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Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: June 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Table of Contents
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        Page 2
    Editorial
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
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        Page 28
Full Text


ol f ..

476 Vol. 12. No. 76.

FLORIDA

(Department or Arrlculture.)



..Monthly Bulletin..


JUNE, 19o2.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Cropa.
Part II. FPertlllear.
Part III. A/eather Report.
Part IV. Mlecellaneous.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them . .

TALLAHA88SEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFtOE, TALLAHARSEE, F1A.
H i ii ill









County Map of the State of Florida.
(Fo ti e Bulletin.)









Editorial.


For want of both time and space, we were unable to include in June
Bulletin with the report for 1900 the following tables, showing the differ-
-ences in acreage and value of farm products for the years 1899 and 1900.
The comparison is interesting, in as much as it discloses a condition of in-
dustrial affairs highly satisfactory. It is a condition that has been believed
and asserted with persistence for months, but till now no solid facts have
been offered in evidence, establishing the real existence of a condition of
prosperity so marked in size of results. It will be noted that.there is a
reduction in the acreage of 1900 in field crops of 89,919 acres, or about 9
per cent., and an increase of only 566 acres in vegetable crops, a mere bag-
atelle which cuts no figures in comparison with the largely increased value
of the vegetable crops, and we say this because the small increase in acre-
age cannot possibly account for the large increase in values. With this
decrease of 89,919 acres in field crops, we have an increase in value of
field crops of $1,961,403, or 24 per cent., over and above that of 189'9. The
increase in acreage of vegetable and garden products is only 566 acres, or
.about 3 1-3 per cent., while the increase in the value of the product was
$501,321, or 59 per cent. in excess of 1899. So with a net decrease in the
acreage of soil products of 89,353 acres, we have a combined increase in
-values of $2,462,724, or an average of 41j per cent. in the period of one
year. There was an increase, it is true, in the products, but the increase in
values was proportionately greater than the increase in products.
In the increase of fruit crops, the relative value is well maintained, and
-shows $784,f91 increase for 1899 in favor of 1900.
In live stock an average increase is shown in number of about 15 per
,cent., while the increase in value shows a total of $856,608, or over 34 per
cent. in favor of .1900, a rate of increase in value of more than 100 per
,cent. in prospective to the increase in number of stock.
The poultry industry shows an increase over 1899, and in favor of 1900,
-of $52,882, or 7j per cent.
The increase in dairy products of 1900 over 1899 is $203,982, or over
25 per cent. In miscellaneous products there is also an increase of $3,838
or practically 3 per cent.
Thus we have a grand total for 1900 of $23,673,313, as against $18,-
525,528 for. 1899, a magnificent increase of $5,147,785, pr an average of
28 per cent.--something without a parallel in the history of farming in
Florida. Distributed, as this large sum is, over every section of the State,
it easily accounts for the great degree of prosperity so much in evidence.
A perusal of the report will disclose many interesting facts.
Tables showing comparative difference in acreage and values for i
years 1900 and 1899:






4

YEAR 1900.

TOTAL ACREAGES OF CROPS.

Field Crops .................................... ........ 962,822
Vegetable and Garden Products ............................ 16,722

Total Acreage in Cultivation ........................... 979,544

TOTAL VALUE OF FARM PRODUCTS.

Table No. 1-Field Crops ............................$10,134,950
Table No. 2-Vegetable and Garden Products ............ 1,357,629
Table No. 3- Fruit Crops ............................. 2,133,723
Table No. 4- Live Stock .............................. 8,143,176
Table No. 5- Poultry ................................ 758,710
Table No. 6- Dairy Products .......................... 1,015,653
Table No. 7-Miscellaneous Products ................... 129,472

Total .........................................$23,673,313

YEAR 1899.

TOTAL ACREAGES OF CROPS.

Field Crops ................. ........................1,052,741
Vegetable and Garden Products .......................... 16,156

Total Acreage in Cultivation ........................... 1,068,897

TOTAL VALUE OF FARM PRODUCTS.

Table No. I-Field Crops ............................ $8,173,547
Table No. 2-Vegetable and Garden Products ............. 856,308
Table No. 3-Fruit Crops ............................. 1,349,132
Table No. 4-Live Stock ............................. 6,503,408
Table No. 5-Poultry ................................ 705,828
Table No. 6-Dairy Products .......................... 811,671
Table No. 7-Miscellaneous Products .................... 125,634

Total .. .................... ...................$18,525,528






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-

HoNs B. E. McLIN, Coin. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.

CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-Field crops are generally in fair condition, and if
seasons are good, there will be good yields; the fruit and vegetable crops
are good, and melons bringing satisfactory prices.
BAKER COUNTY-Corn has suffered for rain, until the crop will be
short, and it is needing rain now; cotton has also been checked by the dry
weather, but is looking better at present, though a good deal of it is dying
with the black rot; bad staid of field peas, owing to dry weather; peaches
and melons are doing finely.
BRADFORD COUNTY-Cotton doing well, also corn, though needing rain;
other field crops looking well, with good prospect for average yields;
peach and melon crops very good.
BREVARD COUNTY-Most field crops are planted here in a small way for
home use, but all are doing well; fruit trees are in fine condition, but the
crop will be a little short.
CALHOUN COUNTY-Corn has been cut short by the dry weather; cotton
and other crops are looking well; peach crop fine.
CITRus COUNTY-Crops are doing well; rains have come and helped
condition very materially; prospects average good.
CLAY COUNTY-The want of rain has cut the corn crop short; other
field crops are doing well, and the prospect is for good average yields;
fruit crop is very good.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-Crop prospects are very good, having good rains,
though early corn was injured some before the rain came; if rai# do not
come in excess, the yield of all crops will be better than for a number of
years past.
DADE COUNTY-Drought in late May, and part of June, caused citrus
trees to drop part of their fruit; since June 10th fine rains have started
them into new growth, and dropping of fruit has stopped; the fruit trees
are in fine condition and good prospect for average crop; other crops did
well.
DESOTO COUNTY-The rainy season having set in, all crops are improv-
ing, and prospects of large yields more cer-ain; fruit trees are doing well
and will give a good crop.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY-Corn is injured by drought, and the storm of the
21st blew it down so badly that there will not be over half a crop; has
been very dry through nearly all of June; cotton and other field crops are
doing well, and the prospect good.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-Corn has suffered some for want of rain, but as a
general thing crops are doing well; peach and melon crops are fine.
GADSDEN COUNTY-The crops of this county are generally in fine condi-








tion, and the prospect for large yields is better than for a number of
years; the fruit crop is also fine.
HAMILTON C6UNTY-The crops in this county have suffered heavily
from drought; cotton is not doing well, and corn will be very short; the
fruit and melon crops are only a fair average.
HERNANDO COUNTY-Corn has come out all right since the rain begun,
aand all the other field crops growing well and indicate good yields; vege-
,table, peach, and melon crops are very fine.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-The drought has been broken in some parts
-of the county, but in others it is still dry; crops are doing very well gen-
-erally; the peach and melon crops are fine, and are bringing satisfactory
prices.
HOLMES COUNTY-There has been the least rainfall up to this date we
'have ever seen at this season; it has seriously injured the Irish potato crop
-and also tobacco; cotton and corn have stood the drought well up to now,
but will suffer severely very soon if we get no rain; peach and melon crops
fine, and selling for good prices.
JACKSON COUNTY-The field crops& in this county, where they have been
well worked, are looking well; there has been some complaint of the boll
worm; labor is also scarce and with heavy rains has contributed to lower
the condition, as also prospective yield.
JEFFERSON COUNTY-Crops have needed rain very much, corn in par-
ticular; cotton and other crops are doing very well; melon crops also do-
ing well, prospect good all around.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY-Crops are fair, considering the unusual seasons,
and if seasons improve there will be good yields of all crops; fruit crops
look very well.
LA v COUNTY-The crops are doing well, and indicate good yields;
fruit trees doing well, and the peach and melon crops are fine and bring-
ing fine prices; pears are a failure.
LEE COUNTY-All crops are doing as well as could be wished, and will
yield well; fruit trees, and crops are very fine and will also turn out good
yields; vegetable and melon crops excellent, and are bringing fine prices;
we are having plenty of rains to date, and weather delightful.
LEON COUNrY-Corn has suffered for rain, but is improving; cotton
has also lost some on account no rain, but is doing better now, and is in
fair condition; prospective yield for all crops is fair; melon crops are
nest for several years.
LEVY COUNTY-Corn has been damaged by drought; cane erop is short
for want of seed, and sweet potato crop will be cut off for lack of vines to
plant; on the average, crops are doing very well, and the vegetable and
melon crops are promising; there will' be an average crop all around.
MADISON COUNTY-The outlook for crops in this county is generally
good, and all indications now are that there will be fine yields; the peack
And melon crops are much fner than usual.










