Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00015
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: March 1, 1904
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text




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FLO.R IDA

MONTHLY

BULLETIN.


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County Map ofthe State of Florida.

(For the Bulletin.)


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PART I

CROPS,


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


Hon. B. E. McLiu, Com.


H. S. ELIOT, Chief Clei


k.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.


ALACHUA CouNTY.-The present acreage of many of the
crops will be considerably increased within the next few
weeks. The condition of crops growing is very good, about
up to the average; the acreage will, when is planted, show
an increase over last year.
CITaus COUNTY.-The acreage of crops, when all arei
planted will probably be an increase over last year; orange
trees in this county were slightly damaged by cold this '
winter, killing most of the leaves, but the wood was prac-
tically unhurt. Peach and pear trees in good condition.
OLAY COUNTY.-Up to this time the acreage plante& to ,
the usual crops is about equal to last year, and so fare
condition of crops is very good. Orange and grapefruit
trees in fine shape.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-The first of the winter has been
very unfavorable for growing vegetables on account of
drought and cold; the acreage in most cases will bte inr
Screamed over last year.
DADE COUNTY.-Acreage of vegetable crops show a very
considerable increase over last year, and to this time con-
ditions are rather unusually favorable. All fruit trees are
in fine condition and growing rapidly.
DDSoTO COUNTY.-The weather has been steadily cokl
but without extremes. There is an increase in'acreageqf .
most crops, and all are doing well; the ground is ip fl
condition for work, buds on trees-are showing ,ell aon a;
citrus trees; peaches and plums in full bloo. ,-..
ESCAMBIA CouNTY---The winter has been so sevee and.
the fail was so dry that there has been little..planted,
except the few crops that cold does not injure; peach,
trees arein good condition -and some blooming; rears ar0
till affected by the blight.
FBANKLIN OOuTy.-We have had so much cold 'frty.
weather this winter that very little has yet been planted

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GADSDEN COUNTY.-The cold weather has been so con-
tinuous this winter that only a few of the strictly win-
ter crops have been planted; the acreage of field crops
will likely be considerably increased this season; ,the con-
dition of crops growing is very good.
AMILTON CoUNTY.--The weather has been.so cold that
- w crops have been planted, and the acreage of those
has not been completed; the usual acreage will be
planted, and probably an increase in acreage of several.
BOLMEm COUNTY.-We have had the steadiest cold this
winter ever known, so much sot hat fewer crops have
been planted than usual; those that are growing aie do-
ing well.
a7 JEFIBRSON COUNTY.-Crops that are planted are doing
very well, but the cold winter has kept back the planting
6f many vegetable crops.
LAKms COUNTY-There will be a larger acreage of wa-
tnqmelons planted this year than ever before, crops of all
S'kinds are looking well, plenty,of rain, and now good sun-
S.:shiney weather. .
LDi COUNTY.-A large acreage is planted and to be
planted.in vegetable crops this year; crops are now in
line condition. Fruit trees are all in good condition and
,many are showing bloom; seasons have been very favora-
ble. i.
LEVY OoUNTY.-The season has been rather unfavora-
ble for planting winter vegetables on account of being
-dry and cold continuously; crops that are planted are
,doing well; fruit trees in,good condition. The dry cold
weather has injured the stock ranges very much, and
a good many cattle have been lost.
MADISON COTNTY.-The acreage planted to field crops,
and winter vegetables, is about the same as usual; the
condition of those crops growing is very good.
MANATEE CourTY.-The orange trees are doing well,
and the majority is in full bloom; the growing vegetable
cropl are looking well an growing 'nicely; some increase.
in the acreage, mostly owing to cultivation of saw grass
lands; peach trees, full of fruit, gtiavas lost their leaves
from cold, but not otherwise hurt; we have plenty of
rain and prospects are good.
NASSAU CoUNTY.-The season has been vry 'backward
and not much has been accomplished so far, but pros-


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pects are good; orange and fruit trees.of all kinds are
promising frof~ results Acreage of crops will generally
be increased, -over last year.
ORANG 'ouCOUNTY.wThe acreage planted in field and
vegetable. crops. i~-nerally larger than last year, and
the prospects foitflne crops have not been so good for
several years. Fruit trees in fine condition.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-The weather has been so cool, that
spring crops have not been planted yet to any great ex- :
tent. Orange and other fruit trees are in good condition.
PAsco COUNTY.-Acreage to field crops has been much
increased,; the acreage of vegetable crops is and will be
about the same as usual; these planted are in good con-
dition. Orange and other fruit trees are in fine condition,
and indications for a full crop of fruit are good. '
POLK COOUNTY.-The acreage of field crops will when
all as planted be about same as last year; the acreage of
vegetable crops will generally be increased over last year;
conditions of crops is generally good. Fruit trees are
looking well, and in good condition.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-It is too early for any but a
very few crops in this county, and specially so this win- '
ter which has been so continuously cold. Everything bide
fair for a larger acreage this year than usual.
SUMTER COUNTY.-The acreage' to crops generally is
about an average, when planting is all done there will '
very likely be a considerable increase in some. Those that '
are growing are looking well.
SUWANNEE COUNTY.-It is too early to obtain definite
information as to acreage of crops, as few of them-have
yet been planted, but inquiry indicates that it will be
about the same as last year, except a few special crops -
may be increased'; the field crops growing are in general
good conditioni, '- .
WALTON Co.nty rIt is too early in this section to
say yet what the ab eage of crops will be, ap little h'a
been done yet, rhut indications are that the usual acreage ,;
will be planted. .a
WAsHINmTON COUNTY.-Too early to make. a repo0rtn o d
most of the crops; the' feld' crops gi~owing are in g6o i
condition.




-'


PRELIMINARY REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CON-
S EDITION OF CROPS AND'FRUIT TREES FOR FEB-
RUARY, 1904, AS COMPARED WIT1 IAST YEAR.


Alachua....
Brevard...
Citrus.....

olfumbifa..
Dade,......
DeSoto....
Escambia..
Franklin...
Gadsden..
Hamilton..
Hi llsboro.'
Holmes ...
Jiefferon..
Lak0e... ...
Lee........
Leon.......
Lety.......
Madason...
Manatee .
Marion....
Nassau....
SOrange....
Oseeola. ...
Pasco ......
Polk .......
Putnam...
Santa Rosa
S~uter.. .
S Suwannee.
/ Wakullk...
SWalton ....
Waseingtoi

Gen'l av'ge
Der cent..


GOUNTIg4S


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Cbge


Oats' Rye Rice




0 3 w13
0 0 0



90 8C 70 80 60 60
. . . . . I .. . . . ..
90 1 ( 10 10 .... .....
110 110 100 .......
105 100 100 100... ...

95 1i 10i 100 ... ....
100 101. 100 10.......
100 9 ............. .
125 100 12t 95 .... ...
.... .... 4 50 50 50
. .l . . .I. .. . . ... . .
100 7 .... .... ... ...
50 9 .. .'. .... ..
501
100 10C 100 100 100 L.C
110 10( 10( 100 ......
100 10C 100 100 .."
100 10 10 100......
110 100 ....... 110 110
100 100.... .....1 100

150 110 ... ... .... ...
100 90 ... ... 100 101
150 100 100 100 100 100
90 100 100 110 l......
-80 75 . . .
100 100 75 8 .... ....

80 80 70 70 90 90
50 80 100 100 ........
100 100 100 100 .... ....
100 90 10, 80 ......


99 904 9 89 "89


Irish
Pota-
toes








90 70
110 100
110 80
10( 100
100 ..
100 100
loc 100
10( 100


50 50
. . I . .


Tom-
toes





I
P0 0


1001 90
1001 100
S100 100


100 80
100 100




100t 100

90 90

*100 120

100 ....
) 150 10(
110 100

115 100
10!1 110
50 100
100 100


100 90
90 9o


/


I 981 98 95 98


60 75
75 100
90,'100
100, 100
100 100

120 100
110 100
100 100
120 100
80 100
100 100



100 100
100 100
80 100
75 75



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CONDUION OF CROPS-Contfiued.


COUNTII






Alachua.
Brevard
Citrus...
Clay....
Columbii
Dade...
DeSoto..
Escambi
Franklin
Gadsden
Hamiltoi
Hillsbor
Holmes.
Jefferson
Lake....
Lee.....
Leon..
Levy....
Madison
Manatee
Marion.
Nassau.
Orange.
Osceola.
Pasco ..
Polk....
Putnam.
Santa R
Sumter..
Suwanne
Wlkulla
Walton.
Washin'i

Gen'l av
.per cee


Cucum- ,Eng
bears Pe
I
es al

0 1


1 00
70 70 ....
... 100 100 100
... 100 100 105
... 100 100 ..
a...... ... 100
... 80 80 ....
... 90 95 100
a..... .... 100





100
. . . . .. .. .



....... 90 90 ...
. . .. . .. .



.. 100 100 90
100 100 10
... 1.... ... 100
.. 90 0 .. 90


... 150 100 150
... 100 100 100
.. ...... 100




. 9 00
... 100 100 120
... .... .... 100
... 80 85 100
... 120 .... 70
... .. .... 75
)sa . ..
...100 90 90
e.. 90 90 90

...... ..... 6100
t'n .... .... ... .

it.. 99 98) 98


lish Beans Lettuce E nts






, 0 C o
0 0 U 0





.. 601 B 100 ~0 50 60
110 100 1 10
100 110 100 75 8 100 75
. 100 1 .. .. . ..... .
.... .... ... 100 100 .. ......
.... 75 100 100 100 80 8C
10 0 110 100 110 100 100 90
100 ..... ....
... ... 100 90 .... ....
. . . . . . . . . .. .

(... .. . .. . .. .. . .. ....
100 .. .... 100 100 .... ...
0 .. . .. . .. . . .. .

100 100 100 100 100 90 110

10( 100100 10( 1 oo
.... 100 100 0 100 100....
90 100 100 10( 100 ......
100 100 100 10C 100 100 100

1 110 1 100 110 110
100 .... .. 12( 110 .. ...
100 50 100100 150 100....





100 :. ... . .. . .. .... .... .
1 00 1001 8100 80 100
.... .. ... .... .... 1 .... ..1

90 .... .. 0 ......
.- .- ...... --I .......


