Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00012
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: July 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
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FLORIDA


(Department of Agriculture.)



..Monthly Bulletin..


JULY, 1902.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crope.
Part II. Fertilizers.
Part III. Weather Report.
Part IV. Miscellaneous.


TALLAHASSEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them . .


Vol.2. N. 77


I Vol. 12.


N6. 77.









County Map of the State of Florida.
(Foi Dhe Bulletin.)










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HON B. E. McLiN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.

ALACHUA COUNTY-Now that rain has begun, crops are doing very
much better; corn is very short, and cotton has also been damaged, but
rains are improving it; cane, peas, bean and rice crops were hurt, but are
getting into good shape; rains are interfering with fodder pulling. Stock
is in fine average condition; hogs in some localities are not doing so well.
BAKER COUNTY-The dry weather did a great deal of damage, and cut
crops of all kinds short, but corn, rice, peas, beans, and potatoes will come
out very much since the rains have begun. Stock in general in good condi-
tion.
BRADFORD COUNTY-Cotton will soon begin to open; it has been greatly
impaired since the rain began; all crops are improving, except corn, which
is very short.
BREVARD COUNTY-Crops are all good; we plant very little tobacco,.
and have no sheep in the county; live stock is all in good condition; fruit
crops are quite promising, and the trees are in excellent growing condition.
CALHOUN COUNTY-The rains have made great improvements in all
crops, but corn, which had about matured, and which will be a very short
crop; continued rains will, if moderate in quantity, enable farmers to
make fair crops; stock is in very good condition.
CLAY COUNTY-With the exception of corn, which is very short, crops
are now doing well since the rains have begun, and if the season continues
favorable the yield of most crops will be very good; live stock is in good
condition.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-The excessive heat has been very injurious to the
crops; corn has been cut short ten per cent, and cotton has shed to a damag-
ing extent; live stock is in fair condition.
DADE COUNTY-Crops that grow in this county are good; the vegeta-
ble crops all marketed; fruit crops of all kinds are in good condition; yield
will be good; trees growing finely; stock all in good condition.
DESOTO COUNTY-There is no longer any doubt that the rainy season
is with us; in consequence the crops and all vegetation is growing with








great rapidity; crops are improving fast, and will average good yields;
stock is in fair condition.
EsacxBIA COUNTY-Early planted crops are practically failures; late
crops -will with rain do very well; live stock is in fair average condition.
FukNxL.N COUNTY-Corn is a failure; other crops doing fairly well,
and mostof them will make pretty good yields if we have rain soon; live
stock is (doing well.
:GADSDEN -COUNTY-Corn is very. short, not less than 10 per cent; cotton
is doing~ well, and will improve when rain begins; tobacco will be a very
fair.crop: werysgood, condition; everything will improve as soon as the rain begins.
1ffiAHILON COUNTY-On account of the severe and long continued dry
weather, (crops of all kinds are short, some worse than others; the average
eondifian (ofi live stock is good.
IHERNANDO COUNTY-Corn is somewhat short, but the average of
ycrops:is generally good, and the yield will be fair; fruit trees are growing
wit,; live stock is.in good condition.
HTuIF'BOROUGH COUNTY-Some localities in the county are still dry,
Abut xains are falling in most sections of the county, and are benefitting
;crops;.niuit trees are growing nicely; stock of horses, mules and cattle are
doing .werygwell.
HonErs 'COUNTY-The drought ruined all the vegetable crops, and also
tobacco; cotton and other crops are holding their own, and if rain comes
:soon, will turn out very well, except corn, which is short and past saving;
stodk is in fair condition.
JACKSON COUNTY-The crops are all suffering from the effects of
'drought; corn is very poor, and rain will hardly do it much good; but rain
-will help other crops if it comes soon; live stock is doing very well.
LEE COUNTY-All crops are good; we are having plenty of rain, and
,crops and fruit trees are making a fine growth; fruit crops will be fine of
all sorts, and live stock is in very fine condition.
LEON COUNTY-Corn is generally believed to be-at least 25 per cent.
off from last year on account of the.long dry and severe drought; cotton is
about the same as last year; all crops are considerably injured by the dry
weather; live stock is doing well.
LEVY COUNTY-Corn crop is short; cotton and other field crops are now
improving-since the rains have begun; there is some cholera among hogs,
cattle suffered from dry hot weather, but are now improving.
MADISON COUNTY-The drought has damaged corn very much; cotton
will be about an average crop; other field crops are doing very well, and.
will improve when rains set in; stock is in a healthy condition generally.











MANATEE COUNTY-Crops are in fair condition; fruit trees are'growiig
nicely; and a fair crop of fruit is anticipated; live stock is in good ordir.
MARION COUNTY-We have been having a little too much rain of lte,
but up to the present time do not think any damage has been done yet;
should it continue much longer, the Sea Island cotton crop will feel iti
effects; crops are all in good condition; live stock doing very well.firuit
trees doing finely, and fair crops will result.
NASSAU COUNTY-Dry weather kept back all crops, but late raihi will
bring them out all right; stock in fine condition; no disease heard of'among
them.
ORANGE COUNTY-It has been the dryest weather we have had for a
good many years, and consequently crops have suffered for rain; corn wil
be a fair crop; stock of all kinds looking well.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-Continued drought in July caused further injury
to corn and delayed setting of sweet potatoes; fruit trees are growing very
well, and live stock is in good condition.
POLK COUNTY-Except corn, the crops have done very well, and are
growing nicely; fruit trees doing very well, and have on them a very goo&
crop of fruit; all kinds of live stock in fine condition.
ST. JOHxs COUNTY-The drought cut short the corn crop about one
half ; has stunted the cane crop and almost ruined the potato crop on high
lands; it has also damaged the fruit trees and pea crop, and has played
havoc with strawberry plants, cassava and velvet beans stands alone as
drought resisters; stock is in tolerably good condition, it having also suffer-
ed from hot weather.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-The corn crop is a failure, and all other crops
are more or less damaged, all caused by the long continued hot weather;
horses and cattle are doing well, but hogs and sheep not quite so well.
SUMTER COUNTY-We have had less rainfall during June and July
than ever before known, which did considerable damage to crops; the past
week we have had good rain; live stock is in fair condition.
SUWANNEE COUNTY-The prospect is encouraging for a goodlgeneral
crop; frequent showers of rain are doing much good, from present ihdica-
tions our county will produce a plenty of corn.
TAYLOR COUNTY-Crops are only medium; ,the dry weather did'mgoodi
deal of damage; corn very short; stock is in general good condition.
VOLUSIA COUNTY-All crops hav been injured by long drought; sweet
potatoes are a month late in planting; live stock in good condition.
WAKULLA COUNTY-Corn is shorter than for years; cotton is doing
well, but will lose much if rain is not soon to come; other rops are alsm









6

suffering and will all be more or less short; stock is doing fairly well, and
will still improve when the rainy season begins.
WALTON COUNTY-All crops have been damaged by the long drought,
especially the corn crop, which is very short; live stock is doing well; potato
just being planted.
WASHINGTON COUNTY-Crops of all kinds have been severely injured;
corn crops will be shortest in years; cotton holds its own fairly well; if
rain comes soon, other field crops will improve a great deal, but, corn is past
improvement; live stock is in fair average condition.












Repo-t of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for
July, 1902, as Compared with an Average.


Counties




Alachua................
Baker ..... ...........
Bradford......... ....
Brevard..............
,Calhoun..............
Clay ....... ..........
,4olumbia...............
Dade ...................
DeSoto..................
Escambia .............
Franklin..............
*Gadsden ..............
Hamilton. ............
fHernando...........
Hillsborough............
Holmes .............
Jackson................
LFayette..............
Lee ....................
Leon ..................
Levy................
,M adison ...............
Manatee ............ ..
Marion ................
'Nassau ................
Orange.......... .....
,Osceola............
Polk ..................
St. Johns...............
:Santa Rosa..............
Sumter..............
Suwannee........ .....
Taylor .... ............
Volusia ...............
W akulla................
Walton .............
Washington............
General averages......