MANATEE COUNTY-Crops are in fine order; vegetable crops have been
good and prices satisfactory; orange trees improving, and there will be
good crops generally.
MARION COUNTY-We are having possibly a little too much rain, but
not enough to do any material damage, and crops are looking very well;
vegetables are yielding well, and bringing satisfactory prices; fruit trees
are doing well, and peach and melon crops are unusually good.
NASSAU COUNTY-Dry weather in the fore part of season put crops:
back, and early crops were cut short, but late rains are fast redeeming the-
late crops, and making fine hay; peach and melon crops are very fine.
ORANGE COUNTY-We are having unusually dry and hot weather, and'
orange trees are suffering for rain; there are few potatoes planted yet, and
likely to be a small crop; crops are generally in fair condition.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-Sweet potatoes just being planted; corn and other
crops were much damaged by drought before rains commenced.
PASCO COUNTY-The crops of this county arc in a very fair condition,.
and promise good yields; vegetable crops good and selling for fair prices;
melon, peach and cantaloupe crops are quite good.
POLK COUNTY-All crops are in a flattering condition, with unusually
fine prospective yields; fruit trees doing very well; vegetable crops about
over and brought good prices; melon crops are unusually fine and selling
well.
PUTNAM COUNTY-Irregular seasons have kept crops from being as
good as they usually are at this time; rains needed soon or crops will lose
greatly.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-The corn crops of this section are almost a fail-
ure, caused by the unprecedented drought; cotton is in fair condition, also
other field crops; peach crop fair, and watermelons fine.
SUMTER COUNTY-In some sections of the county we have had but one
rain, May 29th; in other sections good showers have fallen; hence in some
parts crops are suffering very much, in others crops are good; early corn is
good, but late corn poor.
SUWANNEE COUNTY-Crops will average very good, but rain is needed,
or soon crops will suffer.
TAYLOR COUNTY-Crops are looking well over most of the county, and
with good seasons the yield of all will reach a fair average.
WALTON COUNTY-Thy dry weather is injuring crops of all kinds, and
unless it rains right soon, will make almost nothing; peach crop medium.
WASHINGTON CouNTY-Rains for the past two months have consisted
of eight showers, and that in streaks; in some portions of the county crops
are nearly ruined by drought, while in other sections rain has been suffi-
cient to keep crops in fairly good condition; it is undoubtedly the worst
drought we have had in many years in this section; but if rain comes soot
we will make nearly an average crop.









Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for
June, 1902, as Compared with an average; also Condi,
tion of Fruit Trees.





Counties r-
0 c 0 0 0 .0
i0 V 'C i '0

Alachua................. ...O 75 80 . i 70 ... . 9U 90 50
Baker ..... ........... ... 75 65 80 75 100 50 ..... 50 100
Bradford.......... .... .... 100 75 90 80 80 95 85
Brevard................ ... 100 100 100 12 100 100 ... 100
Calhoun ............... 100 100 00 75. ..100..
Citrus................... ..... 75 60 .. 100 100
Clav.................... .. 75 10 100 100 100 . 100 50
Columbia............... ... 105 100 90 100 100 100 100 1
D ade ...... ....... ... .. ... .. .. 100 100 ....
DeSoto.............. .... 95 100 9 9 0 o0 10 0 o9 95
Escambia .............. 100 .... 50 75 100 100 100 ...... 100 100 50
Franklin.............. .. 90 90 90 90 90 90 ... 90 90 .
Cidsden ............... 100 105 120 110 100 8) 100 500 100 125
Hamilton. .............. 50 50 60 50 5 .50 50 75
Hernando ...... ...............100 110 100 80 100 .. .. .. 100 ......
Hillsborough.......... ...... .60 50 100 100 100 100 ..... .. ......
Holmes ............... 80 75 95! 100 70 95 100 .... ....... 95 65
Jackson............. 80 80 105i 103 100 90 100 .... 100 .. 90 85
Jefferson............. 90 90 90 75 75 80 ........ 90 85
LaFayette......... ........ 95 100 lu0 110 90 90 0.. ....
Lake.............. ..... .. ... 100 75.... 50 50 40 .... 60 .
Lee ......................... 110 100 100 110 100 100 10o 110 100 110
Leon .................. 90 .. 90 95 100 85 95 100100
Madison............... 100 10 80 9510500 110 10 .. .. ... 110 ..
Manatee.................. .. 90 90 z5 75 70 .. ... 100
Marion........... 100 110 110 100 100 11 100 110 100 100 100 100
Nassau ............... ....100 85 ... 80 ... 100
Orange .......... ... ... 80 75 75 50 85 90.. 30 75
OSceol .......... .70 i0 100 75' 901 50 40 80 90
Pasco............... .... 100 80 1 10000 80 .... 100...... 100
Polk ........................ 90 95 10: .. 123 1.: .. 90 100 100
Putnam ................ 40 5 75 5) 50 501 .... .... 75 ..
Santa Rosa.... ....... 90 ... 75 90 80 75 75 100 .. 100 75
Sumter .............. .... 85 95 8( 75 0 90 9u 75 65 95 100
Suwannee ............ .... 100 100 10 75 95 85 75 .... .... 80
Tylor.............. ...75 80 60 70 50 6 .. 80 ...
W alton .............. 7 75 85 7 .. .. .. 101 ..
Washington............ 105 100 90 9 100 10(u 100 100 .... 10 110
general averares....... -941 88 8 861 90 86 81 14 81 88 91 88











Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties






Baker.............. ... ... .. .. .. .. ....
Bradford.................... 100 .. .... ..
Brevard............. .. I. 80 80 80
Calhoun.... .. .............. ... 100
C itrus...... .............. ... 100 .. .........
Clay ......... ............. 10 .
Columbia .............. .. 10
Dade ..... ..... ....... 100 100 105 05 100 105
DeSoto ............... 100 90 90 90 95 95 95
Escamhia................. 10 ... .. .
Franklin .... ............... ... . .. . .
Gadsden ............. 100 .
Hamilton .... .... ..... ... 60 .... ......
H ernando...... .......... 100 . .
H illsborough ............. 100 ......... 50 50
Holmes ... .......... . .. . ... .. ....
Jackson... ..... ...... .. 100 ..........
Jeffeison ..................... 90 .... !
Lafayette................... 100 .. .
Lake.... ...... ......... 100 100 50 100
Lee....... ........ .. 125 125 125 100 100 100 125
Leon .. ... ....... .. 100 ..... .. .. . .
L-vy ...................... 100 .. .. .. .. ...
Madison ......... ...... ... .... .... ....
Manatee.... ............. 100 30 70 8 80 6 80
Marion........ 125 .... .... 110 110 100 110
Nassau .. ...... 100 ..... 9 90 .. .
O range......... ............ 90 .... .. 7 ...... 50
Osceola................ 90 100 95 9 95 .... 90
Pasco......... .... . 100 100 100 10 100
Polk.............. ... ... 5 7I 150 75 2 75
Putnam................. 75 ..... ... 50 .....50
Santa Rosa............. t100 .. .... ........
Sum ter............... . 95 ... .... 100 .... 100
Suwannee .... ........ 1001 .. .......
Taylor.... ... .... .... .
Walton ......... ....... 851 .. .. ... ..
W ashington.... ....... .. 11 .. .. .... .
General aaverages... .... 10( 89 116 8 90 8c 86


S90 90


S. 80 80
90 80

I 100 100

90 80 95 100
10.1 100 75 75
.... 90 90
115 100 . .....
50 50
100 100
100 100
40 40 60 50



100 100 125 125

100 100
.. ... 110 110
S100 100
100 90 110 110
100 100
90 80
80 75
100 100 70 70
... 70 75

. ..... 75 75
75 75


ioo0 100 16 100

94 90 89 88











Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops--Continued.


Pears Peaches Water- Canta- Pine. Grapes
melons loupes apples Gapes

Counties

> o *
no '* ^ V V
;___________0 0 C' 0_ H


Alachua ...................
B aker ..................
Bradford ... ..........
Brevard..............
Calhoun......... ......
Citrus...................
Clay........ ...... .
Columbia..........
D.ide... .......... .
DeSnto .. ............ ...
Escambia ..... ........
Franklin... .........
Gadsden ..........
Hamilton ..............
Hernando .............
Hillsborough.....
Holmes......... .......
Jackson .......... .
Jefferson...........
Lafayette...... ..............
Lake.... .............
Lee....................
Leon ....................
Levy ............. .
Madison ............
Manatee...............
Marion ......... ....
Nassau ....... .......
Orange..................
Osceola ..... .... .
Pasco.............. .....
Polk ...............
Putnam ................
Santa Rosa.............
Sumter. ...... .. ...
Suwannee.............
Taylor.................
Walton ................
Washington.............

General averages.......


