Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00014
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: September 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
i V-
e3V. bo


.'a Vol.


No. 79.


FLORIDA


(Department of Agriculture.)



..Monthly Bulletin..


SEPTEI1BER, 19o2.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I, Crops.
Part II. Fertilizers.
Part III. Aleather Report.
Part IV. Miscellaneous.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them .


STTALLAHAMSSEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAMHAIEE, FLA.
I I


Utah Experiment Statinc


12.


r -I







County Map of the State of Florida.
(FoL uhe Bullet;n ) ]











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HON B. E. McLIN, Cor. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief lerk..



CORRESPONDENTS' NOrES.
ALACHUA COUNTY.-We have had a great deal of bad weather which
has delayed picking cotton, and saving hay crop of nearly all sorts; will
make a fair average yield; sweet potatoes, peanuts, cassava and field peas
will make fine yield.
BAKER COUNTY.-Except cotton and corn, field crops will yield very
fair average crops; the average seasons have been quite unfavorable
throughout the year.
BREVARD COUNTY.-Crops have done well; we are having a great deal
of rain, which is pushing forward very rapidly the growth of fruit trees.
CITRUS COUNTY.-The condition of crops will average very well; fruit
trees are doing well; the yield of the majority of crop will be a pretty
good average; there will be a fair crop of oranges and grape fruit.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.-Cotton has suffered serious loss from excessive
rains; all crops except rice have been cut short from some cause; velvet
beans are now beginning to fruit, and promise to be a good crop.
DADE CouNTY.-There have been ample rains, well distributed during
the month, and is resulting in a fine growth; prospect for fine fruit crop is
good.
DESOTo COUNTY.-We have had a very fine growing season during Sep-
tember; crops and fruit are doing well; the county will produce a girat
deal of food and forage.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY.-All late crops as peas, peanuts, hay, beans and
sweet potatoes, are fine, and the late crops of cotton are fair in some places
sugar cane is poor, but heavy increase in acreage; the same of upland
coton; corn is turning out about half a crop.
FRANKLIN COUNTY.-Excessive rains have injured sweet potatoes in
low lands and washed out turnips and other seed 'sown; large acreage of
strawberries being planted this fall.
GADSDEN COUNTY.-Sugar cane, swet potatoes and peanuts are the
poorest crops grown in this county in many ears; cotton, peas and rice
will yield average crops.
HAMILTON COUNTY.-The continued dry weather ruined all the crops









grown here, with the exception of the hay erop; all kin'ds of crops th.t awns
grown here will not average more than 74Qper cent of a crop.
HERNANDO COUNTY.-Crops of all kinds will yield a good average;.
fruit trees doing well, and a fair crop of fruit will be made.
HOLMES COUNTY.-Cotton and corn are both very short, sugar cane is
Ood, and other crops will yield a fair average; we have had the most un-
favorable seasons known for years.
JACKSON COUNTY.-There will be a fair aera'ge crop made in this
county; the farmers are having some trouble in harvesting the cotton crop
on account of labor being scarce.
JBFFERSON COUNTY.-Cotton is short of the average crop, but most of
the other field crops will yield a fair average crop.
LEE COUNTY.-Crops are all in good condition and growing finely;
we are getting plenty of rain for trees and winter vegetables; there wili be
good fruit crop, and a large vegetable crop.
LEON CouNTY.-Cotton is short of an average, and corn is the poor-
est crop for several years; other crops are turning out well and will yield
a fair average; the hay crop is the largest ever grown.
LEVY COUNTY.-Except cotton and corn, other field crops will turn out
a good average; crops are in general good condition.
MADISON COUNTY.-Upland cotton is shorter than the average; sugar
cane, field peas, sweet potatoes and peanuts ire very fine, and the other
crops will yield a fair average.
MANATEE COUNTY.-Late rains have improved the situation but the
severe drought made terrible ravages; the white fly played havoc with cit-
rus trees, the crops only about half a crop; sweet potatoes are late as are
all vegetable crops.
MARION COUNTY.-We are having far too much rain for a majority of
our crops, more especially cotton; prospects are fine; other crops are up to
the average; from present observation the velvet bean crop will be the fin-
est ever grown here.
NAssAU CoUNTY.-Heavy rains will decrease the average of sweet po-
tatoes and corn, both being planted on low land, which overflows; it is
hard to tell what the result will be; the hay crop is fine, and orange trees
doing well.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-Some of the crops were cut short by the dry weath-
er, but a majority of them will yield an average crop; orange trees are now
doing well, but the crop was cut down by the drought, causing the fruit to
fall off.
PAsco CouNTY.-Fruit trees are looking fine since the rains; a larger
eareage of strawberries and vegetables are being planted; the cool Sep-
tember rains being very beneficial for such work; the last ten days have
been dry and an abundance of hay has been saved.
POLK COUNTY.--All crops are in fine condition, and a majority of them










will average the best yield for a good many years; fruit trees are in fine
growing condition, and there will be a good crop.
ST. JOHNS COUNTY.-Crops generally are making unusual growth, ow-
ing to the abundant rain and auspicious weather; potatoes and cade tre
specially fine; there is some loss in harvesting peas and hay, owing to
heavy rain last of month.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-A majority of the crops are in good condition,
and will yield about an average crop, except corn which is the poorest
ever known in this county; the seasons have been most unfavorable m re-
cent years.
SUMPTER COUNTY.-The late rains have greatly improved the orange
trees, field peas, and grass for hay; late rice is a total failure in some lo-
calities. Crops will average fair; in some sections there are five times as
many oranges as last year; and the quality of the fruit will be fully up
to the average; there is a considerable annual increase in the orange crop
this year.
SUWANNEE COUNTY.-Frequent showers prevent the gathering of the
crop; owing to large acreage of cotton planted, the crop will not fall Ihort
of last year. Provision crops are fairly good. Everything considered
our section has nothing to complain of.
VOLtsIA CorNTY.-September has been very wet, over 10 inclhs of
rainfall, more than in all the previous eight months put together; it has
helped hay and beggarweed and improved the outlook for sugar cane, and
sweet potatoes; is very favorable for fall gardens.
WAKULLA COUNTY.-If we have no storm or excessive hot weather cot-
ton will average fair crop. Other farm crops are rather below the average.
WALTON COUNTY.-Crops are better in some sections of the county than
in others; cotton will yield hardly an average, and some other crops li:.le
better. Field peas, velvet beans and peanuts are very good.
WASHINGTON COUNTY.-The growing season has been the dryest ever
experienced in this section; consequently many crops are short of an aver-
age yield.












Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for
September, 1902, as Compared with an Average.


Counties


A lachua ........................
Baker ...........................
Bradford ...................
Brevard ............. ...... ..
Calhoun ........................
Citrus..........................
Clay........... ................
Columbia......................
Dade............... .........
DeSoto..................
Escam bia ........................
Franklin ........................
Gadsden .......... ............
Hamilton. .....................
Hernando.....................
Hillsborough...... .............
Holmes ................
Jackson.......................
Jefferson .................
LaFayette..................
Lee......................... .....
Leon ..................... .
Levy ..................... ...
Madison .....................
Manatee............. ....
Marion ............... .......
Nassau .........................
Oranges........................
Osceola........................
Pasco..... ...............
Polk ..... ..............
Putnam ......................
St. Johns....... ...........
Santa Rosa.. ........... .. ...
Sum ter ............. .. ... ...
Suwannee ....................
Taylor.......................
Volusia ....................
Wakulla ...................
W alton ............ .....
Washington..................
General averages. ..........


__ __


Upland Island Sugar Field Rice
Cotton Cotton Cane Feas




.. 9 90 0 50 75 7
0 65 8 90 75 80 7 a 8
...... 100 100 00 00 0 100


90 90 90 85 100 100 100 100 .... ....
o E_ Q pd o a.) o CL

.... .... 0 0 35 100 0( 601 ..
.. .. 0 90 90 50 715 75
.... .... .... ....0 75 810 0 75 80

... 100 100 100 100 100


75 120 .. .... 90 100 100 100 75 100......
90 85 100 100.


.... ... 90 85 90 95 90 85
70 65 85 7 90 90 100 100 105 100


.... .... 75 75 50 50 80 80 50 60
.... ...... .. 100 100 .... .... 100 100
. ...... .. 90 9 ..... .
70 65 85 U0 60 65 100 100 100 100
75 75 5 O 80 5 8 0 50 60
S100 100 .....10 100

75 75 ... ... 100 100 90 90 85 80
100 90 90 85 75 75 100 100 .... ....
65 75 75 75 95 100 75 80 .......
...... 90 90 90 95 75 80 8 85
. 100 10 0 90 ...... .....
85 90 ....... 90 io 0 100 90 90
S75 75 60 60 100 100 100 100
65 75 75 80 100 110 100 100 90 95
.... ... .. 100 100 100 100 100 100
100 90 95 95 100 100 100 110 100 100

.... .... .. ... 5 85 100 70 90
.. .... 80 80 100 100 0 90
... .... ... 100 100 120 120 80 80
... .... .... 90 85 90 90 100 0
...... 80 85 50 60 75 75...
80 85 70 75 8 80
95 95 ... .... 90 90 8K 80 9 5 95
80 80 75 75 85 90 100 100
.... ... 80 80 70 70 100 100 80 80
.... .... 75 75 85 90 0 100 90 100
.. ... .. .. 85 85 8 0 80 80
75 75 75 75 60 65 60 60 ... ....
85 70 .. ... 601 651 0 85 .... .
65 615 70 70 701 70 90 90 40 40

801831 78 78 84 851 90l 9il 85 88













Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Velvet Sweet
Beans Pot s Peanuts Cassava Hay

Counties I a a a

Q 0.