Upland dC P
Upland Iand Corn Sugar Field Rice
Cotton Cotton Cane Peas Rice


-J 0- 0- ;- 00
a aS aO O 0 O.
c a 6 u [L| o :6 s 6 a! : 2'S


.... ... 90 85 70 70 80 95 80 85 85 90
.... .... .... 100 100 100 100 100 100
90 90 0 85 75 75 80 100 90 85 ... .
...... 80 75 50 50 100 90 90 0 100 100
.. .. 100 100 90 100 90 100 100 100 100 00
.... .... .... .... ... . . 1 00 ... .
.... ... .. .... 80 90 100 95 100 110 100 110
70 75 .. ... 40 40 50 50 100 100 50 50
.... .... .... 75 75 90 90 0 90 ... ......
110 110 100 100 75 85 75 100 110 100 100 100
.... .... 50 50 60 50 25 50 25 50 25 60
.... .... .... 80 60 75 80 50 25 70 70
90 75 50 50 100 100 1 100
90 95 .... ... 60 60 100 100 95 100 80 80
75 75 60 6 70 70 80 80 100 100 100 100
S... 90 80 75 100 100 90 100 100 1
.. 100 100 100 90 90 100 100
95 10 0.. .. 751 75 80 100 90 90 85 90
80 80 90 90 7 75 100 100 75 75 100 100
.. .... .... 100 100 100 100 .. .... ..
110 100 115 100 110 110 100 100 100 100 100 100
.... 10 100 101 90 75 90 100 100
.... .... .. .... 8 85 70 75 80 85 65 75
.... .... ... ... 5050 50 70 80 80 70 100
.60 70 75 85 100 100 100 100
.... 60 60 70 85 50 75 50 75
80 80 .... .... 6 0 090 90 80 80 7 75
.... .. 80 5 85 90 85 85 65 75 .... .
80 80 90 90 60 0 50 50 70 70
.... ... 80 80 75 7 70 75 75 75 80 80
.... . 75 80 80 0 ....
85 90 80 80 70 75 75 75 75 o -0
75 ........ 60 60 75 75 80 80 .... .
95 9o0 100 100 80 10 70 90 100 100 100 100
90 90 85 78 75 74 79 84 84 86 60 87








8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Velvet
Beans

Counties





Alacnua................. 100 100
Baker ................. 7 75
Bradford..... ...... 100 100
Brevard ............... 1 10 100
Calboun ................. ..
Clay ................... ..75 50
Columbia............... 90 100
Dade................. 100 100
DeSoto............... 95 100
Escambia............. 100 100
Franklin ............. .
Gadsden............... 100 100
Hamilton .............. 75 100
Hernando.............. 100 100
Hillsborough ............ 100 100
Holmes ............... 100 100
Jackson....... ........ 75 75
Lafayette............... 100 100
Lee................... 100 200
Leon........................ 85 100
Levy............... 90 90
Madison................ ....
Manatee.................... 100 100
Marion................ 100 125
Nassau .................... .
Orange .................. 95 100
Oscoola................ 90 100
Polk ... .................. 75 85
St. Johcs... ....... 75 100
Santa Rosa............. 90 90
Sumter.................. 70 75
Suwannee............... 40 45
Taylor.............. .. 60 75
Volusia................ 80 90
Wakula................ 50 75
Walton. .............. 70 75
Washington.............. 95 95

General averanes....... 86 96


Sweet e
Potatoes Pant


a

n
0s


L
75.
0 h.



90 80 80


75 80 90
90 100 100

110 90 80
100 70 50
35 90 90
50 100 110
50 75 75
90 80 75
100 ... ....
100 95 90
80 80 80

90 90 90
75 85 951
75 100 100
85 100 100
50 80 ...
105 100 100
100 .... ...
70 .... ..
70 85 90
85 100 100
75 50 60
85 90 90
85 85 75
90 100 100
65 .... ....
75.. .. .
60 80 85
75 1001 100
75 100 100

80 88 89


Cassi



0a


0
'*
i_


ava Hi





S.2


60


80 85
... 70
100 50
.... 100

90 100o
50 50


1000 5
.... 75
.... 100



i6o i&6
... 75
100 90
.... 90


.*. 75
90 50
100 60
100 100


S 50
.... 100



15300 75


S Egg
ay Plant


va HI



o


771


60 90 80

i... ... ....
. 5 ... .. ....
100 .... .....


120 90 90-
50 50 50.

25.......
75...... ....
100 .. .....



150 100 100.
100 ... ....
85 ........
90 ... ....

100 100 100
75 .... ....
70 ......
100 40 40
100 100 125-

100 50 56-
50 .... ....
100 ......

75......
60 ..... ....



84 77 70,











Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties


E n
v, o
S S


Alachua..... ...... ..........
Baker ...................
Bradford.... ......... .....
Brevard.......... .. ... .....
Calhoun .................
Clay........ ..... .. ...
Columbia...... ...... ..
Dade... ... .. ..... ......
DeSoto............... ... 80
Escambia............. 40
Franklin............. ...
Gadsden ................ 80
Hamilton ............. ....
Hernando.............. ....
Hillsborough...... ......
Holmes.............. ..
Jackson.......... ... ...
Lafayette....... .......... ......
Lee.................... 100
Leon................. .....
Le

Manatee............... ....
Marion............... 100
Nassau........ ........ ....
Orange........ .......... .
Osceola............. .. ....
Polk................... ...
St. Johns.............. ....
Santa Rosa............ ...
Sumter...................
Suwannee............. ....
Taylor.... ... .. ..... ... .
Volusia.... .............. ....
Wakulla..................
W alton............... 8
Washington................

General averaes........ 81


.... 80 80
.... ... ...


.. 100 100
70 90 100



40 ........







.... .... ...
.... ... .
100 100 100


















77 1 93


Cl
0S

V
C
0


s I





110 50



120 100i
150 95








100 100



50 25


95 ....
10. ..






40 30










96 67


2' 1
L"~~ I,.a
$ C-~ CI.-L
Y C, m:


10 10




90 100




80
100



150 100




.... 100
100
... 5
10 80
..... 100

..... 100


.... 80




61 93


78- 95


L


J- 1 LJ !





10

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Grape
'Limes Fruit 2 o. Tobacco Honey Wool
Trees ac

Counties
o 0

.a.hu 2.......- .2 .3l o 5. o 3.

B aker ............ .. 100 00 50 75....... ..............
Bradford.... ...0 90 0 .........
Breard .......... ...... 100 80 100 1000 00 ....... ...
Clakeh. ... .... ......... 100 90 100 ......... 15. .......
C a ..f ...... .... ... .... .... 100 0 0 ........ ............
Columbia......... 100 90 100 95 ....... 8,000 2,000
ade ........... 100 100 105 110 100 100 ...... .... ....
DeS ......... 100 100 10 100 100 1,200 15,000 3.500
Esabia........... ......... 100 100 75 50......... 31,6001 35,000
Franklin.... .... ... .. ... . . . ........ .......
Gadsden... ..... ............ .... 80 110 90 100 900,000 ....... 2,500
Hamilton............. 50 50..........
Hernando... ..... ...100 100 100 100 .......... .......
Hillsbereugh..... ..... 100 30 100 100 .... ........... .............
Holmes ......... .. ...... ........ 85 90 75 80 5,000 4,000 5,000
Jackson... ................. 75 100 90 01 ...... ........
lafayette........ .. ........90 95 85 90.................
.... ... 100 100 100 100 100 120 120 ...... ....... .......
Leon .. .... .... ........ .. 100 100 100 100 100.00 5,000 1,500
y ............ .... ........ 100 95 75 100 1,000 2.000 10,000
Madison ........ .. ....... 80 100 110 95 ..... ............
Manatee .. .. .. 50 30 60 100 100 100 .... .... ..
Marion ......... 100 1 1000 110 100: 105 95 100 .... ....... 20,000
N assau ........ . ... . 100 100 90 .. ....... .... ........
Orange......... .... 80 50 ...
Osceola 85 5 80 30 100 100 100 100 .. ..... 100 4,000
Polk ............... .. 100 60 100 100 100 100 ............ 20,000
St. Johns........ .... .... .... ... 90 90 90 .. .... ......... ....
Santa Rosa....... ... ...100 100 75 80 ........ 10 000 40,000
Sumter.......... .. 100 ...100 95 95 100 ........ 1,500 5,000
Suwannee....... .............. 100 90 10... ...........
Taylor ............. 80 75 85 .. ...............
Volusia.... .... ....80 .... 90 100 100 100....... .... ........
Wakulla........ .. 90 100 9 95 ....... .. .
Walton............ 95 951 100 90 10,000 20,00 50,000
Washington ..... .. 100 100 90 95.- ... .. 5,000 15.000
General averages. 94 85 93 72 95 99 891 86 1,16.000247,000,14,500









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-19J2.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20)......... 51 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............... 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... ................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We fini
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ...............$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20................ .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11xl.10 ............... 7.82
Mixing and bagging ........................... 2.00

$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
'Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price i at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers ar< bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. Ross, State Chemist. MAlION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


Name of Fertilizer




Bright C. S. Meal.....
Dark C. S. Meal.......
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer.................
Ground Bone.........
Dissolved Bone Black.
Extra Fruit&Vine Fert
Kainit...............
Double Manure Salt..
Bone Compound .....
Nitrate of Soda.....
H.G. Sulphate Potash
Dissolved Bone Meal..
Fine Grou'd 1'ri'd Fish
Dissolved Bone ......
Fertilizer..............
H. G. Tobacco Dust...
Acid Phosphate.......
Mixed Fertilizer......
Mixed Fertilizer......
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Acid Phosphate Pot-
ash and Ammonia..
Ashes ..............
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Fertilizer..... .......
Guano...................
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1
Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.
H. G Su;phate Potash
H. G. Sulphate Potash
H. G. Sulphate Potash
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer.............
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.
Mixed F rtilizer No. 2.
Palinetto Ashes.......
Ground Garbage.......
Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer...........
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer..............
Cotton Seed Meal, 2d
class for feeding.....
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Mixed Fertilizer......
Blood and Bone.......
Tobacco Dust.........
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Tobacco Dust.........
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Cotton Seed Meal....
Strawberry Fertilizer.
Mixed Fertilizer..:...
Cotton Seed Meal....
Mixed Fertilizer......