65 75 70
... ... 100
60

30 20 75
30 20 100
60 40 100
50 10 100

100 11I 100
100 "ii
.... .... 100
.... .... 90
100 100 100
50 50l 50
10100 1';0
.. .. .. 100
25 25 100
50 50 100

65 65 85
100
100 10 120
50 20 65
40 40 60
10 10 105
..i. .. 100


100 95 100
100 150 100
40 40 100
150
10 10 90
50 50 75
70 70 100

75
..... .... 100

60 58 93


20 10o
100 100
80 85

65 100
t110 100
10" ..
110 100

120 95
100 50
90 100
100 ..
50 50)
100 100
125 75
100 o100
75 85
.. 100
85 ...
100 100
120 150
50 100
60 90
105 125
115 100
110 100
100 100
100 90
150 90.
100 10o
150 115
90 50


100

75 50
100 90

951 9


50 10 0 ..
10 .... .. .
90 ..00 .. .. ....

100.
100 i.... . .

100 100 100 ....
.. .. 110
110 90 100 100
50 50 50
100 90 90 ....

50 40 40
110 100 150
75 100 100
100 ... ... ....
90 ... ... ..
95 .. .... ...

125 75 75 ...
150 150 150 125
125 100 125 ....
90 75 70
125 100 100
110' 100 90 ...
150 110 150 10(
100 100 100
80 75 30 90
90 75 80 60
100 100 100 .
115 110 1 0 ...
50 ... .... ..
90 . .. ..
100 100 100 ..
100 .... ... ....

50 ...... .....:
85 90 75 .

951 88 97 98


100 100,
... 80 90


..1.. ....
....100 1009
1002 90

150 100 110-

.. 90 90
... 90 90
50 50
.... 100 100'

95 90
100 100,


100 100'
125 100 100
100 100

95 95
85 90
100 100 100
100 100
100 ...
40 80 90,

.. 80 80'
80 80,
100 100
85 85&
.... 90 100




105 92 93


--







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-1902.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) ... .15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ......... 5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid............... "..$1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... ................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We finm
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ...............$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20 ................ .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11xl.10 .............. .7.82
Mixing and bagging .......... .......... ....... 2.00
$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers arn bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that point' must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.





BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
R. E. RosE, State Chemist. MARIoN G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Anal i i alrSe c. tapp o i o
TITT' 1 ven a y purchaser.)


.1ho l holc Acid. I I t

Name ofrt By Whom Set

bai ainilIL .i iS aks liBlSIA 7o
Bright C. S. Meal..... 722 ..... 3.31 8.44 1.83 all a to l Cpe ala ssee
Dark C. 'I,,M 4 .... 5 1.65 I,., S' ,l Oi l .i :, I al1ssee.




Bone Compound ....... 9.42 4.06 1,.48 1.89.... I Fla.
.Fertilze f'.. 't.. .436.12 i
Drilisozive qaiie'l 9600f .79 .2-0 7. 19.Z9 2,77 50. K ei o .a


'ine Grov'1 rd 7 M.:M `8 h 1 Co.0 yFla. e.
Fertl .ze ~ .., 1.~ I.34 .2 8.S Jmes Jlenr.y. .Petertbu Fl a
. G.Pu oo41 rr ~., mp: / 11trB-O 4vll Fla..
Mixed Fert .... .96 8 0 1.5a12.5 ra Fertilizmer Co



Mixed Fertilizer .. 9 24 20 2 83 3.84 7.49 T pa Fetilizr Co.,T a.
Blood, BneP soh. t. T. )& yp ga4 relizedlkrU.Co. T
ashs a lac 0 in gn
Fertilizer...... ......102F' 26 052 W. is
GDu an re .......... .. 3.. .18 ... 2 .14109 .. i3( affap a cti5o o n





Mixed Fe4l4er No.1 9748o .1
Bone Compound ..... IB. i9 4.. 1.4'8' 1 .- .: .....8- oulrtB-Wf^ FIa.
Nitratexofled a. oT F.elo ....... .. 3 o2 Tt a





H. G Sulhate Potash ... ..... ... ..... 51.






H. G. StfirIlate Pota.h M.rs. Hellen i. Wright, r a.
H. Gisso lve006e Pot .. 's. Hellen S 0Wr'gh





Fertilize ..... .. 6.80 042 7 472 E. D, Lutier,L 4iedwoAod, fli





Fertillzei .. ... 6.*98 .6.51 0. '9 's 59 J. H. Loyd, Winter v nt Fla.
Mixed F Pa ter Fert12.9z2er Co1.7011.7 ville3






GMixed F.ftlker No. .'110 10.92 0 '68 25 8 1. Cotton D e, Fla.
Palmert ..... ...- ..... .0.57 Arthur Cornwell, Pa'metto, Fla.
Ground ab ...... I.42 3.56 16.95 20.5 .. 1.35 Southern Fert. Mnf. Co. Gainesvile,Fla.
Fertilized ..... 10.78 3 31 4 1.8 chroeder & uinbaw Quin Fla.
Fertilized er....... .. 7 6.00 7. 1.54 5 T a ertlizr coN 3a






Fertilize 3 4fh.4 R.Ie8100 .,
Cto S d; Ma f a 7 9-27I
Blood and Bone....... 8 7.07 7 7 1







Tobacco Dust 1 'I F Hardes Sq's n j' .Fla.
O :cod Meta..te .....P ..... .. 0.x8 i n S . .i ., a aAj.
H. G. SiRhate Pota. 1 Mr
Hsbes. G. ju i Potas 1rs. HTellen S. W Ne

Cixed F Meal..... 1 40h 74 0. 7
Mixed FWgler '.5 2.5 i. Fla.
Polmptton.. .. 0.57 riiir Cornwell, Pa'metto' la(






-sFaliet.l nibeoou.... i 3 eoi3q 1.I31m b0s a odulavroeer
S.ao Fertir...o to.... a si.q .torm no beaoM asi ,auoi
Fertllle 'r. hwtwila F*lgHSg go8 o iShi


Cotton 92 '0:64'J'.56 25' 1. I aB C o nD ,l

Tobacco Dust ..1 .... .... 1. 51 5.92 h. Coardes ll, Pt. Fla.
Cotton Saa:r::IBB~2 14 351. 20.5 ... 1.3 So h rM C ,as vil'o, Fla.
TF baicoi usf........ 1.........: LI .
Cotton Seed Meal.... .9...

Mixed -37lfzer n933 'g 101 3.
M ixed F il:lZ 7 ,a 29 0 .32 eyeja F la.

.eool 8ot sno ioi eoilq tslfiffl no baea d 9g8 e, oFt









x ,? i -' .. " _: p 1 -51 -




IWUREAl -OFIFE tELLJ1ERg-Contiwied.






.- ,.^S ; ... .
By Whom Sent



Mixed F~rtilzar.:.o.. n dS0I 1.60 Z 9.511Q :.9 A.vllcox-fAlppa, Fla.
ixefl i~7.a.r8...1.,.71 3.T .' T-.h 'l.ffl lark & Co a,,a. Fla. -
MixEd F -rti --lr, 5,-O5 : 1,.1 7. 1.85 .3-64 D. W. Br cadla, Fla.
Feer izer. ..?'-.;7..-2 9.t311 :~ 86[ IT.13-2 [S9C : "Cope, Chipley, Fla.
Artibur's vegetable - -- '-..-
Fertilizer. .:.. ..-. -T 35 4,86 2 .3.21 f 4- .. ArmouriFeri r'WorkshJacksonvill"-
Armour's Fri iA ftol -- __
C r Speci'. .7: 9.45 7.35 iT 1T4[ 453 Ar~m ertilizer Works., acksville
Sulphate of Ammonia. 3 55 *.. .. ..25 ('5 ..~ \Vilso6fh roomfl ,ert. C., JacksonvifM.
Sulphate of Ammonia. 8.60 ... ....: Wflloli i T2p0 b.c1t. C.z ,Jadcsoyi
Mixed Fertilizer ... Jco "-i
S pwee ings_..... -..-. 3 .. illH9ea-e-Toomer-Fert. CS,. Jacgsoil
Nitrate of Soda :.. 170.......... ..18.4 ... illson& Tomert. Ce., Jackso i ,
Sulphate of Potash. ..... 17' ...a 4.00 Willson & T %_Wt. C. JacksoinT.
Dried Blood.. :-..- .... ..:; 15 " .' .M HebbtfJ ien, ila. -
Ground Steamed(fonid .10'8 64154 581 38 4P ".... RM. Hebrt,.tnsen 1, a. 3 [
H. G.,Tobaeco T -. 1.80 t. M. Hebbert, Jensen, ma .
Tobacco Dust..... 7 .. ... -j. 75 '. 0. Painte itFert' i, JFaksoniil

:c-R alues-ehli adin g- -''Bureaut of Fertiizers.-'
N: TE.-TTii s-d partfglnt Is got aWe of the- source of the goo0p~,py.t name ofi
ufacrtrers of tj "S Rpecil mples" entEin by purchasers. Dealis'treqiuntly senlia sa
ples Qf goods fQrsxamin itonbefore purchasing. 'A ''Special Sample" sent in a lterr"Z
maSlnatrer, fLne ison ence l at- thegomdare O afll0 t echym or sale. 'he" '
ciSlutles' -taenyt ta ilst,-or lissitaion prge g tatesShah0
of tbiLgoe9 and.the manufacturers; the -MrEmiatee fdntlybis-,nd the amount of fertUilig -
greieniifound by'the aatte Cheesil e "
#Aiste lotit ie Bln sample3ait" iBper, S brnatdboxes.. S
Tobacco sLtaiip aitobacco f4q ntai soamephBasehorie acid, b Yf fi ought for t4e tfrh
ana'atmonae6nte Cotn seed meal contains some hosphoriadc, -ndf'l -potqh, but i
bog...... fcr-t amtpo.j- .. .. -: .. .. ....... _-
: were-only tha intoflre phisi6f a-cdi e~ he 'n.u oi lnbA o.has be n detee iner a
total s afop oricaeMl.I 1 :_ . .. -





x ,=,I-X.. ,3-- .^ ,. H w -,J ; .
g -. -1 ---- -- ----

...:.a ,rI 5 ; ....|Z; c 7 : : : a


S. ^1 =- s^:^^: s?,. ^< :: = ', x


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


NAME OP BRAND.