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14
14
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5'60
i0 100
5 100 ,
0 100

I l 1 .
75 100 '



15 756


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50 60
10 100


30 110
30 100-
)0 100
75 75 ,
00 100
30 100

,0-.oo ,_ :
30 70
00 100
00 100
00 100 ,
0o 85.
90 90
DO 100


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Cla


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Ha
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Ho
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La
Lee
Leo
Lev
Ma
Ma
Ma
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CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.
W .t. r n .ta-


0sc
Pas
Po!
Put
San
Sun
Suv
Wa
Wa
Wa

Gen
p.


UNTIES


chua...
vard...
rus .. ..
y .......
umbia..
e ...... .
otq ....
ambia..
nklin...
isden...
milton..
lsboro..
Imes....
erson..
ce .......
n .......
In...
y .......
dison..
natee...
rion'...
ssau....
n1ge ....
eola....
co ..-...
k .*....
nam ..
ta Rosa
enter ....
Tannee..
kulla...
lton....
shin't'n

L'l av'ge
er cent ,


Celery Beetf


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>* .5 >


Water- C'nta-
melons loupe's


17 a~


*i66*i66i*T6
i ... .. . .

.1 .. .. ....
100 0 ....1







90





100 ......
.... .. .. .


90 90 90





100 i0 1006
.e.. .

100 115 100

.... ... . .


.. ... .... 86
100.. .. ..





94 92 95


Straw-
berries
j -


Orange
Trees


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"ii
80
100
75
120

110
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100
100
80

100
100
100

100

150
100
100

90


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CONDITION OF CROPS-Continued.



reard.......... 00 100 00 1 00 ...








Citr s. ............ 7 .... ....... ...... 105 100
e. 0 95 0 1 95 0 '
COUNTIES Sa







Fran n 0 0 0 0.......... ... ..... 90 0

Gal aden ........... ........ .......... -7 80
eHamilton ......... 100 1 .. 1 0 .
Cilorou g. ..... ........
- la u ....100 ... .. ..... .
B re ard .......... .... ...... ............ .. ..
Dare........ 100 .090 100 1......00......
DeSoto ........... 90 t95 0 0 100 95 120 100
pcamb..... 100 100 0
-Franklin.".::::::90 90
nd n.......... ................. ...... .. 0 0...
Hamilton ...... .... ........ 50 40
Hlltboroug...... ... ..... ...

Jeerson........... . .. ...... ....... ........... 0......
ae . .... . - **** *** *
.................. .......100 ...... 100 100

d ae ...........100 100 100 100 100 C 0 9 '
n .0 ................ 100
Nassa R......... ... .... ..... .......... ..... 100 .
-Oru.g .......... 4 6 .... 10 ...1 010 7 100. 0 .. .
aon............. ... 100 100 ............... 100 ....
P ....... ... .... 100 ................. 100 100
PA.. ....... 100 100 100 100 100....... 100 100
Putnaei........ 80 80 80 ... ............ 100 40
,Santa Rosa...............................
Sumter........... 60[ o.. g 90 100 100 9.
Suwannee..................... ............ ...... ....
Wuku1a....- .... .... .... .... ....... ...I. 100 100
,W alton........... . .... .......... ............ 100 100. ',
Wahlngton...... .. ............... ...... ...... 75 75 ,
,General Average .
per cent......... 92 97 95 87 100 99 951 85 .
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SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES,


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
Inches.
Mean, as determined from records of 4 stations..30.10
Departure from the normal, 4 records ..........-0.02
Highest observed, at Jacksonville on the 19th....30.49
Lowest observed, at Pensacola on the 22nd.......29.73
Absolute range for the State.................... 0.76

TEMPERATURE.
Degrees.
Mean, as determined from, records of 58 stations..54.9
Departure from the normal, 26 records .......... -2.1
Highest monthly mean, at Key, West..............67.4
Lowest monthly mean, at Molino and DeFuniak
Springs" ...................................... 47.6.
Highest recorded, at Orange Home on the 22nd.... 88
Lowest' recorded, at Molino on the 5th and 6th.... 20
Absolute range for the State .................... 66.

PRECIPITATION.

Inches..
Average, as determined fro records of 57 stations.. 5.20
Departure from the normal, 27 records ......... + 2.54
Greatest amount for any 24 hours at Gainesville on
the 10th'and 11th ......................... 4.78-
Greatest monthly amount, at Gfinesville..........11.79
Least monthly amount, at Plant City ........... 1.20
Average number of days on which 0.01 or more fell 8:

WIND.

Prevailing wind direction ..................Northeast.

WEATHER.

Average nimher of clear days ...................14
Average number of partly cloudy days ..............
'Average number of cloudy days ...................9


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" MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA.

(Dates of.)

Frost, Killing (or 32 degrees or below) :*Archer, 1, 5,
S6, 14, 15; Fedearl Point, 1, 15; Fernandina, 1, 15, 24, 28;
SFort George, 5, 15; Gainesville, 5, 6, 14, 15; Huntington,
1 ., 15, 16; Jacksonville, 5,. 6; 15; Jasper, 1, 5, 6, 7, 14, 15,
25, 30; Johnstown, 1, 5, 6, 25, 30; Lake City, 5, 6, 14, 15,
25, 30; Macclenny, 1, 5, 6, 14, 15, 16, 25, 30; Middleburg,
1, 3, 7, 14, 15, 16, 25, 30; Pinemount, 1, 5, 6, 7, 14, 15, 16,
19, 25, 26, 30; St. Augustine, 15; Sumner, 1, 5, 7, 9, 14,
15, 16, 25; Switzerland, 1, 5, 14, 15; Bartow, 1, 14, 15, 16;
DeLand, 1, 15; Fort Meade, 1, 15; Fort Pierce, 15; Gras-
: mere, 15; Inverness, 1, 14. 15, 16;. Kissimmee, 15; Ocala,
14, 15; Oratnge City, 1, 15, 16; Orange Home, 1, 14, 15;
Orlando, 14; St. Leo, 15; Miami, 15; Nocatee, 15; Apa-
-lachiola. 1, 3, 4, 6, 14, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 30; Bonifay, 1,
4, 5, 6, 14, 24, 25, 27, 30, 31; Oarrabelle, 3, 5, 6, 14, 15, 25,'
30'; DeFuniak Springs, 1, 3. 4, 6, 8, 14, 15, 24, 25, 26, 27,
29, 30; Madison, 5, 6, 14, 15, 25, 30; Molino, 1, 3 to 6, 8,
13 to 18, 24, 25, 17. 30, 31; Pensacola, 3, 4, 27; Quincy,
5, 24, 27, 29; St. Andrew, 1, 3, 5, 6, 15, 25, 27, 30;
WStephensville, 1. 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, 14, 15, 25. 30; TallahaRsee,
3, 5, 6, 14, 15, 27, 30; Wausau, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 14, 15. 18,
S 19, 24, 25. 27, 30; Wewahitchka, 2, 3, 4, 5, 14, 24, 26. 29.
Heavy Frost:-Jacksonville, 1; Olermont, 15, 16; Tam-
pa, 15; Avon Park, 15; Pensacola, 5, 8, 14, 18, 24, 30;
,. Wewahitchka, 25
Light Frost:-Federal Point, 9. 14, 16; Gainesville, 16,
Huntington, 25; Jacksonville, 14, 16, 25, 30; Lake City,
,1, 9, 16, 18, 24, 27; Middleburg, 16, 18. 27; Switzerland,
9, 16; DeLand, 16; Eustis, 15; Inverness, 4, 5, 8. 13;
Ocala, 25; St. Leo, 1, 5, 14; Tampa. 1, 6, 9; Flamingo,
15; Hypoluxo, 15; Jupiter, 15; Manatee, 1, 15; Molino,
2; Pensacola. 13, 15, 23, 25; Wewahitchka, 6, 17.




S ,


17

COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR JANU-
ARY, WITH DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST
THIRTEEN YEARS.


Year 1892 1893 1834 1895

'Mean 56.6 52.2 61.9 59.7
Depar -0.8 -5.2 +4-5 +2.3
Total 3.16 1.95 2.19 3.07
Depar +.53 -o.68 -0.87 +o.54 +


1896 1807 1898 189I

56.5 56.2 60.4 50.2
-0.9 --.2 +8.o +1.8

3.96 1.o0 0.74 4 53
-1.43 -0.63 -1.90 +2.00


19001 1901 1002 1903 104


55. 57.3 55.1 57.2 54
-1.5 --.I -2.3 --0.2 -2.

3.25 2.45 o.65 5.24 5.2
+o.72[ -o.n8 -1.88 X2 71 '2.5


PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Wind Velocity in Relative
Atmospheric Pressure Miles Humidity

STATIONS t I -* z

e| 5 [ o .--



JIacksnvi'e. 3012 30.49 1l 20 7C 11 ,85o 3- nw 13 o10 34 70
,iter ..... 3038 19 2991 3 8.9 6 22 97 53 r
yWest .... 38 3026 15 29.o93 3 2 7.834 31 n I4 98 5 8
Pensacol..... *3o. 3.46 24 29.73 22 8,247L a w 6i 97 52 77
Tampa....... 30. 3041 i 29.84 14 5,131 26 sw II zoo 42 83

*8 a. m. reading only.


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CLTMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JANUARY, 1904. 18

S': temperature in degree's Farh. IPrecipitation; in inches Sky.
a- Z.


0 0I
-.-B^CTiONIrS. COUNTIES. a - 2* *OBSE~VEERS.



-___, ____*__..s -; a o 2. a- ... o 0 ________


" ;'.rtlitm Section,
- A er..... .. Alachua ....
'.edeialPoint Putnam... .
P-- areada .... Nassau ......
. rt ,e gei t... Duval........
. Snesvill .... Al chua.....
rOntington .... Putnam .
Jacksonville... .Iuval... ....
Japer ........ Hamilton ....
Johnstown..... Bradford ...
Lake City...... V'olumbia...
Macclenny ... Baker......
Micatopy...... Alachua....
Mldleburg .. lay ........
Pinemount.....Suwannee...
SSt Augustine.. St. Johns.....
Sumner .. .... Levy ......
Switzerland.... St. Johns...


10.79
6 95
7.50

11.79
6382
6..77
6.23
5.31
4.60
6.36

7.9h
5.99
7.94
7.33
8.8f


+7.78
+4 25


+8.72
-4 85
+3.50
+3.59
U-3. 45
+0.98
4.47



+5 48
+3.68
-86.82


4.26 ...
2 29 ...
2.75 .

4.78
2.80 ..
2.68 ...
2.45 ..
2.56 ...
2.23 ...
2.00:

3 ...
2.95.
2.29 ...
3.14 ..
3.25 ..


ne.
ne.
ne.
nw.
nd.
nw.
n.
n.

ne.
n-ne.

ne-sw
nw.
nw.
ne.


