Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00013
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: August 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text



Nr.'f iAF=


Vol. 12.


v/. x
I0 A


No. 78.


FLORIDA


(Departmenrt of Agriculture.)



..Monthly Bulletin..


AUGUST, o902.


B, E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crope.
Part II. Fertllizera.
Part III. Weather Report.
Part IV. MVliacollaneoum.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requestin them . .


TALLAHASSEAN BOOK AND JfO OMO, TAULLAJASUE, HA.


LIBRARY. FLORIDA IdrlCULTURAL
fKPEPINT STATION.
i i i t T -








County Map


of the State of Florida.
(Foi ihe Bulletin.)












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


BONE B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerko


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.

ALACHUA COUNTY.-Crops continue to do fairly well and are impro-
ing with the change in season; rains are interfering with saving foddbr,
and curing hay, but otherwise are helping all crops.
BAKER COUNTY.-Since the rains have come, crops are improving, but
they will all be short of the average crop; the long dry spell did more or
less damage to all crops.
BRADFORD COUNTY.-A number of crops have improved since the
change in the weather, though the dry spell did considerable damage;: the
hay and velvet bean crops are improving fast; corn is the shortest for sev-
eral years.
BREVARD COUNTY.-We are having plenty of rain now, orange trees are
growing finely, good crop on low lands but short crop on high land; no
storm so far, and insects which infest trees and fruit greatly checked at
least.
CALHOUN COUNTY.-The rains have been very beneficial to crops, and
they are much improved, except corn which cannot do much; the yield
will be much better now than was expected a month ago.
CITRUS CoUNTY.-The orange trees are rapidly recovering from the
-great freeze, and there will be quite a good crop of fruit, though nothing
like before the freeze; sweet potatoes have improved very rapidly since
the rain begun.
CLAY COUNTY.-The rains have brought out all the crops except corn,
which was too near maturity to be benefited; crops are improving
steadily.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.-Corn and cotton have fallen backward, cotton is
opening prematurely, hot weather in July stopped the growth of the plant;.
crops will soon be gathered.
DADE COUNTY.-The month has been dry and hot, light but scattered
rains have prevented the drought from being excessive; citron trees in fine
condition, crops of fruit somewhat shortened by drought in May.









DESOTO COUNTY.-The month has been rather dry and warm, and the
quantity of rain far below the average, although plenty of rain has fallen
for the needs of crops; ground is now being prepared for fall gardening;
taken as a whole, prospects are very good.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY.-All late crops, such as hay, potatoes, cassava, peas
cept partial showers since middle of June has very materially reduced the
crops correspondingly larger.
FRANKLIN COUNTY.-Most of the crops are doing well, have improved
very much since rain came. Fall garden and truck patches are being
planted; crops doing fine.
GADSDEN COUNTY.-The month has been excessively dry, no rain ex-
cept partial showers since middle of June has very materially reduced the
yield of fall crops.
HAMILTON CoUNTY.-Crops are improving some, but nearly all of them
will be quite short, caused by the long dry hot weather.
HERNANDO COUNTY.-Crops are doing well, and the yield will be a good
average; fruit trees doing well.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY.-An unprecedented drought has prevailed in
the eastern part of the county all summer, and at present there are no
indications of its being broken; the sweet potato crop is suffering from it
and planting is much delayed; other sections of the county in good con-
dition, and crops also.
HOLMES COUNTY.-We are having entirely too much rain now for cot-
ton picking. Upland cotton stopped growing about August 1st, and turned
yellow with rust, or something like it, and is opening now very fast, and
also rotting in the boles, on account of too much rain; rain has also dam-
aged corn, probably to the extent of about 4 per cent; other crops are
fine.
JACKSON COUNTY.-Crops are improving very much; should too much
rain come continuously it will injure cotton; corn is a very short crop.
LA FAYETTE COUNTY.-Crops are doing better since the drought has
brlen, knd most of them will turn out a good average.
LEE COUNTY.--It.is extremely dry, so much so that sweet potatoes can-
not do much growing; other crops nearer maturity, and the fruit trees and
crops are doing very well; the guava crop is unusually fine.
LEON COUNTY.-Cotton has lost bout 5 per cent. and corn 20 per cent.
on account of the dry weather; all crops suffered to some extent, but many
of them are improving since the rain begun.
LnvY CoUNTY.-Crops have all improved very much since the rains
commenced except corn, which was too far advanced to be benefited to
any extent; crops all doing well and will yield good average returns.









MADIsoN CoUNTY.-Except corn, which was too much matured for
rain to help it of any account, crops are doing very well, and will yield a
fair average.
MANATEE CoUNTY.-The long prevailing drought which shows no sign
of abating, is ruining the country; the heat has been much greater than us-
ual, and crops have been greatly damaged.
MARION COUNTY.-The general condition is very favorable at this time,
and excellent crops are anticipated; fruit trees are growing finely.
NASSAU COUNTY.-The dry weather during first part of the season kept
crops from growing much, but late rains are improving them and will give
a fair yield.
ORANGE COUNTY.-The dry weather has cut short most of the crops;
stock is looking well.
OSCEOLA COUNTY.-Scarcity of rain has made the sweet potato crop late
though we are getting occasional showers, and fall planting is going on;
fruit trees are improving.
POLK COUNTY.-Dry weather has made the corn crop short; hay is fine
and a much larger crop than usual, velvet beans are not so good for want of
rain but will come out, and the large acreage will make up a large yield;
sweet potatoes are late; an average crop is planted, and rain will help the
yield to make a good average.
PUTNAM COUNTY.-On account of unfavorable season some crops will be
short; others will be fair, and will also improve when sufficient rain falls.
ST. JOHNS COUNTY.-The very partial, and withal, scarcity of rainfall
has cut all crops short, the condition varying with the freak of the weather,
and character of soil, the flat woods lands yielding ninety per cent.
of crops scheduled.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.-All crops are more or less cut short, but many
of them are beginning to improve since the rain set in; rice and sweet po-
tatoes doing fine.
SUMTER COUNTY.-The county has suffered greatly with dry weather
and all crops have depreciated.
SUWANNEE COUNTY.-Crops generally in fair average condition, and
many of them are improving; corn 1; short, but it is thought there will be
plenty to carry the farmers through.
TAYLOR COUNTY.-Crops are doing well, most crops have lost some
but the yield will be a fair average; a good many crops are improving
lately.







6 .

VOLUSIA COUNTY.-The season has been very dry, injuring all crops,
specially corn, hay and sweet potatoes.
WAKULLA COUNTY.-Crops are improving, and doing fairly well since
the rains have come; corn is very short.
WALTON COUNTY.-On account of the long continued drought, the corn,
cotton, sugar cane and pea crops are cut off fully 50 per cent.
WASHINGTON COUNTY.-Since we have had rain some crops have im-
proved; corn is very short, other crcps will make fair yields.











Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for
August, 1902, as Compared with an Average.


U
C


Counties



r
Alachua.....................
Baker ..... .................... .
Bradford.......... ..... .... .
Brevard....................... .
Calhoun ....... ..........
Citrus............... ....... .
Clay ....................... ..
Columbia.....................
Dade............ ...... ........
DeSoto........................
Escambia .......................
Frank in...... .. .......... ...
Gadeden .....................
Hamilton .................... .
Hernando .... .............. .
Hillsborough.....................
Holmes .................. .
Jackson ........................
LaFayette........ .............
Lee ........... .... ..... ......
Leon ..................... ..
Levy ................. ...
Madison............... ...
Manatee.. .............. ...
Marion............ . ......
Nassau............. .......
Orange.. ................ . .
Osceola......... .........
Polk ......... ..........
Putnam ...................... .
St. Johns............: .. ....
Santa Rosa.... ........... ...
Sumter ................. .
Suwannee ................. .
Taylor.............. ....... .
V olusia............... ..........
W akulla................... .
W alton ....................
Washington ....................
General averages. .. .......


Fpland island (orn Sugar Field
cotton Cotton Cane Peas
Cotton


90




70
..7




80


90
90
80

100





o85



85
75
95

88


.... 90 80
.. 50 50
... 50 65

90 90 85

75 75
... 80 60

75 .

70 90 85
... 75 75


60 85 85
85 70 75
.. 90 90

95 . . . .
75 80 70
85 90 90

100 110 100
.... .... ...


80 8('

85 ...
...... 75 75
o80 85
70 70

90 80 80
70 .. ... .
90 100 100

8. 81 79


a;




80 75 8
S0 6.2


75 75 60
100 100 100
75 75 90
75 80 80
50 50 75
100 75 80

80 90 100
50 50 75
90 90 75
80 80 50
50 50 60
100 80 100
75 75 8(
65 60 10(
75 75 9(
90 1110 80
90 100 90
75 80 80
80 80 90
5 75 100
50 50 ...
100 110 100
75 75 75
75 80 80
50 50 40
60 60 80
50 50 40
50 50 60
70 70 10C
50 50 60C
90 90 70
75 75 8S
75 80 80
70 70 8(
50 50 50
80 70 7.5

78 78 78


_. a.0

0
Sc 951 95
50 B0| 60
50 751 75
100 100 100
100 100 100
45 100 100
80 o0 75
75 100 100
... 100 100
95 100 110
65 100 100
80 90 90
65 60 50
50 75 75
100 .......
80 .. ......
100 90 90
90 100 100
80 70 70
90 100 100
95 90 90
60 100 i00
100 90 90

100 100 100
80 .. ..
80
80 95 80
50 90 90
80 100 100
30 60 60
60 .. .
100 80 90
60 70 70
75 65 75
85 90 90
80 75 75
90 85 90
50 65 70
95 100 100

74 871 87









8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Rice wo et Cassava Peanuts BrCom
Corn

Counties a o < s E




Baker.. .........................0 0 .