Phos. Ai


ai

I I


Cotton Seed Meal............... ...... ........
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 11.14 .......
Cotton Seed Meal ............... 9. ......
Cotton Seed Meal..... .. 7..........
Cotton Seed Meal.......... 8. ...
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 10.1
Cotton Seed Meal..... ...... ............
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure. 9.201 7.42 19
Ideal Potato Manure............ 11 8u 7.84 0.91
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer. 10.75 6.86 2.06
Ideal Fertilizer......... ..... 10.40 7.i,.9 1.07
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manre 13.0 7.12 .03
Mape's Vegetable Manre..... 10.68 6 3 257
Mape's Oranee Tree Fertilizer.. 13.20 7,71 2.92
Ideal Fertilizer.................. 10.10 7.32 0.94
Bradley's Fruit &Vine Fertilizer 12.95 8.57 1.65
Fruit nd Vine Fertilizer........ 15. 60 1. bl 2.21
Bradley's Nursery Stock........ 10.5 7.97 2 6
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guaano... 8.60 6.44 1.41
Ideal Vegetable M nure. ...... 1395 7.6- 0 90
Mane's Vegetable Manu e...... 11.15 6.7 5 2.91
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure. '0.95 6.67 2.23
Blood. Bone and Potash .. 11.75 7.70 0.88
Nitrate of Sola .......... ... 0
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure.. 9.0 6.24 0.61
Special Orange Tree Manure.... 12.35| 7.15 2 01
H. G. Tobacco Dust ...... .. 8.86 ..
Osceola Brand Tobacco Dust. 7.91 .......
Special Mixture (Tobacco)..... 17.8
H. G. Sulphate of Potash....... 1.44 ....
Kainit..... .. ....... .... 5.84 ......
Ideal Fertilizer............... 6.32 7.00 45
H, G. Tobacco Dust.......... 7.20 .........


cid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.


.a 0 By Whom and Where Manufactured.

a -a < a 5 o
o6 a 00 wa

2.9 8.61 1 s ....... to 38 to% 1 to 2 DecaturCotton Oil Co., Decatir, Ala.
2.41 8.91 1. 7 ...... .... 3.22 8.24 1.96 Jefferson Mfir. o.. Jefferson, Ga.
2.91 1.92 ...... .. 3 2 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Selma, Ala.
2.3 8.4 .78 ...... ...... 3.22 8.4 1.6 Aabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile, Ala.
2.71 8 38 I 97 ................ .. 3.22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co Mobile, Ala.
2.57 8.24 1.82 .......... ....... 5to2.8 7t8.9 .5--1.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Selma, Ala.
3.31 8.7 2. 16 .... ......to2 g t% 1 to 3 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
9.3 2. 11.45 8 to 10 5 to 7 2 to 4 ...... to 3 10 to 12 Mapes' formula& Peru GuanoCo., N Y.
8.( 4.2 8.3 ........ 6 to 8 to 2 ........ 4 to 8 tO 10 Wilson & Toomei Fert. Co ,Jacksonville
.... .. 5 to 7 ......
8.ft 4.13 5.13 .... ti 1 8 .............. 4 tO 5 5 to 7 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y.
S'1 4.2 7.i9 .... 5 to 7......... 6 to 8 Wilso Toomer Frt. Co Jacksonille
9. 2.52 1.32 8 to ....... to to 12 Mapes' Formula& Peru GuanoCo., N Y.
9.5 4.8 4.79 I" to 12 6 to 2 to 4 5 4 to Mapes' Formula& Peru.unoCo,N Y.
10.3 4.14 3.79 10 to to 8 2 to 4...... 4 to 5 3 to 4 Mapes' Formula & Pcru Guano Co N.Y.
8.26 4.22 691 5 7 ....... ..... 4to-5/ 6 to Wilron & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
.0.2 9 5to7 ...... .X-10X 29to3l 10 to Bradley's Form. & Pern. GuanoCo., N.Y.
S.02 2 11 11.76 8 to 1 8 1 o 3 to 412 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tiompa.
10.61 4.3 3.5 ....... 8 to 10 ..... te 1: 4o05% 3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
7.86 4.22 6.171010 to12 to 7 2 to 4... 1,4 to 4 to 6 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
8.50 3.6 .14 ........ i to 8 1o 2 .. 4 o 5 8 to 10 Wilson oomer rt. Co.. Jacksonville.
9.691 5. It 5.1, 10 to 1 6 oo 8 2 to 4... 5 to 4 to apes' Formula & Peru. GuanoCo N.Y.
8.9 2.310.2 4 8 to 10 5 to 7 2 to 4....... 2 to to Mapes' Formula Peru. Guano Co.. N. Y.
8.58 5.38 5.59 5 to l 8 to 10 2 to 4 .. .. to 6 7 tO 8 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
18.32 ...... ....... .... .......... 17 to 19 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonville
6.85 3.55 12.6t ..... B6 3 to 4 10 ta 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville
.16i 2.54 9.7! 10 to 12 5 to 2 to 2 t 2 to 3 0 to 11Bauh & Sons. Baltimore, Md.
2.31 2 42 8 t8o 10 ......... ..... %to34 IM to 3 A.rmour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
... 144 1.61 ...... ...... .... ..... l% to 3 1 to 5 Wilson ToomerFert. (o., Jacksonville
1.48 44i ...................................... .... Tampa Fertilizer Co.. Tampa.
50.2 8 to 51 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jaksonville.
S12.54 .... ....... .......... ....12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Fert Co.. Jacksonville.
12.5 3.92 6.32 8 to 10 5 to 7.... .. 4to5 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
...... 2.97 10,.06 ........ ...... ... 10 Florida Ferillizer Co., Gainesville, Fi, .