Wm. C. Andruss
E. S. Hubbard
W. B; C. Duryee
Chas B. Spencer
J. P. H. Bell
Benj. N. Bradt
CENTRAL OFFICE *
Prof. R, D. Hall
J. P. Coffin
W. B. Knight
Griffin Bros. Co.
W. A. Carlton
Geo. R. Frisbee, Sr.
S. E. Thompson
Herbert .. Usina
J. P. Little
W. C. Steele


-..~


,t.8










CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JANUARY. 1904 -Conti ued. 19


STATIONS.





Central Section.
Batow. ...
Broosville .'.
clrtnont......
De and ....
Eustis ........
Fort Mead.
Fort Piere ..
Grasiere ....
Inv'rness .....
Kissimmee .....
Maaithar ..... -
Merritt's Island
New Smyrna'.
Ooala ........
Oransg City::
Orange Home


COUNTIES.


'olk ......... 17
fiernando 32
Lake. iIC
Volusia.... 32
Lake. .. 180
Polk........ 12
Brevard..... 25
')range... .. 17
Citrus....... 48
Oseola .... 85
Brevwid ....
trevard ... 20
Volusia ... 20
Maartou .. .. 160
Vnlusia..... 50
Sumter.......


STemperature, in degrees Fah



44
4)





qz a
0 o;


ir.


44
44


Precipitation, in inches.




'I is 8 I


I--

4).. - -- --



4 .2 47 +0.80
88 582 -2 50
84 5.78 8.82
85 ..... ....
85 5 98 4-8.18
42 5 56 +8.60
82 2.74 -1.40
29 .. ....
45 5.74 .....
88 4 16 +1.28
88 4 85 ....
25 8.47 + 41
59 5 9 8.23
I9 7.17 +4,88
48 8,b2 -1.17
4b 4 07 ......


E~ I I


-- -* I



2 0 ... 8
2.72... 8

1.73 ... 11
2.20... 4
0.71 ... 10

1.80 ... 10
1:40 ... 8
1.28 .. 9
88 ... 8
2.00 ...
2.43 ... "9
280 ...
|2 80 ... 1ll


sky.




.0 0 .0


E EO2 S
1z z


-1- I-1 --I -


nw.
ne.
Vw.
ne.
n.
e.
ne.
te.
ne.
se.
nw.
nw.

ne.
sw-nw
.


OBSERVERS.


J. S. Wade -
C. Peck
Dr. J. B Rosenberg
F. G. Brill
A. L, Brown
William Thompson
T J. O'Brien
John B. Escott
W. H. Miller
J A. Simpson
J. F. Farley
Rev. J H. White
R. B. P. Roper
W. L. Je', ett
J. ). Graham
D M. Baker


1.1
rt,~~. .- --.. .~'-


;s"
~t `. ~ ~ i
: -+
4 :L
(I
~i: . ~.c.


I:


I


-c~b,,~~l:~I; iS.. ..i----.------ .- - --;-I-----~ ___


..?
i!
:i, ,it .~





'. .
\.1 -


iir-,, --s
-; .-
-.: -
..
*.
i
.. 4


ntri1iirintiifrt: i4& u'-n1 .TAt41if^ lnrs'-jur'nn.ina..


1.. -
3.


STemperture, in degreesFahr. Prfcipitation; in'inches Sky.
.I ... rn ..

'.' .-. W -. S .0 = Q = .; 0
STATIONS. 'COUNTIES., OBSERVERS.

"- .. .II" .. "$ -. = .-

a i '- =0 o1 D 1 z z. w LZ iH

w] uuuu n-o 1p Ro'') -_i i C0 ) .. *A I A I .4 p) a L 7 1l 11 A r. n R.?1


r-"uy....:..
Plant City......
Reekwell.......
.St.LeoQ.......
Tampa.......:.
'"arp. n,Springs
Timaville ......
-Soth es Section,
Avon Park.....
Flamimgo......
Hypoluxo ......
.Tupiter .........
Key West......
Manatee .....
Marco .........
Miami..k......
Myers .......
Nocatee..l......





.2, --*. .. '2 -..,


Hillsbor'gh..
Marion ......
Pasco.. .
Hillsbor'gh..
Hillsbor'gh..
Brevard... -.


De Soto...... 150
Monroe .. .. 11
Dade......... ...
Dade ........ 28
Mcnroe ... 22
Manatee..... ,1
Lee ...... . ...
Dade....... ...
Lee......... 19
De Soto...... 48


-60.6+0.3 8222
65.3 ... 80 22*
64.4 --0.7 88 29
64.3 -1.4 8029
67.4-2.3 8029
59.4-0.9 8122
63.8 ..... 8128
67.6+3.2 8427*
60.9-1.1 *7922
60.8..... 8822


3215i
3714


3315

3415
3515
3915
5415
8815
4115
3615
8415
8115


1.20

6.15
6.78
5.09



4.09
1.36
1.76
2.56
1.42
4.55
3.00
1.70
3.12
496


1.
-1.02


r404
1.62



+1.73

-2.12
-1.32
-0.67
+1.93

-0.78
+0.44
...... i


1.46 ..
1.36
0.9366 ..
0.77...
1.27...
0.98 ..
0.90 ..
1.00 ...
1,83 ...


... . ......

10i 11 ne.
11 lln.
4 10 n.
.,.. .........


8 8 ....
5 6 ne
11 6n.
16 6 n.
17 5 ne.
7 8nw.
6 6ne.
11 6 se-nw
3 6 se.
8 9e


E. B. Trask ..........
Dunnelon Phos. Co
G.-Schneider
N. R. Taylor t
Dr. A. P. Albaugh
1'. M. Taylor


0. R. Thacher
E. R. Bradley
A. W. Garnett
Hal. P. Hardin
WV U. 8imons t
Emil Broberg
Ludlow Fruit Co
E. V. Blackman
Miss M. M. Gardner
W. G. Welles


*A
' : :

.. "-


~


. t









CLIMATOLOGICkL DkTA FOR JANUARY, 1904.-Continued. 21
Precipitation, in inches. Sky.
0
0


STATIONS.





Y eate n RSetian


COUNTIES.


Apalachicola... ranklin..... ..
Bonfay........ Holmes. .....116 8
COrrabelle.... Franklin.... 12 9
DeFuniak Sp'gs ^ alton .... 193 8
Madison .... Madison ....... ..
Marianna .. Jackson ... 85 5
Molino ......... f ambia.... 49 1
Pensacola..... Escambia ... 56 25
Quincy .... Gadsden..... 260 4
St. Andrew. .. Washington.. 12 7
Stephensvil;e oTaylor ..
rallshassee Le n......... 19 19
Wausau .......Washington.. 20 7
Wewahitchka .. Calhbu ..... ...

| StateMeans.. ..


Temperature, in degrees rahr.

4b
9.5
ce 0


Cd
C 0 I
0 do, *, s
".. bs.~P
0 o. s- 8 03 a 6
~ g~ j


52 0 .....
48.8.....
51.3-2.-
47.6-3.7
50.8 .....

47.6.
49.8-2.7
51.6 .
48.9-2 7
50.0 ....
50.0-1.5
48.1 -3.6
.49.8 ....,
54.9--2.1
-.1-


Precipitation, in inches.



Z- 0


o E. I..


5.02
5.60
8.382
5 54


2.97
3.47
4.82
3.74
5.98
6.60
6.80
8.67

5.20


...... 1.46



...... 2.10
-0.210.89
..... 3.90
-0.762.05
..... 2.45
+8.092:80
+5.372.70
...... 1.40

-2.54....


.... 9
... 6

... 10

... 56
8
8
... 6
. 9
7

.... 8
8


Sky.







E E. E


a
0


Sn.
18 in.
5 ne.
8s.
9n.
i7 s.""
11ne.
0 se-sw.
4n.
8 ne.
7n.
12 n.
10 n.

9 ne.


OBSERVERS.


Geo. H. Whiteside
Wm. Rush
O. H. Kelley
J. T. Stubbs
Randall H. Rowe
D. H. Bryan
W. H. Trimmer
B. Bunnemeyer t
Sol. Friedman
W. A. Emmorns
Miss Mary F. King
W. H. Markham
Curtis Jones
E. G. Mactr


0
r.~ ~- --
.'


>r ..
C:


I .i I-


--~ ;"i ----


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR JANUARY, 1904.-Continued.


21 ,


c

7,
-I
.
i.


1~ 4
4~_'.'















, STATIONS..


COUNTIES.


: Late Report
-. eo 190C4.
Orlando........ ...........
: Plant Ciy.. ..... ..


CLIMATOLOGWtCAt DATA ~O1 A JANjARi, 1004.-C-ontinued


;r 1:1-L12 :1-
;
s:!
r a ,


____________________________--- .--. =P~~--- ______ _______


TemDerature. in d grets Fahr.




CSC
aa




3
g iCfs ttg
g a a ,a ^ a o


3.8 ..... 85 26 81 4
56.2 '.. 8 251 8 4


Precipitation, in inches.

o ~ c
11="

-Z
a '

i.4 C in6E


'S h., -
y -





S l 4 .8






24 4 3


g






dP

w.




nw.


OBSERVERS.


precipitation are


*More than


22..e


..A., records are used in determining ttate means, but the Iearr departures from normal temperature and
based only on records from stations that have ten or more years of observation,
a,. b, c, etc following rlmte of station indicate number of days missing from report.
tJhermometers are not self-registering, and readings are made at 7 a..m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
one day. IWeather Bureau.


t


- I .


2, A. i^- -


5


-`























































PART IHL


FRUiTLIZERS


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.4












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN,Clerk-


STATE VALUATIONS, 1904. 2
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1904.
Available Phosphoric Acid -5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 1 cent a pound
Ammonia(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 15 cents a pound
* Potash (as actual potash, K20) 5 cents a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid $1.00 per unit;
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) $3.00 per unit,
Potash $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.25 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. W
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for
example a fertilizer which analizes as follows:
SAvailable Phosphoric Acid... 6.22 per c.ent.x$1.0Q- 6.22 '
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid..1.50 per cent x .20- .30 "
Ammonia.................. 3.42 per c-nt.x 3.00- 10.2&
Potash.............. ......7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging .... 1.25

Commercial value at sea ports ...............2
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows :
Available-phosphoric acid. .. 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia .................2 per cent.x 3.00- 6.00
Potash .............. ...... 2 per cent.x 1-10- 2.20
Mixing and bagging.....:............ ...... 1.25

Commercial value at sea ports........... ..,.....$17,45 '
The above valuations are for cash for materials deliv-
ered at Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one
ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this- Bulle-
tin. Where fertilizers are bought at interior points, the
additional freight to that point must be added
A '











If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i, e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid 90 cents per unit
Potash (K20) 99 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) $2.70 per unit
The valuations and marKet prices m succeeding illus-
trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT SEA PORTS, JAN. 4,1904.
Less than 5 to 10 10 tons


i







:
i;!
E.
*C: `'
I-i
'j ,
,.. ':'
r
r
I `
'i


tons. & over.

