Title: Florida monthly bulletin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00008
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: March 1902
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text







,Vol. 12.
( .


FLORIDA


(Department of Agriculture.)


..Monthly Bulletin..


MARCH, 1902.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


FPart I. Crope.
\, Part I1. Fertillze5r.
Part III. Weather Report.
Part IVI. jlscellaneous.


These' Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them .


II TALLAHA88EEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAMASBEE, FLA.


Y. 73
rV-773


No. 73.


I I


RLA~~eban~rl~P ~-
UL~UEC~YPL L1 ~C. L rl: u







County Map of the State of Florida.
(Foi rhe Bulletin.)


















Notice.


With this issue of the Monthly Bulletin its publication is resumed.
To our corps of correspondents we tender greetings, and trust that we
will continue to have their support and assistance in the work of making
the Bulletin the truthful exponent of agricultural conditions as they
exist throughout the periods of growth and maturity of the many and
various crops. It is the aim and desire of the Department to make the
Bulletin serve the interests of the people, and to do that effectually it must
have the assistance of friends from all sections of the State; with such help
success and satisfaction is assured. The Bulletin will contain numerous
articles on subjects of great and growing interest to the agriculturists and
fruit growers of the State, and hopes by its efforts to add a good share to
the increasing prosperity and happiness of the people of Florida.


NOTE.-We suggest that all persons receiving copies of the Bulletin
keep them on file for future reference.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HON. B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-The late cold and wet spring has retarded plant-
ing of field crops, which are from two to three weeks behind the usual time.
There will be a considerable increase in a number of crops this year. The
acreage nor condition of vegetables is not quite up to the usual owing to
unfavorable weather so often during winter and spring.
BREVARD COUNTY-Our orange growers particularly feel encouraged;
good prices have been obtained and there is a heavy bloom on trees. Po-
tatoes are a bad stand, though an increased acreage was planted, the crop
will not be up to the average. Most of the field crops we grow are very
good, and fruit trees all doing well.
CALHOUN COUNTY-The spring is so late and so much wet, that crops
are worse behind than for many years. There will be full, and in some in-
stances increased, acreage planted in the usual filed crops; vegetable
crops all late; fruit trees doing well.
CITRUS COUNTY-Most of the crops are doing well, though it has been
too cool for several of them, keeping them back, and causing them to grow
slow. There is an increased acreage in several crops. The falling off in
sugar cane is caused by the seed getting frost-bitten last fall before it was
cut. Fruit trees doing well.
CLAY COUnTTY-We have had plenty of rain, and good spring weather
all through March. The acreage in field crops is about the same as last
year, except in one instance there is a considerable increase. Fruit trees
are doing well.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-The preparations for planting crops are much
more thorough than usual and there is a noticeable increase in the acreage
being planted to a number of field crops; planting is quite late on account
of unfavorable spring weather. Fruit promises to be good; everything
blooming profusely, and trees seem to be more healthy.
DADE COUNTY-We have had a fine growing spring, and the vegetable
crops have done well, and brought satisfactory prices, which continue;
crops all look well. Fruit trees are doing unusually well, and prospects
are fine for a fine yield next fall.