Jeld Phosphate................. 12 1 15.72 4.07 19.79 ..... ........ 15
Dark C. S. Meal...................... 10.2 ............ 2.04 5.44 1.4 8 to ......
DarkO. S. Meal ................ 10 .... ......2.28 5 03 1.31 8 to ..
DixieBrand C. S. Meal.......... 8.16 ... .. .. 2.56 9.11 1. ...........
Kainit........................ 9.04 ....... 12.26 ......
Fish and Potash....... ........4.20 3.48 2.04 5.52 6.19 7.3510 to 1 2 to 3
PineappleFruiter.............. 4.21 7.24 5.76 13.00 3.42 11.28 10 to 12 4 to 5
Potato Manure............. 5.955 5.83 1.97 7.80 3.85 8.95 10 to 12 5 t5 6
Lettnee and Cucumber, Special. 5.50 5.00 1.33 6.33 0.60 5.72 10 to 12 5 to 6
Peruvian Fish Guano. No. I..... 5.00 5.25 2.1.0 7.25 4.81 5.66 10 to 12 5 to 6
Special for Fruit............. 6.9 6.63 2.21 8.84 3.90 12.60 ..... 6 to 8
No. 2. Double Strength of Potash 6.25 6.10 1.87 7.97 2.36 9.82 10 to 12 5 to 6
Blood, Bone and Potash..... 6.75 5.68 3.43 9.09 4.54 4.65 10 to 12 4 to 5
No. 1,Feillilzer............. 8.0 7.13 5.11 12.24 4.54 3.93 ......... 5 to 6
No.2, Fertilizer.....*..*. ...... 7.15 6.62 3.57 10.19 5.07 9.88 ...... 6 to 7
No. 4, Fertilizer ............... 8.05 6.89 3.72 10.6t1 .01 10.30 ..... 6 to 7
Dissolved Bone................. 13.05 11.21 3.64 14.85 2.41 .. 1 to 12 15
Cotton Seed Meal.. ........... 7.65...... ...... 2.7 8.46 1.78 6 to7 ........
Aimour's Practical Trucker..... 7.8 7.13 5 83 12.90 3 04 9.2 5 to u1 6 to 7
Armour's Orange Tree Manure.. 7.90 8.01 7.43 15.44 3.80 4.09 5 to 10 8 to 10
Armour's Fruit andVine Fert... 6.85 8.12 5.90 14.12 2.87 11.02 5 to 10 6 to 8
Armour's Blood, Bone & Potash. 8.70 7.13 4.58 11.71 5.32 7.53 5 to 10 8 to 10
Armour's Fruit&BootCrop,Spec. 6.40 7.21 3.99 11.20 2.46 5.22 5 to 10 8 to 9
Armour's Bone Fl ur ........... 2.70 8.42 15.60 24.02 4.58 ..... 5 to 10 10 to 14
Armour's Dried Blood........ 12.35 ....... ....... 35 .. 10 t 13.
H. G. Tobacco Dust ........ .8l........... 1.76 1.60 8 to 10 ..
Armour's Blood and Bone..... 7 75 3.73 8.04 11.77 7.26 ...... to 10 .
H. G Blood and Bone........... .65 5.46 5.91 11.37 9.64 5 to 1
Blood and Bone......... ...... 8. 6.5 914 15.3 7.27 ...... 5 to 7........
H. G. Blood and Bone...... 8.4 3.3 3.09 6.60..... .........
Acid Phosphate............. 7.8 16.92 7.10 24.02 ................ 14.00
Strawberry Fruiter............ 7.3 5.98 .41 8.39 2.4 8.91 10 to 12 5 to
Extra Fruit and Vine......... 6.1 6.37 2.11 8.50 2.31 13.73 8 to 12 6 to 8
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 8. .........2.88 9.43 1.26
Cotton Seed Meal ............... 7.80 ...... ...... 2.60 8.9 28 58 75.......
Cotton seed *eal.......... 5.9 ........... 2 8. 1. .......
Cotton Seed Meal........ ...... .35 ....... ... 2.66 7.93 1.38 8.0 )
H.G. Acid Phosphate .......... 13.eu 17.57 1.30 18.87 ........... 12 to 15 15 to 17
A. L.Wilson 6.60 Acid Pholphat 12.30 14.77 3.76 17.53 ............ 12 to 15 14 to 16
Branley's XXX Phosphate. 8.05 14 38 1.76 16.14 ........... 10 to 20 13 to 1a
Dissolved Bone Phosphate..... 14.6b 13.67 1.51 15.18 ..... 11 13
Atlas Acid Phosphate......... 2.9 15 49 2.29 17.78 .......... 12 to 1 13 to 1
Acid Phosphate................ 13.75 134 0.28 12.2 .. .. ..... 12 to 16 12 to 14
Bradley's Palmetto Phosphate 7.95 14.89 1.58 16,3 .... . 10 to 12 12 to 24
CnuMberland Bone Super Phoa... 16.15 10.71 1.62 12 3 2.07 1.71 10 to 20 8 to It
Gou'ding's Bone Compound.... 13.9 9.78 3.98 13.71 2.09 .5110 to 12 8%- 10
Gem Guano.. .............. 13.90 10.5 3.18 13.43 1.78 1.8410 to 12 8 to 10
Lott's Compound........ .... 3-4 4.3 8.4 12.8 1.83 12..75 ..... 5 to 6
Jumher and Festilizer .......... 11.80 9.3 2.12 11 46 1 9 2 09 12 8
Mobile StandardGuano....... 7.4t 968 4.74 14 43 2.62 2.6211 to 16 8 to 10
Raw Bone Super Phospnate... 13.51 10.59 3.30 13.9 2.15 1.73 10 to 15 9tol0%
Coulding'aH.G.AcidPhos.&Po 10.3k 14.70 1.42 16 1 .. 1.30;10 to 15 12 to 14


........ ........... ....... Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla
........ 2 to 5to 7 to 1 Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison.
........ 2 to 3 5 to 7 to 1% Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison
.... ......... 8% ..:..... Humphries,Goodwin &Co .Memphis,Tenn
......... . . 12 to 13 little Brothers Jacksonville
3 to 4 ... 7 to 8 5 to Florida Fort. Mfa. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
6 to 7 ........ 3 to 4 12 to 13 FlSrda Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
280 3 ....... 3 to 4 9 to 10 Florida Fort Mfg. Co., Gainesville Fla.
1 to 2 ........ 7 to 8 4 to 5 Florida Fert. MIg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
I to 2 ........ 4%to5% 5 to 6 Florida Fert. Mfg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
I to 2 ........ 4 to 5 12 to 14 Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando. Fla.
2to 3 ........ to 2 10 to 12 Florida Fert. MIg. Co.. Gail esville, Fla.
2 to 3 ..... 4 to 5 4 to 5 Florida Fert. MIg. Co. Gainesville, Fla.
2 to 3 ........ 5 to 6 4 to 5 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
2to 3 ........ to 6 10 to 12 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando Fla.
2 to 3 ....... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Snuthern Fertilizer Co., Oriando, Fla.
3 to 4 ........ 2 t5 ....... Florida Fort. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
2 to 3 ...... 8to 8% 1 to 2 P. A. Smith, A'lanta, Ga.
2 to 3 .... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
2 to 4 .. .. 3.. o41 4 to 5 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
1 to 2 ........ 2xto3% 10 to 13 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
1 to 2 .. ... to 6 7 to 8 Armour Ferti izer Works, J cksonville.
1 to 21........ 2 to 3 5 to 0 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
..... ... 24 to 28 3 to 4 ......... Armour Fertlizr Works, Jacksonville.
................ 16 to 17 ......... rmour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
........ ........ 1to3% 1W to 3 Armour Artilizer Works, Jr cksonville.
... 10 to 12 7 to 8......... Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville
.. 12 to I 9o 10 ......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
........ 15 to 20 to 8 .......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
4.53t lo .......... Aimour Packing Co., Chicago, 11l.
........... .. ....... Little Brothers. Jackronville.
to 3 ........ 2 to 10 to 12 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., G.inesville, Fla.
...... ... 2 to 3!14 to 1 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
........ 7.26.-8'6 1.85 Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala.
.... ... IP, to 3[ 1% to 9 1 to 2 Trader's CottOn Oil Co., Union Springs,Ala
........ 2- 7. 7 15 1to 2.85 SoIthen Cotton Oil Co, Montgomery, la
S 7'50 2 lahamra Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
1 to 2 .... .... ..... Goulding Fertilizer Co, Pensacola, Fla.
I to 2 ........... .. Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2 to 3 ........ ..............Braley Fertilizer Co., Boston, Mass.
1.51 ........ ....... ...... GeorgiaChemical Works, Augusta Ga
2 to 3 .............. ........oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2 to 4 ................... Virginia, Carolina Chem.Co .Hichmond,Va
2 0 3 .... .......... Bradley Fertilizer Co. B- ston, Mass.
1 to 2 .... to 3 1 to 2 Cumberland Bone Phos. Co., Poitland,Md
1 to 2 ....... I t.. 1% to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla
1 to 2 ........ I ..- 1.2 to / io Iding Firtilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
....... .... ... to 13 II. M. Lott Havana, Fla.
S..... 2 Minlual Fertilizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
1% to .... 2 to 2 to 3 Mobile Phosphce Co Mobile, Ala.
I to 3 ... to 3 1 to i Standard Guano AChem. Co., New Orleans
1 to ......1. ...... 1 to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fl.







BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.
I~~~.~o I2 $" 1 I I J.o) fl g '_nj $ y... (0 P"IIfiurlt EClK tfI~ir.T~s~. C~' rl~ ~l'llr
EffkT orGI~~ hpOI_!Jaxt .0 in I tm, inil Ito I -l- t o o. ml Pr~trI!~ ("0 j'C~pr-a.iyMIi
fojapJr piW11( 1 C a. .......... 1 -' 11 1 j'ti B ? 1 ? ff 5'' it tfii, -4n-a, y,$si (0 J{OfiIG ,I
',DU~ip Wnq hGi1iISGL...........II i20 0 IIJ I1 *' s I0III n' II h1f1V'Ln n' O- ''''l 1)1 i
I ronr ...............- '1 VPw:l i III* -" Foi i i
n"pejsq rnt~bn Iie Lur u2 *. 9,l I ovu 1i 1, 'w !, Sr I. '
Ioq flflH~( . j I]. I - :.
fltuqjclnnh belo 11-'fi hI LlJJ~flf m' 0I tH'''' a I i ~ )1 It'S vl Sr I, I
b i42,q14w 1 lsour rjIulDnInI(I 'M 11 p. Ii
kull~t-iii Lp"Wb'jilfc, grIpo" 1)(I-Af
ycjq Loopvi Iii j:; :F


WoZ I III t op411 4Q 4t 44
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i- ;F) t 0, 10 s(~I1. I


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:r. 0 0 to: S13 0.to. ,4

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34%U~tq!2Th Z .o 0Lt..os4
~t~4~~ltlip I 12!6'fl, 'Z