149.00 $49.00

70.50 '70.00

53.50 53.00.


POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate Potash
48 per cent. Potash (K20).... 52.00 51.00 '50.00
Low Grade Sulphate Potash 26
per cent. Potash (K20) ....... 32.00 31.00 30.00
Muriate, of Potash 50 per cent.
Potash (K20) .............. 46.00 45.00 44.00
Nitrate Potash, 13 Am., 42 Pot'
ash (.K20) ................. 8200 81.00 80.00
Kainit 12 per cent. Potash...... 14.00 13.50 13.00
Canada. Hardwood Ashes 4
per cent. (K20) Potash ...... 17.00 16.50 16.00


AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.


1 High Grade Blood and Bone, 10
10 per cent. Ammonia 7 per
cent. Phosphoric Acid ........
Low Grade Blood and Bone, 6j
per cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid............ ..
SOwl Brand Tankage, 51 per cent..
.Ammonia ...:........:.;.......


35.00 34.50 34.00


27.00 26.50" 26.00

20.041. 19.50 19.00


Ammoniates. 5 tons
Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent. Am-
monia ...................... 50.00
Sulphate of Ammonia 25 per
cent Ammonia ............... 71.00
Dried Blood 16 per cent. Am-
onia ...................... 54.00


+ 4"- '









27

Raw'Bone 4 per cent. Ammonia
22 per cent. Phosphoric Acid..
Ground Castor Pomace '6 per
cent. Ammonia, 2 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid ............
Bright (oton 8eed Meal 8 per
cent. Ammonia market quota-
tions .......... ............
Dark Coton Seed Meal, 5 per
cent Ammonia, market quota-
tions ............... ....


29.00 28.50 28.00


22.00


26.00


18.00


PROSPHORIC.

Double Super Phos., 45 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid ... 45.00
High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16
Super cent. Available Phosphoric.
Acid ...... .... .... ..... 16.00
Acid Phosphate 14 per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid.... 14.00
Boneblack 17 per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid ............ 25.00


21.50 21.00


25.50 25.00.


17.50 17.00


44.50 44.00


16.50 15.00

15.50 13.00

24.50 24.00


MISCELLANEOUS


H. G. Ground Tobacco Stems, 3
per cent. Ammonia, 9 per cent
Potash ..... .. ....... 25.00
Pulverized Ground Tobacco Stems 16.00
Tobacco Dust, No. 1, 3 per cent.
Ammonia, 2 K20 Potash ...... 21.00'
Tobacco Dust, No. 2, 1 per cent.
Ammonia, 1 per cent. Potash. 16.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled..... 16.00
Land plaster in sacks .......... 10.50


24.50 25.00
15.00. 15.00


20.50.

S15.50
15.50
10.25


20.00

15.00
15.00
10.00


Any formula will be mixed at the price of $1.25 per
ton, in addition to the cost of the materials used.


4.
4.

.


'.I


4.d


4 I'


,
1 : -^






















- 9"
*' l 1 '"
'' i'


1
"1,


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{- '':
*1 *
1'- *
1 *,. )
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v
,-
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'i

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-4


S28

FACTORS FOBR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into Nitrogen, multiply by..............0.824
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by..............1.214
Nitrogen of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 1647
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid,. multiply by...0.458
Phosphoric Acid into Bone Phosphate, multiply by.2.184
Muriate of Potash into'actual potash, multiply by..0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, nultiply by.1.589
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, nuultipVl by. 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by.1.583
Fort instance you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda-
and want to know iomr much, nitrogen t .in it, multiply
95 per cent. by .1647 you will get 15.65 per cent nitro-
gen; you want to know how much ammonia this Nitrogen
is equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214
and you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.









*j











Composition of Fertilizer Materials,

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.


Ammonia Phocid Potash

Nitrate of Soda............ 17 to 19 ...................
Sulphate of Ammonia........ 21 to 24 ............ .......
Dried Blood........ ........ 12 to 17 ...... .. ..........
Concentrated Tankage....... 12 to 15 1 to 2 .........
Bone Tankage ............... 6 to 9 10 to 15.........
Dried Fish Scrap............ 8 to 11 6 to 8 ............
Cotton Sped Meal.......... 7 to 10 2 to 8 11 to 2
Hoof Meal ..... ........... 13 to 17 1 to 2 .........
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.

Avaiable Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phoph oric
I Acid I Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphte... ......... ......... 38 to 86
Florida Rock Pnosphs;te..... ......... ............ 26 to 82
Florida Super Phosphate.... .......... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Grouned Bone............... 8 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone ............... 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissoved B one.............. 2 to 4 18 to 1 2 to 3'
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES

Pounds per Hundred

~ Phos-
Actua Am'nia phorio Lime
Pota-h I Acid
Muriate of Potash............ 50 .... ...........
Sulphate of Potash.......... 48 to 52 ................... ...
Double Bul.of Pot.'& Mag. 26 to 80......................
K ainit .......... ......... 12 to 12 ........ .... ... .......
Sylvinit ..................... 16 to 20 ... ....... ......
Cotton Seed Hu Ashes...... 15 to 80 ........ to 9 10
Wood Aehes, uneached..... 2to 8 ........ to2 80 to 2
Wood Ashes leached........ to .2 ........ to 1185 to 40
Tobacco Stems.............. 5 to 8 2 to4 ..... 8
Cow Manure (fresh)......... 0.40 0to41 0.16 0.81
Horse Manure (fresh). ..... 0.58 Oto60 0.28 0.21
SheepMagure (fresh) ........ 0.67 1.00 0.28 0.83
HogManure (frpsh) ......... 0.60 0.55. 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)............ 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.21
Mlxed Stable Manure....... 0.68 0.76 0.28 0.70


i 11


























'1.I

*' I




S-"- .



0

SPECIAL NOTICE,
The.attention of persons sending samples of fertil-
Y. izers for analysis is called to the following:
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING ANI>
FORWARDING OF FERTILIZER SAMPLES TO
STHE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.
-SECTION 15 OF LAW.
Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers,
under Sec. 9 of the.law approved May 22, 1901. Shall
be drawn in the presence of two disinterested witnesses,
.. frdm one or ihore packages, thoroughly mixed and a
'FAIR SAMPLE OF THE SAME' OF NOT LESS THAN EIGHT OVNCESa
(QNE-HALF POUNI)) SHALL BE PLACED IN A CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND SENT BY A DISINTERESTED PARTY TO THE COM-
:, MISSIONER OF AGRICTTURE AT TALLAHASSEE. NOT LESS-
THAN EIGHT OUNCES, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, WILL BE AC-
'EPTED FOR ANALYSIS. This rule is adopted to secure fair
samples of sufficient size to make thasix necessary de-
-; terminations, viz: Moisture, available and insoluble
S phosphoric acid, ammonia and potash; and to allow the-
preservation of a duplicate sample in case of protest or
Appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for-
S two months from date of certificate of analysis.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to r--
ceive special samples from the purchaser. The propriety
Sof the methoa'of drawing and sending the samples as-
,. fixed by the law is obvious.
The drawing and sending of special samples, in rare
cases is in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper packages or paper boxes, badly, packed,
and frequently in very small quantity (less than ounce)
frequently there ate no marks, numbers or ohier means,
/--o. f identification, The post mark in some instances be-
ing absent.
I would call the attention of those who desire to-
avail themselves of this privilege to Sections 9 and 10 of
S the law, which are clear and explicit. ,
COPIES OF THE FERTILIZER LAW.
Citizens interested in the fertilizer law of the State,,
and desiring to avail themselves of its protection, can
S obtain a copy free of charge by sending for same to the-
', Commissioner of Agriculture.

i^ r : ., *- "





4


31

COTTON EED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either
for stock feeding or fertilizing purposes, is called to the
analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a contentof 8 per
cent. and above in ammonia, 2 per cent or more of avail-
able phosphoric acid, and 11 per cent. of' potash. Such
meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its
Commercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00 $24.00 -
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00 2.00
1i per cent. potash @ $1.10 1.65

$27.65 J
The commercial value being in excess of the market
value. '
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the
State labeled "For feeding purposes only," These goods
are guaranteed as follows: '
4+ to 5 per cAnt. ammonia.
1 to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
11 to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as
follows: '..
4 per cent. ammoma $13.50
1 per cent. phosphoric acid 1.78
1l per cent. potash ,- 1.65

Commercial value $16.90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than
prime meal Their relative value is $10.75 less than
prime meal. There is no economy in the use -of such
goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the
plante", the value of the meal depending only on its con.-
tent of ammonia, phosphoric acid and potash in both '
cases. Purchasers should buy accordingtothe analysis '
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements, :''
only..




3 2



I .
OHEM~IIOAL EQUIVALENTS.

T i Uder the law and the regulations of the department
chemical equivalents of the three essential elements,
Ammonia,, Available Phosphoric Acid, and Potash, are
i not allowed in the guarantee. A few instances have been
An: oted, particularly in 'cotton seed meals, when the Am-
. monia is guaranteed, and followed by a statement of the
protean contents:
As. Ammonia ........ ........ ...........5 per cent.
S. Protean ..... .............. .... 25.75 per cent.
Or Ammonia ............... .............8 per cent.
Protean ................... ......41.18 per cent.
V Such a guarantee is misleading, as the terms "Ammio-
nia" and "Protean," are equivalent,, and only represent
the "Nitrogen" (or ammonia) content of the goods.
.-.Multiplying the nitrogen by 1.21 gives the ammonia
-thus, 3 per cent: nitrogen X1.21 gives ammonia 3.63 per
-cent. or nitrogen 3 per cent. X6.25 gives "Protean" 18.75
:per cent.

UNIFORM FERTILIZER LAWS.