Bradford .............. .... 70 75 8 60 ... 50 0 .... .
Brevard ........................ 10 0 100 10 0 0 ... .. .... ...
Calboun ....................... .7.. 75 .. .. 5 00 .. ..
Citrus. .............. ... .. .... 100 11 ... 90 0.......
BrevClay...............rd ... .... 75 75 50 75 .. .... 100 12 0 80 80.... ...
Columbia....................... 1 1 75 8 ... ... 90 90 .... ...
C uDaei .... ..................... . ... 100 110 . . . .. .. ..
ClayDeSoto.......................... 75100 110 100 11075 100 90 90 80 .........
E aolumbia..................... 50 50 100 130 100 75 80 10....... 0 100 ... .....
Dade ..... 10........... ... ...... ... 90 190 90 .. .... 0 85. ..
DeSoto ........................ 1001 0 30 100 100 0 0........
Escambia ........................ 50 00 50... .... 0 0 .......
Franklin ....................... 0 5 00 85 .... ..
Gadsden ..................... 100 10 .. 0 0 100 100 40...... .. .....
Hamilton ..................... 5 50 60 ...... .... ....
Hernando ..................... 100 100 80 5 .........1. ...
Hillsborougha .............0....... 50 00 .... .. ..
Holmes ............ ....... 90 90 40 40 90 90 990 90 5
Jackson.............. ............. 10 0 5 ...... 95... ....
Laayette................. ........ 85 1 80 80 1 1 1 1 1
Lee ........... ............ 10 1 0 94 0 .... 00 0 90 .90
Leona....................... 0 50 5 5 ..........
Levy.Mar.............. 100 150 0 110 100 110 100 110 1.... .
Madison ......................100 100 90 0....... 100
Manatee..50 50 50 50..
Marion ......................... 100 150 100 110 100 .1 100 11
N assau.................... .... .. .. 95 100 . . . . .
Orange........................ 50 50 40 50 60 50 .. ... ... .....
Otceola......................... 90 100 40 60 70 70 .. ... .... .....

St. Johr.s.. ................ 60 60 60 60 65 65 60 60 ..
Santa Rosa.................. ... 100 100 100 10 75 80 90 95 100 100t
Sumter........... .......... ... ... 60 60 .... .... 75 75 .... ....
Suwannee.............. ........ 75 80 90 95.... .... 100 100 80 80
Taylor...... ....... ........... 90 100 100 10 100 100......
Volusia..................... ... 50 5 100 100 . .
Wakulla........... ....... 75 75 65 70 .. 85 0 .....
Walton. ............ .......0 .. 60.. ..... .......
Washington..................... 100 8 90 95 100 100 .......
General a veragees................ 88 78 80 89 8 871 86 92 92








9

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties





A lachua.........................
B aker ... ....................
Bradford ... ..................
Brevard.....................
Calhoun ....................
Citru. ........................ *
Clay.. .. ..... ..........
Columbia...... ............
D ade... .... .............. ...
D eSoto .............. ...........
Escambia ..... .. ...........
Franklin ............. .......
G adsden .................. .
H am ilton ................ ......
Hernando......................
Hillsborough ... .. .........
H olm es ........ ................
Jackson........... ...........
Lafayette........................... ...
Lee.............................
Leon ................... .. ..
Levy ............... .... ...
Madison ................ ....
M anatee.... .... ............
M arion ......... .. ........ ...
N assau ........ ............ ...
Orange......... ................
O sreola ........................
Polk... .......................
Putnam ......................
St. Johns......................
Santa Rosa ...................
Sumter.................... ...
Suwannee ....................
Taylor.........................
Volusia ........................
W akulla...........................
W alton ................. .....
Washington....................

General averages .............


Hay


Velvet Bananas Pine
Beans apples


Guavas


,:. I D L a>

-I 5 7,
c I-S = .3 cT s y a I K

U s l o IC.
z I L1 r:!DO 1
ii 1 i3 ^i '4 0 SH ^ Q


75 s 100 100 .... ......
.. 75 75 .... ... .
75 80 70 100 ...........
100 o10 .... .... 80 80 ....
85 90 ...... ..
100 100 100 100 .....
40 50 40 50.....
100 100 100 100....
S100 100 105
100 120 100 110 901 100 100
75 100 ... ..... ... ....

40 40 50 50 .......
100 100 75 75 .......... .
100 100 100 100 .... .. .
...... 15 150 . . .
75 75 5 85 .....
90 100 100 100......
90 90 ... .
100 100 100 110 90 90 100
100 120 90 100 .. ....
80 85 90 90 .... ......
0 901 .
100l 100 o 100 80 50 60
100 1100 125 .. 100
50 100
75 6' 80 95 .... .. 80
50 70 40 100 30 30 70
120 140 80 150 100 100 100
60 60 80 85........
80 80 80 80.. ..... ....
90 90 90 100 .... ......
75 75 85 85 .... .... ....
100 100 75 85.... .... ....
75 90 100 100 .... .... ....
775 7580 80 ... ... ......
75 80 75 85 ... .... ......
.... ... 55 .... .... ... .
100 0 100 1 100 ... .... ....

83 9051 8 941 81 79 89


80 20




100 100
95 90


100 100



50 25
100 ....

85..
80 80
120 10U


t.ol
". ..







10

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Orange Lemon Lime Grate
Trees Trees Trees Trees
Trees

Counties a





Ba er............ .... .S .. ..
.a t a i S Zo s



Bradord ............. ................... .100 50 0 .. ... 10
Baoker ........... .... ....... .. .. ......

Bretard...... .... ........... .. ........ 100 8 3. ....;:: 100 8100
Calhoun.................... ............ I - '
Citrus ... ....... .. .. .. ........10
Clayo... ............... .... ...... I- go

aem bia ... ............... .... ... .. ..
a kSoton........... ........... ... 90
Escam i ................ .. ........... ....
Fran lin.. ............. ................
Hdsden h .............................- 0 ... ...
Ha ilton .................... .... ..........
Hernando......... .... .... ........ ... ... .... .

Lackson .................... ....... ... .... ... ... ..

Lafay ette ........... ........ .......... ..i 100 0 10 10 10
aLee s ................. .. -. . .. .
Leon .. ..................... 75 4 40 0 5 O
LMayon ..................... .......... 100 10 100
Ma isnat .............................. ...... 10 10 7
M aron ................. ... 6. 50 4 ..0 5 0 40
Osrcau .....................*..........* 90 50 0 0 0 90 0
P aolk ............. ..... .... ...... .. ...... .
Putnam ....................... ...... 4 50 .. ... 0
kt. o ns ............. ......... ........... .. . .
PSanta Rsa.......... ........... .. ... .. ... ..
Su tonr ................ ..... .. ........... ..
Suwannee Rsa.......................... 9
VolSuw annee .. ................ .... .. .... 8 ......
Taylor ........... ... ...... ...KL .. .. 80....
W akulla ....... ... .. . ........ .....

4Walton ................. ............ .. ....
W ashington ......................... ......
General averages.............. .......... 881 7 93 75 94 72 91 83









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-1902.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)....15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ......... 5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... ................ $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We fin1
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ...............$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20................ .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.10.............. 7.88
Mixing and bagging .......... .......... ......... 2.00

$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers ar( bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that poin4 must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid...............80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer By Whom Sett
a



Bright C. S. Meal..... 7.22 ..... 3.31 8.44 1.83 Tallaha'see Cotton Oil Co.. Tallahassee.
Dark C S. Meal....... 9.5 .. ...2.03 4.76 1.65 'allahassee Cotton o)il Co., Tallahassee.
Fertilizer ............. 6.78.. I .43 6.12 7.80 H. K. Faire1', Punta Gorda.
Fertilizer............... 7.00 679 2.00 7.79 11.50 0.48' U Piinter Fertilizer Co.. Jacksonvlll
Ground Bone......... 6.00 11.41 9 57 20.98 4.66 ..... Benedict Pineupple Co., Orlando, Fla.
Dissolved Bone Black. 10.60 8.62 0.19 18.81 ..... ..Th. Atwond Co., Manavilta. Fla.
ExtraFruit& Vine Fert 6.50 6.88 2.69 9.57 2.31 4.18 u:hrrn F rtilzer o., Orlando, Fla.
Kainit ........... ...1.88 ... ... 1.5(]Firak adams, Jrspcr, F a.
Double Manure Salt.. 3.50 ....... ...... 0.92 Frank Adam .Jasper, Fla.
Bone Compound ..... 9.42 4.06 13.48, 1.8' ..... Go Iding Fertilizer t'o.. Pensatola, Fla.
Nitrate of Soda.... 1.18 .... ..... .. 18.42 R. Knigh, Lemon Cit,, Fla.
H. G. Sulphate Potash 1.80 . ... 1 H. Kn ght, crmon City, Fla.
Dissolved Bone Meal.. 3.2d 17.0 1.'9 1.39 .7 ... .R. Kni'ht. Lemon(ity, Fla.
FineGrou'd ri'd Fish Il.t, 6.87 4.5 11. 4' 9.41 ..... DR. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
Dissolved Bone. ...... 0.14 21.75 1.0722.82 ... ..... Painter Fertilizer Co.. Jacksonville.
Fertilizer ......... 11.68 8.t6 1.28 9 34 2.23 8.3 J ms Henry ,t. Peler.burg. Fla
H. G. Tobacco Dust... 5.40 3 28 10.33 Florida Fert. Mnf. Co., Gainessille, Fla..
Acid Phosphate....... 11.26 13.72 7 41 21.td ...... .... Tamps Ferilizer Co., Tamp', Fia
Mixed Fertilizer..... 9.96 6.80 0.87 7.75 1.54 12.75 Tampa Ferti'iz. r o Tampa, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer ... 924 6.211 2.19 839 3.84 7.49 Tnnpa Fe.tiliz, r Co Tampa, Pla.
Blood, Bone & Potah...... 5.47 2.15 7.62 10.97 .78 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
Acid Phosphate Pot-
ash and Ammonia....... 12.09 1.51 3.60 1.73 4.31 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
Ashes. .............. . ... ...... .. 4.4 Sterling and lu'ssell, Delray, F a.
Blood, Bone & Potash.. .. 7.45 7.69 15.14 6.48 0.84 Sterling and R ssell, Delray, Fia
Fertilizer .......... 10 22 7.216 .52 7.78 2. 0 12.62 W. L. Foster, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Guano................... 9.18 8.15 2.14 10.29 2.46 2.3 A. L. Willson Co Quinry. 11 a.
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1 9.40 7.24 0.76 8.0v 2.27 II 84 fampa Feitilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer No. 2. 9.74 7.15 1.25 8.40 421 5.9 Tampa Fertilizer Co, Tampa, Fla.
H. G Sulphate Potash ..... ............ . 49.28 Mis, Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
H. G. Sulphate Potash ............... . ..... 46 tO Mrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
H. G. sulphate Potah ..... ........ 0 50.4 l s ellen S. Wright Orlando, Fla.
Fertilizer.................. 6.80 0 42 7.22 2.45 4.7' E. D. Luter, \ ildwood, Fla.
Fertilizer.............. 6.98 6.51 0.79 7.2 3.4312.50 J. H. Loyd, Winter H v n, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer No 1. 12.92 10.07 1.70 11 77 3.21 3.67 R. Shoemaker. Cotton Dale, Fla.
Mixed F rtilizer No. 2. 11.30 10.92 0.64 1 ,t 2.25 1.69 S. H. Shcmaker, Cotton D le, Fla.
Palmetto Ashes............... .. ........ 0.51 Arthur Cornwell, Palmetto, Fla.
Ground Garbage....... 1.42 3.5 16.9520.51 .. 1.35 Southern Pert. Mnf Co ,Gainesville, Fla.
Fertilizer ......... 10.78 8.37 1.31 4.6 .... .8 chroeder& rguinbaw, Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer .......... 7.68 7.02 1.58 8.60 4.61 5.01 W. G.orsworthy, Mcntosh. la.
Fertilizer................. 8.8 4.63 13.47 3.38 0.6 E.. .Lanier & Co., Miami, Fla.
Fertilizer ... ...... 10.30 2.16 1.73 3.9 . 13.2 Schroeder & Arguinbaw Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer ........... 12.65 7.6 2.99 10.59 4.20 4.21 M. Jacoby, Marianna, Ila.
Cotton Seed Meal, 2d
class for feeding.... ..... ... 4 66 ..... Booker & Gentry, Memphi, Tenn.
Cotton Seed Meal..... 6.65... 1.82 2.65 76 1.60 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Washington, Ga.
Mixed Fertilizer....... 7.45 6.45 1.S2 8.27 2.29 10.3& Marshall & Beebe, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Blood and Bone....... 8.5 7.07 7.75 14.82 8.70 ..... Hardec Bros., Jensen, Fla.
Tobacco Dust......... 3.75 ..... ... .... 1.30 5.92 B. F. Hardesly, St. Sebastian, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal..... 8.25... ..... 2.72 8.45 1.78 Florida (Grocery Co Jacksonville, Fla.
Toba co Dust....... ..... ......... 2.25 .00 Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal.... .. ... .. 2.53 .i85 1.72 Mellan Crosby Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal........ .. 3.21 9.3 2.09. J. Brewten, McDavid,Fla.
Strawberry Fertilizer. 8.40 6.22 2.07 8.2 1.86 1.338 W. Valentine, Antioch, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer....... 9.1 1.60 10.7 3.04 0 68 F. S. Dunklin, Lakeland, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .... ... ... .. ..... 561 .. Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer...... 6.2 2.22 8.4 2.55 6.6, M. O. Donell, West Tampa, Fla.