oU 3. 0 C_ 0 a,
Alacaua.. 100100 00

Alacaua.... ......... ....... 1 o10 90 1U0 90 100 1 00 1U 0 100
Baker ................. ......... 100 100 10 0 90 901 .
Bradford .............. ...100 100 10 100 90 90 ... 90 90
Brcvard.................. ... .. .....10 100 20 ... 90 90 100 100
Calhoun ................... ... 100 700 100 100 .... 100 100
Citrus.... ........... ........ 105 105 105 110 90 85 ....... 100 100
Clay ................. 75 80 9 100 100 100.. .... 100 100
Columbia..................... 10 100 95 90 95 90 .... ... 100 100
Dade.... ........... ......... 100 100 100 ... ......... ....
DeSoto......................... 10 10 110 90 80i 100 90 100 120
Escambia................... .. 100 10 10 150 100 100 1 15 100 150
Franklin ............ .. ........ .. 7 .. .
Gadsden ...................... 60 60 50 40 60 60 ........90 90
Hamilton ..................... 80 80 501 50 50 50.... .... 80 85
Hernando.................... 100 100 100 l 100 ..... 80 80
Hillsborough ......... .. . 150 150 75 75 .. ...... 100 1i00 ...
Holmes ....................... 80 0 100 95 100 .... ... 75
Jackson ... ........... .. 100 0 10 10 ... 90 100
Jefferson ....... ....... .... 00 100 75 80 .. . 90 100
Lafayette .................. 9 90 90 85 ..... .
Lee............................ 125 125 60 60 80 80 100 100 80 80
Leon............ ............. 100 100 90 95 90 95 100 100 100 50
Levy....... ................ 90 100 85 80100 1100 90 100
Madison ...................... . .. 110 110 12 120 ... 75 90
Manatee.......... ................... 100 100 80 5
Marion....................... 110 150 110 110 110 120 100 110 9 90
Nassau............ .......... 6 5 .... .100 100
Orange ..................... ... 90 0 65 65 ...75 85 85 90
Ofceola....................... 85 100 75 75 .... .... 50 50 50 50
Pasco ..................... 1. 100 1 100 100 70 701 100 100 100100
Polk ................. ....... .. 15 150 65 100 50 100 100 100
Putnam ....................... 90 100 75 75 .... ..... 75 80
St. Johns.. ....... .......... 100 100 85 100 75 85 75 90 80 80
-SantaRosa................. ... 100 100 95 100 80 80 100 100 100 100
Sumter ........................... 75 80 90 100 75 75 80 80 100 100
Suwannee............ .. ........ 80 80 100 100 10 100 50 50 100 100
'Taylor........................... 100 100 100 10 100 100 . ... 100 100
Volusia........................... . I 80 80 75 75 .. i. 1 1 00 .
Wakulla ........................ 70 60 50 50 60 60 .... .... 60 60
'Walton. ........................ 1000 7500 75 1 100 1 .... 65 70
Washington.............. ... 1001 100 50 50 100100 75 75200 200

General averages............... 99 101 861 87 87 9 89 931 93 98










8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties





Alachua..........................
Baker.......................
Bradford .. ...............
Brevard......................
Calhoun....... ..............
Citrus..........................
Clay........ ...... .......
Columbia...... ..... .. ......
Dade .. ............ ..... .
DeSoto..........................
Escambia......................
Franklin......................
Gadsden.... ............... .
Hamilton ................. ...
Hernando ......................
Hillsborough ... .. ..........
H olm es ........ ................
Jackson ......... ...........
Jefferson.......................
Lafayette...... ................... .
Lee........ ...................
Leon ................ .........
Lea.......................
M anatee........ ...............
Mariona .......... .........
Nassau ...... ........... ....
Orange .....................
Osceola .......................
Pasco.........................
Polk..... .....................
Putnam ......... ..............
St. John ....................
Santa Rosa ....................
sumters ................... ..
8uwannee....................
Taylor .........................
Volusia............ .....
W akulla......... .......... ....
W alton ......................
Washington.....................

General averages..............


Bananas Orange Lemon Lime Grape
Trees Trees Trees Fruit
Trees


g

b0 1- 0 )
0 2. 0 2. 0 024 Q 0I

-.. ...... .... .... .. .. .... .... ... ... ...
........ .
90 90 100 85 85 40.... .. 100 85

.... ... i .. .... .... .. ....
100 110 100 100






S.. ........ ....8





100 10 0 100 100 i2Oi11



90 100 11 80 100 90 100 90 100 90
.. . . .. ... . .i'
..... .. .. 85 65 ..... .. ... 85 65,













10... ..... 50
100 100 I 1O n 0 l 90 90 100 100 .120 120


100 100 80 50 80 50 60 40 80 75.
.... .. 100 110 100 102 .... .... 100 110,
.. 100 .. .... .... .... .... .. ...
. . 65 L5 ...... .. .... .... 65 65
10, 15 100 50 100 30 100 20 100 40
100 50 100 50 100 50 lot 50.
100 90 100 100 75 50 ... 100 500




.... .. .. ... ...........




97 8839 841 98- 67 941 67 97 80









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-19J2.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ......... 5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash...... ....... ................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We fini
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ...............$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20 ................ .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00.............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11xl.10 ............... 7.82
Mixing and bagging ...................... ...... 2.00

$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price i at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers ar< bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that poin' must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. Rosa, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


Name of Fertilizer




Bright C. S. Meal.....
Dark C S. Meal.......
Fertilizer......... ....
Fertilizer.................
Ground Bone.........
Dissolved Bone Black.
Extra Fruit&Vine Fert
Kainit.......... ..
Double Manure Salt..
Bone Compouud .....
Nitrate of Soda....
H. G. Sulphate Potash
Dissolved Bone Meal..
Fine Grou'd ri'd Fish
Dissolved Bone. ......
Fertilizer .............
H. Tobacco Dust...
Acid Phosphate.......
Mixed Fertilizer......
Mixed Fertilizer .....
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Acid Phosphate Pot-
ash and Ammonia..
Ashes.
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Fertilizer ..........
Guano ............ .
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1
Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.
H. G Sulphate Potash
H. G. Sulphate Potash
H. G. sulphate Pota'h
Fertilizer...............
Fertilizer..........
Mixed Fertilizer No 1.
Mixed F rtllizer No.2.
Palmetto Ashe.......
Ground Garbage.......
Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer ....... .
Fertilizer..............
Fertilizer..............
Fertilizer..............
Cotton Seed Meal, 2d
class for feeding....
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Mixed Fertilizer.......
Blood and Bone.......
Tobacco Dust.......
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Toba.co Dust.........
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Strawberry Fertilizer.
Mixed Fertilizer......
Cotton Seed Meal....
Mixed Fertilizer......


Phosphoric Acid


S.By Whom Senit
B C
0 03 5 S


6.65 ....... 1.82
7.45 6.45 1.S2
8.'5 7.07 7.75
13. 5 .. .
8.25 ... .....


8.40 8.22 2.07
9.13 1.60
.... 6. 2.22


3.31 8.44 1.83 Tallata',see Cotton Oil Co.. Tallahassee.
2.03 4.76 1.65 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallanassee.
.43 6.12 7.80 it. K. Farre'l, Punta Gorda.
7.79 11.50 0.481'. Painter Fertilizer Co.. Jajksonvllt
20.98 4.66 ..... Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
18.81 ..... .... Th Atwood Co., Manavl.ta. Fl i.
9.57 2.31 4.1A u'heln Firtilizer o., Orlando, Fla.
... .. 12.5 Frank A.dams, Jcsper, Fla.
..... 0.92 Frank Adam lasere, Fla.
13.48 1.' .... Goilding Fertilizer :o Pensacola, Fla.
1.431. D. R. Knight, Lemon Cit., Fla.
....51. 73 1 H. Knghtr, I emon City, Fla.
19.3P 2.77 ... 1). R. Knieht. Lemo' (City, Fla.
11.46 9.41 ....D R. Knight, Lem.n City, Fla.
22.82. .....E, Painter Fertilizer Co.. Jacksonville.
9 34 2.23 8.36 m.s Henry .t. Petersburg. Fla
3 2 10.33 Florida Fert. Mnf. Co., Gainesaille, Fla..
21. ...... .... Tamp- Ferrilizer Co., Tampi, F.a
7.75 1.54 12.75 Tampa Fertiiz, r r;o, Tampa, Fla.
8 3 3.84 7.4 Ilampa Fertilizr Co., Tampa, ila.
7.6 10.97 o.78 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
'3.0 1.73 4.31 Sterl'ng and Russell, Delray, Fla.
........ 4.24 Sterling and Kussell, Delray, Fia.
15.14 6.48 O.84 Sterling and R sell. Delray, F.a
7.78 2. 0 12.6t VW. L. Foster, Sr. Petersburg, Fla.
10.29 2.46i 2.36 A. L. Willson Co. Quincy. 1ka.
8.0v 2.27 I1 84 rampa Feitilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
8.40 4 21 5.9l Tampa Fertilizer Co, Tampa, Fla.
..... 49.28 Mis. Hellen s. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
. ..... 4.0 Mrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
... . .. 51.04 rs. Itel en a. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
7.22 2.45 4.72 E. D, Luter, % ildwood, Fla.
7.25 3.43 12.50 J. H. Loyd, Winter Hav n, Fla.
11.77 3.21 ;.(7 4. R. Shomaker. Cotton Dale, Fla.
1 .56 2.25 1.89S. It. Shomaker, Cotton D le, Fla.
.... 0.57 Arthur Cornwell, Palmetto, Fla.
20.5' ... 1.35 Southern Fert. Mnf Co, Gainesville,Fla
4.6 .. 11.81 Schroeder & rguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
8. 4.61 5.011W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh. lta.
13.47 3.38 0.56 E. C. Lanier & o., Miami, Fla.
3.89 13.26 Schroeder & .rguinbaw Quincy, Fla.
10.59 4.20 4.21 M. Jacoby, Marianna, kla.
4 66 .....Booker & Gentry, Memphis, Tenn
2.65 7.76 1.60 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Washington, Ga.
8.27 2.29 10.32 Marshall & Beebe, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
14.8* 8.70 ..... Hardec'Bros., Jensen, Fla.
..... 1.30 5.92 B. F. Hardesty, St. Sebastian, Fla.
2.72 8.45 1.73 Florida e.rocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
.... 2.25 00 Sterling & Russell, Deiray, Fla.
2.53 a.l 8 1.72 Mellan Crosby Co., Pensacola, Fla.
3.21 9.30 2,10 J Brewten, McDavid, Fla.
8.2 1.8 1.33 W. W. Valentine, Antioch, Fla.
10.73 3.0410 F. S. Dunklin, Lakeland, Fla.
.... 5.61 Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
8.45 2.55 6. M. 0. Donell. West Tampa. Fla.