The Florida fertilizer law, is based on the report of a
joint committee of the "Association of American Agri-
J' cultural Colleges," and the "Association of Official Ag-
ricultural Ohemists," approved bby the "United States
Agricultural Department;" with few changes to meet
local conditions It was complied by a committee of
the "Florida State Agricultural Society" with a view to
protect the Florida farmer and the manufacturer of
honestt commercial fertilizer, from the vendor of adulter-
ated and inferior goods.
That is has met the requirements, and has accomplished
Sthe desired results, to a certain extent is evidenced by
Sthe higher class ,of goods sold in the State; the large in-
So.erease in revenue, and the fact that complaints of inferior
.or worthless goods are of far less frequent occurrence








33

FORMULAS FOR VEGETABLES.

As vegetable growing for' the early markets -is one of
the most important industries of the State a few ac-
cepted formulas, have been selected from those recom-
mended by various Experimental Stations, and' from the
experience of practical growers and- manufacturers of
standard commercial fertilizers. It is conceded that
ammonia. (or nitrogen) is required in relatively large
quantities for succulent .crops, such as, cabbage, celery,
lettuce, cucumbers, string beans, and for young fruit
trees, to induce growth.
That phosphoric acid, is reqiured for fiber production,
and to mature the woody parts of plants.
That potash is demanded by starch and sugar produC-
ing plants, potatoes, beets, sugar cane, peaches, oranges,
pineapples, etc., to mature their -sugars and starches.
The predominate element required for different classes of
vegetables or plants, is other things being equal.
For foliage crops, cabbage, lettuce, spinage, etc., am-
mionia. For woody plants, and for fiber phosphoric acid.
For fruits, sugar and starch productions, potash.
We give here special formulas for trucking crops pre-
pared by State Chemist John M. McCandles, of Georgia,
together with his remarks prefacing them.

SPECIAL FORMULAS FOR TRUCKING CROPS.
"Those who raise early vegetables for .market, or what
are known as trucking crops, require special formulas.
The trucker must get his crop to market early,- or he is
likely to find ho market for it. He therefore must force
his crop in every practicable way. One of the chief mith-
ods of doing this is by the use of very rich or high grade
fertilizers' used in very large quantities per acre, one
thousand and even as high as two thousand pounds per
acre of the very highest grade fertilizer beingoften used.
Large quantities of nitrogen are required, and part of
Sthi nitrogen must be in the form of the very soluble ni-
trate of soda, which dissolves in water as readily as ou-
gar or salt. This valuable ingredinet of trucking crops
- should not be mixed with acid phosphate, especially if
3Buj


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the latter is damp, if the mixture is intended to stand
for any great length of time before use. There is a ten-:
dency for the acid phosphate to cause a decomposition of
the nitrate of soda with a resulting, lxO of nitrogen. As
t1 the amounts to be used per acre the trucker must, use
his own ijudgnen-t and experience with his soil, remem-
bering that economy in this direction has not been found
to pay by those wishing an early market crop of vegeta-
,bles. It is rarely the case that les than five hundred
pounds per acre will pay. The formulas given below have
been selected mainly from some of the trucking bulletins
'of the INorth Carolina Agricultural Experiment Star
tions."
'



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86

For Celery-7 per cent. Ammonia, 5 per cent. AvaitabLe
phoec Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.


1. 300 lbs. Nitrate of Soda;....
800 Fish scrap...........
800 Aoid pbos., 18 pr. ct.
800 Muriate potash......
2,000 lbs.
2. 250 lbs. Nitrate soda........
600 Dried blood.........
850 Acid phos., 18 pr. ct.
800 Muriate potash......
S2,000 lbs. J


6.9 pr. ct. Ammonia.
will yield 5.5 Avail. pbow
8.0 Potash.




will yield 5.5" Avail. phos.
(7.8 Potash.


For Irish Potatoes-6 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per cent. Ava


Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
:1. 300 lbs. Nitrate of soda....
600 Cottonseed meal.....
800 Acid phos.. .. .. ......
800 Muriate potash.....
2,000 lbs.
2. 800 lbs. Nitrate soda........
600 Fish scrap ...........
800 Acid phos., 14 pr. ct. wi
800 "' Muriate potash .....
2,000 Ibs.
.8. 200 lbs. Nitrate soda........
900 Fishscrap...........
600 Dissolved bone black wil
300 Muriate potpsh.....
2,000 Ibs.
S4. 220 lbs. Nitrate soda.......
500 Dried blood.........
970 Acidphos. 14 pr. t.. il
810 Muriate potash......
2,000 lbs. .
S. 800 lbs. Nitrate soda........
600 Cottonseed meal.....
800 Acid phos. 18 pr. ct.. wil
00 Muriate potash......
S,o00 lbs. J


5.4 pr. ct. Ammonia.
8.1 Potash.



5 .8 pr. ct. Ammonia.
1 yield p 6.8 Avail. phos.
(7.8 Potash.



1 yield 6.6 "Avail. phos.
('7.8 I Potash.



I 6 1 pr. ot. Ammonia.
.1 yield 6.8 Avail. phos.
(8.0 Potash.



Sld .4 pr. ct. Ammonia.
1 yield 8. ,, Avail phos.
(8.8, Potash.


.


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'8. 800 lbs. Nitrate soda........
600 Tankage ...I ....6 5pr. ct. Ammonia.
800 Acid phos. 18 pr. ct.. will yield 6.4 Avail. phos. acids
800 Sulph..potash, H. G.. 7.8 Potash.

;'2,000 bs.
For Beets and Lettuc--6 per cent. Ammonia, 5 per cent. Availa-
ible Phosphoric Acid,8 per cent. Potash.
1.' 800 lbs. Nitrate soda:.......
S 0 Cottonseed meal.... 6.2 pr. ct. Ammonia.
S600 Acd phos' 1 pr. ct.. will yield 4.9 Avail. phos. acid.'
;800 Muriate potash...... 8.5 a. Potash.

2,000 lbs. :(
2. 200 lbs. Nitrate soda........
800 Fish srap ..........5.9 pr ct. Ammonia.
S700 Acid pIho., 11 pr. ct. Will yield 5.4 Avail. phos., acid.
800 Muriate potash... ... 7.8 Potash.

2,000 lbs.
For Cabbage, Cauliflower, Cucumbers and Melons--6 per cent.
Ammonia, 5 per cent. Available Phosphoric Acid, 7 per cent Potash.
1 800 lbs. Nitrate Soda.......
,750 Cottonseed meal..... pr. t. Ammonia.
.7Qf Acid phos. 11 or. .. 6.0 pr. CD. Ammonia. .
M0 uri ..o will yield4.8 Avail phos. acid.
0 'luriatepotash 7.1 Potash.
2,000 Ibs.
For Spinach-- per cent. Ammonia, 8 per cent. Available Phos-
phowic Acid, 6 per cent. Potash.
1. 200 lbs. Nitrate soda.........
850 Fish scrap .........
950 Acid p is., 14 pr. ct. 5.2 pr. ct. Amm onia.
2.80 Muriate:potash... will yield 7.7 Avail. phos. acid.-
O (6.0 '{ Potash.
2,000 lbs.
2. 800 lbs. Nitrate of soda......
600 Cottonseed meal..... 5.0 r. A .
1'000 "bacid .,14 .et. 5.0 prp h Ammon...
"200 acidiate .r....t llyield 7.6 Avail phos. acid.
5.6 Potash.
2,000 lba.


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37

Fnr Radishes and Turnips-5 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per eent
Available Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.


1. 250 lbs. Nitrate soda........
550 Cottonseed meal.....
900 Acid phos., 13 pr. ct.
00 Muriate potash......
2,000 Ibs.


( 4.6 pr. ct. Ammonia.
will yield 6. Avail. Phos. acid
J 8.3 Potash.


For Asparagus: 5 per cent. Ammonia, 7, per cent. Available
Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
1. 200 lbs. Nitrate sola........ 1
700 Cottonseed meal .... (4. pr ct. Ammonia.
800 Acid phos, 13 pr. ct. wil (4.9 pr. ct. Ammonia.
800 cid phos, will yield 6.1 Avail. phos. acid.
200 Muriate potash. 8.4 Potash.
2,000 lbs.
For Egg Plant and Tomatoes: 5 per cent. Ammonia, 6 per.
cent. Available Phosphoric Aci l, 7 per cent. Potash.
1. 200 lbs. Nitrate Soda........ 1
,700 Cottonseed meal. 4.9 pr ct. ammonia
840 Acid phos. 13 r. ct. i 49 pr ct. Ammoia i
260 Muriate potash...... d 6. Avail. hos. acid
2,0007.4 IbsPotas Ibs.
2,000 lbs. J


For Onions: 5 per cent. Ammonia, 5 per cent. Available Phos-
phoric 'Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.
1. 200 lbs. Nitrate soda........
750 Cottonseed meal. 5.1prct. Ammonia.
750 Acid phos.. 11 pr ct. will 0e1 5.1 Avail.phos.'a.
800 Muriatepotash. will yield p5.1 Avail. phos.'acid'.
00 Muriate potash.8.5 Potash.
2,000 lbs.
For Sweet Potatoes: 3 per cent. Ammonia, 7'per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid, 8 per cent. Potash.


1. 100 lbs. Nitrate soda.......
400 Fish scrap ..........
1,180 Acid phos.11 pr. ct
320 Muriate potash.
2 ,000 lbs.


3 .5 pr. ct. Ammonia..
willyield 7.8 "Avail. phos. acid,
8.3 Potash.


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2. 100 lbs. Nitrate soda........
00 "' Cottonscd meal.... 8.5 pr. ct. Ammonia.
1,100 -' Acid ph6s:, 18 pr. t.- will ld e 7.8 *: Avail.phos. acid.
300 Muriate potasO...... 8.8 Potash.

:2,000 lbs.

S For Beans afd Peas: 3 per cent. Ammonia, 7 per cent.
.Avaiiable Phosphori Acid, 7 per cent. Potash.

A. 100 lbs. Nitrate sda:......
,450 Cottonsied inea... 2.9pr. Ot.'Ammonia.
1.200 'Acid phop., pr. ct. wl. yield 7.1 Avail. phos.acid.
250" Murtate potash.'..... . 6.9 Potash..

:,000 bs. '
NOTE.-In'the preceding formulas, H. G. Sulphate may be substituted for Muriate
of Potash wheretve it occurs.,i '
Muriate is ordinarily uSed i vegetB-t6 growers, though the sulphate is preferred
by many, H. G. ulphate, 48'pr qent. potash )s now quoted at $52.oo per ton or I$.og
pet unit of potash. Murate, so per cent.; potash (is quoted at $46.oo per ton or 9z cents
per unit.


/ '
I,






BUREAt OF PER'TILIZfER.
SR. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser).