13

BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer. By Whom Sent




Mixed Fertilizer....... (6.-1 0.9 1.60 7 99 151 10.2 E. A. Wilcox, Anona. Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer...... ... 4 4 8.26 8.1 5.15 1 .88 'lark & Co., Dania. Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer...... 5.75 6.0 I.2 7.26 1.85 3.64 D. W. Brown, reidia, Fla
*Cotton Seed Meal..... ..... 2.77 8.5 2.581 Florida Tobaoco Co., Qu ncy, Fla.
Fertilizer............ 9.. 5 11.47 1.66 13.1 ..... 5.59C. F Cope, Chiplev, Fla.
Armour's V e g e table i
Fertilizer.......... .35 6 28 3.21 9.49 4.46. 9.29 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fruit & Root
Crop Special ........ .4 7.35 2.11 9.46 2.45 6.74 Armour Fertilizer Norks. Jacksonville ...
Sulphate of Ammonia. 3 55 .. ... ... [... 25 ..... 1 illson & l'oomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Sulphate of Ammo, ia. 8.61t ... ) ..... 23.6 ... [Willson &Toomer Fert. Co.,Jacksonville.
3Mixed Fertilizer I
(Sweepings)......... 8.6' 5.55 2.04 7.591 3.66 7.94 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co,. Jacksonville.
Nitrate of Soda........ 1.70 ........ .4 ..... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Sulphate of Potash. .. 17.41 ........ ........24. 0 Willson & Toomer Vert. Co.. Jacksonville.
Dried Blood........... 11.15, ............. 6.29l.... M Hebbert, Jrnsen, Fla.
Ground Steamed Bone 3.111 8.64 15.18 81 4. ... R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
H. G. Tobacco Dust... ......... 2.5 1.8) M. Hebbert. Jensen, Fla
Tobacco Dust..... 7.23 ............ 3. 6.75 ". Painter Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fertilizer............. 1.9 tr'ce tr'ce .... 5.: tr'ce J. D. McDonald. Little River, Fla. (Caus-
Stic Soda, Lime and Muck.
Hickory Ashes............... ........ .. .. .... 2 16 W C. Johnson, Micanopy, Fla
Hard Wood Ashes..... ........... .... .. 3.23 Crump's Muf. Co. W Bay City. Mich.
Mixed Fertilizer....... 7. 7.27 0.81 8.14 2.1 713.05 James Henry, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer...... 4.75 7.1 0.5 7.6 4.3 17.116 A. E Berry, Manchllra, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer...... 14.55 7.25 3310.57 3.3' 4.9! (1ook & West, Little River, Fla.
Dark Cotton Seed Meal .......... .... i 4.0, ..... A. .M Minor. Crown Point, Fla.
Ashes No. 1. Light........... .. .32 ....I. I1.73G. H. Gifin & Co., hiviera, Fln.
Ashes No. 2. Dark.... ..... ... .. .. 0( ..... (I.30 G H. Gittin & Co.. Riviera, Fla.
H 0. Sulphate of Pot........... .... n O F. D. Waite, Palmetto Fla.
H.G. Sulphate of Pot ... ... ..... .... .; 7 F. 1). Waite, Palmetto. Fla.
Sulphate of Ammonia ..... ... .... 4 97 .....F. Waire, 'almetto, Fla,
Nitrate of Soda.... ;..... I I 1 2 ....I. IF ) Waite, Palmetto Fla.
Dis-olved one Black ..... 16. .......... F. \. Wir~, Pulmetto. Fla.
Fruit and Vine Fert........ 6.17 0.6 6.3, 2.47 9.8 F. D. Waite. Palmetto, Fla.
Bright Cotton Seed
Meal... ... ..... .... ..... 7.5 .. R R. Penter, McDavid, y'a.
Sulphate of Ammonia. .............. 25. ..... Willson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.

For values see heading 'Bu eau of Fertilizers. "
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of man.
ufacturers cf the "Special samples sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer o
mannacturer, hence is not an evidence that the goods are otffred by him for sale. The "Of
icial Samples' taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on precedl, g page states the name
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing in-
gredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash
and ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid, and some potash, but is
bought fb r the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, it has been determined as
total phosphoricacid.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


NAME OF BRAND.



Cotton Seed Meal.................
Cotton Seed Meal ..............
Cotton Seed Meal .............
Cowton Seed Meal.....
Co ton Seed Meal......... ....
Cotton Seed Meal .............
Cotton Seed Meal..... ......
Mape' s Fruit and Vine Manure.
Ideal Potato Manure............
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer.
Ideal Fertilizer ......... .......
Nlap 's Fruit and Vine Manore
Mape s Vegetable Man re......
Mape's Oranee Tree Fertilizer..
Ideal Fertil zer..................
Bradley's Fruit&Vine Fertilizer
Fruitanld Vine Fertil zer.. .....
Bradley' s N ursery stock .......
H. G. Vegetable Fislh Guaano..
Ideal Vegetable M nure .....
Mare's Vegetable Manu c......
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure.
Blood. Bone and Potah
Nitrate of Sola.......... ..
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure..
Special Orange Tiee Manure....
H. G. I tobacco Dust.......
Osceola Bra,.d Tobacco Dust .
Special Mixture (Tobacco).....
H. G. Sulphate of Putash....
Kalnit....... .....
Ideal Fertili: pr.................
1t. ~. Tobacco Lust............


Phos. Acid A GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.


S0 By Whom and Where Manufactured.
Sd S El 5"wa I is Is a


8.42... .61 18 .......... a 1to. 3 8 tots 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
11.14.. 8.91 1 .... ......... 3.2 824 96 Jefferson Mfg. to.. Jefferson, Ga.
....0.. 2. I 83 .. .... 3 2 8.24 1..6 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Relma, Ala.
........29 8.34 J78 3.22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile, Ala.
8.18..... 71 8 381 7 ............ ...... 3.22 8 .24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co. Mobile, Ala.
10.10 2 8.24 18 2.5to2.87 it 15--1.85 Southern. Cotton Oil Co.. Selma, Ala.
.8 ..... ...... .31 8.73 2.16 ... ..... to32. 8 to9. 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
9.20 1.9' 9.34 2.18 1.45 8 to 10 5 to 7 2 to 4 ........ 2 to 310 to 12 Mapes' Vormula& Peru Guano Co., N. Y.
11 81 7.84 091 8.7b 4.23 8.30. to 8 to 1 2 ...... to to 10 Wilsox & Toorme Fert. Co Jacksonville
10.75| 6. .0 8.92 4.13 5.1: ....... 8 .......... 4 to 5 55 to 7 mer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y.
10.40 7."9 1.07 & 1 4.26 7.1 ...... 5 to 7 ... ....... 4V2to51 t o 8 Wilson Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
1:.1t0 7.12 2.03 9.15 2.52 11.32 to 1 5 to 7 3 to 4 .. 2 to 310 to 12 Mapes' Formula & Peru Guano Co. N.Y.
10.681 6 93 2.57 9.5 4.8i 4.79 lu to 12 6 to 2 to 4 ........ 5 t 6 4 to 6 Mapes' Formula& Peru. GuanoCo,N Y.
1'.20 7,71 2.9 10.63 4.14 3.7910 to 12 6 to 8 2to 4 ........ 4 to 5 3 to 4 Mapes' Formula & P iu. Guano Co, N.Y.
10.1 7.32 0.94 8,2 4.22 t 69 ........ 5 to 7 ................ 4Xto5% i to 8 Wilron & Toomer Pert. Co., Jacksonville
12.9i| 8.57 1.65 10.22 2.55 9.74 .... W.. i ...... 8%- 2to3 10 to 11 Bradley's form. & Peru. GuanoCo., N.Y.
15.06 hl 2.21 .02 2 11 11.76 8 to 1 1 o 3 ....... 2 to 412 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
10. 7.97 2 i 10.61 4.3 3.52 ... 8 to lo ... .. te 1: 4ytio5 3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
8.61) 6.44 1.41 7.8 4.22 6.17 1 to 12 to 7 2 to 4 ...... 4 to 4 to tTampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
1395 7.J 090 8.50 3.'i0 .14 to 8 1 to 2 .. .o 5 8 to 10 Wilson & oomerFert. Co., Jacksonville.
1l.1"! 6.78 2.91 9.6 5. )t 5.11 10 to 1V li to 8 2 to 4...... 5 to a4 to 6 Mapes' Formula & Peru. GuanoCo.N Y.
0.951 6.67 2.23 8.9J 2.32 10.84 8 to l 5 to 7 2 to 4 ....... to tl 10 12 Mapes' Formula&Peru. GuanoCo., N. Y.
11.75 7.70 0.88 8.58 5.38 5.59 5 to P- 8 to 10 2 to 4 ........ to o 7 t0 8 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
1.8 ...... .. 18.3 ..... ... .... .. .. ....... 17 to 19 ... Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
9.00 6.2 0.1 6. 3.55 12. ...... 6 to 8 I to 3 ... .... to 4 10 to 12 'Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville
12.35| 7.15 201 2.54 9.7: 0 to 12 5 to to .. to to 10 to 11 Bauh & Sons. Baltimore, Md.
8 86 ........ l...... 2.31 2 4: 8 Ito 10 .. ........... 1Ito3y 1x to ,H Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
7. ... .. 144 1.6 ..... .................... to 3 1 to 5 Wilson & boomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
7.8 ...... ..... 1.48 4.4 ............. ....... ............ ......... Tampa Fertilizer Co.. Tampa.
1.4 ................ .....50.2 ... ....... 48 to 51 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jaeksonville.
5.8 ....... 14 ...... ... ....... . .. 12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Fert Co.. Jacksonville.
S7.00 4.58 b 3.92 6.32 8 to 10 5 to 7............. 4%to6 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
7.20 ........... ...... 2.97 10.06 ... .. ... . . 3 10 Florida Ferillizer Co., Gainesville, Fla,











Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred


Ammonia Phosporic Potash
Acid


Nitrate of Soda........ ..... .. ......... 17 to 19.... ... .. .. .......
Sulphate of Ammonia .................. .. 22 to 24 .......... .........
Dried Blood ... .. .. ..... .......... 12 to 17 . . ... ..
Concentrated Tankage ..................... 12 to 15 1 to ..........
Bone Tankage. ............................ 6 to 9 10 to 15 .. .....
Dried Fish Scrap .......................... to 11 6 to 8; ...... ....
Cotton Seted Meal ..........................i 7 t, 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
H oof M eal .. ... ............. ...... ... 14 to 17 1 to 2 ....
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hurdred

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid

Florida Rock Phosphate .............. .. .. 33 to 35.
Florida Pebble Phosphate ................... ............ 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphate .... 14 to 19 .1 to, 6
Ground Bone ........................ 3 to 6 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone. .... ....... .. ... ... to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone.... ..................2 to 4 13 to 15 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.


Actual
Potash


Muriate of Potash ...............
Sulphate of Potash.. ............
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia
K ainit .... .. ........ ............. .
Syl'init...... ....................
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes .............
Wood Ashes, un,:iched .............
Wood Ashes. leached...............
Tobacco Stems ................... .
Cov Manure (fresh) ..............
Horse Manure fresh ) ........
Sheep Manuip (fresh)................
Hog Manure (fresh) ..............
Hen Dung (fre.h) ............
Mixed Stable M inure ......... ......


50
48 to 52
26 to 30
12 to 123
16 to 20"
15 to 3.)
2 to 8
1 to 2
5to 8
0 40
0.53
0.67
0 i60
0 63
0.63


Pounds per Hundred

Phosphoric
mnomna Acid


2 to
0 to
0 tr.
1 .0!
0.55
2.0
0.7(


7 to 9
1 to 2
1 to I
4 .... .. ....
.41 0.16
60 0.28
0 23
0.19
1.54
0 26


Lime







10
30 to 35
35 to 40
3:
0 31
0.21
0.33
0.08
0.24
0 70


--










Peruvian Vegetable Manure... 9.05 6.65 2.59
Ideal Fertilizer............... 9.75 5.89 1.26i
Armour's Fruit and Root Crop,
Special ........... .. ....... 8.10 7.8S 2 06
Armour's Cotton Special Fertil-
izer.. . .... .... ........ 9.35 6.9 2.44
Armour's Vegetable Fertilizer. 7.4" 6.24 3.31)
Armour's Practical Trucker.... 5.i.t 7.14 2.14
Armour's Blood. Bone & Potash 7.30 7 57 2.00
Armour's I practical Pine Apple
Fertilizer .......... ........ .45 6 .4 6.i 1
Armour's Or nge Tree Manure. Ii. 8i 6.9l 4.14
Armour's Castor Porna e... .. : ..........
Armour's Acid Phnsphate..... 3i.10 I'.12;. 2.'
Armour's H. (4. Tobacco Dust. 4.11,
Armour's Pulverized Tobacco
Stems .... ............. 14.9! ..
Armour's I aw Bone Fertilizer i;.25 1..7!1 lii. i
Armour's Bone Flo ..... .... 3..5 1 ." 13.96
Armour's H.G Acid Phosplhat 12.75 17.7 i .
Armour's Canada H. W. Ashes. 10.75 .........
Ideal Blood, Bone antd Potasl h 7.40 4.6' n:1.
Special Mixture No. 1.......... 8 c6i .67 0.8
Simon Pure No. ......... ... 8. b 0.74
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 7 .. ...
Sulphate of Ptash ........... 0.s .. .
Br dley's Fruit nid Vine...... 3.0 4.1' 1.
Williams & Clark's Nur.-erv
Stock ......... .. . .... ... . i.f. ) 8.0 1.76
Bradley's Fla. Vegetable Fer-
tilizer Co............ ... .... 5.2 6. 8 2 42
Bradley's Extra Fine Ground
Bone with Potash......... 3.7 10.41 6.4
Williams & Clark's Orange Tree
Fertilizer.. .......... .... 4. 6.41 11
Bradley's Special Fruit and
Vine Fertilizer............. 4.45 6.r0 1.64
'radley's Nursery Stock ... 6. 7.94 1.9J'
Williams & <'lark's Special
Eruit and Vine.............. 4.35 5.47 1.8
Williams & Clark's I ruit and
V ine ........ ................. 2.0
Complete Vegetable Manure ... 5 5.0 1.6 1
Ideal Fertilizer.. ......... .. 8.9 5.4 1.;


9.27 4.51 8.42 to 10 7 to 9 2to 4 ........ 4 to 8 to 10
7.15 4.;14 7.89 8 t'l0 i to 7 ............... 44t05 6to 8
9.91 :.3I3 5.77 5 to 10 8 to 9 1 to 2 ..... t1 3 5 to 6
.41 1.45 1.84 to I 7 to 8 1 to 3 ....... Ito 1 to 2
9.1:; 4.14 6.81 5 to 0 7 t 9 tto 3 ....... 110o 6 to 8
'. :1 3.91 9.(60 5 t' 1 6to 7 2 to 3 .... 4 10 t i12
l.:7 5.52' 7.89 a5to lt to 10 1 t 2 ..... 5to 6 7 o 8
1301 4.74 7.44 5 to 1 7 to 8 3 to 4 r' O I' 10 to 12
II. 1 3 71 5.8 5 ta to 8 11l 2 to I I t. 41 4 to 5
1.9 5 .99 1.11 t o 8 ..... I. I. : .. i Ito 2
1 1. 611 10 to 12' 1' o t 1to 2 . .... ......
..... 1.4 1.57 8 to l ..... ........ ....... i t3 % to 3
..... 1.57 4.0 sto In ........ ........ I t3% 1 to 3
25. 4,.1 9 .. :i1 10 ........ L........ 1' ',, '; .. to .........
2 .' 1 15.1 ..... 5. 10 11. to 14 14 .. 3to 4 .........
18.-8 ..... ...... ..... ... ............... 17 .... ...... ...
5.9". .. ..... .. .to.. 8 .... ....
77 4,97 84 6 to H 4 -o 6 2 to 4 ... 5 to 6 l o 8
7 1 7 7 81 to 11 to 7 I 1 2 5 to i 5 to 6
7.13 3.. !1 ) 'to 8 l6 to 7 ... 41t 11 o 13
2.6I ,1 3.:03 7. 5 ...... .. ..... "" '4"1 8.01' 1.7,
.... 36 5 to 8 ........ .... . ..... 48 toI 5
;.49 2.6i ll1.2to to 13:1 7'., 3 to 4 .. 4 '3 4 10 12
9.716 4.84 4.4l o1 ;1 S to 9 1 to 2 ....... to 4
8. 4.33 6.11 6to 7 Ito 2 ...... 4 to 5 5 to 6
l':.84 3.05 2.04 1 10 to 1 to 4 t 4 ....... 244 t3% 2 to 3
8 31 4.52 (i.5S 10 to 13 6 to 7 te 2 .. .... 3% t4 S, 5to 6
7.73 4 9:1 10.96 111 0 1:1 5'., t71% 3 to 4 ... 44 t.'% I0 to 12
9.91i 5.28 4.40 9 to 12 io, I1 to 2 .... 4Y4 t5', 3 to 4

7.34 4.75, 11.77 10 to 13 41 7 1 3 to 4 .... i1. t6%, 10 to 12
7.81 2.701 10.53 1 to 13 5,1, t7/ 3to 4 .... .1 t34 10 to 12
6(71 3.64 12.8 '10 to 13 to 5! It 4 to 4 10 to 12
(i. 666 5.o1 7.70 8 to 10 t ......... ...... 4 tSY 6 to 8e


Wiiisoil & Toomer Per. Co.,Jacksonvllie
Willson & Toomer Fer. Co.,Jacksonville
Armour's Fert. Works, lacksonville.
Armour's Fert Works, Jacksonlille.
Armour's Fert. Wor's. Jackon\ill .
Armour's Fert. Works, Jackson 11 '.
armour's Fert. Works. Jacksorvllle.
Armou,'a Fert. Work Jacksonville.
Armour's Fe t. Wo ks, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fort Works, Jaeksonville.
Armo r's Fert. Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fert. Works, Jacksonville.
Armour's Fert Works, Jacksonvill.
Armour's Fe t. Works, Jacksonvi le.
Armour's Fert. Works, Jacksonillie.
Armour's Fer Woiks, .Jac.,onvi le.
Armour's F ( rt. Works, J eksonvill .
Willson & Toomer Fer. Co Jacksonville
Willson & 'oomer Fer. Co., lacksonville
E. 0. Painter Fert ( o., Jacksonville.
Muscoogee Mills. Columbus. Ga.
American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
American Agr cul. & t hem. Co., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y
Amertcan Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Ch m. 'o., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Chem. Co., N. Y.
American Agricul. & Chem. I o., N. Y.

