Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: May 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text


Vol. 12.


FLORIDA


(Department of Qrlculture.)




..lMonthly Bulletin..


MAY, 1902.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crope.
Part II. Pertlzlxeru.
Part III. dA/eather Report.
Part IV. Nftllcellaneous.


TALLAHAISEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAHARSEE, FLA.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them .


~------------


No. 75.





County Map of the State of Florida.
(Fox l ce Bulletin.)







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HON. B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Cleik.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALaCHUA COUNTY-Crops of all kinds are needing rain badly, and
some of them will be badly damaged unless we get rain soon. Vegetable
-crops have turned out very well. Pears were all killed by the late frost;
the trees are healthy and doing well.
BAKER COUNTY-Crops are doing well, though beginning to need rain;
the prospect is encouraging so far for good average crops of all kinds.
BRADFORD COUNTY-The most of the crops are looking very well,
though it is getting very dry; fruit trees are looking well with a good
prospect for fair yield:
BREVARD COUNTY-Vegetable crops are about all shipped; they have
turned out very well; field crops doing well; will be a large fruit crop if
everything continues favorable; so far those matured have brought satis-
factory prices.
CALHOUN COUNTY-All field crops are growing finely, and with con-
tinued favorable seasons the yield will be good; fruit trees are looking
well, and the prospect for fine crops excellent; garden crops are also doing
well.
CITRUS COUNTY-Corn has recovered some from the effects of the drill
worm, though it was materially injured; other crops are very good. Vel-
vet Beans considerably better than normal; they are very fine. Vegeta-
ble crops generally very good.
CLAY COUNTY-It is very dry and crops are all needing rain badly,
though Done of them have been materially injured as yet, and are in good
condition. Vegetable crops have been very good. Peach crop very fine;
other fruit crops good.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-Crops generally are a little late, but in fine aver-
age condition, and promise a better yield than for several years. The oat
crop is much better than usual; the peach crop promises to be excellent.
DADE COUNTY-The month has been distressingly dry, though no crops
were injured materially. The vegetable crops are about all marketed;
fruit crops doing very well considering the season.






DESOTO COUNTY-The weather is very dry; the fruit crops are being
injured by the red spider, and rain is very much hoped for to relieve the
condition; vegetable crops are nearly all disposed of, and other crops are
doing very well for the weather conditions.
EscAMIA CouNTY-Crops are very promising and we are having about
two good rains per week; oats have yielded well; garden crops are all
good; pears are all blighted; grapes and plums are fine.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-Fine weather for crops on.low lands, but rather
dry for high sandy lands. Crops altogether are doing well.
GADSDEN COUNTY-Crops are in thriving condition, better than they
have been at this time for several years; oat crop turned out very fine.
HAMILTON COUNTY-Crops in this county are in rather poor condi-
tion, on account of continued dry weather, with east winds; rain is very
much needed.
HERNANDO COUNTY-All field crops are in very good condition; velvet
beans extra fine; oats fine, best crop for several years. Fruit trees grow-
ing finely. Vegetable crops good and generally brought paying prices.
HILLSBOROUGHI COUNTY-Crops are turning out well over all parts of
the county, better than at one time expected. Fruit crops are on the
average good, trees growing well. Vegetable crops turned out very well,
with good prices.
HOLMES COUNTY-The fine seasons of the past few days have greatly
relieved all crops; all crops are now looking and promising well; are in
fine condition. Farmers generally are well up with their work. Melon
and peach crops promise well.
JACKSON COUNTY-Cotton crop is in fair condition: field work gen-
Serally being somewhat behind; other field crops doing well. Velvet beans
very fine. The melon crop is very promising.
JEFFERSON COUNTY-Parts of the county are needing rain badly,
while other parts have had plenty. Crops are well worked and in fairly
good condition. Melon crops are good. Pears a failure.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY-The condition of field crops is generally very
good and promising. Peaches will make a fine crop. Melon crop doing
well.
LAKE COUNTY-Crops in this county are in very good condition. Vege-
table crops have generally done well, and brought fair prices; fruit trees
doing finely, and melon crop fine, and selling well.
LEE COUNTY-Weather has been quite dry, and fruit, vegetable and
field crops are needing rain; crops are, however, in good condition; good
rain would also be a great benefit to live stock.
LEON COUNTY-The outlook for corn and cotton is the best for a num-
ber of years. We have never had more favorable seasons, all things con-






sidered. All crops are good. Vegetable and fruit crops will be good, but
pears will be very short.
LEVY COUNTY-At this time the weather is very dry and if rain does
not come soon corn will be considerably damaged. At present all crops
are in good condition. Fruit and vegetable crops doing well, and peaches
and grapes promise fine crops.
MADISON COUNTY-All things considered, crops are in better condition
than at this time for several years; the outlook generally is very favorable.
The oat crop is an unusually fine crop. Vegetables fine, and melons,
peaches, and other fruit crops promise good crops.
MANATEE COUNTY-Crops are generally in good condition, vegetables
very good, with fair prices. The orange trees are in poor condition,
caused by drought, and specially the purple mite and red spider, which
have been worse this year than ever before. Unless heavy rains come soon,
the citrus fruit crops will be very short.
MARION COUNTY-Have just made an extensive trip around the county
and from observation think crops are in a very good condition, and pros-
pects better than for some time. -oome sections have been a little dry, but
as a whole there is little to complain of. Fruit trees and crops doing well
and promise fair yields.
NASSAU COUNTY-Crops are looking well and promise better yields
than for a long time. Fruit and vegetable crops very fine. Season very
favorable.
ORANGE COUNTY-We have had a severe drought, but where crops are
well worked they are fairly good. We have had some rain in the last few
days and crops look better. There is some complaint of oranges dropping,
but they usually drop at this season. Stock of all kinds looking well.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-Protracted drought has injured all vegetable crops.
Field crops are generally good; oranges are dropping badly, loss estimated
as high as fifty per cent.
PAsco COUNTY-The seasons have generally been favorable and crops
are doing well; vegetable crops fine and bringing as a rule satisfactory
prices; fruit trees also doing very well, and promise a fair crop.
POLK COUNTY-Field crops are doing very well, velvet beans are
specially fine; vegetable crops have turned out fine and brought good
prices; fruit trees doing finely and a fine crop is confidently expected.
ST. JOHN'S COUNTY-Condition of crops is very good, better than last
year, and promise a good yield. Melon, peach and plum crops are coming
along well; will be good crops.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-Crops are much better than formerly at this
season of the year, and from present indications there will be more made






in this county than ever before. Melon and peach crops are very fine,
also grapes and plums.
SUMTER COUNTY-As a rule crops are all good, oats very fine. Fruit
trees doing well, vegetable crops turned out satisfactorily. Our farmers
are ingood spirits and are doing fairly well.
SbWANNEE COUNTY-The present prospect for the standard crops
never was more encouraging; the seasons have been favorable, rain light
and regular, and our farmers appear to be in good spirits, looking forward
to good prices for cotton, which is our money crop. The Grand Master of
the Universe is smiling upon this part of the vineyard.
TAYLOR COUNTY-Crops are in good, healthy condition, and growing
finely. The oat crop is much better than last year. Melons and peaches
both promise good crops.
WALTON COUNTY-Crops in this county are looking very well; they are
in good condition, growing finely. Melon and peach crops are both prom-
ising for large crops.
WASHINGTON COUNTY-General condition of crops good, with plenty
of rain, but not too much for the crops. Prospects are very flattering for
an abundant harvest. Melons, peaches, grapes and plums will, from pres-
ent appearances, yield fine crops.