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer. P o By Whom Sent

0 50


Mixed Fertilizer....... 6.70 6.3 1.60 7 9 1.1 10.92 E. A. Wilcox, Anona. Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer.... .. .. 484 8.26 8.1 5.151 .88 Clark & Co.. Dania. Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer..... .0 1.21 7.2 1.85 13.64 D. W. Brown, rcdia, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal........ 2.77 .58 Florida Tobaoco Co., Qu ncy, Fla.
Fertilizer...... ... 9.65 11.47 1.66 13.13 .... 5.59C. F Cope, Chlpley, Fla.
Armour's Vegetable
Fertilizer.......... 7.35 6 28 3.21 9.49 4.46 9.29 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fruit & Root
Crop Special......... 9.45 7.35 2.11 9.4 2.45 6.74 Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville....
Sulphate of mmonia. 3 55 ....... ..25. .... Willson & roomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Sulphateof Ammo.ia. 8.60 ..... .... 23 .61 .... Willson&Toomer Fert. Co.,Jacksonville.
Mixed Fertilizer I
(Sweepings)......... .6 5.5 2.04 7.59 3.66 794 Willson & Toomer Fert.Co,. Jacksonville.
Nitrateof Soda........ 1.70 ............... 48 .... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Sulphate of Potash... 17.40 ..... ... 24. 0 Willson & Toomer 'ert. Co.. Jacksonville.
Dried Blood........... 1.1 ....... ..... R. M. Hebberr, Jtnsen, Fla.
Ground Steamed Bone 3.10 8.64 16.1823.81 4. .... R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
H. G. Tobacco Dust..: .... .. 50 1.80 M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
Tobacco Dust....... i 7- ..... 3. 6.75''. O. Painter Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fertilizer.............. 1?.9 tr'cel .83 tr'ce J. D. McUonald. Little River, Fla. (Caus-
1 I tic Soda, Lime and Muck.
Hickory Ahes ........ .....l..... ........ 2.16 W C. Johnson, Micanopy, Fla
Hard Wood Ashes..... .... ....... ..... 3.23 Crump's Mf. Co. W Bay City Mich.
Mixed Ferrilizer....... 7.3 7.27 0.81 8.14 2.1 7 13.05:James Henry. St. Petersburg, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer..... 4.75 7.12 0.56 7.68 4.30 17.06 '. E Berry, Manchura, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer ..... 14.55 7.25 3.32 10.57 3.35 4.16 ook A West, Little River, Fla.
Dark Cttton Seed Meal .. ....... 4.6;... M Minor. Crown Point, Fla.
Ashes No. 1. Light.... ..... .. ...... .3 .... 0.73G. H. Giffin & Co., liviera, Fla.
Ashes No. 2. Dark.... .... ........ 0.69 l.... 0.30,G H. (Giffin & Co.. Riviera, Fla.
H.G. Sulphate of Pot.. ........... .... ..... 9.40 F. D. Waite, Palmetto. Fla.
H. G. Sulphate of Pot i.. ... ..... 8.71 F. D. Waite, Palmetto, Fla.
Sulphate of Ammonia ....... .......... 97 F. D. Waite, Palmetto, Fla.
Nitrateof Soda...... ........ 8.5 ..... F. I). Waite, Palmetto Fla.
Dis olved one Black ..... 0.00 16.55 ........ F. D. Waite, Palmetto, Fla.
Fruit and Vine Fert... ..... 6.17 0.66 6.83 2.47 9. F. D. Waite. Palmetto, Fia.
Bright Cotton Seed
eal........... .... ............. 7.5 .... Penter, McDavid, Fa.
Sulphate of Ammonia. .... ........ 25.80 ..... Willson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.

For values see heading ''Bureau of Fertilizers. "
NOTE.-This d-partment is not aware of the source of the goods, or tLe names of man-
ufacturers cf the "Special samples' sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A 'Special Sample'' sent in by a dealer o-
manuacturer. hence is not an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Ofr
ficia, Samples" taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on precedir g page states the name
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing in-
gredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash
and ammoniacontent. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid, and some Dorash, but is
bought f, r he ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, t has bten determined as
total phosphoricacid.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist und-r Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.

Phos. Acid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.
0


NAME oP BRANO. s O By Whom and Where Manufactured.

n M. 1
0 B S
C S d 0 B S c


Cotton Seed Meal......... ...... 8.42....... ... 2.I aZ.1 8 ..........
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 11.14 ...... ... .4 8.91 1.7 ....... .....
Cotton Seed Meal ..... .. .. 9.06 ...... .91 8.36 1.9 ... ...
Cotton Seed Meal..... .. 7.6............ 2.39 8.34 .7............
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 8.18 ..... .. 2.71 38 I 9 ..... ......
Cotton Seed Meal ........ 10............... 1010 .. .. 2.57 8.24 1.82 .... .
Cotton Seed Meal..... ...... S.82 .. 3.31 8.73 2.1 ... ........
Mape'sFruitandVine Manure. 9.20 7.42 1.9 9.34 2.48 11.45 8 to l0 5 to
Ideal Potato Manure............ 11 80: 7.84 0.91 8.76 4.23 8.30 ........ to 8
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer. 10.75 19.86 2.0e 8.92 4.13 5.3 ...... 6 to 8
Ideal Fertilizer...... ........... 10.40 7.I 1.07 8 11 4.2 7.19 .... .. 5 to 7
Mapd's Fruit and Vine Manulre. 13.00 7.12 2.03 9.15 2.52 11.32 8 to 10' 5 to 7
Mape'sVegetableManure...... 10.681 (1.93 2.57 9.50 4.86 4.79 10 to 12 6 to
Mape's Orange Tree Fertilizer.. 1. 20 7.71 2.92 10.03 4.14 3.79 10 to 12 i to 8
Ideal Fertilizer................. 10.11 7.32 0.94 8,26 4.22 6 69........ 5 to 7
Bradley's Fruit&Vine Fertilizer! 12.95' 8.57 1.65 10.32 2.655 9.74 ... i. 5to7X
Fruitand Vine Fertilizer.. ... 15.60to. h bl 2.21 9.02 2 11 11.76 8 to 10 6 to 8
Bradley's Nursery Stock........ 10.5, 7:97 2_ 6 10.61 4.63 3.52 ....... to 10
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guaano... 8.60 6.44 1.41 7.86 4.22 6.17 10 to 1' 3 to 7
Ideal Vegetable M nure. ....... 13.95 7.61 0 90 8.50 3. .14 ........ 6 to 8
Mape's Vegetable Manu.e...... 11.15 6.78 2.91 9.69 5.16 5.1 10 to 12 tl to 8
Mape'sFruitand Vine .anure. 10.95. .6.7' 2.23 8.9 2.32 10.84 8 to 10 5 to 7
Blood. Bone and Potash .. 11.75 7.70; 0.88 8.58 5.38 5.5f 5 to 1(' 8 to 10
Nitrate of Sola..... 1.80 ...... .... 18.32 . .
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure.. 9.00 6.24 0.61 6.85 3.55 12.61 ...... I to 8
peelalOrange Tree Manure.... 12.35 7.15 2.01 9.16 2.54 9.7i 10 to 12 5 to 6
H G.'lobacco Dust....... ... 8.86 ............. 2.311 2 4: 8 to li ......
Osceola Brand Tobacco Dust .. 7.90 ...... ... 1.44 1.6 ...... ........
Special Mixture (Tobacco)..... 17.8 ............. 1.48 4.41 ....... ........
H G. Sulphate of Potash....... 1.4 .. ....... ..... ... .. ......
K alnit... ... .. ........ 5.8 ...... ...... ..... ...... 12.54 ..... .. ........
Ideal Feerti.izer............ 6.3 7.00 4.58 12.5b 3.921 6.32 to 10 5to 7
H. G. Tobacco Dust........... 7. ...... .... ......97 10.06...... ...


1 to 2

Sto 4
2 to 4
2 to 4

I o 3
2to 4
2 to 4
2 to 4
2 to 4

I to :1
1 to 3
2 toI 4


2 to 3 8 tob% 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
3.22 8 24 1.96 Jefferson Mfg. t o.. Jefferson, Ga.
3 22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Selma, Ala.
3.22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile. Ala.
3.22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Mobile, Ala.
2.5to28 7 ,t .9 1.5--1.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Selma.Ala.
2 to2l 8 to9% 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
........ 2t 3 10 to 12 Mnpes' Formula&Peru Guano Co.,N Y.
...... 4 to 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co Jacksonville
....... 4 t 5 5 to 7 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y.
......... 4/t"5 6 t 8 Wilson a Toomer Pert. Co,, Jacksonville
.... 2 3. 1 to 1 0 Mapes' Formula &Pe-u GunnoCo..N.Y.
........ i5 t 4 to Mapcs' Formula& PirII. GuanoCoN Y
....... 4 to 5 3 o 4 apes' Formula & Pi it. Guano Co ,N.Y-
........ 4to5 6 to 8 Wilron & Toomer F. rt Co., Jacksonville-
--10 2to3 -10 to 1l Iradley's Form. & PeI Guano Co., N.Y.
.... to 4!12 t 14|Tampa Fertilizer Co_. Tampa.
i1, to 131 4,'o5%i 3 to 4 Amer. Agrlhiltural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
...... to 4 t i'Tampa FertilizerC(o., Tampa.
S4 to 5i 8 to 10 Wilson & oomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
..... to 6i 4 to 6jIapes'FormulaA Peru.OuanoCo.N.Y,
........ 2 to 3ill1 to 1- Mapes' Fornnula& Peru. GuanoCo..N. Y.
...... 5 to 6i 7 10 .Si \rmour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
....... 17 to 19 .... Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., .acksonvillc
S3 to 410 to 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Tacklonvillo
....... 2 to 10 to 1i Baugh & Sons. Ba:timore, Md.
........ 1%to3% Y to 3 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
........ i'. to 3 1 to 5 Wilson & Toomcr Fort. Co., JacksonVllle
........ .................. Tampa Fertilizer Co.. Tampa.
........ ..... 48 to 51 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jaeksonville.
....... ...12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Flrt Co.. Jacksonville.
.... 4to5 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
3...... 3 10 F1brida Feriblizer Co., Gainesville, Fla.