6 Phosp

NAME OR BRAND. 4 4
0 o 7


Special Mixture.. 473 ..... 7.35
Fertilizer ............. 4741..... 8.62
Bone Compound (No. 1).. 476119.00 9.75
Acid Phosphate (No. 2).. 477122.45 12.61
Special Mixture ......... 478 ..... 08

Kentucky Brand-Pulver-l
ized Tobacco Stems.... 479 ..
Cotton 'Seed Meal .'..... j480 ..... ..... .
Fertilizer ..... .... 1 481 14.25 4.901
Sulphate of Potash ...... 1483 .......
Fertilizer ... .. .... 14841 985 6.78


S :- -.' ". ., / "
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horic Acid


0
.-.
0?o 4
0 0 0
**_14 EP -
2.26 9.611 4.60 9.03
0.46 9.08 1.64113.32
2.67 12.42 2.201 1.62
2.51 22.451 ...... ....
0.761 6.84 4.361 7.86
. . .. '2.89110.14
I I

.'., . . 7 .021..'..
0.321 5.221 3.57 12.99
... .. . . ..... 150.48
1.70 8.481 6.151 6.77


-
<^-


BY WHOM SENT.




T. Kimball, St. Petersburg, Fla.
F. S. Hickock, Hastings, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
John M. Calhoun, Marianna, Fla.
R. D. Knight, Little River; Fla
Willoon & Toomer Fert. Co.,
Jatcksonville, Fla.

Schroeder & Augninbaw, Quincy.
J. F. Adams, Winter Park, Fla.
Thos. W. Williams, Tampa, Fla.
J. G. Powers, Terra Ceia,-Fla.




jw -W


BUREAU OF FERTILIRERS-Continued.


S40


oPhosphoric Acid--


NAME OF BRAND. BY WHOM 'SENT
a 0o
o o
"0 S i
S+-] -.1 ,

f-ea-Island Cotton-Seed... 485 ... ..... .... ...... .14j ..... Florida Mfg. Co., Madison, Fla.
Sea Island Gotton Seed M'11486 .......... 1 .... ..'.. 4.92j ..... Florida Mfg. Co., Madison, Fla.
--Sea Island Cotton Seed M'11487.1.... ..... ..... I.... ..... 5.62 ..... Florida Mfg. Cb., M1adisol, Fla.
Fertilizer ......... 488........1 5.20 0.771 5.97 1.86113.1 H. 0.. Wordenhlcff, Plant City, Fla
Fertilizer (light) ........ 4891...... 7.561 1.591 9.151 4.651 7.61 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Fertilizer (dark) ........ 490.....I 6.121 0.661 6.781 4.28& 7.24 Mrs. E. M. Lane, Delray, Fla.
Dried Blood ............ 4911... ..... .... .....14.851..... J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Raw Ground Bone ...... 492...... 9.53113.98 23.50 4.501.... J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Wood Ashes ......... 1493[..... ... ......... ...... .... 0. 2 J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Ground Tobaccio Stems .. 4941..... ............... 3.181 9.2f J. T. Stanley, Jensen, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 495 ...... ..... I ......... I 7.75 .... chroeder & Auguinbaw, Quincy.
Cotton Seed Meal ....... 14961............ ..... .... 7.71 .... James B. Bours, Jacksoaville, Fla
SAeid Phosphate ......... 497..... 118.741 0.75119.49 ..... ... Goulding Fert. Go., Pensaeola.
Fertilizer (acid phosphate) 498114.40113.641 0.53114.171 0.00 0.00 J. D. Clark, Mt. Pleasant, -Fla.
Fertilizer No. 1.. ......... 499111.301 7.051 1.011 8.061 4.601 8.42 B. G. Hewet, Pebble, Fla.


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BUREAU OF FERTILIZER-CONTINUED.

o. Phosplioric Acid.

NAME OF BRAND.
0 ,0
ca 0 o B 4

Fetilizer No. 2 ........ .. 50011.35 7.10 1.16 8.26 4.51 8.49 B. G.
Fertilizer ...... ....... 501 ...... 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.42 0.00 Peter
Guano ...... ........... 502 .............1261131 3.711 3.14 Jame
Acid Phosphate ......... 15031..... 113.681 2.05115.731 ..... .....Prof.
Crude Carbonate of Potash 504......... ..... ..... ...... 138.8, J. Hi
White Carbonate of Potash 505 ..... .......... ... .... ... 162.621 J. Hi
Fertilizer ............ 506110.85 7.30 1.261 8.56 3.18[ 3.52 W. M
Fertilizer ........ ...... 507 ..... 9.71 1.56111.271 5.361 7.68 P. L.
Fertilizer ...'... ........ 5081 7.35 8.121 1,20i 9.321 4.011 8.71 C. B.
cottonn Seed Meal ....... 15091 ... .......... 7.131 .... J. E.
Fertilizer ...........5101 ..... 6.101 5.57111.671 2.081 8.46 R. L.


41


BY WHOM SENT.


Hewet, Pebble, Fla.
Gardener, Palatka, Fla.
s Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
0. J. Moore, Lisbon, Fla.
irschburg, Tallahassee, Pla.
irschburg, Tallahassee, Fla.
. Girardeau, Monticello, Fla.
Fiveash, Alliance, Fla.
Robbinson, 0orno, Fla.
Wirick, Jr., Lloyd, Fla.
McMullen, Olearwater, Fla.


T,
i; I --~-- -. 4
w .. ~







JuREAU 0 h FtTlTLIZERS--ContsiheA. 1- 2- 4- -
or values see heading Bureau of Fertilizers."
S NOTE-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of manufacturers
of "Special Samples sent in by purchasers. -Dealers frequently send in samples of goods for ex-
amination before purchasing. A Special Sample" sent in by a dealer or manufacturer hence is not
an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Ofcial Samples" taken by the State
Chemist, or his assistant, on following pages, state the name of the goods and the manufacturers, the
guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertilizing ingredients found by the State Chemist. *
S Moisture not determined in- samples sent in paper or wood boxes.
S-Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain somae- phosphoric acid, but itis bought for the potash and
.ammonia content. Cotton seed-meal contains some phosphoric acid and some potash, but is bought
Jor the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is -given in the table, it has' been determined as total
phosphoric acid.
Not less than eight ounces (- pound), is required for a "Special Sample."


-r-


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* s-
* ^


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION Of OHEMISTf1. 48
R E. R1OSE, STATE CHEMIST, ANALYSIS' OF FERTILIZERS, 1904, MARION G. DONK, ASSISTANT CsEMIST.,
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.

J PHOSPHORIC ACID


A OdD BY WHOM AND WHERE
NAME OF BRAND ,
I a 0 MANUFACTURED

4. II


Cotton Seed Meal....... 311 Guarant'd Analysis. ........................ 7.85...... Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Official Analysis.... .......... ..... 8.12...... Washington, Ga.
Tobacco Dust.......... 312 Guarant'd Analysis. .... 1.20 2.50Tampa Fert. Co, Tampa,
Official Analysis.... ...... .... .......... 1.38 2.80 Fla.
Hard Wood Ashes...... 813 Guarant'd Analysis ........... ...... ...... ..50 Blackshear Manufa'g Co.,
Official Analysis.............................. .60 Blackshear, Ga.
H. G Dissolved Bone
Black................ 314 Guarant'd Analysis. 10.00 16.00 ............ ...... ...... Armour Fert. Co., Jack-
Official Analysis.... 11.30 20.26 0.29 20.55 ...... ...... sonvillc.
Acid Phosphate......... 315 Garat'd Analysis... 14.00 ......... ......... Tampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
S Off ial Analysis.... 13.90 18.76 0.35 1.90: ..... ..... Fla.



e . .

'_- ", " ' ". "- "' " "" -"' "





. -. -.... %.. .. .-- ; ,,._
- r .,. .- -. ,. o - ,
a


* ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS-Codntinued.


7---
Steamed Bone Flour....


HI. j Fegctab.e Ma.lure.

Fruit aid Vine Manure.


SQber's Fi uit and -Vine.

Ober's Vegetable Ma-
nure ...............

Baugh's Special Orange
Tree.... .........

Baugh's- Vegetable Ma-
nure .................

Double Strength of Pot-
ash ............. ......

Peruvian and Fish Gu-
ano ...............


Potato Mixture.........


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Ouamnt'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarantrd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Gnuarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


5.75

10 00
12 10

8 00
'8 95

11 00
6 95

14 00
18 70

12 00
6 20

12 00
13 85

1000
7 55

10 00
835

1000
7 90


13.38

500
764

6 00
8 31

600
8 93

600
7 87

5 00
8 18

6 00
6 71

500
6 65

5 00
6 22

4 00
4 9K


23.00
26.84


13.46

200
2 05

1 00
064

200
1 64

100
1 78

200
1 97

400
1 71

2 00
1 09

1 00
2 44

2 00
2 53


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--i


3.00
3.85

400
4 16

200
.2,42

2-50
3 27

500
5 48

2:00
2 39

5 00
5-48

150
2 08

4 50
4 92

3 00
3 79


...... Tampa Frt. Co.,' Tampa,
.... Fla.

6 00r ampa Fert. Co., Tampa,
5 98 Fla.

12 00 Campa Fert. Co, Tampa,
11-09 I1a:

-10 00 Ober & Sons,. Baltimore,
9 86 Md.

6 00 Ober & Sons, Baltimore,
5 96 Md.

10 00 Baugh & Sons, Baltimore,
9 69 Md.

7 00 Baugh & Sons, Baltimore;
6 88 Md.

10 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
11 40 (. ainesville, Fla.

5 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
6 58 .ainesville, Fla.

9 00 Florida Fertilizer Co.,
8 23 Gainesville, Fla.


10 15

8 42


7 74


8 66


7 52


_


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44


.









ANALYSIS OF PiERTILIZES-Continued.


Peruvian & Fish Guano.
Doub e strength of
Potasq................ 826

Orange Tree Fertilizer.. 327

Vegetable Fertiliz'r No 1 328

Fish and Potash........ 329

Bean Special............ 8.30

Cuke Special............ 31

Early Trucker.......... 332

Lettuce Special......... 38

Strawberry Special Fer- 884
tilizer........ .. .


Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis ...

Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....

Guarant'd Analysis.
Offielal Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....
Guarant'd Analysis.
Official Analysis....