Ameri-an Agricul. & Ohem. Co., N. Y,
N. J. Baker Brothers, New I ork.
Willson l Toamer Pert. Co', Jacksonville










13rREA1T OF F flTIIIZEflS-Continued,


Name of Fertilizer





Blood. none and Potash....... !).!0
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guano.. 10.11
Pineiipple Manure ........... 5.' 0
Special Mixture.............. 5.4
Potato Fertiliz-'r................ S.5'i
Strawberry Fertilizer........... 7.i1
Oranee Fruitcr Special........ 5.N1
Fruit and Vile i erulizer..... 11).10
Ob,'r's Fruit & Vine Fertilizer 9. 1)
Bratile! 's Vegetable Fertilizer li.t
ILnilgh's Special M anurre 'r
Orange Trees and Nlrserj
Stock.... ..... ...... 8.7
Tobacco Dust.... .......... .
Pure Ground Tobacco Dust... 11.2
Dri d Blood ................... 10.53
Ni r to of Soda ................. I 2. I
H. G. Acid Phosphate...... 1. I.15
Dis-olved Bon" Black........ 14
Fine (round Bone............. 1,
* ailit.. ............ ...... .. 4. 15
Doulil Manure Slt........... 141
Acid Phosphate ........ ... ... .i;50
Acid Phosphate......... ..... I .35
Dissolved nIone Black.......... 22. c(
Mape's Pine Apple Manure...... 8..55
Mape's Vegetable Manure....... 9.411
Mape's ruit and Vine Manure. 10.6
Mape's Orange Tree Manure... 10. 25
Cotton Seed Meal .. ...... 5.0U
Dark Cotton Seed Meal .... ... H.i6
Acid Phosphate ............... 7.(1 3
Complete Sweet Potato Fertilizer 12.:
Special Fruit and Vine.......... (.85
Special Mixture No. 1.. ..... ..40
Ideal Fruit and Vine Fertilizer. 8.7'
Ideal Vegetable Manure........ 12.35


Phos. Acid


S 5
^ S i


1i.8(i
7.71
6.1109
8.1.i1
ii. 8

7.47

7 .II

1.511




14. 1
17.45
i.11811



1.51

0.t61






5.6
5 7.0
7.24

14 6i
.1.33


7.20


:3.10 10.46 3.78s
1.41 9..17 3.73
2 1;i 9.3.?1 5.5.i
2.11I 10.41i 7.54 i
1.811 7.98 3.0 1
2.01 S.0 P .'sA5

2.48 10.28: .. 2,
2.llli S l. '1.11


2.81 8.1)0 3.07
.... 1.. ... 1.5
... 1.78
... ... 1 141 .
. 1 .
"1.47 14.6s ....... .
21 17. ..
I.S 0" .KS 8 1;".lI4 .


34. 14 4.
3.4 1 41......
.. 1. .874 ......
".71; 1M.11 .

; .9I (.1 11 1
3 : 8.' i i :.il
3.5l 10.7-1 ;i.!l'i
.... 3.74 8. 11S
.. ... 1 '4 4.8:
7 .-.- ...... .
0. 10.o8 '-.21"
.il 7.3 4.10
1. 1 1..7 4. 5
0.44 7 53 3.57
1..0 8. 0 3.50


4.11 '.11
7.18 10 to 1I
10.S7 8 t( 11
8.18 s8 to 1I
1l.21 s to i1
8.301 to 1(
11t.12 8to 11
12:;.01 8 tl II]
18.71 12 to 1:7
1;.21 It1 to 13

10.85 10 (I 12
1 .. ........
4.94 ........
. ... . .. ....
..... .. . .. .


I' to I12


Guaranteed Analysis


.00





( to b 3 to 5 ..... 4 to f 4to 6
5 to 2 to 4 ........ 4'o ( ( to 8
4 to ........ ........ i 7 to 8
4 to 5 to 5 ........ 7; 7 to 8
4 to 3 to 4 ........ 3to ( 10 to 12
ito o ( to 4 ...... 2! to 4 8 to10
ito I I o 2 ........ 2 o 3 1 l to 18
i to I to 3 ........ 3 to 4 12 1o14
11 I 1 to i Ill to 1.
ti t) to ; I' to 6


5 1o Ii 2 to :3



14 tot 1I 2'to 3
18 to l ... ..


i. l .. ... . .. ......
"2ti.51 .................
S...... 13.5.1

. .. .. l . 17 .
:. .. ........ 1 7 11 1
5i., 8 to I0 4 to Ii
5 711 8 to 1i to
11.74 8 tIn 11 tilo 7
3 91 11 )o 1 li t6o 8
1.!i2 G t71 .......
1.B7i .. ........

5 01 .... ... 8 t 10
14.;,8 ..... I to !
.'.97 8 'o 11 i toi 7I
11.81 8 to I 6 to 1,
8.34 8 to 10 6 to 8,


S2 tu it5


'. ... ........
21o 4 ........
3 to 4 ........
2 1 4 .......
3 to 4 ... .. .



lli,'"1.
2 o to
........ 3 o 3


1 to 3 ... ...
I to a ......
}4 to 1I ... .. .
1 to '2 .. ...


By Whom and Where Manufactured





Tampa F.ertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Tampa For ilize'r 'o., Tampa, Fla.
Tami a fertilizer Co., Tamp Fh.
Timpa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
T.mpa Fertilizer Co., Tampa. Fla.
I ampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Tamna F itillzer Co Tampa, FI .
Tampa Frrtilizer (o., Tamps, Fla.
A. Ober & Sons, Bnliimore, Md.
American Agr. _hem. Co., New York.


Sto 1 10 tell I Bugh & Sons. B,I timore, Md.
3 to 4 1 to a Tampa F, rtil;zor Co., Tampa, Fla,
Sto 3 4 L' 8 Taml a F r i izer C'., Ta pa, Fla. I
Ii t 18 ........ E 0. P. intctr Pert. Co, Jacksonville.
18 to I! ........ ampa Ferti izcr Co., Ta pa, Fli.
S...... Tampa. Fertilizer Co., Tampa, FI .
' ........ Tampa Feitilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
4 to ........ Stein. Hirsch & Co.. Chicago, 111.
.... .. 13.13 Baugh & Sonp, liltimo e, Md.
o........ to Tampa Fei tilizer 'o., Tami a, Fla.
........ ....... Little os. Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville
.................. E Painter FerL. Co., Jacksonville.
....... ......... 0. .Pa'nter Fer'. Co., Jacksonville.
r' to. : i to f Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
5 to 5 4 to i Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co.. N. Y.
3 o :1 to 3 1 Mape's Form. a Per. lGuano Co., N. Y.
4 t. 5I 3 to 4 Mape's Form. & Per. G.ano Co., N. Y.
8to81); to Z A A. Smith. Atlanta., Ga.
S.to ~ ...... Flo'idg Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonvi le.Fla.
..Littl- B os. FertilizerCo., Jacksonville.
%to 4 3'to i Wil sa n& ToomerF r.Co.,Jacksonvil e
4 tol 5 13 to 14 Wlllson & Toomer Fe.. Co.,Jacksonviile
5 to i 5 to t Willson &Toomer Fer. Co.,.ackson ill,
3 to 4 16o 12 Willsot, & Toom r Fer. Co.,Jacksonville
4 to 5 8 to 10 Willson& Toomer Fer. Co,Jacksonville


. :









AeidIPhosphate................ 12 15.7 4.07 19.7.....
DarkC. S. Meal .. .................... 1 2 ..... ... 2.04 5.44 1.46
Dark C. S. Meal................. ..... ... .. ,.28 5 0 1.31
Dixie Brand C. S. Meal ........ .16... .... 2.56 9.11 1.55
Kainit...... ........ ..... .. ..0 ...... 1 ......
Fish and Potash.............. 4.21 3.48 2.a04 5.52 6.89 7.35
Pi. apple Fruiter ............. 4.2 7.24 5.76 13.00 3.12 11 .2
Potato Manure.............. .. 5.95 5.83 1.7 7 ,0 3.85 8.'5
Lettuce and Uncumber, Special. 5.51) 5.0' 1.33 i .3.3 .4i0 5.72
P ruvian Fiph Guat.o. No. 1..... li 5.25 2.'I 7 .5 4.81 5..il1
Special for Fruit.............. 6.O 6).63 2.21 8.84 3.!90 12.(i
No. 2, Double Strength of Potash 6 6.5 6u 1.87 7.:,7 2.;6i .
Blood. Bone and Potash ..... 6. 75. fi6 3.43:1 4.54 4. (
No. 1,Felililzer........ ....... .u0 7.3 5.11 12.34 4.54 3. 93
No.2, Fertilizer..... .. .. 7.15 i.i2 3. 1 I). 1) 507 8.
No. 4, Fertilizer ............. .11 (l5 8), 3.7: 2 110.fi1 i.l I n
Dissolved Bone................... 11.21 3.6i4 11i 2.41
Cotton Seed Meal... ...... 7.6.... ...... 70 84 I
Almour's Practical Trucker ..... 7 .1, 7.11 5 s: 12.' 3 14 '.2.i
Armour's Orange Tree Manure.. 7. 8.01 7.4:1 15.,4 .S4 4.409
Armour's Fruit and Vine Fert... Ii.5 8. 5.(11 14.2 2.87 11.
Armour's Blood, Bone & Potash. 8.1l 7.13 4.,S 11.71 5.32 7.53
Armour'sFruit&RootCrop,Spcc 6.40 7.21 3.19. 11.20 3.45 5.2
Armour's B.ine Fl .ur ....... 3.7 8.42 15.10 24.0 .5 ...
,rmour's Dried Blood.......... 12.35 ... ..'.. ..... 1l 3 .
H. G. Tobacco Du.t ............ t.8 ..... 171 ]. 1 i
Armour's Blood and Bone ....... 775 3.73 8.)I 11.77 7. ......
H. G Blood and Bone ........... 9. 5. 5.91 1137 .4 ..
Blood and Bone.......... 8. 5 6.25 .11 15.30' 1i 7 ......
H. G. Blood and Bone...... 8. 3.53 .0 6....... ... ..
Acid Phosphate ............. .. 7. 16.9 7.10 24.02 ....
Strawberry Fruiter.............. 7.3 5.98 -'.41 8.39 .4 8.
Extra Fruit and Vine............ 6.ti 6.37 .11 8.50 '-.31 13.73
Cotton Seed Meal................ t. ...... .. 2.88 9.43 1.26
Cotton Seed Meal ............... 7.80 ... ...... 2.6 8.99 1 28
Cotton seed 'eal................ 5.96 ............ 8.29 1.504
Cotton Seed Meal............... 8.35 ... .... 2.66 7.93 1.38
H. G. Acid Phosphate........... 13.6 17.57 1.:3 18.87 ...... ......
A L.Wilson 6.60 Acid Phoiphati 12.3 14.77 3.76 7.53............
Branley'sXXX Pho-phbte. 8.0 14 8 1.76 16.14........
Dissolved Bone Pho-phate..... 14. 13.67 1.51 15.18.........
Atlas Acid Phosphate ......... 12.9. 15 49 1.29 17.78 ....
Acid Phosphate............. ... 13.75 34 0.2 12.2 ..
Bradley's Ialmitt Phosphat 7.95 14.89 1.58 6.... ....
Cumberland Bone Super Phoa... 16.15 10.71 1.62 12 ?3 2.07 1.71
Gou'ding's Bone Coapound... 13.96 9.73 3.9 13.71 2.09 1.51
Gem Guano... .13.9" 10.25 3. 13.4 13. 1 1.84
Lott's Compound .............. 3-45 4.3 8.4 12.83 1.83 12.75
3jmber and Festilizer........... 11.80 9.3 2.12 11 46 1 91 209
Mobile Standard Guano......... 7.45 9 6 4.74 1443 2.62 2.62
Raw Bone Super Phosnate... 13.55 10.50 1.30 13.89 2.15 1.73
gonldlng's[.G.ActdPhosp.&Pot 0.30 14.0 1.42 10.13 1,30


