........................
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 52 .....................
DoUble Sul. of Pot. & Mag. 26to 80 ........ ....... ....
Kainit .......... :............ 12 to 12 ................ ....
'Sylvinit....................... 16 to 20 ... ..... .
Cotton Seed Hu Ashes...... 15,to 0 ........ to 10
Wood A-hes, uneached..... 2 to 8 ........ to 2. to 2
Wood Ashes leached......... 1 to 2 ........ to 1485 to 40
Tobacco Stems ............. 5 to, 8 2 to 4 .... 8
Cow Manure (fresh)......... 0.40 Oto41 0.18 0.1';
Horse Manure (fresh)....... 0.3 Oto 60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)......... 0.67 1.00 0.28 0.83
HogManure (fresh).......... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0 0
Hen Dung (fresh)............ 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure........ 0.68 0.76 0.28 0.70


~ C
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S" "I -. .; '

. ..

*PEGIAL NOT CE.
The., tention of per gussending samples of fertil-
S ,izers or analysis'is called to eollowing: .
REGULATIONS' GOVERWI G "THE TAKING AND
, FORWARDING OF iFE1TILI ZER SAMPLES iTO
THE COMITSS01 FT, R OF AGRICULTURE.
S: -SCTION ,15 OF LAW
'Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers,
under Sec: 9 of the law approved May 22, 1901. Shall
,be drawn in the presence'of two disinterested witnesses,
? from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed and a
FAIR SAMPLE OF T;IE SAME O$F .NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OUNCES
,(ONE-HALF POUND)I 81aLL BE, PLACED IN A CAN OR SETTLE,
SEALED AND SENT BY; A,~ ptSITEBRSTED PARTY TO THE COM-
IISIONER OF A-!LTqETU AT TA'LAHASSVE. NOT LESS
THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN ORB'BOTTLE, WILL BE AC '
CEPTED FOR ANALYSIS, This rule is adopted to secure fair '
,samples of sufficient size to t ake the six necessary, de-
terminations, viz: Moisture,, available and insoluble
phosphoric acid, ammgnia; and potash; and to allow' the
preservation of a' d (iPtes~ ple in case of protest or
;appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for
.two months from dat' of certificate of analysis.
The State Cheomi t is not the proper officer to re-
ceive special sanzplet t ,m the purchaser. The propriety
I of the method of drairg and sending the samples as
fixed by the law iisobviops.
The drawing:ai~d'sending of special samples in rare
,cases is in complia4ce with lw. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages Or ,paper boxes, badly packed,
and frequently i very small quantity (less than ounce)
-frequently there are a o Imark, numbers or other means,
of identification. Thepost mark in some instances be-
ing absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to
avail themselves bf. this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of
S the law, which are clear nd explicit. ,
COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW. '
Citizens interested in .he fertilizer law of the State,
-and desiring to avail themselves of its. protection, can
.:obtain a copy free of charge by sending for sameto the
S .Commissioner of A4ric~ilture.

.. -, ', : i -'' ' -:







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assittapt Chemist.
Analysis of special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


NAME OR BRAND.


-- I-


S
*0-


Phosp

0a

I:


Special Mixture ......... 4731..... 7.351
Fertilizer .... ......... 474 ...... 8.621
Bone Oompound (No. 1l.. 476119.00 9.751
Acid Phosphate (No. 2).-. 477122.45 12.611
Special Mixture ......... 4781...... 6.08
Kentucky Brand-Pulver-| I
ized Tiobacco Stems .... .4791 . .. .. I
Cotton lSeed Meal ....... 14801 ..... ..... I
Fertilizer .............. 481114.25 4.901
Sulphate of Potash ...... 483 ..... .....
Fertilizer............ . .484 9.85 6.78
I I


horic Acid


o,



2.261 9.611 4.60
0.461 9.081 1.64
2.6712.421 2.20
2.51 22.45 ...
0.76 6.84 4.36

. .. . . .89
. .... .. ... 7.02
0.321 5.221 3.57
.... .... ... .
1.701 8.481 4.15
i -


0






i 9.03
13.32
1.62

7.86

110.14

12.99
50.48
I 6.77


1'
*~ A -,


88


_ _


Y~



T


BY WHOM SENT.



T. Kimball, St. Petersburg,. Fla.
F. S. Hickock, Hastings, Fla.
Johli M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
R. D. Knight, Little River, Fla
Willson & Toomer Fert. Oo.,
Jacks6nville, Fla.
Schroeder & Auguinbaw, Quincy.
J. F. Adams, Winter Park, Fla.
Thos. W. Williams, Tampa, Fla.
J. G. Powers, Terra Ceia, Fla.









BUREAU OF FERTILIRERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.


61


.0
4 0 1


Phosphoric Acid



0 O
.,-4 0 t
93o *


BY WHOM SENT.


.I ..- ----
Sea Island Ootton Seed... .485 ... ....... ..... 4.141.... Florida Mfg. o., Madison, Fla.
Sea Island Ootton Seed M'I 486 .. ............. ... 4.92 ..... Florida Mfg.- o., Madison, Fla.
Sea Island Cotton Seed M'1 487 ..... .... ..... . 1 5.621 ...Florida Mfg. Oo., MJadison, Fla.
Fertilizer ................ 1488!.... 5.201 0.777 5.97 1.8613.11 H. O. Wordenhoff, Pant Gity,Fla
Fertilizer (light) ........ 4891..... 7.561 1.591 9.151 4.651 1.61 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Fertilizer (dark) ........ 4901..... 6.121 0.666 6.781 4.281 7.24 Mrs-E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Dried Blood ............ 14911. ..... .. .. ..... 114.85 .... J. T-Stanley, -Jensen, Fla.
Raw Ground Bone ...... 4921..... 9.5.313.98123.501 4.501..... J. T. Stanley, Jensa, Fla.
Wood Ashes .......... 4931..... .... .... .... ..... 0.24 J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Ground Tobacclo Stems .. 4941........... .... ..... 3.181 9.2' J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 495 ........... ..... ..... 7.751..... ichroeder & Auguinbaw, Quiney.
Ootton Seed Meal ....... 1496 -.......... ..... ..I 7.711 .... ames B. Bours, Jacksonville, Fla
Acid Phosphate ......... 4971.....118.741 0.75]19.491 ..... ..... oulding Fert. Go., -PensaQola..
Fertilizer (acid phosphate) 1498114.40113.641 0.53114.171 0.0tj 0.0( J. D. Clark, Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1.......... 1499111.301 7.051 4.011 8.061 4.601 8.41 B. G. Hewet, Pebble, Fla.


i--


84


mJ


:
- .
-?
*I



r
1

,
r:.
- -

;
.i;
-








BUREAU OF FERTILIZER-CONTINUED.
. ,.,


Phosphoric Acid.