Phosphoi


..... .....
6.65 .......
7.45 6.45
8.75 7.07
13.75 .....
8.25 ...
..... .....

8.40 6.22
9.18
S 6.28


ric Acid


Z gBy Whom Sent




..... 8.31 8.44 1.83 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co.. Tallahassee.
.. 2.03 4.76 1.65 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.
..... .43 6.12 7.80 H. K. Farrell, Punta Gorda.
2.00 7.79 11.50 0.48 1. 0 Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonvlllt
9.57 20.98 4.66 ..... Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
0.1 18.81 ..... .... The Atwood Co., Manavista, Fla.
2.69 9.57 2.31 14.18 I i uthern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
.... ..... 2.50 Frank Adams, Jasper, Fla.
........ ..... 0.92 Frank Adam. Jasper, Fla.
4.06 1 .83 ..... Goulding Fertilizer Co.. Pensacola, Fla.
..... ... 18.4 D. R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
............. 51.73D R. Knight, emon City, Fla.
1.9 19.39 2.77 ..... D. R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
4.59 11.46 9.41 .....D R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
1.07 22.82 .... ..... E, Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonvill e.
1.28 9.34 2.23 8.36 James Henry. ms. Petersburg. Fla.
S. 3.28 10.33 Florida Fert. Mnf. Co., Gainesville, Fla..
7.41 21.1 .........Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
0.87 7.75 1.54 12.75 Tampa Fertilizer Uo, Tampa, Fla.
2.19 8.39 3.84 7.49 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
2.15 7.62 10.97 v.78 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
1.51 13.60 1.78 4.31 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
.. ..... .... 4.34 Sterling and Iussell, Delray, Fla.
7.69 15.14 6.48 0.84 Sterling and R sell, Delray, Fla.
n.52 7.78 2.10 12.62 W. L. Foster, St. Petersburg, Fla.
2.1410.29 2.46 2.36 A. L. Willson Co. Quincy. lla.
0.76 8.00 2.27 11 84 rampa Fertilizer Co.. Tampa, Fla.
1.25 8.40 4 21 5.98 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
....... 49.28 Mis. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
..... . ..... 46 Mrs. Hellen a. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
..... .... .. 50.04 Mrs. 1ellen S. Wright Orlando, Fla.
0.42 7.22 2.45 4.72 S. D. Luter, Wildwood, Fla.
0.79 7.26 3.4312.50 J. H. Loyd, Winter Haven, Fla.
1.70 11.77 8.21 3.67 .R.. Shoaker, Cotton Dale, Pla.
0.641 .856 2.25 1.89 S. R. Shomaker, Cotton Dale Fla.
........... ..... 0.57 Arthur Cornwell, Palmetto, Fla.
16.96 20.51 .....1.5 Southern Pert. Mnf. Co, Gainesville, Fla.
1.81 4.6..... 11.81 Schroeder & rgulnbaw. Quincy, Fla.
1.58 8.60 4.61 5.01 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh. Fla.
4.68 18.47 8.88 0.56 E. C. Lanier & Co., Miami, Fla.
1.73 8.89 . 13.26 Schroeder & Arguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
2.99 10.59 4.20 4.21 M. Jacoby, Marianna, Fla.
.... 4 66 ..... Booker & Gentry, Memphis, Tenn.
1.82 2.65 7.76 1.60 Southern Cotton Oil Co., Washington, Ga.
1.82 8.21 2.29 10.32 Marshall & Beebe, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
7.7514.82 8.70. Hardec Bros., Jensen, Fla.
..... ..... 1.0 5.92 B. F. Hardesty, St. Sebastian, Fla.
..... 72 8.46 1.73 Florida Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
2.25 2.00 Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
.. 2 6.08 1.72 Mellan Crosby Co., Pensacola, Fla.
3.21 9.30 2.01 R. J. Brewten, McDavid, Fla.
2.07 8.29 1.86 1.33W. W. Valentine, Antioch, Fla.
1.6010.73 3.0410 68F. S. Dunklin, Lakeland, Fla.
... ...... 5.61 .... lorida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.22 8.45 2.55 6.6 M. O. Donell, West Tampa, Fla.











13


BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Name of Fertilizer.


Mixed Fertilizer....... (i.T0
Mixed Fertilizer.... !
Mixed Fertilzer......i 75
Cotton Seed Meal..... ....
Fertilizer............. I9.r5
Armour's Vegetable
Fertilizer........... 7.35
Armour's Fruit d& oot
Crop Special ........ 9 4.
Sulphate of ammonia. 3 55
Sulphate of Ammo ia S.6(1
Mixed Fertilizer
(Sweepings)......... .6i
Nitrate of Soda........ 1.70
Sulphate of Potash... 17.410
Dried Blood........... 11.15
Ground Steamed Bone 3.10
H. G. Tobacco Dust... .1I
Tobacco Dust....... 7.23
Fertilizer............ 1?.9
Hickory Ahhes........ ..
Hard Wood Ashes.....
Mixed Fertilizer....... 7.3"'
Mixed Fertilizer...... 4.75
Mixed Fertilizer ..... 14.55
Dark Cotton Seed Meal....
Ashes No. 1, Light... ..
Ashes No. 2. Dark.... .....
H G. Sulphate of Pot. .....
H. G. Sulphate of Pot.. .....
Sulphate of Ammonia. .....
Nitrate of Soda..........
Dis olved one Black.....
Fruit and Vine Fert... .....
Bright Cotton Seed
M eal .......... .. ....
Sulphate of Ammonia


Phosphoric Acid


0 I i -
Aw ci
o 2 .IlE
. I I1


6.39 1.60
4 ,4 8.26,
6.0 I.26
11.47 1.66


6 28 3.211
7.35 2.11


5.55 2.04





tr'ct tr'c


7.27 0.81
7.12
7.25 3.32






S6.17 0.6


By Whom Sent


7 99 1.51 10.90 E. A. Wilcox, Anona. Fla.
8.1 5.1 1 .81 i'lark & Co Dania Fla.
7.26 1.863 6)3. \V. rown, rcedia, Fla.
2. .57 .51 Florida Tobaoco Co., Qu ncy, Fla.
13.13 ..... 5.59C. F Cope, Chipley, la.
9.49 4.46 9.29 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville,
9.46 2.45 0.74 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville....
.... 15 .... Willson & roomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
2..... 3.6 .... Willson & Toomer Fert. Lo. ,Jacksonville.
7.59 3.66 7.9 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co,. Jacksonville.
.... 18.46 .... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
..... .....24. 0 Willson & Toomer Fert. Ca., Jacksonville.
... 16.29 ...... M Hebbert, Jinsen, Fla.
3.8 4.S ..... R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
.2.50 1. so'R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
... 3.1c 6.75 P. O. Painter Fert Co., Jacksonville,Fla.
... 5.8tr'ce J. D. McDonald. Little River, Fla. (Caus-
tic Soda, Lime and Muck.
........ 2 16W C. Johnson, Micanopy, Fla.
........ 23Crump's Muf. Co., W Bay City, Mich.
8.l 2.i 7 13.0. James Henry, St. Petersburg, Fla.
7.68 4.30 17.16i E Berry, Manchura, Fla.
10.57 3.35 4.91l Cook & West, Little River, Fla.
S... 4.; ... A Minor. Crown Point, Fla.
1.32..... 0.73iG. H. Giffin & Co., Hiviera, Fla.
0.69 ..... .30IG H. Gitlin & Co.. Riviera, Fla.
..... .... 9 0 F.D. Waite, Palmetto. Fla.
..... ..... .8.76 F. D. Waite, Palmetto, Fla.
..... 24 97 ..... F. D. Waite. Palmetto, Fla.
.....18.52 ..... F. 1). Waite, Palmetto Fla.
i6,55 ........ F. D. Wie, Palmetto. Fla.
6.83 2.47 9.88 F. D. Waite. Palmetto, Fla.
.....7.56 .... R. Penter, McDavid, Fla.
.... 25.8 :.... Willso & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.


For values see heading 'Bu eau of Fertilizers."
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or tLe names of man"
ufacturers cf the *Special amples' sent In by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer or
manufacturer. hence is not an evidence that the goods are ottered by him for sale. The "Of-
ficial Samples' taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on precedlg page states the name
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing in-
gredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and toba( co dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash
and ammonia content C ,tt n seed meal contains some phoiphoric acid, and some potash, but is
bought fir ihe ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, it has been determined as
total phosphoricacid.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E, ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Sa sples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


Phos. Acid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.