Report of Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for
May, 1902, as Compared with an average.
-- -c--------

n_ oo > | S p)


Counties .
o o


10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Alachua ................... 100 85 65 .... 75 75 .... 100 80 .. .
Baier ..... ........... .... 75 80 65 50 5050 ... 75 .........
Bradford.......... .... .... 95 95 75 .... 80 90 100 90 ....
Brevard................ i.... ... 10 100 ..... 100 100 100 ...
Calhoun........... .... 100 100 10 0 75 ... 75 ... 100 .. ...
Citrus................. ......... 65 45 ... 100 100 100 95 ...
Clay ........................ 100 1 110 100 100 1 00 1 100 00 90 ...
Columbia............... .... 105 100 100 95 100 100 .. 100100 ....
Dade .................... .... ... . . 100 100 100 .
DeSoto.......... ........ ... 10.. 100 100 0 95 100 10000 100 100 9
Escambia .............. 125 .... 100 85 100 1 1 00 15 100 100100
Franklin....................... SO 80 80 80 80 .. .. 5 ... ...
Gadsden .............. 110 105 110 120 100 90 80 100 80 105. .. 120
Hamilton. ................ 60 60 40 50 75 70 .... 80 65 75
Hernando ....... ..... .... .. 100 110' 100 90 1 100 ..........
Hillsborough....... .. .... .. 100 75 ...... 100 100 100 100 . ......
Holmes ............... 80 .... 120 120 .... 100 100 80 90 80 .... ...
Jackson.............. 80 75 90 100 100 100 100 .... 100 100 ... ...
Jeferson .............. 90 90 75 .. 75 .... 75 85.......
LaFayette................. 90 100 80 .... 85 95 .. ... ....
Lake ................. .... .... 100 100 25 .... .... 50 100 40 .. ..
Lee ...................... .. ... 110 100 100 90 .... 110 10 110 100
Leon .................. 100 100 75 90 100 100 100 110
Levy................... 100 95 1001 60 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Madison................ 0 90 0 80 50 90 50 .. ............
Manatee............. .... ... 80 80 60 60 .. 100 .. 100 ...
Marion............. ..100 100 10 100 100 100 110 200 110 100 90
Nassau................ .. .... 100 100 .... 05 95 .... 100 .. .. ...
Orange................ . .. 75 80 90 .... 95 100 100 ... .......
Osceola.......... ..... .. 100 100 100 7 150 100 15 ....
Pasco.................. .... 100 100 70 85 100 100 100 ..........
Polk..................... ..... 65 100 ... .. .. 100 75 150 100 .... ....
St. Johns ............... ....150 100 100 110 100 65 100 100 ........
Santa Rosa.............. 100 .. 100 90 100 99 100 100 100 100.... ...
Sumter ................ 75 90 65 75 85 100 80 60 100 .. ....
Suwannee ....... ...........100 100 100 60 100 .. .. 80...........
Taylor................ 90 75 75 70 60 90 75 100 .... ...
Walton ......... 85 .. 90 85 .... 75 .. .... 80 110. ....
Washington............ 105 100 115 105 100 75 100 90 125 100 125....
General averages....... 97 9. 96 87 84 89 90 92 102 98 102 102







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


= & o Irish
o Oats Potatoes
E a, F" E
X z Cob xlf 0


Alachua .............. .. ... .
Baker........... ....... .... ...
Bradford................... .. ...
Brevard............... .... 1 0 100
Calhoun.... .... 10 .
Citrus ........... ........ ...... 100
Clay........... ......... ..... .
Columbia ............ ... ......
Dade ....................... ... .100 100
DeSoto. ........... .... 95 90
Escam bia................ .. ..
Franklin .... ............... .... ....
G adsden .......... ....... ...
Ham ilton ................. . .
H ernando ................... 100 ....
Hillsborough.............. 100 100
H olm es ................... .... .
Jackson... ..... ......... .... ..
Jefferson ..................... ....
Lafayette................... .... .
Lake...................... 100 ...
Lee ..................... 90 100 90
Leon ..........................
Lvy ...................... 100 ....
Madison................... ......
Manatee.... ............. .... 80 75
Marion. ................... 110 110
Nassau .............. ... 100 ..
Orange....................... .. 80 ....
Osceola............. ..... 75 75
Pasco..................... 100 100
Polk.......................... ... 80 80
St. Johns ............... ... 50 .
SSanta Rosa... .......... .......
Sum ter..................... .. 100 90
Suwannee.................. 50...

Walton .................. ... .. ....
W ashington................ ... ... ...
General aaveraces........... 8C 98 92


Counties


S0 ca c a'
olo 0 0 0 0

0 C 0 0 0 0 I
...... 90 90 80 70
.... .. . 90 90 90 90
. .. .. .... 100 100 80 90
100 100 95 100 ... ... 100 100
100 100 100 100
.. 100 .. ... 105 110 100 100
100 100
100 100 100 100
100 110 100 100 .... .... ....
90 95 100 100 95 95 100 100
. . 10l 150 100 80
90 9( 75 90
120 12h 80 70
...... 80 75 60 50
100 ...... 100 100 . ......
.. 100 .... .... .... . 100 100
. .. .. I .. .. 100 100 .... ....

.. .... 90 95 ... .
S 100 75 50 50
.. 11 90 120 90 9 120 120
.. 90 90 85 90
100 100 90 90
...... .. .... 110 110 105 105
60 75 60 25 ... lo00 100
100 110 100 100 110 125 100 100
. .. .. .. ... 90 90
80 ...... ...... 75 75 100 100
75 75 50 40 100 100 50 50
.... 100 ... 90 90 80 75
80 75 40 25 100 100 100 100
.. ...... .. 95 85 100 120
... ............. 100 100
90 60 80 .... 100 100 80 75
... .... .... . 10 100 ...... ....
.... .... .... .... 85 80 .....
. . ...... 8 75 75
... .. .... .... 90 100 50 40

83 92 82 76 95 98 88 88







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties





Alachua..............
Baker ..................
Bradford .........
Brevard............
Calhoun........ ......
,Citrus..................
Clay........ .... .. .
Columbia..............
Dade... .............
DeSoto .................
Escambia...............
Franklin ..............
Gadsden ......... .
Hamilton ..............
Hernando ............
Hillsborough........
Holmes ........ ......
Jackson.............
Jefferson...... .......
Lafayette...................
Lake.... ................
Lee.................. .
Leon .................
Levy.................
Madison ...... ........
Manatee.............
M arion......... .. ....
Nassau........ ........
Orange .................
Osceola ........... ..
Pasco ..................
Polk ......... ......
St. Johns.............
Santa Rosa.............
Sumter ...............
Suwannee..............
Taylor ................
W alton ................
Washington.............

'General averages......


Toma- Egg
toes Plant







70 70 50 7





100 100 100 10

95 90 100 10
100 100 100 10
90 90 .. ..
100 100 .....
... .... .... ...

100 100 .....



30 80 0..
120 126 100 10(
70 70 80 8
80 80 ... ...
110 110 .. ..
100 100 100 100
110 100 100 104

75 75. .
80 80 50 54
75 75 40 44
60 50 100 104
75 80 ....
100 100 ......


.... ... ... .
90 90 90 94



100 110 1.....

89 89 84 8,


Cabbage CuCum Beans Water-
bers melons



a I aa aP1
i-S g-
| 3 "- 2


.
0 80 75 80 75 7( 75 6U 60
... ... 75 75 75 80 90 90
. 90 90 80 100! 9 95 100 100
. 100 100 1001 100; 95 100 100 100
100 10 100l 100 1 00 100 100 100
.......... 75 75 9 85 100( 105
. 10. 10 00 100 100
80 80 90 100 105 100 100' 100

)i 100 100 16006 'i i0 105 100. 100
0 100 10 100 100 100 100 100 100
... ... 90 90 80 90 90 90




80 90
.. 100 100
...... 90 90
.... .... ..... 100 100
25 25 ... .. 100 125
0 120 120 100 100 110 100 100 150
0 90 90 100 100 100 100 100 110
. 75 75 8u 75 90 90 75 75
10 1100 10 100 110 110
S100 100 100 100 lOi 100 100 30
0 100 100 100 100 101 100 150 175
.... ... 100 100 100 100 100 110
S100 100 75 75 .. ... 80 80
0 100 120 50 75 60 60 30 80
0 80 80 50 60 100 100 100 93
100l 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
50 50 ... ... ... .... 110 120
S100 100 00 10 1 001 100 100
0 75 85 100 100 75 75 100 100
100 100
. .... ... ... ... ... 85 85
.. ... .... 80 85
S.. 105 110 100 100 100 100

8 9 87 -891 9 94 95 99





10

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.



lopes apples Peaches Pears Grapes Plums

Counties Ca ) Z v a

SS a a o F Cl.