- -
0 ca
S 0
-
> i


Fetilizer No. 2 .......... 500111.35 7.1t) 1.161 8.26 4.511 8.49
Fertilizer ................ 501l... 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.421 0.00
Guano ................502....... ........261131 3.711 3.14
Acid Phosphate :.......15Q3..:...113.681 2.05115.731..... ....
Orude Oarbonate of Potashl5041 ........... ..... ..... ... 38.8F
White Carbonate of Potash 5055. ...... ..... ..... ..... 62.62
Fertilizer .............. 1506 10.85 7.30 1.26 8.561 3.18 3.52
Fertilizer ........ ...... 5071.... 9.71 1.56111.27 5.361 7.68
Fertilizer ............... 508 7.35 8.121 1.201 9.32 4.011 8.71
Oottton Seed Meal ...... 509 ......... .... ....... 7.131 .....
Fertilizer ...... ..:..... 1510..... 6.101 5.57111.671 2.081 8.46


BY WHOM SENT.


B. G. Hewet, Pebble, Fla.
Peter Gardener, Palatka, Fla.
James Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
Pro[. O. J. Moore, Lisbon, Fla.
J. Hirschburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
J. Hirschburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
W. M. Girardeau, Monticello, Ela.
P. L. Fiveash, Alliance, Fla.
C. B. Robbinson, Corno, Fla.
J. E. Wirick, Jr., Lloyd, Fla.
R. L. McMullen, Clearwater, Fla.


NAME OF BRAND.


'4
A,


~


I--
'`
I





~1-
.i.-.

i

a.
-.a
-;

~
:
i-
-j


I







BUREAU- OVV tR't'I ZERS-Contiiitied.


O Phosphoric Acid


NAME OR BRAND. -4 S
1 .1 I I .*
Wg 0 1 0 E0

Fertilizer ......... ...... 511110.45 9.991 1.961 8.951
Fertilizer No. 1.......... 5121 9.10 7.871 0.731 8.601
Fertilizer No. 2, ........ 151311 .15 9.111 3.00112.111
Fertilizer No. 3......... 514 10.101 8.43 2.68111.111
Ferilizer No. 4.......... 514 11.30110.52 3.26 13.781
Blood, Bone and Potash..1516114.201 9.9~ 2,.95 9.861
Dark Cotton Seed Meal and I |I
Potash ...... ....... 5181 .25 ..... ..... 2.031

Ground Tobacco Stems .. 519 ... ........ .. .....
Fertilizer ...... .......... 50114.61 7.751 2.76 10.51'
Fertilizer No. 3 ........ 5211 6.95 8.49 1.95 10.441
Fertilizer No. 2 ........ 52211(.95 7.22 1.39 8.611
Fertilizer No. 1 .......... 523114.25 8.17 3.02 11.191
Fertilizer .............. .524 9.25 81031 0.72 8.751
Rock Phosphate ........ 5251...... .. .... 37.16|


0



S0
P I


4.631 4.86
2.241 1.28
2.121 1.84
2.131 2.15
2.471 1.89
3.801 4.44

5.021 -3.81

2.921 9.24
2.291 2.23
2.15 13.71
4.46 8.07
2.221 2.26
4.44111.44


BY WHOM SENT.


Johnson & Co., Leosburg, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord,.Fla.
J. W. McKeowp Co., Concord, Fla.
J. W. McKeown Co., Concord, Fla.
J. H. Dishong, Dover, Fla.

R. L. Goodwin, St. Pierce, Fla.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
J. H. Hinton, Dover, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
E. J. Yates, Lakeland, Fla.
H. Price Williams, Miami,. Fla.
T. D. Hawkins, King's Ferry, Fla.,


/


c


___ __ ___ ------ --- --- ----- .~ l- ---- - -


" 1 ,


88







L;


:1. tj
r','*%












"ir











: ~

.,'





87 --
87


BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.




Fertilizer .... ........
Armour's H. G. Tobacco.
D ust ........ ........
Fertilizer ...... ........
Fertilizer ... ... .. .
Dark Cotton Seed Meal...
Bright Cotton Seed Meal.
Rock Phosphate.........
Ashes ...........
Fertilizer ... ...... .
Fertilizer TNo; 1.........
Fertilizer .No. 2 (Sulphate
Potash) ..... .......
Fertilizer ..... ........
Fertilizer ...... ......
'Rock Phosphate ........


-----


01 n








528 14.
529 10.
530...
531 ...
532...
533...
534..
535...

5376..
537.
538 ...
539 ..


5.61
7.12




1.63
6.08


9.72
7.22
. ..


3.01
3.00




0.77
0.85


3.12
4.12


8.61
10.12
1.94
2.91
34.05

2.40
6.93


12.84
11.34
33.46


0

3


a .s


4.87

2.60
4.43
4.37
4.99
8.37


4.00
4.20


2.00
2.25


BY WHOM SENT.


13.79 S. B. Robbinson, Seven Oaks, Fla.

3.91 Armour Fert. Wks., Jacksonville.
5.65 H. J. Drane, Lakeland, Fla.
15.56 F. G. Sampson, Boardnan, Fla.
1.49 N. H.'Fogg, Altamonte Springs..
1.81 N. H. Fogg, Altamonte Springs.
..... John S. Flanagan, San Antonia.
0.60 A. J. Rosetter, Enterprise, Fla.
7.08 W. J. Dyer, Stuart, Fla.
9.34 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.