Acid Phosphate............. 12 o2 15.72 4.07 19.79 .................. 15 .... ... ........ .... ..,,.Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
DarkC. S. Meal... ..... ............ 1. ....... 2.4 5.44 1.46 1 to 12 ........... 2 to 5to 7 4 to I1 FloridaManufacturig Co.,Madison.
DarkC. S. Meal ............... .... 228 5 03 1.31; 8 to 12 ...... 2 to :; 5 to 7 4 to 1% Florda Manufacturing Co., Madison
DixiBrd S Me ......... .. .. .11 1.55....... .......... .... ......... Humphries,Goodwin &Co .Memphis,Tenn
Kainit ...... ...... ..... 9. ...... .............. ... 2 to 1 Little Brothers, Jacksonville
Fih andiota ....... .... 4. :.4 204 5.52 6.89 7.35 10 to 1 t 3 : to 4 7 to 8 5 to 6 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co. Gainesville, Fla.
Pi apple Fruiter .............. 4.2' 7.'4 5.76 13.04 3.42 11.2S 10 to 12 4 to 5 6 to. 7 ....... 3 to 4 12 to 13 Florida Fert. Mf. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Potato Manure............ 5.95 5.83, l.17 7.80 3.~5 895 10 to 2 5 t I 3 8 3 ....... 3 to 4 9 to 10 Florida Fer Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
r ettu-c and Cualbr, Siecial. 5. 50 1.3: t6.33 .60 5.72 10 to 12 5 to 6 1 to 2 .......1 7 to 4 to 5 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., ainesvillo, Fla,
P. ruviau Fi-h u-t.o No. .... 5.10 5.25 2.i1 7.25 4.81 5.1 to 12 5 to 1 to 2 ........ 4%to5% 5 to i Florida Fert. Mfg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
S ecial for Fruit ..... .... 6.9 i.(i3 2.21 8.S4 3.8 1.ll0 ..... I; to 1 o ....... 4 to 5 to t 14 Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando. Fla.
lo 2, Double Strength ol Potal 6.23 6.10 1.7 77 2.3H 9.8"0 to 12 5 to i 2 to 3 ........ 14to 2 10 to 12 Florida Fert. Mig Co. ai esville, Fla.
Blood, Uone and loilsh..... 6.7 5.6r :I.4'It .09 4.54 4.5 10 to 12 4 t 5 2 to 3 .. 4 to 4 to 5 Florida Fort. Mfg. Co. Gainesville, Fla
No. 1,Fellller. .... ........ .0, 7 13 5.11 12.24 154 3. .. 5 to i2 to 3. 5to 4 to 5 Southcru Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fa.
No. 2. Fertilizer..... **** 7.15 t62 31.57 10.11 5 7 9.8 ....... to 7 to 3........to to t 10 to 12 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando. Fla.
No. 4. Fertilizer ............. i 3.721' 1t0.il .01 10.3 11 ..... 2 7 to 3 .. ... 3 to, 4 10 to 12 'nunther Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Disolved oe ................. 1.21 .4 11.8 .41 .. to 12 14 to 15 3 to 4 ........ 15 3 .......Florida Fet. Mf. Co., Gainesvlle, Fla.
Cotton Seed'Meal.. ...... 5 ..... ..... 2.70 4 1.78 0i1 o7', ...... 2to ...... 8to to P. A. Smith, A lalta, Ga.
Aroour's Practical Trucker..... 7 .80 7.13 .5 .S 12.) 3 1(14 1.25 5 to lu i to 7 to ... 3 to 4 1 to 12 Armour Feitilizer Works, Jacksouville.
Armour's Orange Tree Manure.. 7.! 801 7.43 15.i44 3.8 4.109 to 10 8 to 101 2 to 4 ... 4o4, 4 to 5 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fruit and Vine Pert... 6.85 8.1 i.01, 14.2* 2.87 lI.lo2 too 10o i2 ........ 24to3 10 to 13 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armoul's Blood, Bone d Potash. 8.70 7.13 4.. 11.71 5.32 7.53 5 to 10 8 to 11 1 to .. 6 to to o 8 Armour Ferti izer Works, Jicksonville.
Armour's Fruit&RootCrop,Spc 6.40 7.21 3.99 11.20 2.45 5.22 5 to 10 8 to 1 to l2........ 2 to 3 6 to t Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Bie Fl ur...... ... 2.70 S.42 15.0 24.02 4.58. 5 to 10 10 to 1..... 24 to 28 3 to 4 ........ Armour Fertilizer Works Jacksonville.
Armour's Dried Blood ......... 12.35 ... 35 .. 10 te 13 ....................... 16 to 17 ......... Armour Fertilizer Wok, acksonville.
H. G. tobacco Dut .......... 6.8 1.76 1.60 8 to 10 ................ ....... 1'too3 I\ to 3 Arnour fertilizerr Works, J cksonville.
Armour's Blood and Bo ...... 7 75 3.7 8.04 11.77 7. ...... 6 o 10 ............ 10 to 12 7 to 8 ......... Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
H. G Bl.od and Bone........... .5 5.46 5.91 11.37 9.64 .. 5 o ........ ........ 12 to 9to 10.......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
Blood and Bone......... 8.5 6.25 9.14 15.39 7.27 .. to 7 ..... ........ 15 to 20 to 8 ......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
H. G. Blood and Bone .... 8.45 3.53 3.09 6.60 .... ...... ........... ...... 4.5t lo .......... Amour Packing Co., Chicago, Ill.
Acid Phostnhate ............... 7.5 16. 7.10 24.02 ....... .. 14.00 .... .. ....... .......... Little Brothers, Jacksonville
strawberry Fruter..* .... 7.3 5.98 4.41 8.39 2.4'1 8.91 10 to 12 5 to 6 2 to 3 ....... 2 to 3 10 to 12 Flolida Fert. Mfg. Co., Ginesville, Fla.
Extra Fruit and Vinte:........ 6.1 6.37 2.11 8.50 2.31 13.73 8 to 12 6 to 8 .... 2 to 314 to 16 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
CottonSeed Meal........ ....... l.801 ...... 2.88 9.43 1.26 ................ 82.0,7 50 SY, 1.85 Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan. Ala
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 7.60 ............ 2.6) 8.99 1 28 6 5-8.75 ..... ..... o to o l 1 to 2 Trader's Cotton OilCo., UnionSprings,Ala
Cotton eed al.......... .......... 2.2 8.29 1.50 ......... ....-.. 2.-. 80 -7 851 lto 2.85 Sonthe n Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery,Ala
Cotton seed eal ................ 96 1
Cotton Seed Meal............... .. .... 2.66 7.93 1.38 8.0) . ..... .1I 7'50 2 labama Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
H. G cid hosphate.............. 1757 1. 18.87 .... .. 12 to 15 1 to 17 1 to 2 ............... ...... Goulding Fertilzer Co Pensacola, Fla.
A L.Wilson 6.f0 Acid P.Ophat 1.3 14.77 3.76 i7.53 ...... ...... 12 to 15 14 to 16 1 to 2. .... ........ Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Branley'sXXX Pho-phtte. 8.05 14 Z8 1.76 16 1' .... ... 10 to 20 13 to 16 2 to 3 ................... Bradley Fertilizer Co., Boston,Mass.
Disso.vd Bone Pho-phate...... 14.65 13.67 1.1 15.18 ........... 11 13 1.50 ...................... Georia Chemical Works, Augusta Ga.
Atlas Acid Phosphate........ 12.95 15 49 2.29 17. .......... 12 to 15 3 to 15 2 to 8 ............ .. . oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Acid Phosphate............... 13.75 1.34 0.28 12.ez ....... 12 to 16 12 to 14 2 to 4 .............. .......... Virginia, Carolina Chem Co,Richmond,Va
Bradley's -altl(tt, Phosphate 7.95 14.89 1.58 16.'3 ...... ... l to 12 t2 to 24 2 o 3 ..................... Bradley FertilizerCo. Boston, Mass.
cunberland BoneSuper Pho... 16.15 10.71 1.62 12.83 2.07 1.I 10l to 20 8 to It 1 to 2........ to 3 1 to 2 Cumberlad Bone Phos. Co., Poitland.Md
Goulding's Bone Coiponnd... 18.96 9.7 8.98 13.71 2.09 1.51 0 to 12 8%-10% 1 to 2 ........ 2 to to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola Fla
Gem Guano.. ........ 13.90 10.25 3.1 13.4: 1.78 1.8410 to 12 8 to 10 1 to 2 ....... to to 14 Go Idlng Frtilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Lott's Compound ..... 3-45 4.85 8.4 12.8 1 .83 12.75 ....... 5 to 6 ...... ...... 2Sto2 12 to 1 II. M. Lott Havana, Fla.
Onuher an-estilizer .........1180 9 2.12 1 46 191 2 09 12 8 2 ..... 2 2 Mulal Fertilizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
Mobile Standqrd Guano........ 7.45 98 4.74 14.4 2.62 2.62 11 to 16 8 to 10 1% to 2 ........ 2 to 3 2 to 3 Mobile Phosphace Co., Mobile, Ala.
Raw Bone S er Phos:nate.... 13.55 10.59 8.80 18.9 2.15 1.7310 to 16 9to10 1 to ... to 3 1% to 8 Standard'Gnano &Chem. Co., NewOrleana
Goulding's H .AcidPhos.& Pot 10. 14.70 142 16.13 .. 1.30 10 to 15112 to 14 1 to ........ ......1 to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Name of Fertilizer.





Blood. Bone and Potash......
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guano..
Pineapple Manure...........
Special Mixture..............
Potato Fertiliz-r...............
Strawberry Fertilizer..........
Oranee Fruiter Special........
Fruit and Vine Fertilizer.....
Ober's Fruit & Vine Fertilizer
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer
Baugh's Special Manure for
Orange Trees and NurserS
Stock............... .........
Tobacco Dust..............
Pure Ground Tobac oDust...
Dri d Blood...................
Ni rte of Soda...............
H. G. Acid Phosphate......
Dis-olved Bono Black.......
Fine Ground Bone.............
'ainit......................
Double Manure Salt...........
Acid Phosphate.................
Acid Phosphate............
Dissolved tone Black...........
Mape' s Pine Apple Manure.....
Mape's Vegetable Manure......
Mape's a ruit and Vine Manure.
Map s Orange Tree Manure...
Cotton Seed Meal... ......
Dark Cotton Seed Meal .... ...
Acid Phosphate...............
Complete Sweet Potato Fertilizer
Special Fruit and Vine..........
Special Mixture No. 1.. .......
Ideal Fruit and Vine Fertilizer.
Ideal Vegetable Manure........


i


Guaranteed Analysis


Phos. Acid


> 0 0
a c '




9.90 6.86 3.60 10.46 3.781 4.11
11.10 7.71 1.46 9..17 .73 7.08
6.20 6.09 3 26 9.35 5.5i 10.87
5.40 8.36 2.10 10.4K 7.50 8.18
8.50 6. 8 1.80 7.98 3.0 10.21
7.65 6.76 2.01 8.80 2.65 9.30
5.60 7.47 1.17 S.64 2.40 16.12
10.10 7.55 1.03 8.18 2.59 12.01
9.10 7 80 2.48 10.28 2.95 12.71
6.60 6.50 2.06 8.61 3.93 6.;.