WsusnS~W m I.JV!j.Q ui 3t 6A gipti4 4$~ 2a .5. -.6. ecln%%iii :'r.(WrW4:ok
BN '1 0.1 W ,.1 o Jt. X I, tIi w 8( 1R....... ......I...
anh&2*D p ;I1 to IW< #jp' i.acyilr obf, wns'
10. a 11 Py U to .3 V'r if'. 7 0 $1 ugg #kticalli Mini



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I4bucxw pjr.h BY"~..............Gil till i.5f I 4 in 11 ))fM WWI )

LBrilblGfltt................ At t 8f 1:. 'T

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l!.................... . P 10 1 1 2n 0 2
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'looeq po be .................j'.i 1253 rol I'm .41 2, &.1li k t0 (0' )IJ
fV. DOLING PiLG(IIIPlli 01 boffilP 0 .11 Wk 1. CO E;2 to)I! r 10 T I I (I t:\11 .il, o VO J.-, i i 'I] t g* i I 11 h1, 16 1 tls
6 Iraq (-,H0111 I 4i Py G 1 n'11 cli' 1 1) 10 1" I f' ufolrc f
h VIVO WWU1JLG ............. : I'I ilto 5 ',I.1i W;i" 6'1 Vir C' G Iilq.101,A l G ]l 1.7
II P ncubbl, Iii ...... 1 .1 1 to e to :I~oS~ ~ l ..: i - to 1 5 41,1., N1Ll(lff l i l /. ,0. W i C.!1$ 1 I*
ili . .. HI......... X.S' .l ... .. ...... (.... IJiS lo
"o r W GU ..... .... ... ..... ... . qH ..... ... 1 .... I l, -,,, I-Iii P (,Ij o IcrJ ;jjr
2 12 F.2,! 8 f ., ;;; f'), i I w -All)(W(Iff YIWITHLIT!rit (,0-' Witior
TLAr C' 2' .... 1 .3-11 .. 10.i g' ffr I fir to 1 3 1 0 ) I i; 1n !iiU
4i L powbp1 s ..IS. 1?I" ,i ...... I ....... ,J to Y ilumij.' --1 12 -ftli CollI(;Ll o- yloqp. (IJ!U oi rS





Con.1P@@4&AL61 Ff iz~ks~mna~Griafs.s
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

jLiffoffiff 1 if 'rmtdff r H tilImJ -
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,J.Fj Jfi ,2[LI tptiiF~ .il ui?- jp iuttiiu 3Ei ji r11,J4 s rL
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Pi biir5.h~lswrorlirrn 'rd'lln'd nxin orMf [ari Tb as~ijrrnnsro cj P1 anri'ro& oriT
'rioo bu rfowl T oI.JRliv oildrrql tn 1Io2 nA~dsi~r1 ~ph cii ,~hcIsMiiaF~i- Efry1.d si
"a*l.,i f- URD W )q 1 92V



'IOPBi ,lJW~f1I bO% no~ito O1isii'1O~b lr P ~ oniam ~ 1Th'';F '~rW
-mr T~I rnrloidunmn mornm ooondj xtrrb ocAIi 'A itIo
~ogn e.d to-n .irn .4C~; iitllrpPM hri4 .n S F Ho~ .7w..o~ciI .9hoq
~rihrlhlf rlt II *di ,f0l 9f; t


CotbnSetH ull Ash OrI-J 1 ao s el fflSl&ff 4 PQ~no fio
Wood sbet, .ai (Ih i


00 . i .. ia 9009%
.Mft F'id.Jr ni -iol bqbipw~diw,na:d:j 0 Imm
wiv rf fgi) idr Jl 1 O.) B cs60b :) v iubj)hj 9 Iv1[r )9ff




-iolaw e ftw erolloo L M s'W
-ml 'M-lubfof ff~m B')fff 0')')B(O c i J-Jlifllk9




Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluble phosphoric acid-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of Bone
Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or Muriate of Potash" or
equivalents of "Nitrate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Ammonia;" basing his
calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of the good,
*offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of fertility re-
quired, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the commercial
values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular elements his
crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods required, and ap-
proximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requires that:
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, the percentage of potash
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all other
ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale, each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show to the satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of
Bone Phosphate of Lime," it may be taken as insoluble to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate contains 26 to 35 per cent. of "phosphoric
acid" equivalent to 50 to 86 per cent. of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its
commercial value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into
"'Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent. "avail-
able" has a commercial value of '$12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural









value is proportionately much greater as raw or untreated! rock, haa butt
little agricultural value.
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"dissolved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the-
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of the State.
Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900, serial number 36, is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative-
and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay no attention whatever to.
names and brands. They should realize, for instance, that in nine cases
out of ten, brands known as "Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle
of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands-
are not made fom bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if they
were made frorf bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and'
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being-
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you,
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for-
purchasing when general trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with,
some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have-
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phosphoric.
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a first-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to.
buy on time and pay interest, why then be assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods:
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manurial chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons. The same
figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa, for spot cash f. o. b. cars:
Less than 5to'0 10
5 tons tons tons,
High Grade Potash 9J to 95.per cent.nulphate (48 to 50 p-r cent. K20) ......$5200 $51 '0 $50~O.
Sulphate Potash, .48 to 55 par cent. aulphate (t7 to 31 per cent. (K20)...... 3200 31 CO 3000
Murlate Potash, 80to 85 per cent. Muri.te '42 to45 per cent. K20) ............ 46 00 4300 44 00










Kainit, 12 to 13 p-r cent. Actual Potvh ...... .............................. 1500 14 51 1300
Blood and Bone, 62 per cent Ammonia .................................. 2 50 26 00 25 5'
Bluod and Bone 7 to S per cent. Ammonia......................... 2750 7 00 2650
Blood and Bone, 10 per cnt. Ammonia.......................... .... 3200 31 50 3100
haw Bone Meal, 2 to 4 p-r cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per cent. total Phos-
phoric Acid .. ............. ........... .... ............... ...... 32 00 3150 31 00
Boneblack, 16 to 18 per cent. available Phosphoric Acid................. 25 00 2400 24 00
Avid Pho 'hate, 14 per cent Phophoric Acid............ .......... ..... 13 1250 1200
Nitrate Soda, 18 to 111 per cent. Ammonia........ ........................... 5100 53 0 5300
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 per cent. Ammoui .. ........................ 7200 7100 7000
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia ........................... .. 47 00 46 50 46 00
Ground Cast )' 'omace, 6 co 7 per cent. Ammonia ....................... 2100 2050 2000
Canada Hard Wood A-hes, to8 per cent K2U (Potash) ................. 1500 11t 1400
Pulverized 'lob.cco Stem,, 5to8 percent. K20 (Potash)............... 15 OU 1450 1400
"Tobac.o Ste ius (Baled) 5 to 8 per cent K2O (Pota-h) ..................... 10 0 1550 15 00
Tobacco Dust, High Grid3, 5 to per cent. K20 (Potah) ................... 210 200 2000
btcumed Bono, Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Amm)nia, 25 to 28 per cent. Pho;-
phori Acid.................. ...................... ......... 2500 2450 2400
*Brght Cotton Seed M-al, 7 to 9 per cent. Amm-nia....................... 2650 26110 2 00
Dark Cotton See 1 Meal, 6 to 8 per cent. Amm .iia.......... .............. 22 (13 215) 21 00
"Blood and Bone," "Tankage," "Garbage" and numerous other by
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
,of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or ternr the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and 1 per cent.
-of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00 ..........................$24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00................... 2 00
1i per cent. potash @ $1.10 ............................ 1 65

$27 65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled
"For feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
41 to 5 per cent. ammonia.
it to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1~ to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:









41 per cent. ammonia ................................ $13 50
1 per cent. phosphoric acid ............................ 1 75
1 per cent. potash ................................... 1 65
Commercial value ............... .................. $16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal.
Their relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy
in the use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of
the meal depending only on its content of amomnia, phosphoric acid and
potash in both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis,
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements only.

ORGANIC AMMONIATES.
It is generally conceded by pineapple growers that the sulphates of am-
monia and potash are harmful to pineapples. The universal practice among
the pineapple growers is to use organic fertilizers only-cotton seed meal,
castor pomace, blood and bone for ammoniates; ashes, tobacco and nitrate
of potash for potash.
Blood and bone supplying ammonia and phosphoric acid, also consider-
.able "Tankage, and garbagee, reinforced by sulphate of ammonia, has
been found in the State an unquestionably valuable fertilizer for certain
crops, is generally acknowledged hurtful to pines.
The State law, section 3, requires the manufacturers to state in the
"guarantee on each package the percentage of ammonia and the source
from which it is derived." A failure to state the source of the ammonia
in a fertilizer is a violation of the law.
Purchasers requiring only "oragnic ammonia" in their fertilizers
should see that this important part of the guarantee is complied with.