------


7 00






9 90
800
490
900
4 75
700
6 80
900
4 9
8
9 80


11.00


5.00 1.00
6.35 4.65
500 200
5 62 1 83
400 200
3 95 2 76
8.00 200
3 19 129
4 00 3 00
424 804
8 50 200
3 15 2 21[
4 00 2 0
-8 52 1 98
400 2
44 2 81
6 001. . .
5 91 2 22


' -. .' . *^-. - -


...fi r .y. i^^ ^ ^' ,.X' ^ ^*'\-.A'i^ ;
ir L f .-4-- AJ~&i, I


6 71

4 48

7 28

5 36

5 50

"7 28

1-8-i3.


Florida Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
ita, dard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesville, Fla.
standard Fertilizer Co,
Gainesville, Fla.
Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Gainesvil e, Fla.
Standard Fertilizer Co.
Gainesville, Fla.
Va.-Car. Chem. Co., Sa-
vannah, Ga.





.-.. .1 -
AN ALS l e

- AI-LYI 9F _:~Y~9 F~BTLtZEE~S-CoBitinued. 48


.Champion Citrus Com-
pound...............

Old Dominion Potato
Manure...............

Special' Vegetable
Grower................


- Tiptop TomatoTrucker.


Fruit-and Vine..........


Southern-States Special.


.


0 98


iie


6 51


335 Guarant'd Analysis. 10 0
Official Analysis.... 11 25

836 Guarant'd Analysis. 8 00
Official Analysis.... 14 50

3887 Garant'd Analysis. 8 00(
Official Analysis.... 12 12

3888 Garant'd Analysis. 8 0M.
Official Analysis.... 1255
389 Guarant'd Analysis 8 00
Official Analysis. ... 11 85

340 Guarant'd Analysis. ...
Official Analysis.... 11 85


* ?'


* .... --'
~.,.~


Co.; Sa-


Co.. Sa-


Co., Sa-.


3 00
408
4

5(
50
8


400
4 00
4 59


8 09
4 05
8 591


14 00 Va.-Car. Chem.
11 50 vannah, Ga.

8 00 Va.-Car. Chem.
8 42 vannah, Ga.

00 Va.-ar. Chem.
8 06 vannah, Ga.

5 00 Va.-Car. Chem.
5 16 vannah, Ga.

10 Va.-Car. Chem.
9 81 vannah, Ga.

5 00 V -Car. Chsm.
5 98 vannah, Ga.


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PART IV,
MISCELLANEOUS.


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49 i-


COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS.

-BY R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST.

Probably no question is of more importance to the. far-
mer than the cost, or value, of the fertilizer he us, on
which depend the success or failure of his crop, th4~ profit
or loss of his years work. The question, is frequently
asked by the farmer, or- planter, "what is the value of
Jones' or Browns' guano?" "Do you consider Smith's' '
phosphate better than Green'?' ? SBch questions cannot '
be answered categorically. The only reply as to the
values of any brand, that can be fairly made, is to give the
relative commercial or "State values" of the actual "plant
food" in the material.
The only comparison that can be drawn between two
brands is to compare the actual amount of available
"plant food" in each, giving to each its commercial value,
and noting the difference in the sum.
Fertilizers, are of value only in proportion to the
amount of available nitrogen (or ammonia as known to
our law), available phosphoric acid, and potash, you are
getting.
The tons or pounds of other material with which it is
mixed should be considered no more than the weight of
the barrel, box, or sack, in which it is paceke. ,
The value of the various plant foods at our sea ports,
is readily obtained from the price litsts of reliable deal-
ers, and from current market prices in the various trade '-
journals.' .
Quotations are made daily or weekly, of the. market
values of the various materials used in the manufacture of
commercial fertilizers.
The ammoniates, cotton seed meal, fish scrap. blood.
tankage, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, etc.; the .
various potashes, sulphates, :nuriates, kanits, aAhes, etc.'; ,:
the phosphates, acid phosphate, bone, bone black, etc.. are .
all quoted, and their price is fixed by the unit, or pound '
of the actual nitrogen, potash, or phosphoric acid, in the '
material, regardless of the weight or bulk of the extran- .
eous matter combined with it.
4 Bul


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-The bulk of the fertilizer sold in this and other coun-
.f is, is made froi .phosphate rock dissolved in sulphuric
ajd; the prehoniGinent plant food in commercial fertili-
zere generally, iir available phosphoric acizd, closely fol-
loWed'by soluable petafi; 'the ismiatest portion of plant
food, i ,an aver~agpfeifiIizer is the" nitrogen, (or am-


', To protect the citizen, the consumer, and ligitiinate
manufacturer or dealer, in reliable goods from the impo-
sition of worthless or deficient fertilizers, the State has
passed a stringent law, plain in its terms, simple, and
readily understood, requiring the manufacturer, or seller
"of fertilizers, to place on each package of fertilizer sold
n the ,State, a plain 'statement, or guarantee, of the
amount or percentage of the three essential plant foods;
'aamely, aminopia, available phosphoric acid, jand potash.
It requires the State dhemist to annually publish a state-
ikent of the commercial values -of.these three essential
-eements; this information being taken from the pub-
lished market reports, and averaged, to make as fair a
"State valuation" as possible. These,values are for ton
lots, purchased at sea ports for cash. He also makes in
addition to this a statement of the values of these ingred-
ments in larger quantities or car loald lots. While tlese
'aluatiorns may not, at all times, be exact similar to trade
-~ilues, they seldom vary greatly, and are made liberal to
meett such fluctuatious; at no time during the past three
Years have the State values been less than the market
valuess at all timed the .farmer could purchase from r'e
/liable dealers the necessary ingredients at or 'below the
~ahees ixed by the Agricultural Department.
It is unnecessary to go into details as to the various
Sources of commercial fertilizers; they are largely com-
osed of waste animal, or vegetable matter; the refuse of
factories, 'fih scrap, blood, bone, tankage from slaughter
li uses, -garbage from cities, wool, hair, horns, etc.; from
1aitt1 tetof'soda; Imlned in Sqiuth America; from sulphate
ot amionia, a refuse material from the manufacture of
gas, cotton seed *teal, castor ponimace, etc.; and niost
largely from phoaspate rock, lined in our own State,
,(the largest producer of high grade phosphate' in the
world) and froan phosphates mined in South Carolina,
and Tennessee. >


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monia), though it is the most costly of all the necessary-
elements.
The commercial values for the last year, 1903, as fxed
by the Agricultural Department of Florida, are as fojlow.a,
and are published in each monthly bulletin of the Depart-
ment:

STATE VALUATIONS.

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia.l ; .
and Potash for the Season of 1904.
Available Phosphoric Acid ............5 cents a pound '
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ..............1 cent a pound',
Ammohia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 15 cents a pound '
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ..... cents a pouiad
If calculated by units- -
Available Phosphoric Acid ............ $1.00 per unit,
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............20 cents per unit ,
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .$3.00 per unit M 'L .
Potash ...... .......................$1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance df $1.25 per ton for mixing
and bagging. -
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. in a ton. We
find this to be easiest and quickest method forcalculating A
the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example
a fertilizer which analiPs as follows: ,
Available Phosphoric Acid-6.22 per cent.x$1.00- 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid..1.50 per cent.x .20- .30 .
Ammonia ............... .3.42 per cent.x 3.00-10.26 ,.
* Potash .... ...... ......7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and bagging .... 1.25

Commercial value at sea pots ................... .25.98
Ori a fertilizer analyzing as 'follows:
Available phosphoric acid.....8 per ceit.x$1.00 8RA.0 .,.
Ammonia .. .............2 per cent.x 3.:00- 6.oi
'Potash ...... ...... ........2 per cent.l.l10- 2.20 -
Mixing and bagging .......................... 1.2 -

Commercial value, at sea ports .................. .t.45 ,-
The above valuationw'are for cash for materials at-i'-
ered at lorida sea ports, and they can be bought in one
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ton lots at these prices at the date of issuing this Bulle-
W tin: Where fertilizers are bought at interior pointss, the
additional freight to that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of
S ten per cent. can be made in above valuations, i.,e.-
: Available Phosphoric Acid ..........90 cents per unit
Potash (K20. .. . .............. .99 cents per unit
;" Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen) ..:. $2.70 per unit
S The. altUations and market prices in succeeding illus-
-i: trations, are based on market prices for one ton lots.
I find it very largely the practice of Florida nanufac-
turers, and dealers carrying large stocks in the sea port
cities, to deal direct with the consumer; that most of the
largest consumers, particularly in the fruit and vegetable
!' regions, order their goods direct'from the factory, or the
General agency, at the sea port.
,,It is frequently asked, which is the most economical to
apply large quantities f. low grade goods, or a smalled
amount of higher grade, more expensive goods? "Are two
.' tons of an $18.00 goods not better or cheaper than one
St~n ,of $36.00 goods?"
If the goods are sold on their merits, and the two brands
Share commercially worth the price demanded, I should cer-
tainly aidivise buying the high priced, or high grade goods;
S' knowing I should get; in either case, the. same amount of
plant food; have just half the freight to,,pay, only one ton
'":`' -to haul from the depot to the field instead of two; and
b. ut one half the labor in distributing it on the field, with
a certainty of equally as good results.
S. To illustrate, 'a ton of 8-2-2 goods has
S 160 poindd available phosphoric acid,
.40 ionds ammonia,
40,- .pounds potash,

S, 240. poiundis of plant food.
S 1,760 pounds of useless matter, of no fertiliaing or com
niercial value.