ByWhomandWhereManufactured.
NA o BRAND. By Whom and Where Manufactured.

a s2 a
~7


Cotton Seed Meal...................
Cotton Seed Meal .......... ....
Cotton Seed Meal ...............
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Co ton Seed Meal..........
Cotton Seed Meal .......... ...
Cotton Seed Meal..... ......
Mape' s Fruit and Vine Manure.
Ideal Potato Manure............
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer.
Ideal Fertilizer ......... .......
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure
Mape' s Vegetable Manure......
Mape' s Oranee Tree Fertilizer..
Ideal Fertil'zer .................
Bradley's Fruit &Vine Fertilizer
Fruitand Vine Fertil zer.......
Bradley's Nursery Stock .......
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guaano..
Ideal Vegetable M inue ......
Mare's Vegetable Manu e......
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure.
Blood. Bone and Potash .......
Nitrateof Sola.................
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure..
Special Orange Tree Manure....
H. G. Tobacco Dust.......
Ospeola Bra".d Tobacco Dust....
Special Mixture (Tobacco).....
H. G. Stlphate of Potash.......
Kalnit........ ..............
deal Fertilizer..................
a. G. Tobacco Jst............


".42 1.92
7.84 0.91
6.86 2.06
7.10 1.07
7.12 2.03
6.93 2.57
7,71 2.92
7.32 0.94
8.57 1.65
. bl 2.21
7.97 2 64
6.44 1.41
7.60 090
6.78 2.91
6.67 2.23
7.70 0.88
6.24 0.61
7.15 2.01




7.00 4.58
,...... 1. .....


2.90 8.61
2.49 8.91
2.91 8.36
2.39 8.34
2.71 8 38
2.57 8.24
3.31 8.73
9.34 2.48
8.75 4.23
8.92 4.13
8.11 4.26
9.15 2.52
9.50 4.86
10.63 4.14
8.26 4.22
10.22 2.55
9.02 2.11
10.61 4.63
7.86 4.22
8.50 3.86
9.69 5.16
8.9J 2.32
8.58 5.38
.. 18.32
6.85 3.55
9.16 2.54
...... 2.31
... 144
. 1.48

12.5b 3.092
...... 4.97


8'to 10 5to7
........ 6.. 8
..... .. ..610
........ .. to 7
8 to 105 to 7
10 to 1 6to 8
........ 5 to 7
..... to7x
8 to 10 6to 8
........ 8 to 10
10 to 12 5 to 7
........ 6 to 8
10 to 11 6 to 8
8to 10 5to 7
5 to 10 8 to 10
........ ......
....... 6 to
10 to 12 5 to 6
8 to 10



8 to 10 5' to.


2 to 4
1 to 2

2 to
2 to 4
2 to 4

oi"o3
2 to 4
1 to 2
2 to 4
2 to 4
2 to 4


20to 3
3.22
3 22
3.22
3.22
2.5to2.8
2 to2/








te 11


Ito 3 .. ...
2 to ........



.. .. .. .


8 to 4% 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
8.24 1.96 Jefferson Mfg. (o.. Jefferson, Ga.
8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Selma, Ala.
8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile, Ala.
8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Mobile, Ala.
7.5t8.9., 1.5--1.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Selma, Ala.
8 to9% 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
2 to 310 to 12 Mapes' Formula& Peru GuanoCo.,N. Y.
4 to 5 8 t 10 Wilson Toomer Fert. Co ,Jacksonville
4 to 5 5 to 7 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N, Y.
4yt05% 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co,, Jacksonville
2 to 3 10 to 12 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
5 to 6 4 to 6 Mapes' Formula& Peru. GuanoCo,N Y.
4 to 5 3 to 4 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co., N.Y.
4%to5% 6 to 8 Wilron & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
2%to3i 10 to 12 Bradley's Form. & Peru. Guano Co., N.Y.
2 to 412 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
4% loM5 3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
.4 to t 4 to 6 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
4 o 5 8 to 10 Wilson &'loomerPert. Co., Jacksonville.
5 to 6 4 to 6 apes' Formula & Peru. GuanoCo, N. Y.
2 to 310 to 12Mapes' Formula &Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
5 to 6 to 7 8 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
17 to 19 ........ Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
3 to 4 10 to 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville
2 to 3 10 to 11 Baugh & Sons. Baltimore, Md.
I1 to3% M to B3 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
1% to 3 1 to 5 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
........ .......... Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
. .... 48 to 51Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jaeksonville.
......12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
4%to 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
10 Florida Ferillizer Cg., Gaingsville, FP,








Acid Phosphate........... ..... 12'0o 15.72 4.07 19.7 .. ....
Dark C. S. Meal.................... 10.2 ...... ...... 2.04 5.44 1.4
Dark C. S. Meal............... 9.0 .......... .2 5 0 1.31
Dixie Brand C. S. Meal ......... 8.16 ........ .... 2. 9.1 1.55
Kainit. .. .................. 9.04...... 12.2 ......
Fibh and Potash....... ..... .. 4.8U ".48 2.04 5. 1 6." 9 7.35
Pineapple Fuiter............... 4.2% 7.24 5.76 13.01 3.42 11.28
Potato Manure ................. 5.95 5.83 1.97 7.60 3.8 8.95
Setture and Cucumber. Special. 5.50 5.00 1.33 8 6.33 .60 5.72
P. rviau Fi-h Gual.o. No. 1.... 5. 0 5.25 2.10 7.25 4.81 5.66
Special for Fruit.............. 6.91 6.63 2.21 8.84 3.9o 12.60
No. 2. Double Strength of Puta'h 6.25 6 10 1.87 7.97 2.3 9 9.82
Blood, Bone and Potash..... 6.75 5.66 3.43 909 4.54 4.65
No. 1,Fedli'xer........ ........ o0 7.13, 5.11 12.24 4.54 3.93
No. 2, Fcrti izer. .... ....... 7.15 6.62 3.57 10.1 5 07 9.88
No. 4, Fertilizer .. ............. 8.5 6 89 3.72 10.61 3.0 10.30
Dissolved Bone................. 13.(05 11.21 3.64 14.8 2.41
Cotton Seed Meal......... 7.65 ....... 2.70 84 1.78
Aimour's Practical Trucker... 7.80 7.1 5 83 12. 3 04 9.2
Armour's Orange Tree Manure. 7.90 8.01 7.43 15.44 3.80 4.09
Armour's Fruit and Vine Vert... 6.85 8.12 5.90 14. 2.87 11.02
Armou's Blood, Bone & Potash. 8.70 7.13 4.58 11.71 5.32 7.53
Armour'sFr.it&RootCrop,Spcc 6.40 7.21 3.991 1.-0 2.45 5.22
Armour's Bne Fl ur.......... 2.70 8.42 15.60 24.02 4.58 ......
Armour's Dried Blood.......... 12.35 ...... ... ........ 3..
II. G. Tobacco Dust ......... .8 ....... .. ... 1.76 1.60
Armour's Blood and Bone...... 7 75 373 8.4 11.77 7.26 ......
H. G Bliod and Bone........... 9.65 5.46 5.91 11.37 9.64
Blood and Bone......... .... 8.15 6.25 9.14 15.39 7.27 ....
H. G. Blood and Bone...... 8.45 3.53 3.09 6.60 ..........
Acid Phosphate............... 7.85 16.92 7.10 24.02..... ......
Strawberry Fruiter............. 7.3 5.98 .41 8.39 2.44 8.91
Extra Fruit and Vine............ 6.10 6.37 .11 8.50 2.31 13.73
Cotton Seed Meal................ 6.80..... ..... 2.88 9.43 1.26
Cotton Seed Meal ................ 7 ........... .6 8.99 1.28
Cotton seed eal.............. 5.96 .... ........ 2.2 8.29 1.
Cotton Seed Meal............. 8.35 ...........2.66 7.93 1.38
H. G. Acid Phosphate.......... 13.6 17.57 1.30 18.87...........
A L.Wilso,' 6.60 Acid Phoiphat 12.30 14.77 3.76 7.53............
Branley'sXXX Pho-phbte. 8.05 14 b8 1.76 16.14 .....
Dissolved Bone Pho-phate...... 14.65 13.67 1.51 15.18 ......
Atlas Acid Phosphate........... 12.95 15.49 2.29 17.78.. ..
Acid Phosphate................ 13.75 12.34 0.28 12.62 .. ....
Bradley's Palmett Phusphate 7,95 14.89 1.58 16.3 ......
Cumberland Bone Super Phoa.., 16.15 10.71 1.62 12.33 2.07 1.71
Gou'dlng's Bone Compound..... 13.96 9.73 3,08 13.71 2.09 1.5I
Gem Guano.. .......... .. 13.90 10.25 3.1 13.43 1.78 1.84
Lott's Compound ............... 345 4.31 8.4 13.8 1.83 12.75
Jumher and Festilizer. ........, 11.80 9.1 2.12 11 46 1 2 09
Mobile StandaddGuano ...... 7,46 9 d8 4.74 14.48 2.62 2,62
Raw Bone super Phosnatae. 18,61 10,59 8.80 18,49 ,16 1.78
oIudlaig'e .,A9IcdPho.& Pot 10,8u 14. 7 1.4. 10.8 .. 31,80