47 24 A. P. DeWolf, Crescent City.
1.69 L. A. Adams, Luanna, Fla.
2.37 R. L. West, Plant City, Fla.
..... John D. Philips,. Bailey, Fla.


Ar.l


00
20


-TT-- 7; ~- - ----- -------


[








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


NAME OF BRAND.





Fertilizer ....... ...... .
Cotton Seed Meal .......
Tobacco Ashes. ..........
Mnu k Soil ......... .... .
Fertilizer ..... ..........
Cotton Seed Meal- ......


Phosphoric Acid


--4 -

0



540 ...... 5.28 1.38 6.661
541 .... ..... .. 2.29
542 .... .. ... 2.53
543 ..... .. . . .39
544...... 7.60 9.05 15.05
546 .... . . . .


---


88 ..


i .
4
r





:2::



ii


BY WHOM SENT.





3.48 7.84 S. P. Lamb, Anthony, Fla.
6.78 1.711J. E. Snow, East Lake, Fla.
.... 12.12 James Holmes, Jensen, Fla,
1.611 Tr. IW. Lippencott, Lakeland, Fla.
3.41 12.36 L. C. Hefner, St. Petersburg, Fla.
6.84 ...e. Lwis Lively, Tallahassee, Fla.


-~-~~~---


`i



.i
,,,
-r,
';i
Z
"
''

''- r23

.. 1~
.,-,,

'






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS--Continued. ,89
For values see heading Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of "Special Samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers' frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample"' sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that.the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Official Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash and
ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given in the table, it has been determined as total
phosphoric acid. -
Not less than eight ounces (I pound), is required for a "Special Sample."


\'*.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY,.
R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS, 1904, MARION G. DONK, ASSISTANT CHEMIST
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22. 1901.


I PHOSPHORIC ACID


IAME OF BRAND
I


Cotton Seed Meal........


Tobacco Dust..........


Hard Wood Ashes......

H. G. Dissolved Bone
Black:........ .......


Acid Phosphate.........


Guarant'd Analysis........ .....
Official Analysis......... ..


10.00
11.80


13.90


16.00
20.26

14.00
13.76


312 Gnaaant'd Analysis.
SOfficial Analysis....

313 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

314 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

315 Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
.i


0
,0
oI
1-


0.29 20.55 .............


0.85 18.900../......


BY WHOM AND WHE

MANUFACTURE


..... Southern Cotton Oil
Washington, Ga.

2.50 Taipa Fert Co, Tam
2.80 ila.

5.50 Blackshear Manufa'g
4.60 Blackshear, Ga.


Armour Fert. Co., Ja
sonvillc.


Tampa Fert.
Fla.


Co., Tan


,A."






RE.

D





Co., i


pa,


CO.,

ck- -


ipa,- -
:-'-^'







--V


----~---- i -I I I I I


~,-~T~----~-~-----1------ -----------------


__ ___







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued. .41


Steamed Bone Flour....


H. G Vegetab'e Manure.


Fruit and Vine Mapure.


Ober's Fruit and Vine..

Ober's Vegetable Ma-
nure ..................

Baugh's Special Orange
Tree.............. .

Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
nure ..................

Double Strength of Pot-
ash ... .............

Peruvian and Fish Gu-
ano ............... .


Potato Mixture .........


316 Guarant'd Analysis. ......
Official Analysis.... 5.75

317 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 12 10

318 Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00
Official Analysis.... 8 95

319 Guarant'd Analysis. 11 00
Official Analysis.... 6 95

320 Guarant'd Analysis. 14 00
Official Analysis.... 18 70

821 Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00
Official Analysis.... 620
322 Guarant'd Analysis. 12 00
Official Analysis.... 18 35
323 Guarant'd Analysis. 1000
Official Analysis.... 7 55
324 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis.... 835

325 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 00
Official Analysis... 7 90


9-


13.38

5 00
7 64

600
8 31

600
8 93

600
7 87

5 00
8 18

6 00
6 71

5 00
6 65

500
622

500
4 99


..... 28.00 .00 ...... Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
13846 26.84 8.85 ...... Fla.

2 00 .... 4 00 6 00 Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
2 05 9 69 4 16 98 Fla.

1 00....... 200 12 00 rampa Fert. Co, Tampa,
0 64 8 95 242 11 09 Fla:

2 00 ..... 2 50 10 00 Ober & Sons, Baltimore,
1 54 1047 3 27 9 36 Md.

1 00...... 5 00 6 00ber & Sons, Baltimore,
1 78 9 65 5 4 596 Md.

2 00...... 2 00 10 00Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
1 97 10 15 2 39 69 Md.

400 ...... 5 00 700 Baugh& Sons, Baltimore;
1 71 8 42 5 48 6,88 Md.

2 00...... 1 50 100 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
1 09 7 74 2.05 1140 Gainesville, Fla.

1 00... 4 50 5 00Florida Fertilizer Co.,
2 44 8 66 4 92 658 t(ainesville, Fla.

2 00...... 800 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
2 53 7 521 8 79 8 2 Gainesville, Fla.
"7 --


,s


,:


r
'. ''i



i
;r-






. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Peruvian & Fish Guano
Double -strength of
Potas .............


Orange Tree Fertilizer..


Vegetable Fertiliz'r No 1


Fish and Potash.......


Bean Special.............


Cuke Special............


Early Trucker........


Lettuce- Special ......:.


Strawberry Special Fer-
tilizer ..........


326


327


8328.


329


830




332


333


334


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Suarant'd Analysis.
Qffiocal Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis.....
Gua=rand Analysis.
Otfidal Analysis....