I ........ 15
8 to 12 ......
S8 to 12

10 to 1 2 to :3
10 to 12 4 to 5
10 to )2 5 t ) 6
II0 to 12 5 )o ;i
10 to 12 a to 6
.... .. ; to 8
10 to 12 5 to li
10 to 12 4 to 5
S....... 5 to l
i to 7
I S.. 1: i to0 15
5-to iC 1i to- 7
5 to 10 8 to 10
5 to 10 6 to 8
5 to 10 8 to 10
5 to 1 0 8 to 9!
5 to 10 10 to 14
0 to 13 ......
S 1o 1( .......
5 to 10 .......
5 to 10
5 to ...
5 to 7 .......


1i to 12
8 to 12
6 5-'F 75

12 to 15
I3 to 15
10 to 20
11
12 to 15
13 to 16
lu to 12
10 to 20
10 to 12
10 to 12
12
11 to 16
10 to 15
10 to 15


14.00
5 1o 6
6 to 8



15 to 17
14 to 16
13 to 15
13
13 to 15
12 to 14
12 to 24
8 to I.
8%-10M
8 to It'
5 to 6
8
8 to 10
9to10%
12 to 14


........ ... ... ........ ........ Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
........ 2 to 3 5 to 7, IM Forida Manufacturing Co., Madison.
........ 2 to 3 5 to 7 I.. I Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison
.... .. ........ Humphries,Goodwin &Co .Memphis,Tenn
........ ... .... 12 to 13 Little Brothers, Jacksonville.
3 to 4 ... 7 to 8 5 to 6Florida Fert Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fia.
Sto 7 ........ 3 to 4 12 to 13 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
2 3 ....... 3 to 4 to 10 Florida Ferc Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Sto ....... 7 to 8 4 to 5 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
I to 2 ..... 4ito51/ 5 to 6 Florida Fert. Mfg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
Sto 2........ 4 to 512 to 14 Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando, Fla.
2 to 3 .. .... Illto 2 10 to 12 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co.. (aiLesville, Fla.
2 to 3 ........ 4 to 4 to 5 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co. Gainesville, Fla
2 to 3 ....... 5 to 4 to 5 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
2 to 3 ........ 5to 6 10 to 12 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
2 to ...... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Snuthern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
3 to 4 ...... 2 5 3 ...... Florida Fert. Mfg.:Co., Gainesville, Fla.
2 to 3 .......8o 84 to 2 P. A. Smith, A'lanta, Ga.
2 to .... 3 to 410 to 12 Armour FeBtilizer \vorks, Jacksonville.
2 to 4 ... .... 4 to 5 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
I to 2 ........ 23to3I!410 to 13 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
1 to 2 ...... 5 to 617 to 8 Armour Ferti izer Works, Jacksonville.
1 to 2... 2 to 3 5 to Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
......... 24 to 28 3 to 4....... Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
..... ....... 16 to 17 ....... Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
........ ....... 11to3% IM to 3 Armour fertilizerr Works, Jscksonville.
....... 10 to i': 7 to 8 ......... ArmourFertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
2.... to I **.1 0 .......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
S........ 15 to :. o 8 .......Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
...... 4. 58 o ........... Amour Packing Co., Chicago. 11.
...... . .. .... ........... Little Brothers, Jacksonville
2 to ...... 2 to 310 to 12 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
....... .. 2 to 314 to 16 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
........ i 1.85 Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala.
. ... to. '. *. 1 to 2 Trader's Cotton OilCo., Union Springs,Ala
........ 2-2.80 7 i-7 5 1to 2.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co Montgomery,Ala
210 7 '50 2 labama Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
1 to 2 .. .................. Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
] to 2 .......... .......... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2 to 3 ...................... Bradley Fertilizer Co., Boston, Mass.
1.50 .... ............... Georgia Chemical Works, Augusta. Ga.
2 to 3 ..... .. ......... toulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2 to 4 .. ...... ............ Virginia, Carolina Chem.Co.,Richmond,Va
2 10 3 ................. Bradley Fertilizer Co. Boston, Mass.
1 to 2 ...... 2 to 3 1 to 2 Cumberland Bone Phos. Co., Portland,Md
1 to 2 .. .. 2 to 2 to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla
1 to 2 ........ to 2 2 to Go Iding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
....... ....... % 2to 12 to l1 B. M. Lott. Havana, Fla.
2 ..... 2 2 Mulual Fertilizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
1% to 2 ........ 2 to 3 2 to 3 Mobile Phosphace Co., Mobile, Ala.
1 to 3 ...... 3 to 38 1 to 3 Standard Guano &Chem. Co., New Orleans
1 to Z ........ ..... to 3 Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Flai










Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluble phosphoric acid-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,'
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of Bone
Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or Muriate of Potash" or
equivalents of "Nitrate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Ammonia;" basing his
calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of the good,
offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of fertility re-
quired, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the commercial
values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular elements his
crop or soil demands, can intelligently '-sluct the goods required, and ap-
proximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requirgs'lat:
Sec. 3. Every bag, 'barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
cotton seed meal, ca tor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached hwr labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fer lizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, he percentage of potash
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all other
ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale, each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show to the satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of
Bone Phosphate of Lime," it may be taken as insoluble to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate Contains 26 to 35 per cent. of "phosphoric
acid" equivalent to 501 to 86 per cent. of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its
commercial value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into
"Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent. "avail-
able" has a commercial value of $12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural











value is proportionately much greater as raw or untreated rock, has but
little agricultural value.
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"dissolved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of the State
Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900, serial number 36, is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative
and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay no attention whatever to
names and brands. They v1,ould realize, for instance, that in nine cases
out of ten, brands known !,s "Pure DissolverchBoNe" contain not a particle
of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate -rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made frol hbone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof' hat such brands
are not made from bone is that they contain no amj1ionia, and if they
were made from bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for
purchasing when general trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with
some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phosphoric
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a first-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to
buy on time and pay interest, why then be assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manurial chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons. The same
figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa, for spot cash f. o. b. cars:
Lessthan 5 to 10 10
5 tons Ions tons
High Grade Potash 91 to 95 per cent.sulnhate (49 to 5) p.r cent. K 20)..... .852 00 $5100 $%0O00
Sulphate Pot ish. 4S to 55 per cent. sulphate (25 to 3 I per cent (K2O)...... 3200 3100 3000
Muriate Potash, 89 to f5 percent. Muri.te 423to45 per cent. K20) ............ 46(( 4500 4400










Kainit, 12 to 13 percent. Actual Potah...................................... 1500 14 50 1300
Blood and Bone, 6% per cent Ammonia................................... 2650 2600 2550
Blood and Bone, 7 to 8 per cent. Ammonia.............................. 2750 .7 00 20 5
Blood and Bone, 10 per cent. Ammoni............... .............. .... 3200 3150 3100
1iaw Bone Meal, 2 to 4 p:r cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per cent. total Phos-
phor c Acid... ..................... ................ 3200 3150 3100
Boneulack, 16 ,o j8 per cent. available Phosphoric Acid.................... 500 2450 2400
Acid Poos hate, 14 per cent. Phosphoric Acid... .............. .......... 13 0 1250 1200
Niirate Soda, 18 to li per cent. Ammonia........ ........................... 4700 46 50 4600
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 ler cent. Ammoni .. ........................ 2 00 71 00 7000
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia ........ ........................ 47 00 4650 4600
Ground Casto Pomace, 6 to 7 per cent. Ammonia ......................... 21 0 2 0 2000
Canada Hard Wood Ah-es, to b per cent K, U (Potash).................... 1500 14 .l 1400
Pulverized 'lobicco Stem,, 5 to 8 per ceut. K 20 (Potash)................... 15 (0 1450 1400
Tobacco Sten s (Baled) 5 to 1 per cent. K20 (Potash) ..................... Id(0 15.50 1500
Tobacco iust, High Grade 5 to s per cent. K20 (Potash).................. 2100 2050 0 00
teamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 1 er cent. Ammonia, 25 to 28 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid....................... ... ..................... 25 0 2450 2400
Br ght Cotton ,-eed Meal, 7 to 9 per cent. Ammonia......................... 2650 26( U 25 00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6 to 8 per cent. Ammonia.............. ............ 22 0 215) 21 (0
"Blood and Bone," "Tankage," "Garbage" and numerous other by
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cottdh seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and li per cent.
of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00 ..........................$24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00 .................. 2 00
1 per cent. potash (@ $1.10 ............................ 1 65

$27 65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled
"For feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
41 to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1i to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1J to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:







22


4) per cent. ammonia.................................. $13 50
1j per cent. phosphoric acid ........................... 1 75
1 per cent. potash ................................... 1 65
Commercial value ................................ $16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal.
Their relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy
in the use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of
the meal depending only on its content of amomnia, phosphoric acid and
potash in both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis,
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements only.