8 to 1 ..... ..... .. 2 to 3 5to 7 to
8 to 12.............. 2 to 3 5 to 7% to 1%
........ ........ .. ... ........ S3/ ........
...... ... .... ........ ... . ... .. 12 to 13
10 to 1' 2 to 3 3 to 4 ... 7 to 8 5 to
10 to 12 4 to 5 6 to 7 ........ 3 to 412 to 1R
10 to 12 5t 6 2 o 3 ....... 3 to 49 to
10 to 12 5 to to 2 ... 7 to 84 to
10 to 12 to to 2 ........ 4to5% 5 to
... to 8 1 to 2 ........ 4 to 512 to 14
10 to 12 5 to 62 to 3 ........ 1to 210 to
10 to12 4 to 2 to 3 ........ 4 to 5 4 to
......... 5 to 6 2 to ........ 5 to 6 4 to
....... 6 to 7 2 to 3 ........ 6 to 6 10 to 12
...... to 7 to 3 ....... 3 to 4 10 to 1
1 to 12 14 to 15 3 to 4 ....... 215 . ..
5 to 6 to 7 2 to 3 .... 3 to 4 10 to
5 to 1 8 to 2... 2to3 10 to 1i
S to7 8o9 2 tito .. to l to
5 to 8 to 10 2 to . to to t
5 to 10 8 to 9 1 to 2 ...... 2 to 35 to 6
5 to 10 to 14 .........24to 28 3 to .........
10 te 13 ........ ....... ...... .. 16 to 17 ..........
8 to 10 .. ............ 1... to3x 1 to 3
5 to 0 .... ....... 10 to 1 7 to 8 .........
5 to ....... ..... 12 to 9 to 10 ..........
to 7 ........ .. 15 to 26% to 8 ..........
... ..... ... . 4.58 lo .....
........ 14.00 ..... ... ... ... .. .. .. .......
10 to 12 5 to 6 2 to 3 ... 2 to 310 to 12
8 to 12 6 to 8 .... ... 2 to 314 to 16
.. ........ ....... 2. 80 7.60-8 1.86
65-8.75 .... ...... .. to 3 to 9 to 2
........ ... ....... 2 -2.80 7 7 85 1 to 2.85
8.00 ..... ... 2.1 750 2
12 to 1515 to 17 1 to ............
2 to 15 14 to 16 1 to 2 ... .....
10 to 2013 to 15 2 to 3 .... .............
11 13 1.50 ... .. .... ....
12 to 5 13 to 15 2 to 8 ...... ...........
12 to 16 12 to 14 2 to 4 ... .... ... ....
10 to 1212 to 24 o 3 ...... ..... .....
10 toto to 1 to 2 ........ 2 to 1 to q
10 to 128%.-10 1 to 2........2 t to
10to12 8 to 10 1 to 2 ........ 2o to
........ 5 to ...... ....... t 2 to i2
12 8 2 .. 2
11 to i6 8 to 101 to 2 to 8 9 to 8
10 to 1 tol to ... ... 3 to 8 T to 8
10 to 161 l to i1 to ........ ..... to


Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison.
Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison
Humphries,Goodwin &Co ,Memphis,Tenn
littlee Brothers, Jacksonville.
Florida Fart. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fia.
Finrida Fert. Mfe. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Florida Fert Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
Florida Fert. Mfg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando. Fla.
Florida Fert. Mig. Co.. Gait esville, Fla.
Florida Fert. Mfg.,Co. Gainesville, Fla.
Southern FeriliFellr Co., Orlando, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando. Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Or:ando, Fla.
Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
P. A. Smith, A lanta, Ga.
Armour Fettilizer VWorks, Jacksonville.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
SArmour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour Ferti izer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour .ertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
Armour Packing Co., Chicago. Ill.
Little Brothers, Jack'onville.
FloIida Fert. Mfg. Co., G.inesville, Fla.
Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala.
Trader's Cotton Oil Co., Union Springs,Ala
Southern Cotton Oil Co Montgomery, Ala
lahama Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla.
Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Bradley Fertilizer Co., Boston, Mass.
Georeia Chemical Works, Augusta, Ga.
-oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Virginia, Carolina Chem Co.,Richmond,Va
Bradley Fertilizer Co. B,,ston, Mass.
Cumberland Bone Phos. Co., Poitland,Md
Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla
Go Hiding Fertililer Co., Pensacola, F14.
H. M. Iolt Havana, Fla,
Mulual Ferllizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
Mobile Phosphaoe Co., Mobile, Ala.
Standard Guano AChem. Co, New Orleang
Goulding F rtiller Co,, Pensaola, Fla.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Name of Fertilizer


Blood. Bone and Potash.......
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guano..
Pineapple Manure...........
Special Mixture.............
Potato Fertilizer.............
Strawberry Fertilizer .........
Orange Fruiter Special........
Fruit and Vine ertilizer.....
Ober's Fruit & Vine Fertilizer
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer
Baugh's Special Manure for
Orange Trees and Nuser3
Stock ............... .
Tobacco Dust...............
Puie Ground Tobacco Dust...
Dri, d Blood...................
Ni rite of Soda................
R. G. Acid Phosphate......
Dis olved Bon- Black.......
Fine Giound Bone............
Saint. ........................
Double Manure Salt..........
Acid Phosphate................
Acid Phosphate...........
Dissolved Bone Black..........
Mape' s Pine Apple Manure....
Mape's Vegetable Manure......
Mape's ruit and Vine Manure.
Mapu' s Orange Tree Manure...
Cotton Seed Meal... .......
Dark Cotton Seed Meal .......
Acid Phosphate.................
Complete Sweet Potato Fertilizer
Special Fruit and Vine ..........
Special Mixture No. 1.. .....
Ideal Fruit and Vine Fertilizer.
Ideal Vegetable Manure........


Phos. Acid


9.90 6. 3. it
10.10 7.711 1.4
5.20 6.09 3 '
5 40 8.36 2.1(
8.50 6. 8' 1.8(
7.465 6.76 2.0
5.60 7.47 1.1
10.10 7.55 1. 3
9.10 7 O0 2.48
6.60 6.59 2.01

8.7 6.05 2.81
3.05 ...... ......
11.2 . ...
10.55 ......
2. 0 O .....
15.15 14.16 0.47
14.35 17.45 0 21
6 15 10.80 10.0
4.15 ..... ... .
14 20 .... ......
9.50 16.32 3.43
12.35 18.55 0.32
22.00 17.35 0.76
8.55 5.9 1.57
9.40 6.61 2.98
10.65 5 40 3 26
10.25 7.24 3.51
5.70 ..... ......
9.60 ... ......
7.60 14 61 7.92
12.:0 9.33 0.75
6.85 6 6 3 0.60
V.40 5.63 1. 1
8.70 7.09 0.44
12.35 7.2 1. 0


3 10.46
6 9..17
S9.35
0 10.4Vi
S7.98
1 8.S0
8. 64
8.18
1i.28
8.65

8.86



14.68
17.60
20.88

19.74 .
18.87 .
18.11
7.50
9.59
8.66
10.75
2.74
1 914
S22. 55
10.08
7.24
6.87
7 53
8.:0i


_ .. ~~


Guaranteed Analysis


'a a -
a 3 .3 '08 ai o a

-0:


3. 4.11 .1 6to 3 to .. ... 4 to 6 4to 6
i.73 7.08 10 to12 to 2 to 4 .. ... 4 ) 6 6 to 8
5.51 10.87 8 t 10 4 o 5 .... ...... 5 tn 6 7 o 8
7.50 8.18 8t1l 4 to 5 to 5 ....... T7 7 to 8
3.0 10.21 8 to 1 41o t 3 t 4 ........ 3 to l 10 to 1
2.65 9.30 8 t 10 6to l 0 to 4 ........ 2, tc 4 to 10
2.40 16.12 8 to 10 6 to 1 o .. ... 2 3 16t 18
2.59 12.0, 8 to 1 6 to to I 12o 14
2.95 19.71 12 to 1:1 E i to I0o l2
3.93 6.2110 to 13 6 t I to I '.r5 to 6
rI I

3.07 10.8510 Te12 5 to 6 2to 3 ........ to 3 10 tell
1.55 1.96 ........ ......... .............. 3to 1 to :i
1.78 4.94 ........ . ........ .. 2 to 3 4 t 8
16.41 ...... ........ .......... ... ... 16 t 1. ........
18. 1 ...... ....... ... .... . ..... 18 to l .....
... ..... 10 to 12 14 to 1 2 to 3 . ...
.... ..... ........ 18 to ] .... .. .. .
5.64......... ............ ...... . 2t . . .
. 12.84 ........ ........ ........ ....... .... 2.13
. 26.56 ........ ........ .. . ... ... ... .. 25 t 2
..... ...... 13.5 ...... .. .. ...... .. .. ... '.
..... .. .. .. 17.00 . ...... ... .. .. ..
.. . . . . .. 1 7. .0 ..... . ....... ....... . ....
5.U2 5.8' 8 to 4 to 6 2to. 4........ 5 t, 5 to 6
5.21 5 79 8 to 1 ito 8 2to 4 ....... 5 to 5 4 to 6
2.69 11.74 8to 10 5 to 7 2to 4 ....... I to 3 10 to 12
3.95 3 02 l]0tol2 (1 t, 8 2to 4 ...... 4t 5 3 t 4
8.65 1.92 6t7 ................ 2 to 3 8to8%1 Ito 2
4.82 1.67 .. ........ ...... ........ o I ..
..... ..... .. .. .. 13 ... .... ....... .... ... ...
.26 5 01 .. 81 Ito 3 ........2% to 4 3% to
4.10 14.'8 ........ 6 to l I to 3 ........ 4 to 5 13 to 14
4.85 5.97 8 'o 10 6 to 7 Ito 2 ....... 5 to 6 5 to 6
3.57 11.81 8 to 10 6 to % 1to I ..... 3 to 4 10 60 12
3.50 8.34 8 to 10 6to 8 Ito 2 ........ 4 to 5 81010


1=Y

By Whom and Where Manufactured





Tampa Fertilizer Co Tampa, Fla.
Tampa Fer ilizrr C'o., Tampa, Fla.
Ta m a Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla. i~'
Timpna Ferti izer Co.. Tampa, Fla.
Timpa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
'I ampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Tampa F Itillzer Co 'ampa, Fla.
Tampa Frrtilizer Co., Tampa. Fla.
A. Ober & Sons, Baliimore, Md.
American Agr. Chem. Co., New York.