Guaranti Analysis.
Offeial Analysls....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Olficial Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


..... 5.00 1.00
7.00 6.35 4.65

900 5 00 200
5 20 5 62 1 83

8 00 4 00 200
8 80 3 95 2 76

9 00 300 2 OC
9 90 3 19 1 2C

800 400 3 00
4-90 4 24 304

9 00 3 50 2 00C
4 75 3 15 2 21

7 00 4 00 200
6 80 3 52 1 9

9 00 4 00 2 OC
4 95 4 74 2 81

8 6 00 ..
980 5 91 2 29


11.00


4 48


-7 28


5 36

5 50


7 28


10.00
9.56

10 00
10 78

5 00
604

5 00
6 66

800
786

80C
8 52

500
509

600
6 99

5 00
5 14


s ;- :-
c:
r


I I


-----~.--~-~3


Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesvil e, Fla.

Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.


I I I ----iI


I


III


.t
I ~
2\.. zr,r.
'


, ,


J


\-
,
r- ..-
ii


.
Q








ANALYSIS OF FERTLIZERS-Continued.


Champion Citrus Com-
pound. ..............

Old Dominion Potato
Manure ..............

Special Vegetable
Grower........,...


335

336

337


Tiptop Tomato Trucker. 338

Fruit and Vine........ 339


Southern States Special. 340

Cotton Seed Meal ....... 341

Sterns Ammoniated Raw
Bone. ............. 342

Baltimore Soluable
Bone ........ ........ 343

Cumberland Stand rd
Fertilizers........... 344


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


6 OC .....
5 86 0 98

70 ..
5 37 1 IR

8 00...




SOC .
5 8l 1 08

6 00 . . ..
8 49 1 53


1000
11 25

8 00
14 50

8 O
12 12
80(
12 5

800
11 35

11 65



15 00
15 75

15 00
14 96

14-00
13 40


" '


V. -


6 77




10'6i
8 51










1002

2 50


11 53

14 11

9 17


1400
11 50

8 00
.8 42

3 00
S06

5 00
5 16

1000
9 81

5800
5198
1 50

2 00
1 48

1 00
1 11

2 00
1 97


S48


Va.-Car. Chem. Co., 'Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Csr. Chem. Co.. Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.

Va--Car. Chem. Co., Sa- -.
vannah, Ga.

Southern Cotton Cil Co.,
Pensacola.

Standard Guano & Chem.
M'f'g. Co., New Orleans.

Georgia Chemical Co.,
Augusta, Ga. '

Mutual Fertilizer Co., Sa-
vannah.






ANALYSIS OF Fi~TILIZgRS---Continued.


Scotts H. G. Acfd Phos-
phate ............. 345

Champion Farmers'
Choice... ......... 346

Vegetable Compound... 347

Baltimore Soluble Bone 348

Bone and Potash....... 349

H G. Acid Phosphate 350

Hard Wood Ashes.... 351

H. G.Sulphate, f Potash 352

Acid Phosphat.......... 353

Sulphate of Ammonia... 354


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis.-..
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


12 0
14 00

15 00
11 7T

16 00
14 05

15 00
13 75

15 00
12 30

16 00
13 20







14 25


14 00
15 27

8 00
9 8

7 00
9 82

1000
1006

1000
10 82

15 00
16 92






1400
14 75


200
1 84

1 00
1 25

100
1 983

1 00
2 0

1 00
2 57

1 00
043







1 02


17 11

10 63

-11 75


12 14

13 39


17 31







15 47


2 00
.2 37

40 C
2 51

1 00
084






......







2400
25.09


2 00
2 77

40
4 52

100
0 90

200
1 84



5 5C
506

50 00
50 28




.. ii


Va.-Car. Cher
gomery, AlI

Standard Gu
M'f'g. Co.,

Goulding Fe
Pensaco!a.

Georgia Chei
Augusta, G

Georgia Chei
Augusta, Gi
Goulding Fe
Pensaco'a,

W. R. Fuller
pa, Fla.

W. R. Fuller
pa, Fla.

W. R. Fu'ler
pa, Fla.

Manatee Fer
Palmetto, F


n. Co., Mont-

ano & Chem.
New Or means.

rtilizer Co.,

nical.Works,

mical Works,

rtilizer Co.,
Fla.

& Co., Tam- :

& Co., Tam-

& Co., Tam-

tilizer Co..
la. .



*1 *- '
.l ; :^




, .
i"%~
''
'~' '
r:


ANALYSIS OF FERtTLIZCEnS-Continued.
.. _


Vegetable Fertilizer.....


Fruit and Vine No. 1....


H. G. Sulphate of Potash


Fruit and Vine.........

Baugh's Vegetable Ma-
nure..................


Dissolved Bone Black...

H. G. Vegetable Fish
Guano ................


Acid Phosphate........


Blood and Bone.........


Blood Bone and Potash.


355


356


357


358


359


360


361


362


363


364


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


10.00
12 40

8 00
8 70



8 00
10 20

'12 00
9 85


7 50

12 00
9 15


9 85


10 00

8 00
110 90


5.00
5 48

6 00
7 18



6 00
6 96

6 00
7 62

17 00
18 26

5 00
5 13

14 00
15 47

6 00
5 71

6 00
6 26


2.00 ......
2 76 8.24

100 ......
2 51 9 6



1 00 ......
2 26 9 22

400 ....
1 459 07


3 74 22 00

2 00 ......
3 22 8M


2 34 17 81

8 00 . . .
9 79 15 50

3 00 ....
3 17 9


4.00
418

200
2 97



200
2 29

500
4 91



400
400



650
6 58

400
3 93


N ,- *,


L


:
-~ '


6 00 W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,'
7 05 Fla.

12 00 Baugh & Sons, Ptaltimore,
12 88 Md.

49 0- W. R Fuller Co., Tampa,
49 08 Fla.

12 00 W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
11 88 Fla.

7 00 Baugh & Sons, Ba'timore,
7 60 Md.

...... Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
...... Md.

8 00 Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
7 05 Md.

..... Manatee Fert. Co., Pal-
...... metto, Flo.

.... R. Fu'ler Co., Taur a,
.. Fla.