8.7 6.05 2.81 8.86 3.07 10.85
3.05 ................ 1.59 1.96
11.2 ............ ...... 1.78 4.94
10.55 .... ...... ...... 16.41 ... .
2.FO .... . .... 18.31 ..
15.15 14.16 0.47 14.68..... .....
14.35 17.45 21 17 .. ......
6.15 10.80 .08 20.88 5.64 .....
4.15 ........... .. .... ..12.84
14.20 .... ...... .... .. ... 26.66
9.50 16.32 3.43 19.74 ......
12.35 18.55 0 33 18.87 ...
22.00 17.35 0.76 18.11 ....
8.55 5.93 1.57 7.50 5.'2 .8s
9.40 6.61 2.98 9.590 5.21 .79
10.65 5 40 3 26 8.66 2.6 1.
10.25 7.24 3.51 10.75 3.95 3 92
5.70 .. .. ...... 2.74 8.65 1.92
9.60 ...... ...... 1 4 4.82 1.67
7.60 14 6i 7.92 22.55 ...... ......
12.30 1.33 0.75 10.08 .2 501
6.85 6 63 0.601 7.2:4 4.10 14.0,8
6.40 5.63 1..1 6.87 4.85 .97
8.71 7.09 0.44 7.53 3.57 11.81
12.85 7.20 1. 0 8.10 3.50 8.14


--


S' By Whom and Where Manufactured
4 08
'5 0 S a ,
i .4 S t -4 t8


9.11 6 to 8 3 to 5 ........ 4to 6 4to 6 Tampa Fprtilizer Co, Tampa, Fla.
10 to 12 5to 7 2 to 4 ........ 4 to 6 to 8 Tampa Fer ilizor Co., Tanpa, Fla.
8 to 10 4 n ........... 5tto6 7to 8 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampi, Fla.
8 to 10 4 to 6 5 to ....... 7 to 8 Tempa Ferti izer Co., Tampa, Fla.
8 to 10 41o 6 3t 4 ....... 3 to 6 10 to 12 Tempa Fertilizer Co., Tampa. Fla.
8 t, 10 6 to 0 to 4 ........ 2 te 4 81010 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
8 to 10 6 to s 1 o 2........ 2 o 3 6 to 1 Tampa F ilillzer Co ,'ampa, Fl*.
8 to 10 to ..... r, 4 2 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
12 to 13 6 t 8 1 to 2 ........ to3, 10o 12 A Ober & Sons, Baltimore, Md.
10 to 13 6to 1 to ........ -; 5 5 to 6 American Agr. ,hem. Co., New York.

Sto 12 5 to 6 2 to 3........ 2 to 3 10 to 11 Bugh & Sons. Ba timore, Md.
... ....... .... ........ 3 to 4 1 to 3 Tampa F rtilizrr Co., Tampa, Fla,
... .. .. ...... ...... 2 to 4 8 iTamraF r i'iz'r Co.,Ta pa, Fla.
.. ...... ... .. ...... I t 18 ........ E O. P inter Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
.. ... ............. 18 to 19 ........ Tampa Frti Izer Co., Ta pa, Fla.
10 to 12 8 to In 2 to 3 ........... ........ Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fl .
........ 4 to 19 ... .... ........ ......Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
.... ....... ...... 22 t 2. 4 to ........ Stein. irsch & Co.. Chicago, Ill.
........ ..... ....... .. 12.13 Baugh & Sons, Baltimo e, Md.
........ .. ........ ....... ........ 25 t Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tamra, Fla.
........ 13......... ... .... ........ ....... Little Bros. Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville
700 ........ .. ..... ...... E Painter Fert. Co., .acksonville.
........ ....... i... .... .. ...... E. O. Painter Ferr. Co., Jacksonville.
8to i 4to 62 to 4 ..... 5 to 50to 6 Mape'sForm. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
8 to I 6 to 8 2to 4 ....... 5 to 5 4to 6 Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co.. N. Y.
t )1U to 7 2 to 4 ........ to 3 Oto13 Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
0 to12 6 to 8 2to 4 ........ 4t, 5 3t 4 Mane's Form. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
6% 07%! ........ ...... 2 to : 8tSl. 1 to 2 A A. Smith, Atlanta, Ga.
... ....... ....... 5 o .. .. Flo id Cotton OilCo.,Jacksonvl le.Fla.
... ;....... ....... ............... Little B os. Fertilizer Co._ Jacksonville.
... ... 8 t ito .... '% o 4 3 to 5 Wils n &ToomerF r.Co.,Jacksnnvil e
........ 61 to Ito ...... 4 to 5 to 14 Wlllson&Toomer Fer.. Co.,Jacksonvillo
o 10 6to 7 to 2 ....... 5 to 5to 6 Willson ToomeriFer. Co, lackson ill
8to 10 6 to to ........ 3 to 4 10to 12 illso ToomerFer. Co.,Jackso vil e
8 to 10 6to 8 to 2 ........ 4 to 5 8 o 10 Willson a Toomer Fer. Co ,Jacklsonville









Peruviin Vegetable Manure...] 9.05
Ideal Fertilizer.... ... ....... 9.75
Armour's Fruit and toot Crop,
Special..................... 8.10
Armour's Cotton Special Fertil-
izer. ... ................... 9.35
Armour's Vegetable Fertilizer. 7.40
Armour's Practical Trucker.... 5.50
Armour's Blood. Bone & Potash 7.30
Armour's Practical Pine Apple
Fertilizer .................. 3.45
Armour's Orange Tree Manure. 6.80
Armour's Castor Poma e... .. 8 3
Armour's'Acid Phosphate..... 13.1(0
Armour's H. G. Tobacco Dust. 4.5i
Armour's Pulverized Tobacco
Stems ................ 14.93
Armour's Paw Bone Fertilizer. 6.28
Armour's Bone Flour..... .... ..5
Armour's H.G Acid Phosphate 12.75
Armour's Canad' H. W. Ashes. 10.75
Ideal Blood, Bone and Potash.. 7.40
Special Mixture No. 1.......... 8.5(
Simon Pure No. 1 .. ...... 8.01
CottonSeed Meal ............. 1.85
ulphate of Potash. .......... 0,8
Br Ridley' s Fruit and Vine..... 3.0.
Williams & Clark's Nursery
Stock...... ............ ... 6.5
Bradley's Fla. Vegetable Fer-
tilizerCo..................... 5.2-
Bradley's Extra Fine Ground
Bone with Potash... ......... 3.75
Williams & Clark' s Orange Tree
Fertilizer.. .......... ...... 4.05
Bradley's Special Fruit and
Vine Fertilizer........... 4.41
Bradley's Nursery Stock... ... 6.00
Williams & Clark's Special
.ruit and Vine............... 4.35
Williams & Clark's I ruit and
Vine .......................... 3.20
Complete Vegetable Manure.... 5.65
Ideal Fertilizer .......... 8.95


6.45 2.59
5.89 1.26

7.88 2.06
6.97 2.44
6.24 3.39
7.04 2.14
7 57 2.00
6.43 6.611
6.99 4.14
12.3 2.0


9.79 'iiJ8
9.25 13.96
17.78 0.3A
4.62 3. f
6.67 0.89
o.39 0.74

4.:8 1.88
8.00 1.76
6.08 2.42
10.41 6.41

6.41 1.90
6.09 1.64
7.94 1.96
5.47 1.87
2.23 2.08
5.05 1.66
5.40 1.32


9.2e
S7.15
S9.91
9.41
9. M
9. I
I .57

13.03
11.13
1.95
S15.60

...
I 25 97
23.21,
I 18.08
S7.75l
7.13
2.61
6.49
S9.76
S8.50
S12.84
S8.31

7.738
9.90
7.34
7.83
i 6.71
6.66M


4.51 8.42 8 to 10 7 to 9 to 4 ....4. 1 to 8 to 10 Willson &t oomer Fer. Co.,Jacksonville
4.4 789 8 to 10 6 to 7........ ........ 5% to 8 Willson & Toomer Fe Co Jacksonville
2.33 5.77 5to 10 8 to 0 1 to 2........ t to 1 Armou's Fort. Works, J cksonville.
1.45 1.84 5to 10 7to 8 to ........ to 2 to 2 Armour's Fort Works, Jacksonville.
4.14 6.81 t to 2to 3........1 to 5 to t Armour's Fert. \ors. .Jackronxilie.
3.91 9.60 5 to l 6to 7 2 to 3 .. .... 3 4 t 2 Armour's Yert. Works, Jacksons ill.
5.52 7.89 5 to 10 8 to 0 1 to 5 to ,o 8 Armour's Feit. Works, Jacksorville
4.74 7.44 5 ol10 7 to 8 3to 4 ........ 3.04., 10 to 12 Armou Pert. Work Jacksonville.
3.71 5.85 5to 10 8 to 2 to 4 ........ t 4 to 5 Armour's Fe t. Wo ks, Jacksonvilte.
5.99 1.11 to 8 ........ ....... 1 t. to 2 186 to 2 Armour's Fert Works, Jacksonville.
10 to 12 13 to14 I to .... ........ ...... Ar r's 'erL. Works, Jacksonville.
1.45 1.57 8 to 10 ..... ........ ........! t31 to 3 Armour's Fert. Works, Jacksonville.
1.57 4.60 8 to 10 ........ ....... l') tS to 3 Armour's Fert. Works, Jacksonvill.
4.69 ..... 5 to 10 ........ .... i o 251 43 to ......... Armour's Feit. Works, Jacksonvi le.
9 .. 5to 0 1 tol4 14 ..... 3 to 4 .........Armour's Fert. Woiks, Jacksonville.
..... ........... ........... ..... 1 ...... ........... Armour's Fer Works, Janck onvile.
.95 ......... ... .. .. 8 ... .o Armour's Ft rt. Work., Jrcksonvill-.
4.971 6.84 6 to S 4 o 6 2 to 4 ..5 to 6 4i to 8 Willson & Toomer er. Co., Jacksonville
4.7S 7 86 8 to 10 6to 7 1 to 2!' .. .. 5 to i 6 to i Willson & 'oomerFer. Co,, Jacksonville
3.9- !1.89 5to 8 6to 7.............. 4 to 5 t 12o 13E 0. Painter Fert. .o., Jacksonville.
.41 3.03 7.65 ........ ........ ; 2.41 8.00 1.7. Mucoogee Mills, Columbus. Ga.
...... 5.6 5 to 8 ........ .................. 48 to50 Am'rican Agricul. & Cliem. Co., N. Y.
2.60 11.2 10 to 13i s -l i 3 to 4 ..... /4 t34 10 to 12 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
4.84 4.49 10 to13 8 to 9 i to 2 ...... t 3 to 4 American Agr.cul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
4.33 6.11 6 to 7 1 to 2 ........ ........ 4to 5 5 to 6 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y
3.05 2.04 10 to 12 6to 8 4 to 4 ........ 2Y4 t3% 2 to 3 Amertcan Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
4.52 6.58 10 to 13 6to 7 1 to 2 .. .... 3 t 5 to 6 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
493 10.96 10 to 13 t7l;, 3 to 4 ........ 4Y4 tti 10 to 12 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
.28 4.40 19 to 12 8 o to ....... 4 t 3 to 4 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
4.75, 11.77 10 to 13 4% 3 t ) 4 .... t6% 10 to 12 American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.