DESOTO COUNTY-Weather conditions are rather too cool, but the
ground generally is in fairly good working order; there is considerable in-
crease in several field crops, also in the vegetable crops; conditions are
fairly good, considering the unfavorable weather. Fruit and fruit trees
are looking well; fine crops are apparently assured.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY-The Spring weather has been so cold and there is
so much rain, that there has been very little planting so far; the acreage
will be increased in all field crops; vegetables are doing well considering
the unfavorable weather. It is too early to make estimate on fruit crop,.
but the trees are looking well.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-The Spring has continued so backward that plant-
ing is slow; the heavy rains have also been a drawback; garden truck is
doing fairly well.
GADSDEN COUNTY-Planting is very backward on account of the wet
cold weather; recently it has been so wet that little or no planting or other
field work could be done. There will be a considerable increase in acreage
of a majority of the crops.
HERNANDO COUNTY-There is a very general increase in the acreage of'
crops this year, and in several instances the increase is very large; crops
are in very good condition, and truck is doing well. Orange trees are com-
ing out finely and looking well;,other fruit trees also doing well.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-Planting is backward, and few of the field
crops are finished planting. Vegetable crops are increased in acreage and
turning out well. Fruit trees doing well and a fine prospect for heavy
crops of fruit.
HOLMES COUNTY-This is the latest, also the wettest, spring on record,.
and has delayed planting very much; all crops will be largely increased in
acreage this year. Garden crops are doing well and so are fruit trees.
JACKSON COUNTY-The rains during March have been the heaviest that
we have had in this section since 1882, and has caused the farmers to get
badly behind with all farming operations; acreage of field crops will be
largely increased in nearly all instances.
JEFFERSON COUNTY-Farmers are away behind in all farm operations,
owing to the cold and wet spring. Planting is just getting under good
headway. There will be an increase in acreage, of some of the principal
field crops.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY-The lateness of spring and the cold, excessive
rains have made farm work later this year than usual. There will be an
increase in one or two crops; others will be about same as last year.
LAKE COUNTY-Crops are doing well, the area planted is about the
same as last year. There is a considerable increase in acreage in vegetable
products for market, and so far prices have averaged satisfactory.








LEE COUNTY-We have had fine seasons for fruits, vines and vegetables;
citrus fruit trees in extra fine condition, also corn, sugar cane and many
other crops; we have had plenty of rain and but very little frost in this
county; all is prosperity; as much as one thousand dollars net from an
acre of vegetables is often reported. All crops are growing their best.
LEON COUNTY-Planting is very much behind in this county, owing to
late, cold spring. The acreage planted to field crops will be mostly in-
creased; planting is just getting under good headway, and with favorable
weather will progress rapidly. Vegetable crops are on the average doing
well, though in some localities they were much injured by heavy rain.
LEVY COUNTY-The weather has generally been very unfavorable for
all crops; too wet for vegetables;. frost killed a large per cent. of the cu-
cumber crop on the 18th of March. There will be in most cases quite an
increase in the acreage of field crops.
MADISON COUNTY-The acreage of crops will be about same as last
year; the spring has been so backward, and cold, that farmers are very
much behind in planting. Vegetable crops are in fairly good condition,
but backward owing to cool weather.
MANATEE COUNTY-There is an increase in the acreage of nearly all
crops; vegetable crops have done well, ,nd on the average have brought
fair prices. Fruit trees are doing well.
MARION COUNTY-It has been a little cold for growing crops at times,
but as a whole we have had a splendid season up to the present time; a
number of the crops will be increased in acreage over last year, while none
are likely to fall below it; field and vegetable crops are in general good
condition, and vegetables have been selling at fair prices; fruit trees are
doing very well, growing rapidly.
NASSAU COUNTY-We have had plenty of rain and crops are doing
well, looking extra well; fruit also promises well. The acreage of crops
will average about the same as last year; vegetable crops also about the
same.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-Acreage of crops are about the same as last year,
except in one or two cases, such as cassava and velvet beans, which are
very largely increased; there is also considerable increase in some vegetable
crops; these crops have averaged well, and generally brought satisfactory
prices. Fruit trees are growing finely and the prospect good.
POLK COUNTY-The increase in acreage of crops this year is greater on
the whole than for many years; condition of field crops is good; the vege-
table crops have done well and are bringing in satisfactory returns. Fruit
trees are growing splendidly, and will have good crops. Everything seems
prosperous.









ST. JOHN'S COUNTY-Truck is very backward in consequence of cold
spring; the acreage planted to crops of various kinds is about as usual,
though an increase in some instances is to be seen. Peach, pear and plum
crops give promise of a full yield.
SANTA RosA CoUNTY-The crops were very late in being planted this
year on account of the cold and wet spring. The acreage will be about as
last year.
SUMTER COUNTY-With a few exceptions the acreage to field crops is
about the same as last year; in both oats and sugar cane there is a lack of
seed, much cane being killed by frost before cutting. Vegetable crops
have done very well, and fruit also looking fine. Peaches in heavy bloom.
SUWANNEE COUN-TY-In some sections of the county there will be an
increased acreage in some of the crops, but on the average, the acreage will
be about as last year. Conditions are becoming more favorable; fruit trees
are in good condition, prospect good for full crops.
TAYLOR COUNTY-The spring has been so backward that little planting
has been done; it has been too cold and too wet. The acreage will be about
as last year.
WAKULLA COUNTY-The cold and backward spring has prevented farm-
ers from planting as early as usual; the acreage in crops generally will be
about the same as last year.
WALTON COUNTY-Farmers are very backward in planting on account
of rain and cold weather; acreage of sugar cane will be short from the
fact that a good many people lost their seed cane by freeze. In most cases
the acreage will be about same as last year. Fruit crop promises good.
WASHINGTON COUNTY-All farming operations are very much behind,
on account of late spring and unusually heavy rains. There will be quite
an increase in acreage of a number of crops, particularly oats, cassava, and
velvet beans.