4 00 W. R. Fuller Co., Tampa,
4 20 Fla.


-- '


X







ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Orange Tree Special.....

Dark Cotton Seed Meal

H. G. Sulphate of Potash

L. G. Sulphate of Potash


Guaran'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guakant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


1200 600 2 00
7 80 757 0 38
12 00 ... ....



""... .. .


250
227
5 00
.4 89
.....


Manatee Fert.
more, Md.

Florida Mzi'fg
son, Fla.

Manatee Fert.
metto, Fla.
Manatee Fert.
metto, F.a.


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS--Continued.


12 00
18 65



49 00
49 72
27 00
25 86


7 95


-. 4s "

46

Co., Palti-

Co., Madi- -

Co., Pal-

Co., Pal-







.





S-. '
-<


s ^~


l./ ^-




r
r
I
~-:~


PART V, ..

MISCELLANEOUS .


/,


6'




"A-;
I. /e .-

'4 ~


i'~' ~*"' I.~
.~3: .~
~`'I
*.




}


ADDRESS BY R. E. ROSE STATE CHEMIST, READ.
AT THE SECOND ANNUAL CONVENTION OF
THE INTER-STATE CANE GROWERS CONVEN-
TION, JACKSONVILLE, MAY 4-6-1904.


The Culture of Sugar Cane, and Manufacture of Sugar,
in the Gulf States-Commerecfly ggfylgs. '
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemeu: After listening
to the addresses of those gentlemen preceding me, who
have so positively demonstrated the amount and quantity
of sugarcane grown per acre throughout the Gulf States,
and the cost to produce it, with the testimony of such
men as Dr. H. W. Wiley, Prof. William C. Stubbs and
others, as to the sugar content of the plant with the
practical experience of men like Messrs. W. B. Rodden-
berry, 0. K. McQuarrie and John Thomas Porter.as to
the cost of culture and yield per acre, it would be pre-
sumptuous for me to attempt to add to this feature of
the discussion.
I have for many years maintained that it was only nec-
essary to ascertain these facts, as they exist and have
been stated here, of the cost to produce the cane, the
yield per acre in sugar and to publish them authori-
tatively, to induce an enormous development in the com-
mercial production of sugar in the Gulf States. In this
connection I beg to repeat part of my remarks made to
this association at Macon last year.
"The American people are the greatest consumers of
sugar in the world. Our market for foreign sugar is ac-
knowledged to be the best known.

STTr'a IMPORTED.

"We import annually practically 4,000,000,000 pourids,
or 2,000,000 tons (excluding the sugar imported from our
island possessions), of which 1,600,000 tons is raw, or un-
refined cane sugar, and 389,000 tons refined beet sugar.
"The importation of strictly foreign sugar for 1901-
1902 was 3,975,000,000 pounds.


, i




.' I '



r.u0


."From the American colonies, Porto Rico, Hawaii and
the Philippines, 838,000,p00 pounds. Total imports i'n-
tluding the colonies, 4,813,000,000 pounds, or 2,406,500
tons. We produced in the States of beets, 163,126 tons.
Of sugarcane in Louisiana, 275,000 tons. A total con-
sumption in the United States proper of 2,844,626 tons.
"Recently the production of American sugar has been
very largely incr-esed by the establishment of the beet
sugar industries i, the- West and Northwest, and by the
annexation of our island colonies, HBawaii, Porto Rico
and the Philippines; still with this enormous increase in
the American production we produce but thirty per cent.
of the sugar consumed within the United States proper.
While on this subject I wish to call your attention to the
fact that with the exception of 389,000 tons of beet sugar
from Germany,. and 163,000 tons of Western beet sugar.
this vast amount is cane sugar only. The total cane su-
gar produced-in the world is 3,775,000 tons, of which the
United 'States consumes 2,192,000.tons, not quite two-
thirds of the entire cane sugar production of the world.
The increase in beet sugar production during the last
twenty years under the fostering care of Germany, Aus-
tria, France an'5 our own Govermnent,rhas been phenome-
nal. Today two-thirds of the world's sugar is produced
from beets. While beet culture has had the intelligent
fostering care of our own, and the various European Gov-
ernment bounties, rebates, tariffs and drawbacks, cane
sugar has had neither, on the contrary, legislation has al-
ways been adverse to cane sugar in our own country and
in England, the two largest sugar consumers in the
world.

BEET CULTURE.

"Scientists and trained agriculturists, men eminent
Sin their professions, have been retained in the interest of
beet culture, to breed up a plant from six to fourteen per
cent. sugar content. Vast sums have been expended in
this and! other countries to promote the industry with
wonderful results. Until very recently no intelligent ef-
fort to improve the quality of tropical cane, nor methods
of manufacturing cane sugar has been made. No effort
was *made' to encourage or educate the cane grower, to




* i 'i -






improve his methods, decrease his cost of culture and
manufacture. Recently, I am glad to say, the Louisiana
Sugar Planters' Association, at their own expense, estab-
lished a sugar experimental station, and placed a com-
petent .man, in charge-a practical man, as well as a
most eminent scientist. The results have justified their
faith, and the Louisiana sugar planters have reaped a
rich reward for their investment, The improved methods
of culture, fertilizing and manufacture, to say nothing of
Sthe improvement in cane, has repaid them many fold. I
am pleased to say that our general Government and the
State of Louisiana now contribute liberally to the sup-
port of the station.
"That .-ane sugar can be produced in the cane belt of
the South for less cost than beet sugar in the West, or in
Europe, can certainly be proven I believe that but a
Small part of the inum expended in the effort to establish
the beet sugar in America, intelligently used-not in ex-
periments-we have passed that stage years ago-but in
demonstration of the facts as to cost of production and
manufacture, would have 'ong since made America the
principal sigar producer of the world."

NEW ERA HAS ARRIVED.