ORGANIC AMMONIATES.
It is generally conceded by pineapple growers that the sulphates of am-
monia and potash are harmful to pineapples. The universal practice among
the pineapple growers is to use organic fertilizers only-cotton seed meal,
castor pomace, blood and bone for ammoniates; ashes, tobacco and nitrate
of potash for potash.
Blood and bone supplying ammonia and phosphoric acid, also consider-
able "Tankage, and "Garbage," reinforced by sulphate of ammonia, has
been found in the State an unquestionably valuable fertilizer for certain
crops, is generally acknowledged hurtful to pines.
The State law, section 3, requires the manufacturers to state in the
"guarantee on each package the percentage of ammonia and the source
from which it is derived." A failure to state the source of the ammonia
in a fertilizer is a violation of the law.
Purchasers requiring only "oragnic ammonia" in their fertilizers
should see that this important part of the guarantee is complied with.

MECHANICAL CONDITION.
A number of complaints have been made to the department this season
of failure of vegetable crops, using certain brands of goods. On exam-
ination chemically, these goods have been found well within the guarantee
of their makers. The same goods (that is, goods having the same amounts
of fertilizing elements) have proved satisfactory to growers in the same
localities, and under the same conditions. The difference in results can be
attributed solely to the imperfect grinding and failure to properly mix the
goods complained of. In all cases the best results have been had from
those goods having the best mechanical condition.
Other things being equal, those goods most finely pulverized and well
mixed have proved most satisfactory. Coarse ground "Blood and Bone,"
"'Tankage" and "Mixed" Fertilizers" using such coarse material in com-









pounding, have proved -unsatisfactory in producing quick results, as de-
manded by the vegetable growers of the State.
That the mechanical condition of commercial fertilizers has much to do
with results, has been practically demonstrated, particularly among the
vegetable growers of the State.

TOBACCO DUST.

Large quantities of tobacco dust are used in this State, particularly by
pineapple growers. It is valuable mostly for its potash, and for its pun-
:gent or aromatic properties, as an insecticide. No material offered in the
:State v4aies more in its composition and value, nor is anything more apt
to be adulterated or "loaded."
Analysis of two samples taken from different parts of the State show
58.43 per cent. and 51.30 per cent. (more than half) to be simply clay or
-fine sand. The "commercial value" of different samples are shown in the
preceding analysis, varies from $23.20 to $10.92 per ton. Purchasers
should buy only on guarantee and pay for what they get. Manufacturers
and dealers purchase only on guarantee and settle according to analysis.
This particular material varies in value probably' more than any other
on the market, and requires the utmost care on the part of the dealer and
consumer to prevent confusion, disappointment and dissatisfaction.
If purchasers demand the guarantee and refuse to purchase goods shown
by the guarantee to be worth less than the price demanded, this condition
will soon cease.


ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO CANADA ASHES.

There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this State. When
they can be purchased at a price comparable with their actual value they
are doubtless a most valuable source of potash. The average price of these
goods is, however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained from this
source generally costs much more than from other reliable sources-Sul-
phate, or Muriate of Potash, Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory,
Maple, Palmetto and other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0.57 to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth from $0.62 to
$4.66 per ton at seaports. The average of four samples shows 2.56 pr
cent. of Potash. Guarantees are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The
minimum is the actual guarantee. The best unleached ashes contain but
.8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.









SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequent requests are made for soil analysis by our farmers. We are
pleased to comply so far as our time and apparatus will permit, and
give what information we can. Soil analysis, however, has, except in es-
pecial cases, proved very unsatisfactory from a practical standpoint. The
local conditions of drainage, areation, tilth, seepage, etc., have so great an
influence that the deductions from a small sample in the laboratory under
entirely different conditions from those in the field are misleading.
A soil may have an abundance of phosphoric acid, as shown by analysis
in the laboratory, while the application of phosphates in an available form
will greatly increase the crop. *
A large amount of ammonia may be discovered by analysis, and still the
land, or soil, be sterile. This is particularly illustrated by the undrainned
muck soils of the State, frequently having from 1.50 to 2 per cent. of
ammonia. These soils in their natural condition (or partially drained)
are practically barren, as to cultivated crops. When put in first-class me-
chanical condition, thoroughly drained, and "areated," they are exceeding-
ly productive. The -"1.il woods" of Florida are frequently fertile, with
sufficient plant food in an unavailable condition, requiring only thorough
drainage to make them exceedingly productive.
A good mechanical condition, together with perfect drainage, is as nec-
essary as plant food to insure profitable returns.


REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND FORWARDING
OF FERTILIZER SAMPLES TO THE COMMISSIONER OF
AGRICULTURE.-SECT, 15 OF LAW.
Special samples of fertilizer sent in by purchasers, under Sec. 9 of the
law approved May 22, 1901. Shall be drawn in the presence of two disin-
terested witnesses, from one or more packages, thoroughly mixed, and a fair
sample of the same of not less than eight ounces (one-half pound) shall
be placed in a can or bottle, sealed and sent by a disinterested party to the
Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Not less than eight ounces,
in a tin can or bottle will be accepted for analysis. This rule is adopted
to secure fair samples of sufficient size to make the six necessary determina-
tions, viz: moisture, available and insoluable phosphoric acid, amonia,
and potash; and to allow the preservation of a duplicate sample in case of
protest or appeal. These duplicate samples will be preserved for two
months from date of certificate of analysis.







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ClImaltologial Data for July, 1902.


Stations Counties






:NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............. Alachua....... 92
iFederal Point....... St. Jchns....... 10
Fernandina........ Nassiu ......... 15
Fort George ....... Duval.......... ..
Gainesville ......... Alachua........ 175
:Huntington ....... Putnam........ 50
.Jacksonville........ Duval.......... 43
Jasper.. ...... Hamilton...... 165
Johnstown.......... Bradford ....
Lake City........ Columbia....... 201
Macclenny.... ..... Baker .... 14
licanopy .......... Alachua..... .105
Pinemoun t.... ...Suwannee........
Rideout............. Clay...........
St. Augustine ..... J9. os.,...... 10


--9p--- -


Precipitation, in inches


0




C51
-.







8.67 +2.831.8
3.72 -3 651 01


0








18
9
1
17
10
6
30
5

13
7
7

52
58


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit











81.8 +1.3 101 1* 65 1 36
82.4 +1.9 102 1 66 7* 35
82.4 +1.8 98 2 6823 23
82.4 +1 4 9529 7326 ..
82.4 0 9 102 7 68 13 30
82 8 -1.1 102 1 66 7 32
88 0 1.0 101 7 6913 26

80.8 -1.3 100 6 6312 35
82.4 +1.3 101 2 6525 29
88.8 -1.3 104 1 67 1* 37

83:61.... 102 67 724i 31
82.3. .. 102 1* 66 7 86
81.6 -0.2 97 7 7926 21


Sky






. 0. 0. ,


0
0E


0
0"

a.


Be
ne



BW

sw
sw
se

sw
w


5.86

4.85
6.86
6.69

4.72
7.41
4.50

4.48
2.47
4 49


1
0


-:---._____-fc--^ - --I : I -"J--


-1.062 (>4

-1 991 50
+0 12 1 59
+0 87 2 52

-3 08 2 05
+0 13 2 75
-4 100 97
...... ....
......11
..... 0 72
-1.821 96







Ilimatological )ata for Julv-(Continued.)


Stations


.Sutnner ..........
Switzerland ........


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow.............
Brooksville.........
Clermont..........
DeLand ..........
Eustis ............ ...
Ft. Meade........
Fort Pierce........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee .........
Malabar .........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smryna..........
Ocala..............
Orange 31ity........
Orlando............
Plant City.........
Rock well .........
gt. Leo...........
Tampa. ...........


Counties


Levy ..... .. .....
,t. Johns......

Mqans .......


Polk.... ......
Hernando......
Lake ...........
Volusia ........
Lak ..... .....
Polk ..........
Brevard ... ...
,Citrus. ..........
O.ceola ........
Brevard.... ...
Brevard........
Volusia..........
Marion .......
Volusia :....
Orange ........
Hillsborough...
Marion ........
Pasco........
lllsborough. ..


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches
Fahrenheit


-s





81.0 0.0 100 7
i s




b8l 6 +1 5 bh09 7

82 22 + 6 .. .


82 24-0 8 95 7
82 1 +1 4 102 7
83 8+0 7 103 7-
828 2 .. 97 7
85 2+8 0 10411
82 1 -2.1 100 8
80 4-2 0 92 7*
82 4 .... 102 7
88 3 +0 7 10013

82 4 -1 0 94 7
80 5:-0 1 97 1
82 5+1 3 102 2*

828+ 41 2 96 2*
81 2--0 3 9914

82 3--0 7 2 7
81 51+0 2 96 8


66
b66


C


110 29
14* b33



16 22
20* 29
14* 28
23 22
21 28
20 30
7* 27
i9* 31
9* 28
22* 28
26 18
7*a 28
10 32

18* 25
14 33

10* 33
13 24


6 35

3 97
3 53
4 64

2 10
9 56
6.74
3.09
5 36
3 26
5 18
6 40
8 41

5 43
3 54T

7 34
7 64


a
Sl S

o 1

Q 5Z


Sky



I 0

S- a

=l 30 g00
Z Z Z


-0.732.63 11 9
- 4 87 25 1 ...

-2 34 ... 11


--5 49
-5 99
-2 48

--4 69
+1 31
+1 22

-0 68

-0 04
4-0 97s
+1.64

-1 18


-7 01
-0 50


0




a


3sw


5 se-sw


0 se
3w

35se


11se
4sw
. I; e....
1se
3se
3 se
4 ......

4.


5 w
8 1,e


--------- -------------.








Tarpon Aprngs..;. I Eillsborough ..
Titusville .......... Br ward........


SOUTHERN SECTION.

Avon Park.........
Flamingo..... ...
Hypoluxo..........
Jupiter. ..........
Koy West........
Manatee...........
Marco .... ....
Miami. ......
Myers .............
Nocatee .. .......


WESTERN SECTION.

B)nifay ...........
Carrabelle..........
DeFuniak Springs..
H olt....... ......
Marianna .........
Molino ........ ...
Pensacola..........
Quincy.... ..........
St Andrew......
Stephensville ........
Tallahassee.... ....
Waukeenah.........
W ausau............
Wewahitchka ......


,leans ..... ....


1)-8 o ........ .
Monroe ...... ..
)adte....... ..
Dade......... .. 2E
Vonroe.... .... 2
MVanatee........
L P....... ...... ..
Dade ...... ..
L'e ... ....
DeSoto.... ... 4 *

Means .. ....


:olmes ........ 116
Franklin ..... 12
Walton ... ... 193
SLnra Rosa. ... 20
Jack.on....... I5
Eucambia .....
Eisonblia ...... 56
Gadsden ..... 26(1
Wa.slington.... .. .
Paylor............ .
Leon ... ...... 193
J, ff&rson.........
Washington .. 25t
Calhoun..........

Means....... ..
State Means ....