.Average and Condition of Crops for March, 1902, as Corn,
pared with March, 1901.



-^ a | |

Counties
0 )d .) C.) C M cc 0
a. a a g r a a a a

Alachnua................ 1|0 90 75 40, 100 O 90 7.
Bradford.......... ... ... 95 1 85 10 85 1l. .. ...100 100
B revard ................ .... 125 ..... 100 .. 125 100 100
Calhoun................ 100 100 125 100 100 110 100 .
Citrus................. .... .... 105 95 25 100 115 100 ...
Clay.................. ...... 100 100 1(0 SO. 100 100 100 100 100
Columbia ........... .... 100 100 105 75 100 100 1001 100
Dade...... ............ 100......... . 100 1 100
DeSoto........ .. 110 80 90 50 100 100 100 110 95
Escambia.............. .. 120 100 200 10 100
Franklin . . 80 80 90 ...... ..... . . . 100 75 ..
Franklin.100 75
Gadsden ..... 100 100 100 100 25 125.
Hernando. .110 150 125 ... 100 100 10 125
Hillsboroug..... ........ ......100 .... 100..... . 100 ..... .....
Holmas ............... 95 5 110 125 15 95 100 95 105 100 200
Jackson...... .. 100 100 10 100 110 10 105 100 115 100 125
Jefferson ............... 90 100 110 110 100 0 ......
LaFayette........ .... 105 110 85 70 .. i5 100
Lake ............. .. ... ... 100 100 .... .... .... 100 75
,Lee ............. ..... . .10 10 0 100 111 1100 100 .
Le ................... 110 115 I 10 100 .... 100 10 100 110 100 125
Levy.................. 100 100 110 1(o 75 ....... 10 0 100 90 100
Madison ............... 100 10 0 90 80 75 50 100 .
Manatee .......... ... .. 120 12 100 100 120 120 100
Marion ........... 100 100 110 11 100 100 70 100 1 10 1 110
N assau........... .. .... ... 10 . 90 .... .. 110 100 ....
Orange................ .. 10 90 90 .. .... ... 100 105 .. 160
Osceola.. .... . 105 1001 . . 110 110 ...... 150
Polk ...... .... .. 100 50 1 0 100 200 200 100 100 200
St. Johns......... .. 110 87 80 .. . 110 ... 80
Santa Rosa............ 100..... 100 100 105 .. .... 80.... 100 100 ....
Sumter ............. 100 11 100 9 ..100 .. 100
Suwannee ...... ....10 100 80 100 80 80 50 100.........
Taylor................ 75 80 60 5 60 60 70 50 100 ... ....
W akulla. ... .. ...... 100 100 125 100 .... .... 100 .. 100 ....
W alton ........... 95 .... 120 90 ... 100 100
Washington ...........100 80 10 100 .0 1 ...... 100 100 90 100 125
General averages...... 101 95 106 00 95 108: 86 97 96 102 95 116









9

Acreage and Condition of Crops-Continued.


Counties


Alachua . .. ...
Bradford ..........
Brevard ..........
Calhoun ... ..
C itrus............. ...
Clay ....... .. .. .
Columbia ..........
Dade .............
DeSoto ....... .... .
Escambia .............
Franklin.. ........
Gadsden .. .......
Hernando ............
Hillsborough ..... ..
Holmes ........... .
Jackson .........
Jefferson.............
Lafayette. .............
Lake. . ....... .....
Lee. .... ...... ......
Leon .. ... .........
L'vy ............
Madison.... ... .....
Manatee .... ......
Marion. ...........
Nassau ........
Orange.......... ....
Osceola ............
Polk....
St. Johns ...........
Santa Rosa... .....
Sum ter.............
Suwannee ............
Taylor.......... ..
W akulla..............
W alton .............
Washington ..........