Mr. President, I believe the time so long hoped for by
yoiirself and your associated has come, that a new era in
the history of cane sugar production in America is upon
us. When I note the interest shown by the head of the
United States Agricultural Department, that eminently
practical farmer, broad-minded agriculturist, and far-
seeing statesman, the Hon, James Wilson, Secretary of
Agriculture; Dr. H. W. Wiley, chief of the Chemical Bu-
reau of the Agricultural Department, and Prof. W. O.
Stubbs, director of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment
Stations, and remember that they were with us at our
first meeting in Macon, I feel that the long period o.f wait-
ing for recognition of the intrinsic value of this peculiar-
ly Southern production has passed, and that the sugar-
cane of the Gulf States will now receive that careful,
-scientific care and culture and official recognition of its
value, that has so long been given to its humble relative
the beet, which has for years enjoyed the protective care





.

52

of our .own and European Governmenits, and had the con-
sideration of the most eminent scientists, agriculturists
and statesmen of both Continents to assist in its develop-
ment. Now that dane has attracted the attention of
statesmen, scientists and business men, I have,no fear
of the result.
.Though the beet has been wonderfully developed, and
the business has grown to enormous proportions, I believe
that recent results' in cane culture justify me in pre-
dicting'a, far greater development in cane culture. That
sugarcane is susceptible of vast improvement, by careful
selection and intelligent culture, has always been my con-
tention,. though in its natural state it has always been,
and is now, superior to the most improved varieties; of
beets for sugar making.

1 RESULTS IN LOUISIANA.

Recent results in Louisiana under the practical and
scientific direction of Dr. Stubbs, have demonstrated the
correctnessa of these claims made by myself, that, with
less cost and labor, and in far, shorter timegreater im-
provements could be expected from intelligent efforts to
improve a natural'siugar plant than one not originally a
true sugar producer. The results of the work at the
Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station, covering a period
of only ten years, in cane breeding and selection, have
recently been published.
In an interview with the New Orleans Times-Democrat
Professor. Stubbs says:
"Six years aggq we received a large number of various.
We tried to ascertain which cane Was best adapted for
this climate. We made a score or more experiments and
carefully compared the results. We wanted to get a cane
that would find ready and congenial growth here in Lou-
siana, and that would at the same time increase the sugar
output for the acreage in this State.
"I am delighted' to say that our 'patience has at length
been rewarded. We now have two kinds of cane that are
highly successful. They, are unquestionably a great deal
more satisfactory than the best cane known here for
many, years. In my opinion they are the most valuable
ear s that can be grown in Louisiana soil. They make






II 'I '- -

5U.


what our agricultural experts call an ideal specimen. We
have classified them as 'D 95' and 'D 74'.
"To the lay public there is nothing exceedingly signm-
ficant in those words 'D r/4,' but to the sugar planter they
will be nothing less than startling. This caue produces
thirty-eight tons to the acre. The juice fields 16 per
cent. of sugar. Under a nine-roller mill 81 per cent. is
obtained without saturation.
"If you will compare these figures with statistics of
cane now grown you will realize that this new cane will
revolutionize the .sugar industry in Louisiana The old
cane gives an acreage of thirty to thirty-one tons, with a
12 pe recent. yield in the juice. Under the roller it gives a
percentage of 71.
"The new cane is long-jointed, green, perfectly healthy
and beautiful in appearance. It has an excellent stubble,
and remarkable vigor. It withstood the terrific gale that.
swept over the city on September 9 and 10. It is deep-
rooted and strong, and was the only cane in the field that
was not blown either flat or partly down to the ground.
It was not ,damaged the least bit by the storm.
"We are ready and willing to furnish this cane to any
planter who may apply for it. We expect to send out
more than 500 bundles in the next few weeks. Requests
for the cane are coming in on every mail. We shall begin
to ship the cane in a few days. Planters throughout the
State show intense interest and have strong faith in the
specimens. Next week we shall send some of the cane to
the experiment stations in Cuba and the Hawaiian
islands."
In the Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer (,f
February 20 appears the report of Pr8f. R.,E. Blouin, rs-
sistant director of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Sta-
tion. of the results of this work in the development and
distribution of these two seedling canes, selected from
hundreds of seedlings with which they have experi-
mented; not only the results obtained at the station,
scientifically and experimentally, but the field results of
nunibers of our foremost sugar planters who have cu'-
tivated these canes on a commercial scale under ordinary
field conditions.
These results are truly phenomenal. and prove beyond
cavil the truth of the assumption that the tonnage and
I ,








S, 54

sugar content of the cane plant can, and has been, in-
creased in as great a ratio as ever the beet has, and that
the continued strife for excellence will give us a plant as
far superior to the original cane plant as commonly
grown as the sugar beet of the present day is to the orig-
inal type This report is of too great length to be quoted
here. All those interested should procure the report and
study it. I simply summarize the results as given by
SProf. Blouin, and follow his figures to the final results. He
says: "The canes are known as 'D 74' and 'D 95,' and
have been under culture at the station some ten years,
and throughout Louisiana but a few years." The sum-
mary of the report, taking a field of 50y acres as a basis
of 'comparison, the field to consist of 250 acres of plant
cane, and 250 acres of first year's stubble, and comparing
it with an equal area of domestic or home ,cane, under
similar conditions of age and culture, is as follows:
Five hundred acres seedling canes D 74, compared' to
500 acres of domestic or home canes:
D 74, tons of cane 18,187, averaging 36.33 tons per acre;
.home cane, tons of cane 15,020, averaging 30 tons per
acre; increase, 3,167, averaging 6.33 to n per acre.
S 74, pounds of sugar, 3,203,875, averaging 6,407.75
pe-r avre; home cane, pounds of sugar, 2.234,546, averag-
ing 4,469.09 per acre; increase, 969,329, averaging 1,938.-
66 per acre.
D 74, value at 3 cents $112,135.63, average $224.27 per
acre; home cane, value at 3j cents, $78,212.44, average,
$156.42 per acre; increase, V33,922.19, average $67.85 per,
acre.
Average increasepin tonnage, 20 per cent; average in-
crease in sugar, 43 per cent; average increase in value,
43 per cent.