U a. CL o o a., C o Ca 0.
Alactua ................ 90 90 ........ 70 50 ........... ... 30 20
S Baker.. ............... 100 100 .... 7 ..... 75 75 .... ........
Bradford............. 100 95 .. ... 100 90 .... . ...........
Brevard... .......... ........ ....
Calhoun ............... .... .. .... .... 60 65 35 25 .... .. 75 75
Citrus................ .... .... ... 105 110 30 20 .. 100 95.
Clay. .............. ........ ....... .... 100 110 90 80 100 100 .....
Columbia .............. 1 100 00 .. 110 120 ...
Dade... ....... .... . 100 110 .. .. .... ... ........
DeSoto................. 100 100 100 100 10 ... ., 100 100 .. ..
Escambia ............. 100 100 .... .... 100 150 ...... 100 100 100 125
Franklin.............. 100 100 ...... ...100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Gadsden ............... 100 100 .. 90 90 50 50 .. ..
Hamilton .............. 20 20.... .... 50 50 50 50 60 60 25 20
Heruando.............. .. ... ... ... 100 200 ....... 100 100 ......
Hillsborough .......... . ...........100 100 .... .... .. ... ....
Holmes .................. .... .. .. 80 100 .... .... ... ... .... ....
Jackson ...... ....... .... ... ..... .... .....
Jefferso r.............. 75 75.... .......... 40 10 100 100 80 80,
Lafayette.......... .......... ... .... 75 75 .. ... 100 100 100 100
Lake................... 15 15 .... .... 75 75 ....... 100 100 .... ..
Lee.. .................. 100 110 100 100 120 0 0 100 100 100 100 100 100
Leon....................... 85 90 ....... 70 75 35 30 100 100 100 100%
Levy...... ........ 0 ... 80 80 16 10 100 100 40 40
Madison... .......... 100 100 ....115 115 100 100 80 80 70 70
Manatee................ ... 100 80 100 100 100 80 ..... 100 100 100 80
Marion................. 110 150 .... .... 110 100 90 50 100 100 100 110
Nassau................. 90 90 ...... .. 110 1 5 .... ... 100 100 .... ...
Orange.................. 90 90 100 100 110 110 .... .... 95 95 75 75
Osccola................ 30 40 25 25 90 130 100 125 ... .. .... ...
Pasco ................. ... ... .... 100 90 ...... . .
Polk ................... 50 50 70 70 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
St. Johr.s............. .. .. ..... 120 125 25 5 ..... 85 85.
Sana Rosa ............. .......... ....95 95 .. .. 100 100 100 100
Sumter... ........... 90 90 .....10 100 50 50 100! 100 60 60(
Suwannee.......... .. .... . ... .. ....... 80 75 75 80
Taylor.............. . ......... 100 100 .. ....
Walton. .............. ....I. 100 100 30 10...... ....
Washington.............. 100100 ........ 100 10 ... 100 100 100 100

General averages........85 86 85 86 95 100 61 54 96 96 72 82






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-1902.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a, pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20)......... 51 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid................. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... ................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
-bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We fini
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
"fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ................$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20 ............... .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.10 ............... 7.82
Mixing and bagging .................... ....... 2.00

$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
-these prices at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Whore fer-
tilizers are bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) .......................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.






BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R.-E. Ross, State Chemist. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer = y Whom Sent
"8 | h S et w
E-
*5 5
S < iS Se< &


Bright C. S. Meal.....
Dark C. S. Meal.......
Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer.................
Ground Bone..........
Dissolved Bone Black.
Extra Fruit&Vine Fert
Kainit .......... .....
Double Manure Salt..
Bone Compound .....
Nitrate of Soda.....
H G. Sulphate Potash
Dissolved Bone Meal..
Fine Grou'd I ri'd Fish
Dissolved Bone. ......
Fertilizer .............
H. G. Tobacco Dust...
Acid Phosphate.......
Mixed Fertilizer......
Mixed Fertilizer.....
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Acid Phosphate Pot-
ash and Ammonia..
A she's. ....... .......
Blood, Bone & Potash.
Fertilizer ............
Gnuno.................
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1
Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.
H. G Suphate Potash
H. G. Sulphate Potash
H. G 'ulphate Potash
Fcrtilizer..............
Fertilizer.......... ..
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.
Mixed F rtilzer No. 2.
Palmetto Ashes.......
Ground Garbage.......
Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer ..........
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer ..............
Cotton Seed Meal, 2d
class for feeding.....
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Mixed Fertilizer.......
Blood and Bone.......
Tobacco Dust.........
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Toba.co Dust........
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Strawberry Fertilizer.
Mixed Fertilizer......
Cotton Seed Meal....
Mixed Fertilizer......


9.55 ... ...2.03 4.7(
.78. .... ..... 2.43 6.1'
7.00 79 2.00 7.79 11.5(
6.00 11.41 9 5720.98 4.6(
10.60 8.62 0.19 18.81 .....
6.50 6.88 2.69 9.57 2.31

16. 9.42 4.06 13.48 1.8
.18 ..... ..... .. 1 .4
1.80 . . .
3.26 17.80 1.'9 19.39 2.7
11.C8 6.87 4.59 11.46 9.41
10.1421.75 1.0722.82 ...
11.68 8.16 1.28 9.31 2.2
5.40 ..... . 3 2i
11.26 13.72 7.41 21. .......
9.96 6.80 0.87 7.75 1.54
9 24 6.20 2.19 8.39 3.84
..... 5.47 2.15 7.62 10.97
..... 12.09 1.51 13.60 1.78
' 7.45 7.69 15.14 8.4
10 22 7.26 .52 7.78 2.
9.18 8.15 2.1410.29 2.46
9.40 7.24 0.76 8.00 2.27
9.74 7.15 1.25 8.40 421


S6.8 0 42 7.23 2.4.5
.98 6.51 0.79 7.25 3.43
12.92 10.0 1.7011.77 3.21
11.30 10. 0.641 .56 2.25
1.42 3.56 16.95 20.51 .....
10.78 3.37 1.31 4.6- ....
7.68 7.02 1.58 8.60 4.61
..... 8.8 4.63 13.47 3.38
10.30 2.16 1.73 3.89.
12.5 7.601 2.99 10.59 4.20
..... .... ... ... 4 66
6.65....... 1.82 2.65 7.76
7.45 6.45 1.S2 8.27 2.29
8.75 7.07 7.7514.82 8.70
13.75 ... ..... ..... 1.30
8.25 ... ...... 2.72 8.45
.... ..... ..... .. 2.25
.. .... .... .. 2.53 6.18
..... .. 3.21 9.30
8.40 6.2 2.0 8.2 1.86
..13 1.60 10.73 3.04
S 5.61
6.23! 2.23 8.45 2.55