Baugh & Sons, Ba timore, Md.
Tampa F. rtilizpr Co., Tampa, Fla,
TamTi Fer iiizer Co Tampa, Fla. I
E O. P intrr Fert. Co, Jacksonville.
Tampa Ferti Izer Co., Ta pa, Fla.
Tampa Fertiliztr Co., Tampa, Fl .
Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tnmpa, Fla.
Stein. Hirsch & Co., Chicago, 111.
Baugh & Sons, Baltimo e, Md.
Tampa 1Fetilizer 'o., Tampa, Fla.
Little Bros. Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville
E O. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
E. O. Pa'nter Ferr. Co., Jacksonville.
Mape' s Form. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co.. N. Y.
Mape's Form. & Per. Guano Co., N. Y.
Mape's Form. & Per. G ano Co., N. Y.
A A. Smith, Atlanta, Ga.
Florid" Cotton OilCo., Jacksonvi le,Fla.
Little B-os. Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.
wil son& ToomerF r. Co.,Jacksonvil e
Wlllson & Toomer Fe.. Co.,Jacksonviile
% illson& Toomer Fer. Co.,Jacksondilla
Willson &Toom r Fer. Co.,Jacksonville
Willson & Toomer Fer. Co ,Jacksonville








Peiuvian Vegetable lVanure...
Ideal Fertilizer .................
Armour's Fruit and Root Crop,
Special............ .. .......
Armour's Cotton Special Fertil-
izer.... ..................
Armour's Vegetable Fertilizer.
Armour's Practical Trucker. .
Armour's Blood. Bone & Pota-h
Armour's I practical Pine Apple
Fertilizer ... ......
Armour's Orange Tree Manure.
Armour'sCnstor Poma e.....
Armour's Acid Phosphate.....
Armour's H. G. Tobacco Dust.
Armour's Pulverized Tobacco
.lem s . ..............
Armour's I aw Bone Fertilizer
Armour's Bo;;e Flo. r .........
Armour's H.G Acid Pho.phate
Armour's Canada H. W. Ashes.


9.05 6.65 2.59 9.27
9.75 5.89 1.26 7.15
8.10 7.88 2.06 9.91
9.35 6.97 2.44 9.41
7.4) 6.24 3.39 9.63
5.50 7.114 2.141 9.1
7.30 7 571 2..0 I.57
3.45 6.43, 6.61 13.03
6.81 6.99 4.14 11.1!
8 3, .......... 1.95
13.10 1 3 2.17 15.6(
4.01 ..

14.9) . .
6.25 9.79 16.i8 25.17
3..55 9.25" 1:3.1, 23 .2
12.75 17.7 i 0. 18. !
10.75 ......... .


4.51 8.42 8 to 1 7 to 9' 2to 4 ...... 41 *o 6 a to 10 Willson&ToomerFer. Co.,Jacksonville
4.34 7.89 8 to to 7 ........... 4t.. 5t 6to 8 Willson &ToomerFe Co.,Jacksonville
2.33 5.77 5to 10 8to 9 1 to ........ 3 5 to 6 Armour's Fert. Works, I cksonville.
1.45 1.84 5 to l 7to 8 1 to ...... I to Ito 2 Armour's Fort Works, .Ja'ksonville.
4.141 t1.81 to 10 7to ) to 3. ...... 1o 1 i to 8 Armour's Fort. W\or' s. Jacksonville.
3.91 i.60t 5 to 10 6 to 7 2 to ..... i io 4 0lt 12 Armour's Fer't. Works. Jackson ille.
5.52 7.89 5 to 10 8 to10 1 to 2 .. :to t 7 o 8 Armour's ilrt. Works. Jacksorville

4.74 7.41 5 o 0 71 8 to to ... t 4, 10 to 1 A mou 'i Fcrt. Work Jauksonvill,.
3.71 5..85 to llll 8 to 10 2to 41.. . 4 to Au our's Fe t. Wo ks, Jacksonvil e.
5.99 1.11 6 to 8 ....... ..... i' to ,2:' I to Armiour' Feit Works, Jacksonville.
10to 1 3 to 41 to .... ........ .......... Arm r's Fort W works, Jaclkonville.
1. 4, 1.5; 8 to l .... .. .... ...... I J. .; I to 3 ArDn our's F trit. Works, Jacksonville.
1.t7 4.60 Sfto Io ....... ....... ..... I .. to 3 |Armour's Fort Works, Jacksonvill .
4.69.'i! 1) ......... .... :' i 2 t . .. Arm ur' F ot. Works, Jacksonvi le.
5.I ....... .to 0 to 14 ........ 4 ... Armo r's Fort. Woi ks, Ji.cksonville.
.. .... .. . 1 ... . ... Arniour's Fer 0'oI ks, .Taui( onvi le.
.. 5. .1 .. ...... ... ...... ... Ati m our's I' rt. W ork?, Ji cksonvill-.










Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred


Ammonia Phosphoric Potash
Acid

Nitrate of Soda............................ 17 to 19........................
Sulphate of Ammonia..................... 22 to 24 .....................
Dried Blood ......... .. ................. 12 to 17 ......................
Concentrated Tankage............ ..... 1 to 15 1 to 2..........
Bone Tankage............................. 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap .......................... 8 to 11 6 to 8...... ....
Cotton Seed Meal.......................... 7 to 10 2 to 8 1 to 2
Hoof Meal ... ..................... ....... 14 to 17 1 to 2 ..... .......
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid

Florida Rock Phosphate ................... .. ...... .......... 33 to 35.
Florida Pebble Phosphate................ ... ........... 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphate............... ......... .'14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone........... ............. ..... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone............... ............ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone............................. 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3.
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds per Hundred

Actual ammonia Phosphoric L
Potash Acid Lime

M uriate of Potash ............... .. 50 ......... ........... ........
Sulphate of Potash... ............ 48 to 52 ....... ... ... ..
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia 26 to 30 .................
K ainit.... .. ....................... 12 to 12 .......... ..... .. ........
Sylvinit........................ .... 16 to 20 ...........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes ............. 15 to 30 ... ..... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached.............. 2 to 8 .......... 1 to 2 30 to 35.
Wood Ashes, leached............... 1 to 2 ......... 1 to l 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ............ ........ 5 to 8 2 to 4 ...... .. 3j
Cow Manure (fresh) ................ 0.40 0 to .41 0.16 031
Horse Manure (fresh) ............... 0.53 0 to .60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)................ 0.67 1.00 0 23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh)............... 0 60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) .. ............... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure ................ 0.63 0.76 0 26 0 70









Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluble phosphoric acid-the only in--
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of Bone-
Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or Muriate of Potash" or,
equivalents of "Nitrate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Ammonia;" basing his
calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of the good,
offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of fertility re-
quired, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the commercial
values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular elements his
crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods required, and ap-
proximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requires that:
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, he percentage of potash-
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all other
ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale, each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show tqhe satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of"
Bone Phosphate of Lim' it may be taken as insoluble to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate contains 26 to 35 per cent. of "phosphoric
acid" equivalent to 50j to 86 per cent. of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its-
commercial value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into
"Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent. "avail-
able" has a commercial value of $12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural










value is proportionately much greater as raw or untreated rock, has but
little agricultural value.
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"dissolved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are'used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of the State
Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900, serial number 36, is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative
and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay no attention whatever to
names and brands. They should realize, for instance, that in nine cases
out of ten, brands known as "Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle
of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands
are not made from bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if they
were made from bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for
purchasing when general trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with
some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phosphoric
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a first-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to
buy on time and pay interest, why then be assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manurial chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons. The same
figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa, for spot cash f. o. b. cars:
Less than 5 to 10 10
5 tons tons tons
I'igh Grade Potash 90 to 95 per cent.Sulphate (48 to 50 per cent. K20) ......$52 00 $5100 $50 00
1nulphate Pot sh. 48 to 55 per cent. Sulphate (25 to 30 per cent. (K20)...... 3200 3 CO 3000
-Muriate Potash, 80 to 85 percent. Muriate '42 to45 per cent. K20) ............ 4600 4500 4400