SUPERIOR SUGAR PRODUCED.

This gentleman should dispose of the plant, its.tonnago
and sugar content, and show to the world that we have a
plant now the superior of all others for sugar production;
with a soil and climate eminently adapted to its culture;'
in fact. its natural soil; a plant that will doubtless be
much improved by further work along the -lines pursued







,' 55


by, Dr. Stubbs, with the assistance of the Department of
Agriculture, which I feel assured will be heartily given.
This question-the agricultural question-is certainly
disposed of.
The manufacture of sugar, commercially and profita-
bly: Hiere I fear I shall cause a vigorous protest on the
part of the sirupmakers present. While I do not dis-
credit the sirup business, and know there will always
"be room at the top," that many will succeed in making
large returns from their cane fields and sirup factories
SI maintain that until we produce commercially, scienti-
fically, and economically, a pure granulated or crystalized
sugar, as do our friends, the beet-sugar manufacturers,
we will not become a factor in furnishing the sugar of
America.
The American consumer demands, and will accept noth-
ing but a pure white sugar. The price does not come into
the calculation at all. It is well enough to say we like,
or even prefer, a nice "yellow, clarified" sugar, or a raw
sugar. better than a pure white; the facts are we don't
use it. We can today purchase first-class, 96-per cent
centrifugal sugar at 3 cents per pound; still, we pay
4- to 4+ cents for the same sugar with but a trace of col-
oring matter and the four pounds of water removed.
A carload of choice, pure, open-kettle, or 96-per-cent
centrifugal sugar, could not be readily sold in Jackson-
ville today to the trade, while tons-of granulated, or pure
sugar, would find a ready sale. We should be willing to
recognize this fact, as has the American Sugar Refining
Company. the so-called trust. They simply understand
the American demand and meet it. They buy raw sugar
(or sirup), for as small a price as they can piocure it, be
it of foreign or domestic production, properly refine or
clean it, and sell it to the American public for the highest.
price they can obtain. This is not peculiar to the sagari
refiner. It is the business of all manufacturers to buy
cheap raw materials, and sell the finished product at a
profit. This anplies to all raw products, particularly ag-
ricultural products hides, wool, beef, pork, cotton, to- ,
bacco, or wheat. The commercial value of sirup, or raw ,
sugar, depends solely on its sugar contents, and is fixed
'by the refiner. hence to, produce lafge quantities of, raw
sugar or sirup would be siiiiply to cheapen the cost-bf






" -' ; * : ",' .'"it" ' C, ' *




raw material to the refiner, and by no means affect the
price of refined (or clean) goods, to the American public.
I have no reason to change my opinion; that the only
method to produce sugar, commercially; economically,.
and profitably, is to establish ,central factories at con-
venient points, equipped with the latest and most im-
proved apparatus of large capacity; the grower selling
his cane direct to the factory at an agreed price per ton,.
based on the market value of pure sugar and the sugar ,
content of the cane. This is the ohly way by which the
sugar industry can be made profitable and successful, the
same system as is employed in all sugar growing coln-
tries, and universally adopted by the beet-sugar manu-
Sfacturer.
I do not desire to discourage the manufacture of first-
.class sirups. There will always be a demand for a really
first-class table sirup, well made, and neatly packed, in
convenient packages. However, the majority of our.
farmers have neither the means, not the skill', required to
produce,such an article, and must expect to dispose of his
crop to the central factory (or refinery), either as cane
or sirup. If he makes his crop into sirup, by the ordinary
process, just one-half the sugar will be lost in the milling
and manufacture, and he will be paid for but one-half of
his crop, after he has grown it, hauled it to his factory,
and made it into sirup or raw sugar; in fact, less than
half, as the cost of manufacture, and packages, will have
to be deducted from the prpice he receives. In other
words, a ton of cane, is worth more at a central'factory,
well-equipped and modern in its construction, than the
sirup the average farmer wilH obtain from the same ton
of cane by the ordinary method's now used in milling and
manufacture. To illustrate: The juice of average, well-
ripened cane required to produce one gallon of good
sirup, say 40 degrees Beaume, cold, will, under' proper
conditions, make eight or more pounds of pure sugar; if
first made into sirup, under ordinary conditions, it will
yield not more than tour pounds of pure sugar, particu:
larly if it be what is known as good sirup, "thick and not
'liable to crystalize." I cannot better express my position
than to repeat statements made by myself in this city in
1900.









57

MODERN METHODS.

The sugar-planter and, manufacturer will soon discover
that by using modern methods, late improvements in
manipulation, with economical and .labor-saving devices,
he can for less cost make more refined sugar from his
cane than he could formerly make of raw sugar, and sell
it direct to the consumer at prices 25 to 50 per cent. more
than he can now get for his raw product, delivered" at a
refinery. The facts are that a modern central mill can
take the cane direct from the farmer, and, by a no-meanp
expensive or difficult process, thoroughly purify the
juice, and male a standard article of granulater sugar,
ready for the table, equal to any, at a less cost than can
the farmer make a brown sugar, with his crude and,
wasteful apparatus and methods. At the same time this
modern, central mill will double the output of granulated
sugar from each ton of cane, as compared to the output
of the open-kettle or steam train. The beet sugar manu-
facturer has recognized this fact, and uses none but the
latest-improved apparatus, and makes none but refined
sugar. He is independent of the refiner, and sells direct
to the trade.
Louisiana is rapidly learning this lesson and is now
building numerous central mills, or refineries, to make
refined' sugar only, direct from the cane.

SUPERIOR CLIMATE AND SOIL.