2,000"
The same amount'of fertilizing material can be laidi by
": 'usingthe. following combbination:



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1,000
200
80


pounds 16 per cent. available, acid phosphate
pounds 20 per cent. sulphate of ammonia,
pounds 50 per cent. sulphate of potash,


1,280 pounds, containing 240 pounds of plant food, th6
same amount as contained in a ton of 8-2-2 goods,
goods, saving the freight and handling of .720
pounds of "filler."
The average amount of plant food in 24 brands, taken
from six of the largest dealers in the State, for the years
1902 and 1903, was 340 pounds per ton, the average of all
mixed goods sold in the State during 1903 was 338 pounds
per ton, the average of plant food in commercial fertili-
zers throughout the United States is about 300 pounds,
showing that Florida growers demand a better average
quality, of fertilizer.
The average price was $33.00 per ton, the average com-
mercial value (or 'S~ate value), was 27.00, showing an
average excess over State values of $6.00 per ton not in-
cluding $2.00 per ton allowed.for mixing and liags.
This was not the highest prices for the same class of
pounds of plant food sold at an excess of $10.30 per ton
above State values.
Another lot with 327 pounds of plant food, sold at an
excess of but $2.05 per ton over State values; in one case
the dealer making the profit of $10.30 on 296 pounds of
plant food, in the other but $2.05 profit on goods having
327 pounds of plant food. In both cases the goods were
'from reliable, and trustworthy manufacturers, and'made.
from first class materials.
In one case 296 pounds of plant food, sold for $336.00
or 12 cents per pound for the actual food in the ton of
material; in the other case 337 pounds of plant food.'
were sold for $29.25 or 8.7 cents per pound
for the actual plant food in'the ton of material.
The average profit per ton of goods sold in the State
during 1902 and 1903 was (including $2.00 for-bags and
mixing $8.00 per ton, hence it is evident that the relative
cost of high grade goods is less than that of low grade
goods.
In this,connection, I quote from Bulletin No. 990of.the-
Vermont Experimental Station publishedin May .1903, olw
acknowledged authority on the subject, as follows;


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The high grade fertilizers for a third advance in price
over the cost of a .lpo class goods, furnished two thirds
more pant food, and five sieths more commercial value."'
The average of a number of the most generally used
brands, by ix -of the most reliable manufacturers and
dealers in Florida, shows practically 4 per cent., of am-,
monia, 6 per cent. of available phosphoric acid and 7 per
cent. of potash, or 17.per cnt of total plant food or 440
pounds of a necessary fertilizing elements in each ton;
for general use this is undoibtedly a, good formula, the
general average of all mixed goods sold in the State dur-
hig 1903 was practically the same percentages as above.
However, their~ are special crops that demand differet
proportions of these epential elements, some 'cropi d-
mand larger proportions of nitrogen; all saiculent cropi,
grown for their foliage, sunch as cabbage, celery; letttue,
etc., require nitrogen, (or ammIonia) as the predominat-
ing element, hence large quanttiies of blood and bone,
tankage, fish, sca'ap, and the nitrates, are used in -making
fertilizers for these crops, nitrogen being the predoimi-
nent element required for sueculent foliage crops.
Plants cultivated for their starch, or sugar content, re-
quire larger apmeounts of potash to insure a large yiel'dof
gain or fruit, hence the predominant element for -such
crops is potash.
Plants grown for fiber, cotton, flax, or hemp, or for ma-
tating the wood of fruit, tree, to form cellulose, or wodff
fiber, require an excess of phosphoric acid in a properly
balanced fertilizer; hence in cotton fertilizers, phosphoric
aeid is the predominating element.
It may be broadly Estted, that the necessary elements
atse used by the growing plant as fdllows, it being uiiwt-
ttood that all of them are absolutely escentiaf to fle6
healthy growth of fhe plant; that each of them mudt t1
pedabt in the sotl, in an available condition, and in anf-
flctent quiatity,'1t supply the deWaflid of the crop.
1st. Nitraoen, to pr.d ,ceifliia, succulent leaves, gri4
se4na, and immature wood.
2nd. Phosphoric aci, to induce the formation of 6f$,'
wb ssody iss^I e, to tiifatre -the woody part of a
kni, or to am t 1 n*,o at i.o obton, fla ot" himp, to pir
duce mati I'*d i JtA ft'ttree.

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3rd. Potash, to assist in the formation of starch, or
sugar, as in the potato, grain, sugar cane, or fruit.
The cotton grower requires all three of these elements,
nitrogen, to give his crop a quick healthy growth, potash,
to harden the stems, and mature the seeds, and phosphoric
acid, to grow the fibre.
Experiments made by trained investigators have shown
that these elements are required for cotton in about the
.following proportions:
Ammonia 3 per cent.
Potash 24 per cent.
Available Phosphoric acid 7 per cent.
or 12 pounds of ammonia, 10 poupnde of potash, .28
pounds of phosphoric acid, using about 400 pound& per.
.acre.
A crop of '300 pounds of lint cotton requires 22
pounds nitrogen, 50 pounds of phosphoric acid, and 15
pounds of potash; to supply all this amount; assuming
there be none of these essential elements available in the
soil- would require an application of not less than 800
pounds of the above formula per acre, however, all soils
have more or less of these elements of fertility, some
(though very few soils) have all of them) particularly
new lands, not worn out.
Our cotton fields are rapidly being robbed of their
original fertility, the lint is sold, as is tie seed, taking
from the land.with each 1,000 pounds of seed; 38 pounds
-of ammonia, 13 pounds of phosphoric acids, and 12 pounds
of potash; excepting the ammonia, these elements are
permanently lost, and must be restored by man, or the
field will necessarily become barren.
.The sale of the seed from our cotton fields, with no. re-
turn ,of the mineral elements, has removed millions' of
dollars of actual wealth; while also the sale of each ani-
mal, each bushel of wheat, or ton of hay, has impoverished
to a certain' extent fertile prairies of the West.
That our farmers, the cotton planter, the corn an d
wheat producer, and the stockman, have wasted the 0fx-
ural wealth of their lands, is best evidenced by the e'or,
mous growth of the fertilizer industry; an industry prac-
tically unknown thirty years ago, is now ohe of the most










S important in the country, with hundreds of millions of
dollars invested in the business. Besides the enormous
S" domestic consumption, (approximating 4,500,000 tons,
I'?, [ worth $100,000,000.00) we exported in 1903, up to Noveim
h; er 1st, 5,600,000 dollars worth of fertilizers, and im-
ported 2,600,000; dollars worth.
The question, of maintaining the 'fertility of our fields
and pastures is certainly the most important one now be-
'fore our farmers; its importance is becoming greater each
year, fields formerly said to be inexhaustibly fertile, now
demand, assistance to produce average crops.
The question is, "how can we economically preserve and
'increase the fertility of our farms;" as fertilizers are
known to be generally the waste -or offall of our homes,'
.' -fTctories and cities, the answer is contained in the ques-
tion, and is simply, "stop wasting," dqn't sell. off the fer-
ility of the farm, make more manure, return to" the soil
all that is possible, feed your'crude materials to your eat-
-tie, care for and carefully husband, the waste material of
all kinds, sell only the finished product, 'economize in the
-purchase of the necessary fertilizers, pay for, what you
-netu, :ind don t buy things you do .not need; don't sell a
-ton of cotton .seed, without buying back one thousand
Pounds of cotton seed meal, feed.this meal to livestock,
: and -save the manure, nhix it with acid. phosphate and
"'kainit, and apply it to your field.
If the meal from the seed of an acre of cotton, was
S -mieied in proper proportion with acid phosphate, and pot-
S ash, and returned to the field each year, its.fertility would
increase annually, the yields be' greater each year instead
of less.'
,Tliat most expensive element of fertilizing. nitrogen;
S that costs three times as much per pound as either potash,
or phosphoric acid. can by proper notation and care, be to
,a large extent produced oh the farm. It is the only one
S:' f them that can be so produced. Any soil supplied with
I the necessary available potash, and phosphorii'acid. can
'be made to produce abundant quantities of nitrogen by
-planting the various legumes, or pitiogen gathering
S -plants, such as cow peas, velvet beans, beggar weeds an
-the various clovyrs. 'Such crops demand first a supply of
S available phosphoric a8id, and the potash in the soil, they


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57
.will then produce large quantities, of nitrogen from the
air, leaving the soil in better condition for the production
of othet crops, sucht as cotton, tobacco, and grain, that
require, but do not produce nitrogen, as do the legunms'
mentioned. These, leguminous crops make the best of hay
or forage, and as such should be utilized on thefarm; all
the -manure should be carefully saved, and reinforced by
pbtash and phosphate, returned to the soil. ..
For general use under the condiftins outlined, on onir
ordinary cotton soils, I would suggest that acid' phosphate
and potash (either kainit orethe higher grade goods) be
used,, with very little ammonia of any. The lands to be
S planted in peas, velvet beans or beggar weed, to be fol-
lowed by cotton, oats, oats or corn, making a three tears
-rotation.
1,000 pounds of 14 per cent available phosphate, 1,000
pounds of 12 per cent. kainit. making a ton, would analize
per cent. phosphate, and 6 per cent. potash, with a total
of 260. pounds of plant food.' This mixture can be pur-
chased at $14.00 per ton, mixed and sacked for $1.25..
taking the cost at sea ports, $15.25 per ton; 260 pounds
of plant food costing less than 6 per cent. per pound.
Or, 1,000 pounds of 14 per cent available phosphate,
500Q pou ds of 12 per cent kainit, 500 poundeof 8 per cent"
cotton seed.meal, making a ton, would yield 7+. per cent.
available phosphate, 3 1-3 potash, 2 per cent. ammonia, or
.257 pounds of ,plant, food, costing 74 cents per pound;
S tih mixture will cost $18.75 per ton, at present market
values including ipixing and,bagging, and will be sold un-~
der'full guaraatee; the guarantee ~~e qv red of the nman-
foaturer, and is just as essential -to insure the obtdiiang
of the materials required, in the, proper amount, ni a,
special miteture, made to order, as on a regular brad ah':
should be demanded, and insisted on in each coas.
In conclusion, I would mention that our Government,
both National and State, are spending vast sums of monioy
in. experimental work at the various exivrimenta.l RtFh
tions, they are proViding agricultural colleges; furnish-
ing lectures to thousands of farmers iletitutes, pVblshb-
ing a large number of bulletins; all beating on agri etnre
in its various forms. T ese are valuable papers, 1byemi-
nently practical and scilntifc men. unon almost ever; ag-
i.cultural subject, all classes and kinds of crops, roils ,









58

fertilizers, :tock raising, poultry, hogs and cattle, the best
methods of feeding, of dairying, and the many various
Industries allied to agriculture..
These bulletins are published for free distribution, and -
are available to every farmer, and of her citizen in the .
' aId. I .particularly mention a few that ate of great value
* t those seeking information as to the proper use offertil-
SiszeA, t be held from the U. 8. 'Dpartment of 'Agriulture. ;
No. 16, Leguminous ,plants.
:No. 21, Bardi Yard manure.
fNo. 44, Commercial Fertilizers.
No. 36, Cotton Seed and its products. ,
There are many others to be had for the asking. A list
of them is published in the bulletins mentioned. Our Agri-
cultural Experiment Station at Lake City also publishes
a dumber of bulletins of peculiar value to our Florida
faSmers. These bulletins should be in the hands of 'eery
fatner in the State,. being applicable to the crops, cli-
mate and soil of the State; they are published for the
benefit of the farmer, and belong to him, as he pays for
theN, be should not avoid himself of them and procure
tbose treating'upon his particular lines of agriculture, be
NA farmer, truek.r, fruit grower, dairyman or .stockman.













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