Kainit, 12 to 11 percent. Actual Potih...... ............................... 1500 11 50 1300,
Blood and ione, l'1; per cent A immnoniaL .................................. 26 50 26 00 25 5)
Blood and lone, 7 to S per cent. Ammonia.......................... 2750 _7 00 2650
Blood and Bone, 10 per cent. Ammouia............................. 00 31 50 31 00
Raw Bone Meal. 2 to -1 p r cent Ammonia, 22 to i per cent. total Phos-
phoric Acid................. ........... .. ........................... 3200 3150 31 00
Boneblack, 16 to IS per cent. available Phosphoric Acid................... 25 00 4 00 24 00
Acid Phos hate, 14 per c.nt Phosphoric Acid ........... ...... .......... 13 00 1250 1200
Nitrate Soda, 18 to 10 per cent. Ammonia........ ..................... 5400 53 ;0 5300
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 2ti per cent. Ammoni........................... 72 00 71 00 7000
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia ......... ............ ................ 47 ) 4060 4600
Ground Casto' Pomace, 6 to 7 per cent. Ammonia ........................ 2100 20 50 20 00
Canada Hard Wood Ashes, to 8 per cent K20 (Potash).................... 1500 1450 1400
Pulverized tobaccoo Stem., 5 to8 percent. K20 (Potash)................... 500 1450 1400
Tobacco Stems (Baled) 5 to 8 per cent. KzO (Potash) ...................... 1600 15 50 1600
Tobacco Dust, High Grade. 5 to 4 per cent. K,0 (Potash)................... 2100 2050 2000
teamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Ammonia, 25 to 28 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid .......... ..... .......... .............. 2500 24 50 24
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7to9per cent. Ammonia......................... 2650 2600 25%0
Dark Cotton Seel Meal, 6 to 8 per cent. Ammonia......................... 2300 2153 21 O0
"Blood and Bone," "Tankage," "Garbage" and numerous other by
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and 1 per cent.
of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00......................... $24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00................... 2 00
1J per cent. potash @ $1.10 ........................... 1 65

$27 65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled
"For feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
4- to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1I to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1 to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:









4j per cent. ammonia. ...............................$13 50
1 per cent. phosphoric acid .......................... 1 75
1 per cent. potash .................................. 1 65
Commercial value ............... ................ $16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal.
"Their relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy
in the use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
,forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of
4the meal depending only on its content of amomnia, phosphoric acid and
potash in both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis,
-and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements only.

ORGANIC AMMONIATES.
It is generally conceded by pineapple growers that the sulphates of am-
monia and potash are harmful to pineapples. The universalpracticeamong
the pineapple growers is to use organic fertilizers only-cotton seed meal,
-castor pomace, blood and bone for ammoniates; ashes, tobacco and nitrate
-of potash for potash.
Blood and bone supplying ammonia and phosphoric acid, also consider-
-able "Tankage, and "Garbage," reinforced by sulphate of ammonia, has
been found in the State an unquestionably valuable fertilizer for certain
crops, is generally acknowledged hurtful to pines.
The State law, section 3, requires the manufacturers to state in the
"guarantee on each package the percentage of ammonia and the source
,from which it is derived." A failure to state the source of the ammonia
in a fertilizer is a violation of the law.
Purchasers requiring only "oragnic ammonia" in their fertilizers
:should see that this important part of the guaratee is complied with.

MECHANICAL CONDI ION.
A number of complaints have been made to the department this season
of failure of vegetable crops, using certain brands of goods. On exam-
ination chemically, these goods have been found well within the guarantee
of their makers. The same goods (that is, goods having the 'same amounts
of fertilizing elements) have proved satisfactory to growers in the same
localities, and under the same conditions. The difference in results can be
attributed solely to the imperfect grinding and failure to properly mix the
goods complained of. In all cases the best results have been had from
-those goods having the best mechanical condition.
Other things being equal, those goods most finely pulverized and well
,mixed have proved most satisfactory. Coarse ground "Blood and Bone,"
"'Tankage" and "Mixed" Fertilizers" using such coarse material in com-









sounding, have proved unsatisfactory in producing quick results, as de-
manded by the vegetable growers of the State.
That the mechanical condition of commercial fertilizers has much to do
'with results, has been practically demonstrated, particularly among the
vegetable growers of the State.

TOBACCO DUST.

Large quantities of tobacco dust are used in this State, particularly by
pineapple growers. It is valuable mostly for its potash, and for its pun-
gent or aromatic properties, as an insecticide. No material offered in the
State varies more in its composition and value, nor is anything more apt
to be adulterated or "loaded."
Analysis of two samples taken from different parts of the State show
58.43 per cent. and 51.30 per cent. (more than half) to be simply clay or
fine sand. The "commercial value" of different samples are shown in the
preceding analysis, varies from $23.20 to $10.92 per ton. Purchasers
should buy only on guarantee and pay for what they get. Manufacturers
*and dealers purchase only on guarantee and settle according to analysis.
This particular material varies in value probably more than any other
on the market, and requires the utmost care on the part of the dealer and
consumer to prevent confusion, disappointment and dissatisfaction.
If purchasers demand the guarantee and refuse to purchase goods shown
by the guarantee to be worth less than the price demanded, this condition
will soon cease.


ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO CANADA ASHES.

There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this State. When
they can be purchased at a price comparable with their actual value they
are doubtless a most valuable source of potash. The average price of these
goods is, however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained from this
-source generally costs much more than from other reliable sources-Sul-
phate, or Muriate of Potash, Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory,
"Maple, Palmetto and other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0.57 to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth from $0.62 to
*$4.66 per ton at seaports. The average of four samples shows 2.56 per
cent. of Potash. Guarantees are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The
'minimum is the actual guarantee. The best unleashed ashes contain but
:8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.









SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequent requests are made for soil analysis by our farmers. We are
pleased to comply so far as our time and apparatus will permit, and
give what information we can. Soil analysis, however, has, except in es-
pecial cases, proved very unsatisfactory from a practical standpoint. The
local conditions of drainage, areation, tilth, seepage, etc., have so great an
influence that the deductions from a small sample in the laboratory under
entirely different conditions from those in the field are misleading.
A soil may have an abundance of phosphoric acid, as shown by analysis
in the laboratory, while the application of phosphates in an available form
will greatly increase the crop.
A large amount of ammonia may be discovered by analysis, and still the
land, or soil, be sterile. This is particularly illustrated by the undrainned
muck soils of the State, frequently having from 1.50 to 2 per cent. of
ammonia. These soils in their natural condition (or partially drained)
are practically barren, as to cultivated crops. When put in first-class me-
chanical condition, thoroughly drained, and "areated," they are exceeding-
ly productive. The "flat woods" of Florida are frequently fertile, with
sufficient plant food in an unavailable condition, requiring only thorough
drainage to make them exceedingly productive.
A good mechanical condition, together with perfect drainage, is as nec-
,essary as plant food to insure profitable returns.






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Cllmatological Data for June, 1902.
: f- *


Stations


Counties


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............. Alauhua....... 92
Bainbridge.......... Decatur, Ga ..... 119
Federal Point....... St. Jchns....... 10
Fernandina ........ Nassau ........ 15
Fort Georget....... Duval.......... ...
Gainesville .......... Alachua........ [ 175
Huntington ........ Putnam........ 50
Jacksonville ....... Duval............ 43
Jasper.... ....... Hamilton...... 165
Johnstown......... Bradford ...... ..
Lake City........... Columbia....... 201
Macclenny.......... Baker.......... 140
Micanopy .......... Alachua..... ... 105
Pinemount.... ... Suwannee...... ...
nideout..... ... Clay........... ....


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches
Fahrenheit I


80.6
81.5

79.8
80.9
81 2
a79.6
80.3
b79.5
80.0
79.0
80.2
80.2
79.5


SV
0

~1


v c" 18alo S>
a Q a a
(D0 0


1.8 99
+0.3 98

+0.9 96
+-1 6 95
-0 9 99
-0.6a98
0.0 98

-0.5 b97
-0.6 98
-1.6 101
+0.3 99
99
..... 101


60 4* 36
65 3* 31

66 12 23
7216 ..
63 8 32
a59 8 b36
65 8 29

h58 3 b33
62 4* 32
58 4' 40
60 4* 35
62 3" 31
57 8 39


I-a Ia



2 Q


6.22
7.16

3.69

8.21
2.66
3.65

6.43
9.42
5.23
5.75
15 01
8.97


--1.88
42 31

-1.31

+1 38
-6 17
-2 02


--2 98
-1 78
-0 97

.,.....


Sky


.T ^


.~$ .8 ~
a .2 a2 '
~z Z Z


..9






se


se

ne

sw

e

esw
%Y~








Climatological Data for June-(Continued.)


Stations


Savannah, Ga.......
St. Augustine........
Sumner ...........
Switzerland ........
Thomasville, Ga....
Waycross, Ga......


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow.............
Brooksville T .......
Clermont............
DeLand... ........
Eustis .................
Ft. Meade..........
Fort Pierce.........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee..........
Malabar...........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smryna..........
Ocala..............
Orange City........
Orlando...........


Counties


Chatham, Ga..
St. Johns.......
Levy ..........
St. Johns .....
Thomas, Ga....
Ware, Ga ......