When the South, with her superior climate and- soil,
builds central mills, or factories, she can make at a
profit in spite of free raw sugar from Cuba, as she will
have the assistance of the sugar trust and the beet-sugar
grower in maintaining the price of refined sugar. In
other words,, there is a large profit in manufacturing a
finished article videe, the sugar trust), while a raw'pro-
duct finds slow sale at reduced prices.
The South can make niore refined sugar direct from her
cane, for less cost per pound, than she at present makes
raw sugar; she can increase the yield fully 50 per cent.
per ton of cane over present'conditions, and increaAe the
value per pound fully 30 per cent. This is but a matter
of education-when our farmers begin to think, and then




-'



S58

combine their practical knowledge and labor with capital
S and skill, now seeking profitable employment, the' ques-
tion of the American supply of sugar will be solved by the
cane belt of the United States, making, the necessary
amount to supply the demand. The beet-grower will soon
discover that he cannot compete with cane, and will 'nat-
urally gravitate into the cane belt, where his profits will
be greater, and his crops more certain.

COST OF.FACTORY.

A factory to turn out 50,000 pounds of granulated su-
gar per day can be erected for $75,000. Allowing the raw
material (cane or'sirup) to cost 50 per cent? of the selling
price of sugar, 50,000 pounds will pay the grower $1,125;
cost of manufacture (75 cents per 100 pounds), $375;
net profits of factory per day, $750; gross daily proceeds,
$2,250. These figures are based on present prices of su-
gar-i. e., 4j cents for standard granulated. The factory
should run one hundred days, showing a net profit of $75,-
000 per season. Such a factory will require 300 tons of
cane (-or its equivalent in sirup), per day, and will con-
sume the product of some 1.500 acres of average Florida
cane, paying the growers $112,500 for the season. There
is not a town or village in the State, from Pensacola to
.Jacksonville, or from Jacksonville to Tampa or Miami,
that cannot furnish within a short distance twice the re-
quired acreage for such a mill. A thousand such mills
would be required to produce the 5,000,000,000 pounds
imported annually.
The modern factory will make 175 pounds granulated
sugar per ton of cane,pay the farmer $4 per ton, and net
the factory J$2.50 per ton of cane. The product of the
modern house will find a ready sale wherever offered. The
open-house sugar can only be sold to a refinery, as the
American public will use none but the best granulated
-sugar. A mill handling from 400 to 800 tons of'cane per
-day requires no greater number of skilled employees, en-
gineers, sugarmakers, etc., uses little fuel, the wast of
'house is reduced to a minimum, the extraction is practi-
cally perfect (80 to 82 per cent,), practically no labor is
required after the cane is placed on the carrier, the
product is ready for irnm'diate consumption. Such a
'X 4








59

house should make none but granulated sugars, at a cost
not to exceed that of crude sugar or sirup, with a much
greater yield. These mills or factories, purchasing their
supplies fromthe farmer, can afford to pay for the cane
delivered, a price, equal to the sum now obtained for his
crude sirup, pow made in a crude and wasteful manner,
saving the farmer the annoyance and cost of manufac-
ture and packages, and at the same time make large prof-
its on the capital invested.
I advocate the central mill plan, purchasing cane from
the farmers, that the best results may be had both in
the field, and in the factory, the farmer devoting his time
and skill and labor to producing the largest possible crop
of high-grade cane, the miller, to the most economical
methods of making the best sugar, each receiving the
greatest-reward possible for his skill in his particular
line.

CONSERVATIVE FIGURES.

I believe the foregoing figures are conservative, based
'on average conditions as they now prevail; that these
profits can be largely increased by the intelligent coop-
eration of the Agricultural Department and experiment
stations working along the lines, and following the lead,
-of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station, in the de-
velopment of the plant, andi improvement in methods of
manufacture.
That the sugarcane will in the near future replace the
beet as the most economical source of sugar I have no
doubt. I am convinced that only the apathy, and false
security, left by the cane grower, his neglect of scientific
and economical methods, together with the careful,
* economical and aggressive methods of the beet grower,
backed by Government aid and encouragement, in this
and European countries, has temporarily increased the
world's supply of beet sugar, as compared to cane sugar.
That the cane belt of the South can, under the same in-
telligent system of culture and manufacture, produce
pure'sugar at a profit when selling at- a price less than .
the cost of producing beet sugar, under the most favora-
ble.conditions,.I believe can, and will, be demonstrated in.
the near future, and that the American cane grower will




S ,* 1';'



60

supply not only the enormous home demand, but a large
Part of the foreign consumption.
That others,besides myself are of this same opinion is
best evidenced by this gathering of, representative
farmers, cane 'growers, and business men of the New
South; from the Brazos to the St. Johns; from California
to the keys; this gathering certainly shows that the cane
grower of the South has awakened to the possibilities of
the profitable commercial production of sugar in the cane
belt of America.



RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE INTER-STATEY
OANE GROWEIIS CONVENTION AT JAOCSON-
VILLE MAY 5, 1904.

BY R. E. ROSE.

"Whereas, Prompt, efficient and speedy transportation
of cane from the field to' the factories at reasonable uni-
form rates of freight are prime necessities for the sue-
cessful establishing of the sugar industry in the Gulf
States; therefore, be it
"Resolved, That the various transportation companies
and tariff associations throughout the cane prodheing
States, and the various. Railroad Commissions of the sev-
eral States represented, be required to establish and put
into effect similar rates as now fixed by the Louisiana
authorities, and that the officers-of this association be
authorized to take such steps as may be best adapted to
secure such rates, and have the same put in effect."

BY DR. E. M. SPENCE.

"Whereas, It is highly important to the best interests
of both the producers and consumers of cane sirup, that
all the Southern States enact laws providing against the,
sale of adulterated! sirups branded as pure articles; there-
fore, be it
"Resolved by this convention, That the General Assem-
bly of the State of Florida is hereby earnestly petitioned
t \.









to enact into law a measure for the protection of man-
ufacture and sale of pure sugarcane sirup in that State
on lines similar to the present law enacted by the General
.Assembly of Georgia in 1901."


SPECIAL NOTICE.

The new seedling canes mentioned in this paper--can
'be had only from the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Sta-
tion at New Orleans, La.
Requests for these canes should be sent to the Director
of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station, during,
'September.
A limited quantity will be distributed to' reliable
farmers, who will agree to pay the express on the canes,
properly cultivate and care for them and report results.




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