MECHANICAL CONDITION.
A number of complaints have been made to the department this season
of failure of vegetable crops, using certain brands of goods. On exam-
ination chemically, these goods have been found well within the guarantee
of their makers. The same goods (that is, goods having the same amounts
of fertilizing elements) have proved satisfactory to growers in the same
localities, and under the same conditions. The difference in results can be
attributed solely to the imperfect grinding and failure to properly mix the
goods complained of. In all cases the best results have been had from
those goods having the best mechanical condition.
Other things being equal, those goods most finely pulverized and well
mixed have proved most satisfactory. Coarse ground "Blood and Bone,"
"Tankage" and "Mixed" Fertilizers" using such coarse material in com-










pounding, have proved unsatisfactory in producing quick results, as de-
manded by the vegetable growers of the State.
That the mechanical condition of commercial fertilizers has much to do
with results, has been practically demonstrated, particularly among the
vegetable growers of the State.

TOBACCO DUST.

Large quantities of tobacco dust are used in this State, particularly by
pineapple growers. It is valuable mostly for its potash, and for its pun-
gent or aromatic properties, as an insecticide. No material offered in the
State varies more in its composition and value, nor is anything more apt
to be adulterated or "loaded."
Analysis of two samples taken from different parts of the State show
58.43 per cent. and 51.30 per cent. (more than half) to be simply clay or
fine sand. The "commercial value" of different samples are shown in the
preceding analysis, varies from $23.20 to $10.92 per ton. Purchasers
should buy only on guarantee and pay for what they get. Manufacturers,
and dealers purchase only on guarantee and settle according to analysis.
This particular material varies in value probably more than any other
on the market, and requires the utmost care on the part of the dealer and!
consumer to prevent confusion, disappointment and dissatisfaction.
If purchasers demand the guarantee and refuse to purchase goods shown
by the guarantee to be worth less than the price demanded, this condition
will soon cease.


ASHES, HARD WOOD, PALMETTO CANADA ASHES.

There are many tons of ashes used as a fertilizer in this State. When.
they can be purchased at a price comparable with their actual value they
are doubtless a most valuable source of potash. The average price of these'
goods is, however, far in excess of their value. Potash obtained from this.
source generally costs much more than from other reliable sources-Sul-
phate, or Muriate of Potash, Kainit or Sylvilite. Samples of Hickory,
Maple, Palmetto and other so-called Hardwood Ashes, examined this
season, show from 0.57 to 4.24 per cent. of Potash, worth from $0.62 to
$4.66 per ton at seaports. The average of four samples shows 2.56 per
cent. of Potash. Guarantees are generally 2 to 8 per cent. Potash. The
minimum is the actual guarantee. The best unleached ashes contain but
8 per cent.; ordinarily less than 5 per cent.









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau--Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Climatological Data for May, 1902.


Stations


Counties


1ORTHnRN SECTION.

Archer............ Alachua........ 92 18
Bainbridge........... Decatur, Ga ..... 119 10
Federal Point....... St. Johns....... 10 9
Fernandina......... Nass u......... 15 1
Fort George....... Dual.......... .. 17
Gainesville......... Alachua....... 175 10
Huntington ........Putnam........ 50 6
Jacksonville........ Duval............43 30
Jasper........... Hamilton...... 165 5
Lake Butler........ Bradford ...... 5
Lake City........... Columbia...... 201 13
Macclenny......... Baker ...... 140 7
Micanopy .......... Alachua..... ... 105 7
Pinemount.... ... Suwannee...... ....
Rideoug............ Olay.... .......... I


Precipitation, in incheF


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit











77.7 2.7 95 4* 60 1 34
aa 1 3 a I






77.4 +3.0 9526 5729 33

76 4 3.2 92 4 63 1 23
76.3 +1 7 8820* 69 9
79 2 3 6 9921 6324 33
77 5 +2.0 9826 59 21 33
77 8 3 0 9326 64 1 24
76.2 +0.7 9501* (024* 30
75.6 -0.3 95 21* 51 7* 39
78.1 +1.9 9726 5924 33
77.8 +2.010126 624 38
77 7 +1.4 9621* 59 23* 34
77.4 9826 59 1 36
.TB ..... T 6 5 3 387


2,
E..
'.-
~e
Uc


--0.27
-0 22

-0.51

-1 84
-2 43
-1 N6
-0 92
-0 85
-1 05
--1 22
+0 31


Sky


,


^ J 3
^ s


o














lie


.,
e
se




sw
a


rs




3.51
3.18

2.32

1.14
0. 75
1.82
2 27
1.51
1.79
1.50
4 25
3 31
S17I







Climatological Data for May-(Continued.)


Stations


Savannah, Ga.......
Sj. Augustine...x...
Sumner ..........
Switzerland ........
Thomasville, Ga....
Waycross, Ga......

CENTRAL SECTION.


Counties


Chatham, Ga..
St. Johns.......
Levy...........
St. Johns......
Thomas, Ga....
Ware, Ga......

Means .......


Bartow............ Polk..........
Brooksville ....... Hernando ......
Clermont........... Lake............
61eLand........... Volusia........
Eustis.................. Lake......... ...
Ft. Meade......... Polk..........
Fort Pierce......... Brevard........
Inverness .......... itrus............
Kissimmee......... Osceola ..........
Malabar .......... Brevard........
Merritt's Island .... Brevard........
New Smryna......... Volusia.........
Ocala.............. Marion .......
Orange City........ Volusia .......
Orlando.......... Orange........


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit i









77 2-3 4 9 66 2* 0 0 49 --2 960 21 6 20 511e

76 4-07 9826 58 7* 1 32 -1 380 48 6..........
78 4+4 3 101 21 62 23 31 1 20 -2 720 4b 5 ... .... .....
a77 2-2 4 93 3*a61 7* 3 6 65 +3 902 90 7 ... .... ......
77 1 2 0 ......05 1 09. 6 13 16*1 2 e

79 0 +2 8 9319* 6017* 33 2.18 -0 39,2 18 1 15 16 O sw
79 0 2 5 95 26* 6323 29 2.54 -, 440 78 8 161 13 2 tie
80 1+2 2 96 27 64 1 26 1 00 --2 080 38 6 12 19 0e
78 6 . 97 926 6228 29.1 .. .... ..........
79 6 +2 5 95 4*1 63 2- 29 3 55 +0 752 24 7 7 23 le
784--+3 1 9828 591 35 3 70 -022 315 3 5 6 O0e
76 2 -0 89527* 60 3*1 3 0 62 -3 6810 25 5 20 7 4se
78 1 .. 9420 622 2. 5 158 ...... 50 1 9 20 l se
a79 6: 1 6a9928 6012 *I 32 0 34 -2 640 3 2 ............
77 4 .... 9526* 61 3* 32 2 88 2 38 2 055 5 1se
78 4--2 1 92 26 68 4* 18 1 83 -1 74 81 2 21 10 0 se
75 2 0 4 9726 56 14 33 085 -1 0 7 2 25 6 0
78 2 3 5 96 20* 623* 33 2 32 -0 590 95 8 16 14 ne
77 21-0 9726 56 2 36 1 15 -1 680 69 4 13 18 One
78 2 0 9826 60 3 30 1 52 -1 6 10 ( 18 13 Oe
78 21 26 66 2 18 97 1 1 1








Plant City.......... Hillsborough... 121 10[76 8 +0.6 94
Rockwell........... Marion........ .... 79 3 .... 99
St. Ceo............ Pasco.... ... .... 7 79 4 1 1 96
Tampa.............. P.llsborough... 20 12 78 1 -3 0 92
Tarpon Springs .... illsborough .. 20 18 77 7+2 6 91
Titusville .......... Br3vard........ 11 8 76 8 2 3 97

Irleans ..... ... .. 78 1 1 8 ...
SOUTHERN SECTION.

Avon Park......... DpSoo............... 78.. .7
Flamingo..... ... Monroe....... .... 2 78 9 94
Havana............ Cu ......... ..57 11 77 5-1 089
Hypoluxo........... Dade........... 5 7 3 -0 3 95
Jupiter.............Dade........... 28 14 77 8+2 092
Key West......... Monroe........ 2 31 80 0+1 0. 87
Manatee............ Manatee.... .. 16 19 77 6+1 6 95
Marco ... .. .... Lee....... ...... 2 78 8 . 94
Miami. .. .... Dade.......... .... 7 80 2+2 9 92
Myers.............L .............. L.. .. 19 78 4+0 4 9
Nassau............. N. P. Bahamas. .... .....77 ...
Nocatee...... ..... DeSoto.... ... 3 79 2 ..... 97
San Juan.... ...... Puerto Rico.... 82 27 78 1--1 0 89

Means .. ..... 78 6 3
WESTERN SECTION.