1.83 Tallahassee Cotton 011 Co., Tallahassee.
1.65 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.
7.80 B. K. Farell, Punta Gorda.
0.48 0 Painter Fertilizer Co.. Jacksonvlllt
.... Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
..... The Atwood Co., Manavista. Fla.
14.18 ,. athern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
12.50 Frank Adams, Jasper, F'a.
30.92 Frank Adam- Jasper, Fla.
.... IGoulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
D. R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
51.73 D R. Knight, I emon City, Fla.
..... .R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
..... D R. Knight, Lem City, Fla.
.....E, Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.
8.36 Jmes Henry. St. Petersburg. Fla.
10.33 Florida Fert. Muf. Co., Gainesville, Fla..
.... Tampa Fertlizer Co., Tampi, Fla.
12.75 Tampa Fertilizer Co, Tampa, Fla.
7.49 Tampa Feitilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
0.78 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
4.31 Sterlng and Russell, Delray, Fla.
4.24 Sterling and russell, Delray, Fla.
0.84 Sterling and R sell, Delray, Fla
12.62 W. L. Foster, St. Petersburg, Fla.
2.36 A. t illson Co Quincy. kla.
Ii 84 ramps Feitilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
5.9s Tamp Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
49.28 Mis. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
46 60 Mrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
50.04 vrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
4.72 E. D. Luter, \\ ildwood, Fla.
12.5n J. H. Loyd, Winter H.vwn, Fla.
3.67 4. R. Shomaker, Cotton Dale, Fla.
1.89 S. H. Shomaker, Cotton D')e, Fla.
0.57 Arthur Cornwell, Palmetto, Fla.
1.35 Southern Fert. Mnf. Co, Gainesville, Fla
11.81 Schroeder & rguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
5.01 W. G, Norsworthy, McIntosh. bla.
0.56 E. C. Lanier & Co., Miami, Fla.
13.2d Schroeder & Arguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
4.21 M. Jacoby, Marianna, kla.
..... Booker & Gentry, Memphis, Tenn.
1.60 southernn Cotton Oil Co.. Washington, Ga.
10.32 Marshall & Beebe, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
..... Hardec Bros., Jensen, Fla.
5.92 B. F. Hardesty, St. Sebastian, Fla.
1.73 Florida Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.00 Sterling & Russell, Deiray, Fla.
1.72 Mellan Crosby Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2.09 R. J. Brewten, McDavid, Fla.
1.33 W. W. Valentine, Antioch, Fla.
10 68 F. S. Dunklin, I akeland, Fla.
,.... Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
6.64 M. O. Donell, West Tampa, Fla.








13


BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer. .0 n

o~'~


Mixed Fertilizer....... 6.70
Mixed Fertilizer....... ...
Mixed Fertilizer...... 5.75
Cotton Seed Meal..... .....
Fertilizer.............. 9.65
Armour's Vegetable!
Fertilizer............ 7.35
Armour's Fruit & Boot
Crop Special......... 9.45
Sulphate of Ammonia. 3 5
Sulphate of Ammonia. 8.60
Mixed Fertilizer
(Sweepings)......... 8.6
Nitrateof Soda........ 1.70
Sulphate of Potash... 17.40
Dried Blood........... 1.15
Ground Steamed Bone 3.10
H. G. Tobacco Dust... .10
Tobacco Dust....... 7.23


By Whom Sent


6.39 1.60 7 99 1.51 10.92 E. A. Wilcox, Anona, Fla.
4.84 8.26 8.1 5.1 1.88 Clark & Co., Dania, Fla.
6.0 1.21 7.26 1.85 13.64 D. W. Brown, Arcadia, Fla.
... . 2.77 8.5j 2.58 Florida Tobaoco Co., Qu ncy, Fla.
11.47 1.66 13.13 ... 5.59 C. F Cope, Chipley, Fla.
6 28 3.21 9.49 4.46 929 Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
7.35 2.11 9.46 2.45 6.74 Armour Fertilizer 'orks. Jacksonville....
.... ........ 5.05 ... Willson & roomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
................23.61 ..... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
5.55 2.04 7.59 3.66 7.94 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
.. ... .... 18.48 ..... Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
.. ... .... ..... 24.00 Willson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
16 .. 29.. R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
8.64 15.18 4.88 ..... R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
.... 50 1.80 R. M. Hebbert, Jensen, Fla.
S..i ... 6 6.75 F. O. Painter Fert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


For values see heading ''Bureau of Fertilizers."
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or tLe names of man'
ufacturers cf the "Special-amples" sent in by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer or
manufacturer. hence is not an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The 'Of
flcial Samples' taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on preceding page states the nam
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing in'
gredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the potash
and ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid, and some pooash, but is
bought for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table,it has been determined a
total phosphoric acid.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Samples taken by State Chemist under Secti on 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


Phos. Acid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.
0


NAmz or BRAND. ig a S S0
..c c i _
S 0
0 0 02 E


Cotton Seed Meal.....................
Cotton Seed Meal ............
Cotton Seed Meal ...............
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Cotton Seed Meal..........
Cotton Seed Meal ..............
Cotton Seed Meal..... ......
Mape' s Fruit and Vine Manure.
Ideal Potato Manure............
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer.
Ideal Fertilizer................
Mapd's Fruit and Vine Manure
Mape' s Vegetable Manure......
Mape' s Orane Tree Fertilizer..
Ideal Fertilizer..................
Bradley's Fruit &Vine Fertilizer
Fruitand Vine Fertilzer........
Bradley's Nursery Stock.......
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guaano...
Ideal Vegetable M nure ......
Mare's Vegetable Manu e......
Mape's Fruit and Vine Manure.
Blood. Bone and Potash
Nitrate of Sola .......... .
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure..
Special Orange Tree Manure....
H. G. Tobacco Dust ....... .
Osceola Brand Tobacco Dust...
Special Mixture (Tobacco).....
H. G. Sulphate of Potash.......
Kalnit..... ......................
Ideal FerTilizer.................
H. G. Tobacco Dust............


8 4 ......
11.14 .
9.06 ......
7.60 ......
8.18....
10. ......
3.82 ......
9.20 7.42
11 80 7.84
10.75 6.86
10.40 7. 19
13. 0 7.12
10.68 6.093
12.20 7,71
10.10 7.82
12.91 8.57
15.60 B.81
10.5b 7.97
8.600 6.44
13)95 7.6
11.15 6.78
0.95 6.67
11.75 7.70
1.80
9.00 6.24
12.35 7.15
8.86 .
7.90 ......
17.8 ......
1.44 ..
5.84 ......
6.32 7.00
7.20 ......


2.90 8.61
2.49 8.91
2.91 8.36
2.39 8.34
2.71 8 38
2.57 8.24
3.31 8.73
9.34 2.48
8.75 4.23
8.92 4.13
& 11 4.26
9.15 2.52
9.50 4.86
10.63 4.14
8,26 4.23
10.22 2.55
9.02 2.11
10.61 4.63
7.86 4.22
8.50 3.8S
9.69 5.16
8.9J 2.32
8.58 5.38
.. 18.32
6.85 3.55
9.16 2.54
.... .. 2.31
1,44
...... 1.48

. .i5b.3.97
...... 2.97


" to 10 5to 7
' io to 8
........ to 8
........ ..to .
.... ........5 to 7

8 to 10 5 to 7
0. to 12 6 to 8
10 to 128 to 8
.... .. to 7
8 to 10 5 to 7
8 to 10
10 to 12 6 to 7
6 to 8
10 to 12 6 to 8
8to.. 5 to 7
5 to 10 6 to 1
....... 6to 8
10 to 12 5 to 6
8 to 10



8 to 5 to 7"
.... . .....


2 to 4
1 to S

... 4
2to 4
2 to 4


2 to 4


1 to s
2 to 4
2 to 4
2 to 4
' to a
2 to a


2 to 3
3.22
3 22
3.22
3.22
2.5to2.8
2 to2y5








i. te 13


8 tolb
8.24
8.24
8.24
8.24
7.5t8.95
8 to09
2 to 3
4 to
4 to 5
4%t05
2 to 3
5 to 6
4 to 5
4%to5%
2Xto3i]
2 to 4
4 5lo5%
4 to 0
4to 5
4 io 5
5 to 6
2 to 3
5 to 6
17 to 19
3 to 4
2 to 3
1%to3
1% to 3



3


S By Whom and Where Manufactured.