2.70 53 10 to 13 5% t7% 3 to 4 ...... 2 t3Y4 10 to 12 kmeriean Agricul. & Ohem. Co., N. Y,
3.4 12.8 to 13 4to 51 t ........ 3to 4 to 1 N. Baker Brothers, New ork.
5.01 7.70 8 to 10 5to 7 ........ ....... 4% % 6 to 8 Willson & Toamer Fert. Co, Jacksonville


I









Composition of Fertilizer Materials..

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred


Ammonia PhosDhord Potash
Acid

Nitrate of Soda....................... ........ 17... ..
Sulphate of Ammonia ...................... 22 to 24 ............ ..........
Dried Blood........ .. ............... 12 to 17 .......................
Concentrated Tankage.................... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ...........
Bone Tankage............................ 6 to 9 10 to 15.........
Dried Fish Scrap .. ....................... 8 to 11 6 to 8 ..........
Cotton Seed Meal......................... 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal. ............... ........... 14 to 1 1 to 2 ..........
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred

Available Insoluble
mmonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid

Florida Rock Phosphate ................ .. .... .... 33 to 35
Florida Pebble Phosphate .. ................. 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphate .............. ....... ..... 14 to 19 1 to 6.
Ground Bone ............................ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone ................ .......... 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bon.... .. ....... ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds per Hundred

Actual mmnonia Phosphoric Lime
Potash Acid

Muriate of Potash ............... ... 50 ..... .... ...... . ..
Sulphate of Potash.......... .. 48 to 52 ......................
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia 26 to 30 ....... .......
K ainit ... . .............. 12 to 12 .......... . .. ........
Sylvinit....................... .. .. 16 to 20 ............. ........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes .......... 15 to 30 ........ 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached............. 2 to 8 .......... 1 to 2 30 to 35
Wood Ashes, leached ............... 1 to 2 ........ 1 to 35 to 40&
Tobacco Stems..................... 5 to 8 2 to 4.... ......
Cow Manure (fresh) ............... 0.40 0 to .41 0.16 031
Horse Manure (fresh) ................ 0.53 0 to .60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh).......... ..... 0.67 1.00 0 23 0.83
Hog Manure (fresh) ......... .... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) .. .......... ... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable M:inre .. .......... 0.63 0.76 0 26 0 70








Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluble phosphoric acid-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of Bone-
Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or Muriate of Potash" or
equivalents of "Nitrate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Ammonia;" basing his-
calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of the good,
offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of fertility re--
quired, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the commercial
values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular elements his
crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods required, and ap-
proximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requires that:
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco,
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, he percentage of potash
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all other
ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale, each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show to the satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of
Bone Phosphate of Lime," it may be taken as insoluble to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate contains 26 to 35 per cent. of phosphorice
acid" equivalent to 50 to 86 per cent. of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its
commercial value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into.
"Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent. "avail-
able" has a commercial value of $12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural









value is proportionately much greater as raw or untreated rock, has but
little agricultural value.
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"dissolved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of the State
Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900, serial number 36, is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative
and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay no attention whatever to
names and brands. They should realize, for instance, that in nine cases
-out of ten, brands known as "Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle
,of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just. as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands
are not made from bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if they
were made from bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for
purchasing when general trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with
-some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
-from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phosphoric
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a firs-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to: wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to
'buy oi time and pay interest, why then be assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manurial chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons. The same
figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa, for spot cash f. o. b. cars:
Less than 5 to10 10
5 tons tons tons
'irhi Grade Potash o9 to 95 per cent.Sulnhate (4S to 50 per cent. K20....$5200 $51 o $50 00
nSulhate Pntaih. 4S to 55 per cent. Qulphate (25 to 3l per cent. (KzO)...... 3200 3100 3000
"Muriate Potash, 80 to 85 percent. Muri;te 42 to 45 er cent. K0O) ........... 46 00 4500 4400










Kainit, 12 to 13 percent. Actual Potah...... ........................... .5 (0 14 50 13 CO
Blood and Bone, 612 per cent Ammonia....................... ..... 26 50 3 00 2550
Blood and Bone, 7 to 8 per cent. Ammonia........................ .. 2750 7 (10 2650
Blood andBone, 10percent. Ammonia............................. .... 3200 3150 3100
hlaw Bone Meal, 2 to 4 p'r cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per cent, total Phos-
phoric Acid.. ..................... 32 X0...... 3150 3100
Boneblack, 16 o 18 per cent. available Phosphoric Acid.................... 25 00 2450 24 00
Acid Phosohate, 14 percent. Phosphoric Acid ......................... 13 00 1250 1200
Nitrate soda. IS to Wl per cent.Anmmnonia............................... 4 00 46 . 4800
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 per cent. Ammoni i.. ...................... 7200 7 00 7000
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia ......... ............. .......... 4700 4ti60 4600
Ground Casto romance, ( to 7 per cent. Ammonia ......................... 2100 2050 20 00
Canada Hard Wol Ashes. 2 to 8 per cent K-20 (otash)..................... 1500 14.10 1400
Pulverized'lobaccoStemr 5to8 percent. K2() (Potash) ................... 15( 1450 1400
Tobacco Stens (Baled) 5 to F per cent. K20 (Potash) ...................... 16(0 ]550 1500
Tobacco Dust, High Grade, 5to S per cent K..( (Potash)................... 210 2050 2000
teamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Ammonia, 25 to 28 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid....................... ............. ..... ................ 2500 24 50 2400
Br ght Cotton Seed Meal, 7 to ) per cent. Ammonia......................... 250 26 (i 2500
Dark Cotton Seel Meal, i to 8 per cent. Ammonia.............. ............ 220(0 2159 21 00
"Blood and Bone." "Tankage," "Garbage" and numerous other by
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and 1 per cent.
of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00.........................$24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00....... .. ... .. 2 00
1J per cent. potash @ $1.10 ........................... 1 65

$27 65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled
"For feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
4 to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1I to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1) to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:










41 per cent. ammonia ... ............................. $13 50
1a per cent. phosphoric acid ........................... 1 75
1I per cent. potash ................................... 1 65
Commercial value ............. :.................. $16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal.
Their relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy
in the use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of
the meal depending only on its content of amomnia, phosphoric acid and
potash in both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis,
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements only.

ORGANIC AMMONIATES.
It is generally conceded by pineapple growers that the sulphates of am-
monia and potash are harmful to pineapples. The universal practice among
the pineapple growers is to use organic fertilizers only-cotton seed meal,
castor pomace, blood and bone for ammoniates; ashes, tobacco and nitrate
of potash for potash.
Blood and bone supplying ammonia and phosphoric acid, also consider-
able "Tankage, and "Garbage," reinforced by sulphate of ammonia, has
been found in the State an unquestionably valuable fertilizer for certain
crops, is generally acknowledged hurtful to pines.
The State law, section 3, requires the manufacturers to state in the-
"guarantee on each package the percentage of ammonia and the source
from which it is derived." A failure to state the source of the ammonia
in a fertilizer is a violation of the law.
Purchasers requiring only "oragnic ammonia" in their fertilizers
should see that this important part of the guarantee is complied with.

MECHANICAL CONDITION.
A number of complaints have been made to the department this season
of failure of vegetable crops, using certain brands of goods. On exam-
ination chemically, these goods have been found well within the guarantee-
of their makers. The same goods (that is, goods having the same amounts
of fertilizing elements) have proved satisfactory to growers in the same
localities, and under the same conditions. The difference in results can be
attributed solely to the imperfect grinding and failure to properly mix the
goods complained of. In all cases the best results have been had from
those goods having the best mechanical condition.
Other things being equal, those goods most finely pulverized and well
mixed have proved most satisfactory. Coarse ground "Blood and Bone,"'
"Tankage" and "Mixed" Fertilizers" using such coarse material in com-









pounding, have proved unsatisfactory in producing quick results, as de-
manded by the vegetable growers of the State.
That the mechanical condition of commercial fertilizers has much to do
with results, has been practically demonstrated, particularly among the
vegetable growers of the State.

TOBACCO DUST.

Large quantities of tobacco dust are used in this State, particularly by
pineapple growers. It is valuable mostly for its potash, and for its pun-
gent or aromatic properties, as an insecticide. No material offered in the
State varies more in its composition and value, nor is anything more apt
to be adulterated or "loaded."
Analysis of two samples taken from different parts of the State show
58.43 per cent. and 51.30 per cent. (more than half) to be simply clay or
fine sand. The "commercial value" of different samples are shown in the
preceding analysis, varies from $23.20 to $10.92 per ton. Purchasers
should buy only on guarantee and pay for what they get. Manufacturers
and dealers purchase only on guarantee and settle according to analysis.
This particular material varies in value probably more than any other
on the market, and requires the utmost care on the part of the dealer and
consumer to prevent confusion, disappointment and dissatisfaction.
If purchasers demand the guarantee and refuse to purchase goods shown
by the guarantee to be worth less than the price demanded, this condition
will soon cease.


ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO CANADA ASHES.

There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this State. When
they can be purchased at a price comparable with their actual value they
are doubtless a most valuable source of potash. The average price of these
goods is, however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained from this
source generally costs much more than from other reliable sources-Sul-
phate, or Muriate of Potash, Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory,
Maple, Palmetto ar- other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0 .! to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth from $0.62 to
$4.66 per ton at sea -Is. The average of four samples shows 2.56 per
cent. of Potash. Guarantees are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The
minimum is the actual guarantee. The best unleashed ashes contain but
8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.









SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequent requests are made for soil analysis by our farmers. We are
pleased to comply so far as our time and apparatus will permit, and
give what information we can. Soil analysis, however, has, except in es-
pecial cases, proved very unsatisfactory from a practical standpoint. The
local conditions of drainage, areation, tilth, seepage, etc., have so great an
influence that the deductions from a small sample in the laboratory under
entirely different conditions from those in the field are misleading.
A soil may have an abundance of phosphoric acid, as shown by analysis
in the laboratory, while the application of phosphates in an available form
will greatly increase the crop.
A large amount of ammonia may be discovered by analysis, and still the
land, or soil, be sterile. This is particularly illustrated by the undrainned
muck soils of the State, frequently having from 1.50 to 2 per cent. of
ammonia. These soils in their natural condition (or partially drained)
are practically barren, as to cultivated crops. When put in first-class me-
chanical condition, thoroughly drained, and "areated," they are exceeding-
ly productive. The "flat woods" of Florida are frequently fertile, with
sufficient plant food in an unavailable condition, requiring only thorough
drainage to make them exceedingly productive.
A good mechanical condition, together with perfect drainage, is as nec-
essary as plant food to insure profitable returns.


REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND FORWARDING
OF FERTILIZER SAMPLES TO THE COMMISSIONER OF
AGRICULTURE.-SECT, 15 OF LAW.
Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers, under Sec. 9 of the
law approved May 22, 1901. Shall be drawn in the presence of two disin-
terested witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and a fair
sample of the same of not less than eight ounces (one-half pound) shall
be placed in a can or bottle, scaled and sent by a disinterested party to the
Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Not less than eight ounces,
in a tin can or bottle will be accepted for analysis. This rule is adopted
to secure fair samples of sufficient size to make the six necessary determina-
tions, viz: moisture, available and insoluable phosphoric acid, amonia,
and potash; and to allow the preservation of a duplicate sample in case of
protest or appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for two-
months from date of certificate of analysis.










NOTICE TO MANUFACTURERS, DEALERS AND OTHERS
INTERESTED IN FERTILIZERS.
Notice to all manufacturers, importers and dealers in fertilizers, and
such materials as come under the fertilizer laws of the State of Florida.
After careful consideration, I have decided to issue the following gener-
al orders to take effect January 1, 1903.
ORDER NO.1.
Section 5 of the Fertilizer Law, approved May 22, 1901, r< quires that all
manufacturers or dealers shall file their oath of analysis with the commis-
sioner of agriculture annually. In order to prevent confusion as to the
dates when oaths expire, it is ordered that all oaths be filed between the 1st
and 15th of January. 1903, and subsequent years the same. Any oaths
heretofore filed, or that may be filed prior to that date named, will be re-
garded as void after January 1, 1903. For any new brands of goods, or
new firms entering this territory for business during the year, after Jan-
uary 15 of each year, the oath of analysis will continue in force until Jan-
uary 1 of the next year, and no longer.
ORDER NO. 2.
In compliance with sections 3 and 15 of "An Act to Provide for the
Inspection and Analysis of and Regulation of the Sale of Commercial
Fertilizers, etc., approved May 22, 1901, also in compliance with the
resolutions of the "Association of American Agricultural Colleges and
Experiment Stations," and the "Association of Official Agricultural
Chemists," as recommended by the State Chemist of Florida, the follow-
ing regulation is adopted, to take effect January 1, 1903.
"Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon, the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manufac-
turer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, the percentage of potash,
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid, and the
percentage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture con-
tained therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and
all other ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp sho.--
ing the payment of the license fee provided for in this act."
The guaranteed analysis shall state the ingredients guaranteed in the
following order:
Name of fLrtilizer or brand; name of manufacturer; place of manu-
ture.
Number of pounds to package.







24

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.
Moisture at 212 degrees Far. not exceeding...............per cent.
Available Phosphoric Acid not less than..................... per cent.
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid not less than ................ per cent.
Ammonia-Actual and Potential-not less than...........per cent.
(Derived from nitrate of soda, blood, fish scrap, etc.)
Potash (K20) water soluble not less than.................. per cent.
Chlorine not exceeding .................................. per cent.
This fertilizer is made from (nitrate of soda, sulphate of potash, blood,
bone, tankage, fish scrap, acid phosphate, etc., as the case may be.)
Equivalents of fertilizing ingredients will not be allowed in the guar-
.antee.
The stating of the maximum and minimum percentages of a given
material guaranteed will not be permitted. The catual amount of mini-
mum will only be allowed on the guarantee.
B. E. McLIN.
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, September 11, 1902.








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Climatological Data for August 1902.


Stations


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............. Alachua........ 92
Federal Point....... St. Johns....... 10
Fernandina......... Nassiu......... 15
Fort George ....... Duval..........
Gainesville......... Alachua........ 175
Huntington ....... Putnam........ 50
Jacksonville........ Duval............ 43
Jasper.. ..... .... Hamilton...... 165
Johnstown.......... Bradford ...... ...
Iake City........... Columbia....... 201
Macclenny......... Baker......... 140
Micanopy .... ..... Alachua..... ... 105
Pinemount....... Suwannee...... ...
Rideout.............. Clay..............
4, Augustine........ St. Johns...... 10


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


0
2-
ZL

0
h0 v
Is i) -
0o Qlr .0J 4


18 80.7
9 81.1
1 81.5
17 80.8
10 81.9
6 81 6
30 81.0
5 .. .
.... a80 3
13 81.8
7 d82.4
7 ....
.... 82.2
2 81.4
52 81.4


-1.0 97
-0.3 98
+1.7 98
+-0 4 97
q 0 9 99
40.1 100
--1 0 98

-1.4 a 99
+0.4 99
--C.3 b103

..... 100
S. 102
0.9 98


0



6226
6226
69 17*
72 16*
6426
61 26
6626

5928
61 26
b57 26

6125*
5826
71 26*


Precipitation, in inches Sky









5 4.5 992 10 25 0




3 7.07 -0.141.84 16 13 12
S .49 -2 71 10 1 .... 10
5 4.54 -0.99290 10 25 0

ti 2.77 -5'9911 12 24 3
7 3.06 -5 410 96 14 18 12
34.74 -1451 84 1f 13 12

i 6.49 -2'70110 1.......
7 5.21 -1 04 130 9 5 17
5 4.79 -3 721 76 11.......

8 5.17 ...... 2 35 11 49 19
1 4.33 .......1 04 13 10 22
1 3 89 -0.4711 75 11 5 8


aw
.g













se

ne
sw


sw


w
ne








Climatological Data for August-(Continued.)


Stations


Sumner...........
Switzerland ........


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow.............
Brooksville.........
Clermont ..........
DeLand ..........
Eustis............... .
Ft. Meade.........
Fort Pierce........
Inverness...........
Kissimmee.........
Malabar .........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smyrna.........
Ocala..............
Orange City........
Orlando...........
Plant City..........
Rock well...........
St. Leo.............
Tampa ...........


Counties


Ley........


Levy ..... .. ......
St. Johns..........

Means....... ....


Polk.... ......
Hernando......
Lake ...........
Volusia ........
Lake...... .. ...
Polk .........
Brevard ........
,itrus.........
Osceola ........
Brevard........
Brevard........
Volusia..........
Marion ......
Volusia .......
Orange ........
Hillsborough...
Marion ........
Pasco.. ......
illsborough...


degrees Precipitation, in inches
eit


g Temperature, in
Fahrenh

o

b9 I
8 *s !
=


12 80.4+0.3 96121
5 80 9+11 101 22

81 3-0 .. .


7 82 6 4-1 0 97 21*
10 82 0+1 4 9821
10 83 3+0 6 9922
2 80 6 .... 9722
12 84 3 1 101 20*
16i 81 9+0 8 10021
11i 80 5-2 1 9823
2i 82 2+0 9 9915
10 e82 8 +0 2 j 9821
.. 82 4 ..... 100 2*
21 82 1 +0 5 96 21
14 80 7+1 0 96 22*
16 81 8+0 7 10121
12 .... .... .. ..
12 82 4+0 6 9922
10 82 0-0 2 9922

7 8s 2_-0 5 100 21
12 81 8 0 00 94118


5726
a8026



6926
6626
6826
70 17*
6726
6426
675*
66237
68 27
69 2*
72 10*
67 26*
6126

6826
6426

66 26
6826


2

0
o .2


.a
17 3 ( D
Ms a z
clr Is E


32 4.90
a 29 3 79


4.71

22 4 97
26 7 47
24 6 47
21 ...
26 2 47
30 6 51
26 5.11
26 4.11
j 26 7 27
26 1 80
19 8 50
25 2 39
30 3 90

23 3 53
29 1 87

27 6 98
21 7 35


--3.66
--2 31

-2 87


--2 77
--S 63
-1 65

-4 55
--1 68
-1 84
-4 46
-1 39

+3 05
--3 75
-4 02


-7 40

-4 66
-1 29


Sky



15"




z z z
:
8P P .22
z Z Z~ae~r~a


121 9
13
13 7

17 11
7 14
6 16
11 ....

3 17
11 1i
8 18
12 14

11 19
6 11

17 15
15 YT


a


~
a

i
5~tE
c~21


nw

sw


ne
ne
8.
_--













sw
ne
new

ne





sw
ne

ne
w
ne


ne
ne


-----------







Tarpon Springs....
Titusville .........


SOUTHERN SECTION.


Hillsborough .. 20
Br-vard........ 11

fleans ..... ...


Avon Park......... DeSolo.........
Flamingo........ Monroe .....
Hypoluxo........... Dade........
Jupiter............. Dade......... ..
Key West ... ..... Monroe........
Manatee............. Manatee........
Marco ... .... Lee...... .......
Mami ............. Dade........
Myere .... ....... L e ..........
Nocatee .. ........ DeSoto......

Means ...
WESTERN SECTION.

Bonifay ........... Holmes .......
Carrabelle. ........ Franklin........
DeFuniak Springs.. Walton........
Holt .............. Santa Rosa. ...
Marianna ......... Jackson .......
Molino ............ Escambia .....
Pensacola........... Escambia ......
Quincy.... ......... Gadsden .......
St- Andrew. ....... Washington....
Stephensville....... Taylor.............
Tallahassee .... .... Leon ..........
Waukeenah .......... Jefferson......
Wausau........... Washington
Wewahitchka ..... Calhoun... ..