Bonifay ........... Rolmes ....... 116 1 77 0 .... 96
Carrabelle........... Franklin........ 12 4 77 9 9 97
Daphne............ Baldwin, Ala........ ... 76 3+2 1 94
DeFuniak Springs.. Walton........ 193 676 8 +2 98
Holt....... ....... Santa Rosa. ... 208..... c774 .... (97
Marianna ......... Jackson........ 85 2 76 .... 95
Mobile ............. Mobile, Ala... 35 3: 76 9 3 0 95
Molino ............. Eseambia .. .... 78 0 ....8
Montgomery....... Montgom'y, Ala 219 2977 0-4 0 95


28* 57 2 34 1.37
5 62 37 4 65
18* 61 32 93
20 6423 28 4 11
30 68 2 25 1 11
26 5814 33 0 27

. . 2 16


8s 60 1 31 3.71
25 65 3 26 3 05
19 675 17 0 85
27 63 4 21. 3 98
27 664 28 4 83
0 72 13 1 0 28
30 60 29* 35 1 06
30 6314 2; 4 79
2N a67 16*c 24 0 94
2U* 62 3 7 1 :3
26* 70 4* 11 0 63
9 59 4 85 0 57
8 68 16 1 13 97

.. ... .. 2 44


21* ,.57 29 32 0 22[
26 62!20y 28 2 10
21*'58H 9 a 31 5 53;
21 5729 33 2 46
21 (57 7 u 38 2 15
21 5828 29 4 99
21 9 25 3 (10
22 69 1( 32 3 60
21 5728 26 5 62


-2 640.68
...... 2 25
-1 32 0 67
-~ 1 6 3 12
-1 00 84
-4 03 0 17

-1 49 ....


...... 3.12

-3.6 0 79
S2 81 2 25
-0 43 2 27
-2 88 0 12
2 22 0 54

-5 180 ;0
-2 130 5
...... 0 32
. O 12
+9 09 ....

-2 61...


...... 0 08
+u 80 1 25
+3 103 50
-0 660 90
...... 2 07
..... 11 40
-1 0900 93
... 7. 1 91)
-+1 87 2 69


9] 14
3 28
2 19
Q 22)
7 10
4 16
5 10
9 27
5 18
6 24
3 ...
8 13
22

6 b18


5...
5 17
12 12
3 .
11 16
8 16
5 161
9 16


8 Oe
1 14 nw
13 1 e
:7 7 ne
9 2S
15 9.se

12 2e


16 1 e
0 3so
1 1 e
7 2
20 1 se
It 2e
.21 Onw
4 0 oe
7 6 e
7 0te

0 19 .....
11 17 e

10 3st-e




5 9 Bw
18 1......


9 6s
12 3s
9 6se







Olimatologioal Data for May, 190--Continued.

9 Temperatur degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
? Fahr

Stations Counties a 0 "

St atillo.n s al. 5 .S. 1-0 1 r. ,,..
(V loP 1 I0 ad $1 | 550
Pensacola........... EscH 6 22 72.2+3.0 9321 6529 23 1.15 -1 190.82 11 15 12 4ise
Quincy................ 20 2 78 6 .... 98 5429 85 2 08 ...... 0 9 7 14 17
St- Andrews Bay...Washington ....... 4 76 7+-1 3 9721 59 1* 38 781 +486) 78 11 28 S Os
Stephe ille.....Taylor ............ . ... .. 95 5 ... ...... 2 85 +1 21 1 75 4 10 1b 2sw
Tallahasee .... .... Leon ........... 1 16 767+2 2 921 61 46 26 2 86 -0 620 75 9 21 t10 s
Waatkeenah......... Jefferson...... .... .. 78 2 .... 9922 61 4* 34 2 90 ...... 0 90 4 25 4 2
Watsau.......... Washington .. 250 4 77 8+1 1 9921 5129 41 8 72 -0 30 1 79 8I 1 7 2....
Wewahitchka...... Calhoun.... ... .... 8 77 0+ 4 9921 5928 34 4 6 ..... 42 8 11 11 s
Means........ . . 778+1 8 .. 3 84 0 59... 8 16 13 2s
State Means ...... ... 77 6-2 1 ...... ... 2 45 46 ... 6 16 13 2-
ARIL, 1902.
SanJuan.... P.R ................... 7 77 3-0 0 9219 6828 19 609 2 32 5 10 12 9 18 8e
)a.phne, Ala......... ....... .. .... ~464 8 2 8a84 8 a39 n 32 1 15 -2 06 90 3 18 9 sw


tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are
made at 7 a. m,, 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau.
11Not included in means. Instruments moved from
Middleburg four miles northwest to Rideout on the 1st inst.


All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
on'y such stations as have normals.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.










Salient Climatic Features.



ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

The mean pressure for the month was 30.01 inches, which is 0.04 inch
above normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.19 inches, at Jack-
sonville on the 31st; the lowest observed pressure was 29.77 inches, at Jack-
sonville on the 27th; monthly range for the State was 0.42 inch.

TEMPERATURE- (Degrees Fahrenheit).

The monthly mean temperature for the State was 77.7 degrees, 2.1 de-
grees above normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 77.1 de-
grees; Central, 78.1 degrees; Southern, 78.6 degrees; Western, 77.3 de-
grees. The highest monthly mean temperature was 80.2 degrees, at
M.iami; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 75.2 degrees, at New
Smyrna. The highest temperature during the month was 101 degrees, at
Macclenny on the 26th; the lowest temperature was 51 degrees, at LAke
Butler on the 7th and other dates, and at Wausau on the 29th; absolute
range for the State was 50 degrees.

PRECIPITATION- (Inches and hundredths).

The average precipitation for the State during the month was 2.45 in-
ches, 0.46 inch below the normal amount. By sections, the averages were:
Northern, 2.05 inches; Central, 2.16 inches; Southern, 2.44 inches; West-
crn, 3.34 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 7.81 inches, at St.
Andrews' Bay; and the least was 0.27 inch, at Titusville. The greatest
amount for any twenty-four hours was 3.15 inches, at Fort Meade on the
30th.
WIND AND WEATHER.

The prevailing winds during the month were from the southeast. By
sections, there were: Northern, 13 clear days; 16 partly cloudy; 2 cloudy.
Central, 17 clear; 12 partly cloudy; 2 cloudy. Southern, 18 clear; 10 part-
ly cloudy; 3 cloudy. Western, 16 clear; 13 partly cloudy; 2 cloudy.
Rainy days: Northern section, 6; Central, 5; Southern, 6; Western, 8.
MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA--(Dates of).
Fog.-Jacksonville, 5; Marianna, 20; Wewahitchka, 6, 19.
Hail.-Sumner, 3; Ocala, 3; Myers, 2, 30.











HalweSolar.--Rideout, 8, 9, 13, 19 ;Fort Meade, 13, 16, 18.
Halos, Lunar.-Lacksonville, 12,144; Rideout, 12, 14; Fort Meade, 14.
Thunderstorms.-Jacksonville, 2#7, 9, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 31; Archer, 9,
16; Gainesville, 9, 15, 16, 21, 26, 30, 31; Lake Butler, 15, 16; Rideout, 1,
18, 19, 20, 30, 31; Sumner, 1, 4, 5, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 30; Clermont, 2, 15,
29; 30, 31; Eustis, 3, 16, 26, 30; Fort Meade, 2, 16, 19, 29, 30; Fort Pearce,
9, 10, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31; Malabar, 9, 30; Merritt's Island, 19, 26, 27, 28,
29, 30; Ocala, 3, 26; Orlando, 20, 26, 31; St. Leo, 2, 3, 4, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20.
30; Tarpon Springs, 20, 21, 30; Titisville, 27, 30; Avon Park, 30, 31;
Hypoluxo, 27, 31; Manatee, 2, 3, 4, 12, 13, 15, 16, 20, 21, 29, 30, 31;
Myers, 1, 2, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 22, 29, 30; Carfabelle, 10, 31;
Marianna, 26; Molino, 14, 22, 25, 26; Waukeenah, 4, 5, 8, 14, 17, 21; We-
wahitchka, 1, 2, 3, 13, 26, 31.


COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR MAY, WITH
DEPARTURES FBiOM NORMAL, DURING THE PAST ELEVEN YEARS.
The normal temperature for May is 75 6 deg., the normal rainfall is 2.91
inches.

Year -189 1898 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1961 1902


Mean... 75. 76.8 74.6 75.9 74.7 74.0 76.4 78.2 755 75.1 77.7
-Departure-0.8 +0 -1.6 +0.8 -0.9 -1.6 +0.8 +2.8 -0.1 -0.5 +2.1
Total. .. 2.19 892 .51 4.46 2.73 2.25 1.60 1.22 3 88 4.88 2.45
Departure-,4 .l.40+1.55-0.18-0.66-1.1 -11.69 -0.92 +1.47-0.46


PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE

Atmospheric Pressure Wind Velocity. Relative
in Miles Humidity
Stations

I a I -


Jacksonville ............. 80.0 80.1981 29.7727 5.858 27 n 9 9545 73
Jupiter. ......... ...... 80.02 0.15 1 29.8027 8.65 48nw27 9554 74
Key West.............. 29.99 30.12 1 29.8818t 6,884 26 ne 81 8658 71
PenMoaola .............. *0.04 80.17 1 29.87 18 6.996 84 e21 9842 74
Tamp ................. 0.01 80.17 1 29.8127 4,844 42 se80 ,0651 75


*


*8 a. m. readings only.


+And succeeding date.




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