1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
1.96 Jefferson Mfg. o.. Jefferson, Ga.
1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Selma, Ala.
1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile, Ala.
1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co Mobile, Ala.
1.5--1.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Selma, Ala.
1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
10 to 12 Mapes' Formula& Peru Guano Co., N. Y.
8 tw, 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co Jacksonville
5 to 7 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y.
6 to 8 Wilson a Toomer Fert. Co,, Jacksonville
10 to 12 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
4 to 6 Mapes' Formula& Peru. GuanoCo.,N.Y.
3 to 4 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co., N.Y.
6 to 8 Wilron & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
10 to 12 Bradley's Form. & Peru. Guano Co., N.Y.
12 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
4 to 6 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
8 to 10 Wilson & I oomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
4 to 6 Mapes Formula & Peru. GuanoCo N. Y.
10 to 12 Mapes' Formula &Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
7 tO 8 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
.. ..... Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonville
10 to 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
10 to 11 Baugh & Sons. Baltimore, Md.
1N to 38 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
1 to 5 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
.......... Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
48 to 51 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jaeksonville.
12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
6 to 6Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
10 Florida Ferillizer Co., Gainesville, Fla.








Deid Phosphate................. I'O3
IDark O. S. Meal .................. 10. 2
Dark C. 8. Meal............... 9.10
-AixieBrandC. S. Meal......... 8.16
lKainit.......................... 9.04
rFish and Potash...... ..... 4.20
IPineapple Fruiter .......... 4.25
IPotato Manure .............. 5.95
Settuce and Cucumber, 81 eclal. 5.50
SPeruvian Fish Guano. No. 1.... 5.0
SSpecial for Fruit............... 6.
No. 2, Double Strength of Putash 6.25
1Blood, Bone and Potash..... 6.75
'No. 1,Fellizer......... ......... 8.00
No. 2, Fertilizer.....**....... 7.15
SNo. 4, Fertilizer ............... 8.05
Dissolved Bone........ ...... 13.05
' Cotton Seed Meal.. ........... 7.65
Armour's Practical Trucker..... 7.80
Armour's Orange Tree Manure.. 7.90
- Armour's Fruit and Vine Fert... 685
Armour's Blood, Bone & Potash. 8.70
Armour'sFruit&RootCrop,Spec. 6.40
Armour's Bone Flour............ 2.70
Armour's Dried Blood... ...... 125
H. G. Tobacco Dust........... 6.
Armour's Blood and Bone....... 7
H. G Blood and Bone.......... 9.65
Blood and Bone............... 8.05
H. G. Blood and Bone...... 8.45
Acid Phosphate .............. 7.85
Strawberry Fruiter.. ........... 7.35
Extra Fruit and Vine......... 6.10
Cotton Seed Meal............... 0.80
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 7.8
Cottonseed Veal ..........-.... 5.96
Cotton Seed Meal....... ....... 8.35
H. G. Acid Pimsphate......... 13.0
A L.Wilsoi 6.60 Acid Phoiphat, 12.30
Branley'sXXX Phosphate. 8.05
Dissolved Bone Phosphate...... 14.65
Atlas Acid Phosphate......... 12.95
Acid hos h e................. 13.75
Brad Ry metto Phosphate 7.9f
uun behind Bone Super Phoa... 16.15
Gou'dli'T*nue Compound..... 13.98
Gem Gduo.. ........ ....13.90
Lott's mptiund............ 3-45
Number tid Fertilizer....... 11.80
Mobile Stibdard Guano....... 7.40
Raw Bo Super Phosrnate... 13.B5
rqpklidBig'8s.G.AcldPilQ.A Potl 10.a3


15.72 4.07



3.48 2.04
7.24 5.76
5.83 1.97
5.00 1.33
5.25 2.1t
6.63 2.21
6.10 1.87
5.66 3.43
7.13 5.11
6.62 3.57
6 89 3.72
11.21 3.64
7.13 5.83
8.01 7.43
8.12 5.90
7.13 4.58
7.21 3.99
8.42 15.60

"73 8.04
5.46 5.91
6.25 9.14
3.53 3.09
16.92 7.10
5.98 V.41
6.37 2.11
...... .. ..


19.79 ..... ....
2.04 5.44 1.46
2.28 5 03 1.31
2.56 9.11 1.55
...... 1 .26 ......
5.52 6.89 7.35
13.00 3.42 11.28
7.60 3.85 8.95
6.33 .60 5.72
7.25 4.81 5.66
8.84 3.90 12.60
7. 2.36 9.82
9.09 4.54 4.65
12.24 4.54 3.93
10.19 507 9.88
10.6 3.01 10.30
14.85 2.41 ..
2.70 8.46 1.78
12. 3.04 9.25,
15.44 8.80 4.09
14.02 2.87 11.02
11.71 6.32 7.53
11.20 2.46 5.22
24.02 4.584.
16 35..
1.. .76 1.60
11.77 7 ......
11.37 9.64
15.39 7- r......
6.60........
24.02 ...... .....
8.39 2.43 8.91
8.50 2.31 13.73
2.88 9.43a 1.26s
2.60 8.09 1.28
2.92 8.'29 1.50
2.66 7.93 1.38
S18.87 ...... .....
17.53 .... .. .....
16.14 -- ... ..
15,18... ......
17.78 .. .. ....
12.82 .. ** ......
S16.23 ... ...

13.71 2.09 1.51
13.43 1.78 1.84
12.83 1.83 12.7
11 46 2 09
14.43 2 2.62
13.89 2.15 1.73
16 13 .. .30


.... .... 15
8 to 12 ......
8 to 12 ... ....


10 to ?.
10 to 12
10 to 12
10 to 12
10 to 12
10 to 12
10 to 12


1(0 to 12
5 to it
5 to 10
5 to 10
5 to 10
5 to 10
5 to 10
10 te 13
8 to 10
5 to 10
5 10
5 to 7
5 to 7

i'......'i
10 to 12
8 to 12
6.5-. 75
8.011
12 to 15
12 to 15
10 to 20
11
12 to 15
12 to 16
lo to 12
10 to 20
10 to 12
10 to 12
12
11 to 18
10 to 15
10 to ]a


2 to 3
4 to 5
5 ti 6
5 to 6
6 to 6
6 to 8
5 to 6
4 to 5
5 to 6
6 to 7
6 to 7
14 to 15
6 to 7
8 to 10
B to 8
8 to 10
8 to 9
10 to 14





14.00
5 to 6
6 to 8



15 to 17
14 to 16
13 to Is
13
13 to 16
12 to 14
12 to 24
8 to it
8%.-101s
8 to 11
5 to 6
8
8 to 10
9tolO%
12 to 14


.......2 to 3
.... ... 2 to 3

3 to 4 ..
6 to 7 .......
2 so 3.......
1 to 2 ........
1 to 2 ......
1 to 2 ...
2 to 3... ..
2 to 3 ........
2 to 3 ........
2 to 3 ........
2 to 3 ......
3 to 4 ...
2 to 3 .....
2 to 3 ....
2 to 4 ... ....
1 to 2 ........
1 to 2 .. ....

........ 124 to 28,

... ...... t
........ 10 to 12
........ 12 to 1P
... 15 to 20
.. 4.58
. ... .. ... ....

2 to .......3
...... 2 .2 ...
.... ... 2.10

2.10
1 to 2
1 to 2
2 to 3 ....
1.50 ........
2 to 3 ........
2 to 4 .......
2 o 3 .....
1 to 2 ... ....
1 to 2 ........
1 to 2 .......