81.6 +0.4
81 4 -0 7

82 2 +0 4


82.5 .. .
g82 8 ....
81 2 -0 1
81 6+1 0
83 2 0 0
81 0-0 1
82 4 ..
82 9 +0 2
80 6 -0 4
8: 0 .....

82 1 +0 8


82 7 ... .
8:h 2+1 4
82 0-+1 4
81 2 .....
82 4 .....
82 2 ..
82 2 1 0
83 8 ...
83 (0 + 2
83 2 .
81 4+10
83 4
83 2+1 0
82 0 ...

82 +1 0
82 3+0 8


961 8 67 19
96ts 6* 66125


27 7.30
27 6.69

S5.45


8 68
2 94
1 72
4 73
1 57
11 66
8 41
3 28
4 60
5 19

5 28


-4.98 2.00
+1 093 38

-2 3 ....


1. 1 0
...... 1 64
-2 78 0 63
-0 45 1 21
-2 170 81
+0 05 4 18
.. .. 60
--4 59 0 88
S3 4> 0 96
I 60

-2 66 ....


21 4
16 6

14 4


;0 7
0 .
15 2
18 6
15 3
19 3
-0 1
11 0
11 0
0 20

11 4


1027 6624 30 320 ...... 1 30 7 0 11
96 7 6721 23 7 08 +1 92 0 9 5 ,C
104 6625 31 4 72 3 16 1 12 14 2 29
103 56 6 44 3 30 ...... 00 5.... .
98 2* 6924 2 5 14 ...... 2 0 3 14 17
105 7 6425 86 5 11 ..... 57 6 19 10
92 7 7121 It 2 01 -4 660 72 11 10 17
104 Y 6525 383 19 ......0 88 6 11 16
100 7 6921 26 5 20 -3 321 48 14 21 1(1
103 7 70 8 30 8 84 ..:... 30 12 3 26
9 2 665 22 5 83 -2 400 87 16 17 14
104 8 66 25 30 2 08 ...... t 10 5 20 8
105 7 6726* 366 623 +0 548 00 11 3 26
1007 6813 31 4 57 ..... 1 41 17 2 2

.... ... .. .. .... 4 68 -2 74 ... 10 10 17
... . .. . ...... 5 20 1 47 . . 11 12 15


nW
se

se



Be
se
se
e
Be
se-sw




so
eet


20sw
6sw
0 ......
..... "6 "...
Osw
2s
4 n
4e
0 iw
2sw
0 .....
3 w
2 ......
4s

4 sw
4ise







Climatological Data for July, 1902-Continued.


Stations


MISCELLANEOUS.

Bainbridge...........
Daphne............
Havana........ ..
Mobile ...........
Montgomery .......
Nassau ...........
San Juan.... ......
Savannah, Ga .......
Thomasville, Ga....
Waycross, Ga......
LATE REPORT.
JU~n 1902.
San Jnan .. ......


Counties


Decatur, Ga ..... 111
Btldwiu, Ala...
C iu' .t ...... 5,
%Mobile, Ala .... 3
nontgoin'y. Ala 21'
N. P. B.hamas ...
Puerto Rico.... 8
Chatham. Ga.. 38
Ihomas. Ga ... 33'
Ware, Ga ...... 13


Porto Rico .....


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


S
&
2-.
E s
**> C *
i S


Q


a


102 7 67 5 29i
98 7 6725 281
9128 6919 201
96 7 7620 22
ll1 7 681i3 27
90 7* 70 13* 18
87 1z* 71 23 15
101 6 7013 x7
102 7 6625 25
102 1* 67116 28


91 4 71 16 15 1


Precipitation, in inches Sky








=' -
I a 1 1 z z tz z
F- ~E Q ~ .5 Z; %


3.87
2 25
2 37
2 65
0 43
1 62
4 61
9 28
4 52
8 J16


2.22


-2 770.93
-5 37 1 ('0
-2 69 1 33
-4 06 0 '83
-3 96 0 17
...... 0 90
-1 33 I 15
+3 46 3 32
-2 37 1 27
+2 91 8 83


+6 591.84


12 .... .... ... .
4 16 13' 2
7 18 16 2
15 15 9 7
7 1i 14 7
8 ..... ... ...
22 7 S1 3
11 12 17 2
161. . . .. ...
141 ... .. ....


22 7 7 16


tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
made at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily. in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
*More than one day. SWeather Bureau. only such stations as have normal.
Not included in means. Name of postoffice changed a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
from St. Andrew's Bay to St. Andrew, and name of staton of days missing from report,
changed accordingly.


0
0~c
0r
I..~

1B
PJ0


.w
e
nw
sw


sw




se


0 ij


"7


-------------~-----













Salient Climatic Features.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean pressure for the month was 30.06 inches, which is 0.04. inch
above normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.22 inches at Jupiter
and Tampa on the 3d; the lowest observed pressure was 29.95 inches, at
Jasksonville on the llth and Tampa on the 25th; monthly range for the
State was 0.27 inch.

TEMPERATURE- (Degrees Fahrenheit).

The monthly mean temperature for the State was 82.3 degrees, 0.8 de-
grees above normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 82.2 de-
grees; Central, 82.2 degrees; Southern, 82.1 degrees; Western, 82.6 de-
grees. The highest monthly mean temperature was 85.2 degrees, at Eus-
tis; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 80.4 degrees, at Fort
Pierce. The highest temperature during the month was 105 degrees, at
Molino and Wausau on the 7th; the lowest temperature was 56 degrees,
at Holt on the 6th; absolute range for the State was 49 degrees.

PRECIPITATION-(Inches and hundredths).

The average precipitation for the State during the month was 5.20 inch-
es, 1.47 inches below the normal amount. By sections, the averages were
Northern, 5.35 inches; Central, -.45 inches; Southern, 5.28 inches; West-
ern, 4.68 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 11.66 inches, at Man-
atee; and the least was 1.57 inches, at Key West. The greatest amount
for any twenty-our hours was 4.18 inches, at Manatee on the 27th.

WIND AND WEATHER.

The prevailing winds during the month were from the southeast. By
sections, there were: Northern, 11 clear days; 15 partly cloudy; 5 cloudy.
Central, 13 clear; 14 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy. Southern, 16 clear; 11
partly cloudy; 4 cloudy. Western, 10 clear; 17 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy.
Rainy days: Northenr section, 13; Central, 12; Southern, 10; West-
ern, 10.









0
MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA--(Dates of).

Hail.-Archer, 20; Brooksville, 12; Fort Meade, 8; Jacksonville, 13;
Sumner, 8.
Lunar Halo.-Federal Point, 22; Avon Park, 25, 26, 27.
Solar Halo.-Rideout, 5, 7, 8, 22, 24, 26, 28, 31.
Thunderstorms.-Archer, 4, 20, 31; Federal Point, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18,
20,21,22,23, 27, 30, 31; Gainesville, 2 to 8, 11, 13 to 18, 20, 21, 23,28, 31;
Rideont, 1, 2, 6, 11, 13, 15, 19, 20, 23, 24, 27, 30: Brooksville, 5, 6, 12,
14 ,17, 19 to 30; Eustis, 4 to 9, 12, 13, 14, 28, 30, 31; Fort Meade, 7, 8,
11, 12, 13, 1'5, 19, 20, 21, 22,'23, 26, 27; Fort Pierce, 20 to 23, 25 to 28,
30; Merritt's Island, 1, 6, 7, 11 to 20, 22 to 31; Ocala, 7, 21, 27, 30; Or-
lando, 7, 8, 12, 15, 16, 19 to 25, 27, 30; St. Leo, 5 to 8, 11 to 17, 19 to 23,
26, 31; Tarpon Springs, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19; Titusville, 21, 22, 24, 27, 31;
Avon Park, 8, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28; Hypoluxo, 21 to 27; Manatee,
3, 4, 8, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 20 to 25, 27; Miami, 14, 19, 20, 21, 23; Myers,
1, to 31; Carrabclle, 7, 14, 29; Marianna, 6, 7, 13; Molino, 11, 12, 15, 20,
S 28, 29 30; Wewahitchka, 3, 4, 7, 8, 19, 20 22, 23, 26; Tampa, 7, 8, 12, 13,
16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23, 26; Jacksonville, 2, 6, 7, 11, 13, to 24, 27, 29, 30, 31.



WEATHER AND CROPS DURING JULY.

The first decade of the month was characterized by local showers-
light and widely scattered-being most frequent over portions of the west-
ern and southern districts. Showers became more general during the sec-
ond decade and covered a wider territory, with some heavy rains over lim-
ited sections-mostly the southern and western. As the month advanced
the dry weather became less noticeable, rains becoming almost general dur-
ing the early part of the third decade-diminishing during the last few
days of the month.
Precipitation for the month was greatest in Manatee County, where
11.66 inches are reported; the least precipitaiton occurred over the ex-
treme southern section of the State, Key West having less than two inches.
The month, as a whole, was one giving typical local showers, and in
view of which crop conditions vary, depending on the frequency and suffi-
ciency of rains. In the same county the condition of crops ranges
from very good to almost a failure.











COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR JULY, WITIB
DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST ELEVEN YEARS.

The normal temperature for July is 81.5 deg., the normal rainfall is 6.67
inches.


Year 1892 1893, 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902


Mean .... 81.4 82.1 80.4 81.1 81.4 82 1 81.6 8U.9 81.7 81 82.3
Departure -0.1 +0.8 -1.1 -0.4 -0.1 +0.6 +.1 -0.6 -0.2 -+0.3+0.8

Total.... 4.69 5.14 8.04 7.16 3.18 6.90 8.66 8.88 7.41 6.67 5.20
Departure-1.98 -1.58 +1.7 +0.49-3.49+0.23 1.99+2.21+0.74 U.00-1.47




PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE


Atmospheric Pressure Wind Velocity. Relative
in Miles Humidity
S.






Jupiter................... 0.08 30.22 3 29.9825 5.977 348sw 26 9568180
Key West.............. 30.04 30.16 3 29.96 265,254 24 ne l4 8362 72
Pensacola .............. *30.09 30.21 3 29.9726 5,956| 40 e 8 85 65/ 77
8 a. m. readings only.
it


Jacksonville............. 30.06 80.21 3 29.95 11 4.981 36 s21 9667 76
Jupiter.W............... 0.08 30.22 3 29.98125 5.977 84 sw 26 68 80
Key West .............. 30.04 30.16 3 29.96126 5,254 6ne1 2 72
Pensacola ..............30.09 0.21 8 29.97 26 ,956 4 e 85 65 77

*8 a. m. readings only.







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