Means...... .
State Means


18 82.2
8 81 6

S82 1


+1 0 96
-1 6 101

+0 6 ....


99
... 95
-0 6 95
+2 0 96
-1 0 91
+0 5 95
.... 95
--1 2 93
0 0 93
lul

--0 2 ...


I'l ...

82 0+1 6

82 8 .
a82 6 ..
82 6 --2 0
82 6 ...
83 0 +1 5

80 9 1 3
84 0 ....
84 +2 1
183 0 .

82 8 +2 1
82 1 +0 7


102121
96 22
9921

9922
103 23
97 '23
9921
96 17
96 13
9321
100 16
1051 1
glOl 22*


251 4.78 --4.95
30 7.01 ......


- .03


4 43
7 10
4 96
1 91
5 35
4 69
3 41
5 33
3 97
2 87

4 30


-2 53




-0 10
-3 40
+0 60
--4 67

-2 ;9
-4 1i)


2 73


1.47 7
2 16 12

. .. 10


1.84 9
2 20 5
1 89 7
0 46 13
10
1 85 13
0 81 14
2 90 7
1 42 9
1 08 -

... 10


24 3


14 13


13 9
27 0
21 8
14 16
12 16
91 20
23 7
22, 9
8 0

17 9


S 42 4 ...... 1 40 5 5
S3 79 --3 37 20 7 h
7 35 --4 912 74 12 26

S2 68 ...... 160 "19
9 13 ..... 3 92 11 11
3 16 -4 95 1 25 10 12
0 9? ......0 36 4 7
S3 72 -9 04 1 4 2
5 97 -4 912 20 6 9
4 98 -2 461 12 9 22
4 4 25 ...... 1 20 7 17
3 27 6 440 89 7 5


4 --5 0.... 13
. 4 0 -2 89 ...... 11 141


... ne

4 r.e


9se
4 se
2 e
6 w
8e
2 sw
1 sw


23 .....

5 8se


15 w
7 w
0 .....


6s
3 w
6 w
0 W-sw
2 ......
Oe
4 w
1 ......
13s

4 w
5 sw


I...








Climatological Data for August, 1902-Continued.


Stations


MISCELLANEOUS.

Bainbridge...........
Daphne............
Havana...........
Mobile.............
Montgomery .......
Nassau............
San Juan..........
Savannah, Ga.......
Thomasville, Ga....
Waycross, Ga ......


Counties


Decatur, Ga .....
Baldwin, Ala...
Cu ......
Mobile, Ala ....
.Montgom'y, Ala
N. P. Bihamas.
Porto Rico.....
Caitham, Ga..
Thomas, Ga ...
Ware, Ga ......


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit

8

RV
.3 a 00
'.


9821
e',00 t7


1110 21
94 23
91 27
10121
98 20*
97 15*


6626
e67 2
67 1
72 7
7111
68 8
71 31
69 30
66 26
63126


Precipitation, in inches Sky



0 S.




o z z
r i Z Z Z


25 3.3k
2 25
21 3 21
21 3 30
25 2 53
20 4 91
15 4 66
%4 6 30
25 2 29
23 2 45

i: ::""::


-2 741.87
--6 86 2 001
--2 81 0 95
-3 8.d4 17
-1 68 0 76
...... 2 34
-1 44 ..
-1 60 1 85
-4 01u 45
-3 71 0 60
1:i:: ...


10 14 17
9 11 15 5
10 11 6 14
14 .. .. ...
15 7 20 4

1 12 ... ...
10 ... ... ....


0



0I
S.g
1
o -
0


e
,w


tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
made at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily. in determining State or district means, but State and district
e at 7 a. in., 2 p departures are determined by comparison of current data of
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau, only such stations as have normals.
[Not included in means, a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report,


--"


I -~Dc~


------ --~-


--












Salient Climatic Features.
4 '.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean pressure for the month was 29.98 inches, which is normal.
The highest observed pressure was 30.11 inches, at Pensacola on the 11th;
the lowest observed pressure was 29.81 inches, at Jacksonville on the
16th monthly range for the State was 0.30 inch.

TEMPERATURE- (Degrees Fahrenheit).

The monthly mean temperature for the State was 82 degrees, 0.7 de-
grees above normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 81.3 de-
grees:Central, 82.1 degrees; Southern, 82.2 degrees; Western, 82.8 degrees.
The highest monthly mean temperature was 84.3 degrees, at Eustis;
the lowest monthly mean temperature was 80.3 degrees, at Johnstown.
The highest temperature during the month was 105 degrees, at Wausau
on the 21st; the lowest temperature was 57 degrees, at Macclenny and
Sumner on the 26th; absolute range for the State was 48 degrees.

PRECIPITATION--(Inches and hundredths).

The average precipitation for the State during the month was 4.60
inches, 2.89 inches below the normal amount. By. sections, the averages
were: Northern, 4.71 inches; Central, 5.03 inches; Southern, 4.30
inches; Western, 4.13 inches. The greatest monthly amount was
9.13 inches at Molino; and the least was 0.92 inches, at Quincy.
The greatest amount for any twenty-four hours was 3.92 inches,
at Molino on the 5th.

WIND AND WEATHER.

The prevailing winds during the month were from the southwest. By
sections, there were: Northern, 13 clear days; 13 partly cloudy; 5
cloudy. Central, 14 clear; 13 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy. Southern. 17
clear; 9 partly cloudy; 5 cloudy. Western, 13 clear; 14 partly cloudy; 4
cloudy.
Rainy days: Northern section, 12; Central, 10; Southern, 10; Western,








MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA--(Dates of).

Lunar Halo.-Clermont, 18; Fort Meade, 11.
Fog.-Rideout, 13, Eustis, 19; Jacksonville, 14.
High Winds.-Gainesville, 16; Rideout, 10, 16; Eustis, 23; Fort
Meade, 10, 21, 22; Tampa, 8; Jupiter, 24; Pensacola, 22; Jacksonville,
1, 6, 7, 8, 16, 22, 23.
Hail.-Bonifay, 22.
Thunderstorms.-Archer, 1, 3, 6, 13, 29; Federal Point, 1 to 4, 8, 9,
12, 13, 22, 24; Gainesville, 1, 2, 3, 9, 15, 16, 22; Rideout,, 1 to 4, 6, 8, 12,
14, 15, 21, 22, 23, Clermont, 1, 4, 9 to 13, 16, 17, 22 to 24, 31; Eustis, 1,
2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 16, 21, 22, 30, 31; Fort Meade, 1 tb 5, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18,
21, 22, 24, 29.; Fort Pierce, 3, 4, 6, 23, 24; Malabar, 1, 2, 6, 8, 24;
Merritt's Island, 1 to 17, 20 to 24, 30, 31; Ocala, 6, 14, 15, 23; Orlan-
do, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 24, 31; St. Leo, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 16, 17, 23,
30, 31; Tarpon Springs, 23; Titusville, 22; Manatee, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14,
15, 18, 21, 22, 29, 30, 31; Myers, 1 to 11, 14, 15, 17 to 20, 22 to 25, 29,
30, 31; Carrabelle, 4, 22, 23, 28; Molino, 1, 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 23; Tampa,
1, 4, 5, 6, 10, 13, 15 to 18, 21, 24, 29, 30, 31; Jacksonville, 1 to 4, 7,
10, 12 to 16, 22, 23.

WEATHER REVIEW.

Examining August records since 1892, it is found that there has been
a deficiency in moisture during seven of the eleven years considered, the
deficiency ranging from a small amount to more than three inches, the
latter occurring in 1900, when the deficiency was 3.29.It is noted that in
August, 1898, there was ani excess of 5.47 inches, followed in 1899 with a
deficiency of 0.87. In 1900 there was a deficiency of 3.29
inches, followed in 1901 by an excess of 3.0! inches, which
in turn was followed by a deficiency of 2.89 inches during the cur-
rent month. Excepting the instances cited there were no abnormal con-
ditons during other years and hence it is hardly tenable to make a
claim for the "law of compensation." Looking for an explanation of
the heavy rains during August, 1898, and 1901, they are found to be due
to a large extent, to tropical storms, which approached the State near Car-
rabelle and Pensacola, bringing the total monthly precipitation at near-by
stations up to quite 30 inches. The appended table shows the plus and
minus departures from normal during the several years. Assuming
that the precipitation at Jacksonville fairly represents the seasonal total
for the northern portion of the State, it is found that since March-the
beginning of the crop year-there is a deficiency in proportion of 5.74
inches.






31

PRECIPITATION FOR AUGUST.

1892 to 1902.

Year. Total. Deficiency. Excess.
1892 ............................. 7.84 .... 0.35
1893 ............................. 6.68 0.81 .
1894 ............................... 7.33 0.16
1895 ............................. 6.20 1.29
1896 ............................ 5.81 1.68
1897 ............................. 6.68 . 0.81
1898 .............................. 12.96 .... 5.47
1899 .............................. 6.62 0.87
1900 ............................. 4.20 3.29
1901 ............................... 10.58 .... 3.09
1902 ............................... 4.60 2.89







32

COPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR AUGUST, WiTH
DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST ELEVEN YEARS.
The normal temperature for August is 81.4 deg., the normal rainfall is 7.49
inches.


Year 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902


Mean.... 80.9 81.5 80.0 81.3 8. 81 6 80 8 2.2 82.4 80.41 82.1
Departure -0.6 +0.1 .1-1. +0.6 +-0. ---U. +0.8 +1.0--1.0+0.7
Total.... 7.84 6.68 7.3 620 581 6.68 12. 6.62 4.20 10.58 4.60
Departure-0.5--O.81 -0.16 --1.2 1.68 0.61- -5.4 -0.871 -3.29- 8.09-2.89




PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE

Atmospheric Pressure Wind Velocity, Relative
in Miles Humidity

Stations I t
C
P 0.10/30 t | | | 1 1 I

Jacksonville............. 29.98 30.10301 29.81116 6,989 41 nw 23 10u 62 80
Jupiter ....... ............ 29.99 30.09110: 29.8217 5,178 30 w 24 9360 80
Key West.............. 29.98 30.09 ; 39.87117 4,163 30nw25 8962 71
Pensacola .............. *30.00 30.111 29.8617 6,693 36 sw 27 9165 80
Tampa ................. 29.98 30.10111; 29.83 17 4.120 30 sw 8 9651 79
*8 a. m. readings only.


















J




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