1% to 2 .....
1 to 3 .....
1 to ; ........


i


................ Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
5 to 7 to 1 Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison.
5 to 7 % to 1% Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison
SY ........ Humphries,Goodwin &Co ,Memphis,Tenn
... 12 to 13 Little Brothers, Jacksonville.
7 to 8 5 to 6 Florida Fort. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fia.
3 to 4 12 to 13 Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
3 to 4 9 to 10 Florida Fert Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
7 to 8 4 to 5 Florida Pert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla,
4tto5% 5 to 6 Florida Fert. Mfg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
4 to 5 12 to 14 Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando. Fla.
l1to 2 10 to 12 Florida Fert. Mig. Co. Uaii esville, Fla.
4 to 4 to 5 Florida Fert. Mig. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
5 to 6 4 to 5 Southern Fertlizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
6 to 6 10 to 12 Southern Fertiliser Co., Orlando Fla.
3 to 4 10 to 12 Snuthern Fertilizer Co.,Or;ando, Fla.
2 15 3 ........ Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
8to 8i ] to 2 P. A. Smith, A'lanta, Ga.
3 to 4 10 to 12 Armour Feltilizer Works, Jacksonville.
3'o4% 4 to 5 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
2)to3a l10 to 13 A mour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
5 to 6 7 to 8 Armour Ferti zer Works, Jacksonville.
2 to 35 to 6 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
3 to 4 ........ Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
16 to 17 ......... Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Ito3X 1N to 3 Armour .ertilizer Works, Ji cksonville.
7 to 8 .......... Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
9%to 10 ......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
6%1 to 8 ......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
lo .......... Amour Packing Co., Chicago, Ill.
..... .......... Little Brothers, Jacksonville
2 to 3 10 to 12 Flotida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
2 to 314 to 16 Southern FertiliaerCo., Orlando, Fla.
7.50-H8, 1.85 Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala.
*,% to 9 1 to 2 Trader's Cotton Oil Co., Union Springs,Ala
7%-7 85 lto 2.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co, Montgomery,Ala
7'50 2 lahama Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
...................Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla.
............... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
........... Bradley Fertilizer Co.,.Boston, Mass.
........ .... ... Georgia Chemical Works, Augusta, Ga.
....... ........ ioulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
........ .......... Virginia, Caolina Chem. Co ,Richmond,Va
....... ............ Bradley Fertilizer Co. B-iston, Mass.
2 to 3 1 to 2 Cumberland Bone Phos. Co., Poitland,Md
2 to 2 l. 1 to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla
1 i. -' 2 to 3 Go Iding Frtilizer Co., Pensacola Fla.
l/.tuzY. l to 1i I. .M. Lott Havana, Fla.
3 2 Mulual Fertilizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
2 to 3 2 to 3 Mobile Phosplace Co., Mobile, Ala.
2 to 3 1% to 3 Standard Guano &Chem. Co., New Orleans
........ 1 to 2 Goulding Fertiliger Co,, pelsacela, F14:




BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS-Continued.

Phos. Acid Guaranteed Analysis

Name of Fertilizer By Whom and Where Manufactured

o : 0 a S a-
a 4 a oc iS B < &o

Blood. Bone and Potash....... 9.00 6.86 3.60 10.46 3.78 4. 9.11 6 to 8 3 to 5 ....... 4 to 6 4 to Tampa F rtilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
H. G. Vegetable Fish Guano.. 10.10 7.71 1.46 9..17 3.73 7.0810 to 2 5 o 7 2 to 4 ....... 4to 6 6to 8 'ampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Pineapple Manure........... 6.20 6.09 3 26 9.35 5.57 10.87 8 to 10 4 to 5 ............. 5to 6 7 to 8 Tam a Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fli.
Special Mixture............ 5.40 8.86 2.10 10.4 7.50 8.18 tn t 4 to 6 5 to ... 7% 7 to 8 Tempa Ferti ier Co.. Tampa, Fla.
Potato Fertilizr ............. 8.50 6. 8 1.80 7.98 3.01 10.21 8 to 10 4o 6 3 4 ....... 3 to 6 10 to 12 Ta mpa Fertlizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Strawberry Fertilizer.......... 7.5 6.76 2.01 8.80 2.65 9.30 8 t 10 6 to 8 o to 4........ 2 tc 4 8 to 10 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Orange Fruiter Special ....... .60 7.47 1.17 8.64 2.40 16.12 8 to 1 6 to 1 2 ....... 2 3 to 1 18 Tampa Felillzer Co Tampa, Fla.
Fruit and Vine erilizer..... 10.10 7.5 1.03 8.18 2.59 12.01 8 to 10 6 to 8 1 to 3 ...... 2to 4 12to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa. FJa.
Ober's Fruit & Vine Fertilizer 9.1 7 80 2.48 16.28 2.95 19.71 12 to 13 6 to 8 1 to 2 ... t.. 2 3 10to3 0 o12 A. Ober &Sons, Baliimore, Md.
Bradler's Vegetable Fetilizer 6.60 6.59 2.06 8.65 3.93 6.20 10 to 13 6 to 7 1 to 2 ... to 5to 6 American Agr. 9hem. Co., New York.
Baugh's Special Manure for
Orange Trees and Nusery
Stock.. Trees and y 875 6.05 2.81 8.86 3.07 10.85 10 te 12 5 to 6 2 to 3... 2 to 3 10 te 11 Bugh & Sons, Batimore, Md.
Tobacco Dust......... 3.06 ...... ..... ..... 1.59 1.96 ........ ............. ....... 3to 4 to 3 Tampa Frtilizer Co. Tampa, Fla,
Pure Ground Tobac oDust... 11.25 ...... ...... ..... 1.78 4.94 ........ ... .. ...... .... 2to 3 4 o 8 Taml FFr ilizrrCo., Ta pa, Fla.
Dried Blood................ 10.55 .... .... ... 16.41 ....... .............. ........ 16t 18 ......... 0. P inter Fert. Co. Jacksonville.
Ni rate of Soda................. 2. .... ....1.1..... 28 to 19 ........Tampa Ferti izer Co., Ta, pa, Fla.
H. G. Acid Phosphate.... .. 15.15 14.16 0.47 14.68 .......... 10 to 12 14 to 1 2 to 3... .. ...... ..... Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fl .
Dissolved Bone Black... .... 14.35 0. 17 .... .............18 to 19............. .. Tampa Fertilizer Co., TC mpa, Fla.
Fine Ground Bone ............ 15 10.80 1.08 20.88 5.4 .............. .... .......22 t5 4 to ........ irch & Co.. Chicago, ll.
anit......... ........... 4.15 .. .. 12.84 ........ ........................ 12.13 Baugh & Sons, Baltimo'e, Md.
Double Manure Sal'.......... 14.20 ...... ...... 26.66 ..... ........................... 25 t Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.





'Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


Pounds per Hundred

Ammonia Phosphoric
Acid otash

Nitrate of Soda........ ....... .... 17 to 19 ..........
Sulphate of Ammonia .... ............. .. 22 to 24............
Dried Blood.......... ..... ....... 12 to 17 ..................
Concentrated Tankage .................... 12 to 15 1 to 2 .........
Bone Tankage.......................... 6 to 9 10 to 15 .......
Dried Fish Scrap ................. .... to 11 6 to 8
Cotton Seed Meal............. ........ 7 to 101 2 to 3 1 to2
Hoof Meal .... .... 14 to 17 1 to 2.......
PHO-PHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid

Florida Rock Phosphate ...... .... ........... ... 33 to 35
Florida Pebble Phosphate ............. ........ 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphate .......................... 14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone ........ .... .... ... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone...... .......... ... ... 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone.. ..... ... .. 2 to 4| 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds per Hundred

Actual Ammonia Phohospric Lime
Potash &Acid Lme

Muriate of Potash................ ... 50 ......... ......... .
Sulphate of Potash............ 48 to 52 .....................
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia 26 to 30 ......... ..............
K ainit.... .. ....... .............. 12 to 12 ............ .................
Sylvinit.................... ... .... 16 to 20 ..............
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes ............. 15 to 30 ........ 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached........... 2 to 8 .......... 1 to 2 30 to 35
Wood Ashes, leached............... 1 to 2 ......... to I1 85 to 40
Tobacco Stems ............ ......... 5 to 8 2 to 4.........
Cow Manure (fresh)................. 0.40 0 to .41 0.16 0 31
Horse Manure (fresh) ................ 0.53 0 to .60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)............... 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh)................... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)... ............. 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure ................ 0.63 0.76 0 26 0.70




Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully :studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluble phosphoric acid-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of Bone
Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or Muriate of Potash" or
equivalents of "Nitrate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Ammonia;" basing his
calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of the good,
offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of fertility re-
quired, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the commercial
values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular elements his
crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods required, and ap-
proximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requires that:
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers,
.cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage- of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, the percentage of potash
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all other
ingredients from which it is compounded, also the stamp showing the pay-
ment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale, each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show to the satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of
Bone Phosphate of Lime," it may be taken as insoluble to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate contains 26 to 35 per cent. of "phosphoric
acid" equivalent to 501 to 86 per cent. of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its
commercial value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into
"Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent. "avail-
-able" has a commercial value of $12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural






value is proportionately much greater as raw or untreated rock, has but
little agricultural value.
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"dissolved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of the State
Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900, serial number 36, is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative
and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay. no attention whatever to
names and brands. They should realize, for instance, that in nine cases
out of ten, brands known as "Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle
of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands.
are not made from bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if they
were made from bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for
purchasing when general trade in fertilizers is dull, club together with
some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia, phosphoric
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a first-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to,
buy on time and pay interest, why then be assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods:
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manurial chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons. The same-
figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa, for spot cash f. o. b. cars:
Less than 5 to 0 10
5 tons. tons tons
High Grade Potash 9, to 95 per cent. ulphate (48 to 50 p-r cent. K 20)......$52 00 *51 "0'A 0wa
Pulphate Potash, 48 to 55 per cent. 'ulphate (25 to 31 per cent (K20)...... 200 31 00 30 00
Murlate Potash, 80 to 85 per cent. Muriate (42 to45 per cent. K20) ............ 4600 400 4400







Kainit, 12 to 13 percent. Actual Potash....... ........................ 1600 14 50 1300
Blood and Bone, 6% per cent Ammonia................................. 2650 2600 2550
Blood and Bone, 7 to 8 per cent. Ammonia................................. 2750 -7 00 26 50
Blood and Bone, 10percent. Ammonia................................. 32.00 3150 3100
taw Bone Meal, 2 to 4 p-r cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per. cent. total Phos-
phoric Acid..................................... ...................... 32 00 31 50 31 00
Boneblack, 16 to 18 per cent. available Phosphoric Acid................... 2500 2400 2400
Acid Phosohate, 14 per cent. Phosphoric Acid........................... 1300 1250 1200
Nitrate Soda, 18 to 19 per cent. Ammonia................................. 5400 5350 5300
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 per cent. Ammonia.. .................... 7200 7100 7000
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia..... ........ ................4700 46 50 4600
Ground Castor Pomace, 6 to 7 per cent. Ammonia ......................... 2100 2050 2000
Canada Hard Wood Ashes, 2 to 8 per cent KO0 (Potash)..................... 1500 14 1) 1400
Pulverized obacco Stem , 5to8 per ceut. K20 (Potash).................... 1500 1460 1400
Tobacco Stems (Baled) 5 to 8 per cent. KzO (Potash) ....................... 100 1550 1500
Tobacco Dust, High Grade, 5to 8 per cent. K20 (Potash)................... 2100 2050 2000
teamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Ammonia, 25 to 38 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid..... .................................. ....... 25 00 24 50 2400
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7 to 9 per cent. Ammonia....................... 2650 26 (1 25 00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 6 to 8 per cent. Ammonia............ .......... 22(0 2153 21 00
"Blood and Bone," "Tankage," "Girbage" and numerous other by
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and 1 per cent.
of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00 ..................... $24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate @ $1.00 .................. 2 00
1 per cent. potash @ $1.10 ........................... 1 65

$27 65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled
"For feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
4- to 5 per cent. ammonia.
li to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
14 to 2 per cent. potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:







4 per cent. ammonia ................................. $13 50
11 per cent. phosphoric acid ............................ 1 75
1j per cent. potash ................................... 1 65
Commercial value ............... ................ .$16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal.
Their relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy
in the use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as
forcibly to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of
the meal depending only on its content of amomnia, phosphoric acid and
potash in both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis,
and pay for the actual content of the valuable elements only.

ORGANIC AMMIONIATES.
It is generally conceded by pineapple growers that the sulphates of am-
monia and potash are harmful to pineapples. The universal practice among
the pineapple growers is to use organic fertilizers only-cotton seed meal,
castor pomace, blood and bone for ammoniates; ashes, tobacco and nitrate
of potash for potash.
Blood and bone supplying ammonia and phosphoric acid, also consider-
able "Tankage, and "Garbage," reinforced by sulphate of ammonia, has
been found in the State an unquestionably valuable fertilizer for certain
crops, is generally acknowledged hurtful to pines.
The State law, section 3, requires the manufacturers to state in the
"guarantee on each package the percentage of ammonia and the source
from which it is derived." A failure to state the source of the ammonia
in a fertilizer is a violation of the law.
Purchasers requiring only "oragnic ammonia" in their fertilizers
should see that this important part of the guarantee is complied with.

MECHANICAL CONDITION.
A number of complaints have been made to the department this season
of failure of vegetable crops, using certain brands of goods. On exam-
ination chemically, these goods have been found well within the guarantee
of their makers. The same goods (that is, goods having the same amounts
of fertilizing elements) have proved satisfactory to growers in the same
localities, and under the same conditions. The difference in results can be
attributed solely to the imperfect grinding and failure to properly mix the
goods complained of. In all cases the best results have been had from
those goods having the best mechanical condition.
Other things being equal, those goods most finely pulverized and well
mixed have proved most satisfactory. Coarse ground "Blood and Bone,"
"Tankage" and "Mixed" Fertilizers" using such coarse material in com-






pounding, have proved unsatisfactory in producing quick results, as de-
manded by the vegetable growers of the State.
That the mechanical condition of commercial fertilizers has much to do
with results, has been practically demonstrated, particularly among the
vegetable growers of the State.

TOBACCO DUST.

Large quantities of tobacco dust are used in this State, particularly by
pineapple growers. It is valuable mostly for its potash, and for its pun-
gent or aromatic properties, as an insecticide. No material offered in the
State varies more in its composition and value, nor is anything more apt
to be adulterated or "loaded."
Analysis of two samples taken from different parts of the State show
58.43 per cent. and 51.30 per cent. (more than half) to be simly clay or
fine sand. The "commercial value" of different samples are shown in the
preceding analysis, varies from $23.20 to $10.92 per ton. Purchasers
should buy only on guarantee and pay for what they get. Manufacturers
and dealers purchase only on guarantee and settle according to analysis.
This particular material varies in value probably more than any other
on the market, and requires the utmost care on the part of the dealer and
consumer to prevent confusion, disappointment and dissatisfaction.
If purchasers demand the guarantee and refuse to purchase goods shown
by the guarantee to be worth less than the price demanded, this condition
will soon cease.








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Climatological Data for April, 1902.