Means....... I.... ....


Polk.... ......
Hernando......
Lake............
Volusia........
Lake......... ...
Polk......... .
Brevard.... ...
Oitrus..........
Osceola .........
Brevard ........
Brevard........
Volusia..........
Marion .......
Volusia .......
Orange........


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit




~ ~ $4
a
ca 0. a fi -i ps
v I
a "- bQ I 3Q


99 30
9529
95 0
a98 80


81 0 +1 3 98 30
a82 0 +1 7 100 80

79 9 +0 4...


81 6 +0.3 94 27*
80 4 +0 4 96 11*
82 6+0 9110129

82 4+1 910380
80 8 +2 1 91 9*
80 2-+0 5 93 14*
81 0 .... 9720*
81 6+1 1 100 29
81 3 .....9527*
81 2+22 92 26*
80 0+1 0 9626
81 0+1 910027
79 6i-1 6 96 18*
81 41+1 6 96J28*


Precipitation, in inches




ca
II^.r.
2o a .s g.


t a .
a.0
o ~u
0 CD 4


2.19
2 95
1 77
6 30
7 97
9 59

6 16


6.62
4.06
2 50

5 31
9 90
5 92
1 93
5 85
8 63
11 14
5 10
5 93
8 92
6 94


--3.920.72
-1 930 96
-4 48 1 07
+0 1T2 02
+2 57 3 51
+4 454 35

-1 45....


--1 45
-4 9.
--3 67

-1 06
+0 64
-4 36

-1 26

+4 18
-1 00
-2 48

-0 26


Sky





S.,
2. .e
>-A
. 800
zi zi


0
0

V *-

w
o


SW
se
nw




se


1 aw
6 ne
2e

6e
3Je
8s
1 ne-sw

I ,se"e
5e
0 se
4e

4e


...s....


^






Plant City.........
Rockwell ..........
St. Leo............
Tampa.............
Tarpon SpriLgs....
Titusville ..........


SOUTHERN SECTION.

Avon Park........
Flamingo ........
Havana...........
Hypoluxo..........
Jupiter............
Key West ........
Manatee...........
Marco ... ...
Miami. .. ....
Myere ........... ..
Nassau,...........
Nocatee... .......
San Juan.........


WESTERN SECTION.

Bonifay ...........
Carrabelle..........
Daphne.............
DeFuniak Springs..
Holt ....... ......
Marianna .........
Mobile.............
Molino ......... ..
Montgomery .......


Hillsborough...
Marion ........
Pasco. .. ....
Elllsborough...
Billsboiough ..
Br wvard........

leans .....


DuSo o..........
Monroe ....... ....
Cub'. ......... 57
Dade... ..... ..
Dade........ .. 28
Monroe.... ....i 29
Manatee........ 16
Lee...... . . .. .....
Lade .. .. ...... .

N. P. B hamas.
DeSoto.... ... 3
Puerto Rico.... 82

fMeans.. ..


Holmes ........ 116
Franklin........ 12
Baldwin, Ala... ......
Walton........ 193
Santa Rosa. ... 208
Jackson........ 85
Mobile, Ala... 35
Escambia ........
Montgom'y, Ala 219


10 ......

7 81.b
12 80 8
18 80 4
8 80 0

. 81 0


1 81 3 ..... 97
4 80 5-0 94
... f81 4- +1 99
6 81 2-i- 2 98
81 4 .... 100
81 0 ....
3: 82 0 2 0 98
...... 82 1 .. 102
29 83 2]4-2 0 90


5.83
6 43
2 82
4 14

5 50


5.70
4 15
10 27
7 88
3 92
9 59
6 28
8 73
6 01
8 63
4 73
9 12


7 00


3 60
7 06
1 50
2 71
2 00
3 63
0 53
0 00
1 57


-1.28
-2 59
-6 38
-3 71

-1 94



33.11
-2 99
-2 39
+5 39
- 1 96

-2 1.3
-2 21



-1 05


18 8
8 17
23 3
3 14

16 10


13 13
91 0
2 3
14 8
10 14
8 9
8 18
19 6
13 10
20 6




12 8


...... 2 30
43 38 4 85
--6 52 1 50
-3 850 94
...... .2 00
.. 1 403
-5 700 34
-2.. 0 001
- 2 79 0 93


4e
5 ne
4 w
1 e

4e


4s

24 .....




7 w
6 W

1.

2s w

Is
2sw


12* 6324
5 68 3*
13 16424
12 63 23
17* 5513
30 64 2*

17 55 3*
18 60 23








Climatological Data for June, 1902-Continued.


Stations


Counties


Pensacola.......... Escambia ......
Quincy.............. Gadsden..... .
St. Audrews Bay... Washington....
Stephensville........ Taylor.............
Tallahassee........ Leon .........
Waukeenah.......... Jpfferson.......
Wausau........ .... Washington ..
Wewahitchka ...... Calhoun.......

Means...... .
State Means
.. . .. . . ....................i:


56 22
260 2
4
-... 3
193 16

250 4
8


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


(8 M




0 cc
be "R


Precipitation, in inches


f0


38 20 1.41
3 41 8 06
4* 28 1 96
.. .... 5 86
9 24 9 94
4 31 10 97
23* 38 4 4611
2 z8 4 87

. 5 01
. .... 5 95


l






-8 75 1.41 1 16 14
-3 7 1.41 1 16 14
...... 5 82 6 22 6
-4 760 8 5 26 4
H0 45 2 iu 7 9 17
+8 58335 6 21
...... 6 O 17 10
...... 51 .... .
..... 420 5 3 23

-0 82 ...... 5 15 12
-1 20 .... 8 15 10
V:1:: ...:: ....


tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
made at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily, in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau. only such stations as have nprmals.
ITNot included in means. Instruments moved from a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
Iake Butler 2 miles northwest to JohnstQwn on the 1st inst. of days nmissmi from report,


0
M



I

0
s

2e
8

4s

3s
5 e


C~


--~----`











Salient Climatic Features.



ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean pressure for the month was 29.96 inches, which is 0.04 inch
'below normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.23 inches, at Jack-
zsonville on the 1st; the lowest observed pressure was 29.71 inches, at Key
West on the 13th, Tampa on the 14th and Jacksonville on the 15th;
;monthly range for the State was 0.52 inch.

TEMPERATURE- (Degrees Fahrenheit).

The monthly mean temperature for the State was 80.7 degrees, 0.8 de-
:grees above normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 79.9 de-
grees; Central, 81.0 degrees; Southern, 80.9 degrees; Western, 81.2 de-
grees. The highest monthly mean temperature was 82.6 degrees, at Cler-
mont; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 78.6 degrees, at Sumner.
'The highest temperature during the month was 103 degrees, at Eustis on
the 30th; the lowest temperature was 53 degrees, at Quincy on the 3d;
;absolute range for the State was 50 degrees.

PRECIPITATION-(Inches and hundredths).

The average precipitation for the State during the month was 5.95 in-
*ches, 1.20 inches below the normal amount. By sections, the averages
-were: Northern, 6.16 inches; Central, 5.50 inches; Southern, 7.00 inches;
Western, 5.01 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 15.01 inches, at
Pinemount; and the least was 0.00 inch, at Molino. The greatest amount
for any twenty;four hours was 6.08 inches, at Waukeenah on the 15th.

WIND AND WEATHER.

The prevailing winds during the month were from the southeast. By
Sections, there were: 'Northern, 15 clear days; 11 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy.
Central, 16 clear; 10 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy. Southern, 12 clear; 8 partly
cloudy; 10 cloudy. Western, 15 clear; 12 partly cloudy; 3 cloudy.
Rainy days: :Northern section, 10,; Central, 8; Southern, 10; West-
,ern, 5.







30

COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE- ANDI RAINFALL DATA POWl XLUEj WITIR
DEPARTURES FROMINORMAL, DURING THE PAST' ELREVB YEARS.
The normal temperature for June is 79.9 deg., the normal rainfall is 7.156
inches.

Year 1892 1898 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902


Mean.... 78.8 80.2 78.2 79.8 79.8 82.0 80.9 80.4 79 4 7.4 80.7
Departure -1.1 +0. -1.7 -0.1 -0.1 +2.1 +1.0 +0.5 -0.5 -0.5 +0.8.
Total.... 9.00 8.02 6.39 4.46 10.78 4.96 3.08 5.43 9.57 9.77 5.95
Departure -1.85+0.87-0.76-2.69 +.6-2.19-4.07-1.72 +2.42+2.62-1.20-




PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE,


Atmospheric Pressure

Stations




Jacksonville............ 29.96 80.23 1 29.7115
Jupiter.................. 29.97 30.1118 29.7613
Key West............... 29.93 30.070 29.71 13
Penpacola .............. *29.98 30.18 1 29.7414
Tamps.................. 29.96 80.13 1 29.71 14
*8 a. m. readings only.


Wind Velocity, Relative
in Miles Humidity

a t->




5.829 42sw 5 9244 75
8,849 48 sw 13 9864 82
6,915 26 ne 1 10066 79
7,925 34 sw29 8840 78
5,254 36 s14 10045 77




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