Stations


Counties


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............ Alachua........
Bainbridge........... Decatur, Ga .....
Federal Point....... St. Jchns.......
Fernandina......... Nassu..........
Fort Georget...... Duval..........
Gainesville ......... Alachua........
Huntington ........ Putnam.......
acksonville........ Duval...........
,asper............ Hamilton.....
ake Butler........ Bradford .....
ake City........... Columbia......
acclenny.......... Baker.........
canopy .......... Alachua........
iddleburg la......... Clay ....
inemount.... ... Suwannee.....


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


18 67.8
10 65.1
9 67.1
1 64.8
17 67.1
10 68.2
6 67.9
30 67.2
5 66.1
5 65.7
13 67.4
7 67.8
7 67 4
2 64.4
...... 66.6


2
0

B V

gI..10 /
3 o 'S 0 x.
tH _ _ _ 1


38
34
45
27

33
38
28
33
38
36
41
43
44
37


Precipitation, in inches


_-



1.23
1.01
1.65
1.37


1.91
2.02
1.45
1.16
2.04
1.35
1 44
2 59
0 95


a








--1.660.45
S..... 0 5
-0.98 0 '7
-1 550 61

-0 750.76
-0 01 1I 31
-0 940 86
-1 370 55
-1 *280 38
--1 07 0 80
--2 550 72
-0 600 83
.... 1 31
... .. 0 55


Sky





a a S
3 0 0


ne

.wa



e
nw


sw
w

i-e
3W


1









Climatological Data for April-(Continued.)


S Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sk
-, Fahrenheit



Stations Counties 4 ;. .


CS bO 0
I o I | o l E
___________, 0 Voi Q ~ 5 ~ ; z ZV L


Savannah, Ga.......
St. Augustine...x...
Sumner............
Switzerland ........
Thomasville, Ga....
Waycross, Ga ......


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow.............
rooksville .........
Clermont...........
DeLand... ........
Eustis............. . . .
Ft. Meade.........
Fort Pierce........
Inverness..........
Kissimmee .........
Malabar...........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smryna..........
Ocala ............
Orange City........
Orlando............


unatnaw, Ga..
St. Johns.......
Levy.........
St. Johns......
Thomas, Ga....
Ware, Ga ......

Means .......


Polk.... ......
Hernando.....
Lake ............
Volusia........
Lake............
Polk ..........
Brevard... ...
Citrus...........
Osceola ..........
Brevard.... ...
Brevard........
Volusia..........
Marion .......
Volusia........
Orange ........


64. -1.0o bai 410
67 --0 4 8426 48
65 5 -1 8828* 37
66 7+1 4 9 9* 40
65 8 -1 7 827 4
64 7+0 7 829 41

66 8 -0 5... ..


70 6 +0 6 91 14 45

704-1 3 9030 48
679 9114 42
71 2 +0 8 91 29* 47
699 +1 3 9214* 41
69 6-2 9 8 12* 48
69 2 .... 924 43
69 8-- 7 9027 43
70 8... 17* 43
70 41-1 4 8714 53
66 8-3 4 9u14 40
68 3--0 79329 41
67 9-1 99230 38
70 61+0 6 89)14 49


2.47
0 26
1 45
1 76
1 56
2 63

1 52


2.77

1 67

1 79
1 50
2 00
1 34
1 73
1 25
1 43
1 80
1 22
2 85
23 27


1 -0.81
--2 44
--1 11
-3 70
-2 18
-0 17

--1 54


+0 30

-i 09

-0 36
-0 60
-0 59
-2 60
-0 56

-1 64
-0 14
-0 9-.
+0 87
+0 12


se
sw




ae-sw


sw

ne

ne


5 ..
B
ne


p-ne
se

9
se
B-w


I .... ....








Plant City.......... Hillsborough...
Rockwell........... Marion.........
St. Leo............. Pasco........
Tampa.............. Hillsborough...
Tarpon SpriLgs.... Hillsborough ..
Titusville .......... Brevard........

Means......
SOUTHERN SECTION.

Avon Park........ DeSoio..........
Flamingo..... ... Monroe .....
Havana............ Cuba. ........
Hypoluxo........... Dade........
Jupiter ............ Dade......... ..
Key West ......... Monroe ........
Manatee........... Manatee........
Marco.... ........ Lee........ ..
Miami......... .... Dade..........
Myers .......... .. Lee ..... .....
Nassau............. N. P. Bahamas.
Nocatee... ....... DeSoto.... ..
San Juan.......... Puerto Rico....

Means...
WESTERN SECTION.

Bonifay ........... Holmes ........
Carrabelle .......... Franklin........
Daphne.......... Baldwin, Ala...
DeFuniak Springs.. Walton........
Holt .............. Santa Rosa. ...
Marianna ......... Jackson........
Mobile ................. Mobile, Ala....
Molino ............. Escambia ......
Montgomery....... Montgom'y, Ala


-2.2a89
.... 94



- 0 8 89

--1 I ...


iQ2 14
85 13*
9013
85 -5*
86 13
8328
92 30
91 15*
89 8*
8826
A4 8*
92 14*


116 1 65 ..... 88
12 4 66 3+0 483
...... 61 7 .... ..
193 6 65 4 1 0 86
208 ...... a64 6 .... a88
85 2 66 4 .... 89
35 31 65 -3 0 83
. ....... 65 4 ... 87
2191 29 63 9-1 0 86


0.60
1 20
1 18
1 07
1 79
1 19

1 61


1.44
? 45
1 70
1 81
0 97
0 82
1 17
1 21
1 85
1 03
2 66
0 29


1 30


-2 22

-1 76
-1 26
-0 26
-0 84

-0 68


..... .1.24
.. 1 8U
-1.131 40
- 0 68 1 24i
-1 740 44
-u 38 0 23
- 0 93 14
.. .. 1 18
-1 73 0 75
-1 6030 60
0 80
...... .0 20


-1 18|....


e-w
nw
w
w
se

B



e
a
e
e
e
nw
se-w
Se
8




se


10 aw
2sw
4.
4 ..o..

2aw
7s

8ne


38 2


37 1
a36 1
43 1*
44 1
36 1*
4. 0


0 03 2
0.60 2

0 24 4
1 50 2
0 66 3
0 80 7
110 3
1 45 6


-1 72

-3 14


-2 54

-2 62


L ..





Climatological Data for April, 1902-Continued.


S Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit


Stations Counties 0





ePensacola.... ...... Escambia ...... 56 '22 66.2 -1.0 80 30 9 4011'8 1.55 73U?75 4 1| 11 5n
Quincy.............. Gadsden...... 20 2 65 8 ..... 9127 38 48 0 25 .... 25 1 6 e
St. ndrews Bay... Washington....... 44 8- 7 9029 36 2 41 1 06 68 3 2 3
Stephensville .. Taylor............1 15 50 3 ..
Tallahassee........ Leons ....... 56 266.4-0 8052 4O 1 84 -1 150 66 4 2514 5 w
Waukeenah.......... Jefferson.............. 66.6 .... 9227 40 1 32 110 ...... 0 80 2 23 4 3s
Wausau ............ Washington. .. 250 4 6 2-17 9027* 36 2 40 1 70 -1 81 08 3 17 10 3....
Wewahitchka...... Calhoun...... 3 66 0 ..... 8930 43 2* 35 1 23 ..... 0 49 4 15 7 8 n

Means...... .. ..... 65 8+0 .. 1 21 -1 72 ...... 19 7 4sw
State Means ......... -1 1 ... .... 1 45 -1 08.... 21 6 3s
MARcn, 1902.
San Juan...... P.R .... .......... ... 75 4-1 0 8526 67 31 1 408 +1 6 96 15 12 11 8e
.... ......... I .... .............. .. .. _.....
tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
made at 7 a. m,. 2 p m. and 9 p. m. daily.- in determining State or district means, but State and district
ae ata n a a departures are determined by comparison of current data of
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau, only such stations as have normals.
Not included in means. Incomplete. a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.




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