General aaverages.....


Velvet Irish Toma- Cunum- English
Beans Cabbage Potatoes toes bers Peas






I17 90 80 60 0, 10 80 5 90!.. ..
0 85 90 65 60= 90 6 90!

... 100 100 125 80 100 100 100 100 25 195
S 100 ... -
1-u l ^ n- aC c

1130 100 75 100 10' 1O1u S 0 910)..
* hlu sr 90 6i5 60i 95; 90 6) 90:.
125 10l( 100 1200 1 1001 100 100 100 125 102
110 100 75.) 100, 100 100 810 10( 101*......
125 10( 10') 1001 11)0 100 100 100 100 100 100
15,' 100 100 100 1001 100 10 100 100 100 100
100 100i 105 100 100 100 101 100 100 100
150 )00 100 105 110 100. 90 90 95 100 100
150- 90 150 851 100 9i 1O 95 100 100


300 1 100 100 90 ..... ....
150 10 10i 100 100 100 90 ...
90 10o 100 10(; 110 90 90 100 90 10 105
20) *..,. .... ..
120 . .. ... .... .. .

11,o) 10 75 150 100 7 50 100 100
100 1001 100 10 120! 100 15 100 10 100 110
125 7.- 80 100 95 11 100 100 801 100; 100
100 90 80 100 80 75 6 100 90 100 100
100 85.... 100, 100
120 100 100 110 100 110 100 00 10 .....
175 100 1110 0 110 100 110i 100 110 100 100
S100 100o .. .. 100 100 ...
215 150 901 100i 100 100 90 90 75 100 100
200 200 100! 1(0 100 120 90 100 80 100 100
S 150 100 100 101 100 200 100 0 100 1001 100
95 50 70 105 100 .. .... ...
.100' 10' . . . ... . .. 100 100
S 120 110; 701 100 75 100 100 100 100 ... ....

. I . -. . . . ... .
125 .... 100 1GO ....... .... .. ..
200 .. ... ..

189 11041 92 10 95 103 94 95 90 102 102









LO

Acreage and Condition of Crops--Continued.


Eg
Beans Pla

Counties

o c

0 0 Q
Alachua .. ....... 50 70 60
Bradford .. ....... 75 85....
Brevard......... .. ... 100 100
Calhoun..... ........ 100 100 ....
Citrus.................. 100 100 ...
Clay ........ ... 100 100 .....
Colum bia...... ...... ... .. ....
Dade... ........... 100 100 100
DeSoto.................. 110 100 90
Escambia .... 100 50 100
Franklin.......... .. ............
Gadsden. ....... ... ...... ..
Hernando., .... ........ .... .... ...
Hillsborough... .. 9 100 .
Holmes........ .. . 100 100 95
Jackson........... .. .. .... ...
Jefferson ................ ........
Lafayette...... .......... ... ... .
Lake.... ... .. ........75 75 75 ....
Lee.................. 100 116 100'
Leon .................... 100 85 ....
Levy............... 100 90 ......
Madison ............. 100 100 .
M anatee.............. ... 100
Marion... ........... 100 100 100
Nassau........ ...... .. ... ....
Orange ................ 85 95 100
Osceola ........... .. 90 90 70
Polk................. .... 100 100
St. Johns.............. 100 .....
Santa Rosa ............... .
Sumter....... .... 100 9U ....
Suwannee ............ .... .... ....
Taylor.... ... ....... .......
Wakulla....... ........ .... ...
W alton............ ....... ...
Washington............. ........

General averages....... 94 94 92


g
nt


Peanuts


o 00
ba

0 0 0
70 60 50
.... 100 80

S100 100
... 105 100
.... 100 100
.... 100 ... .
100 .. .
95 100 100
75 100 90
.... 90 95
100 90
... 200 85

90 100 120
.... 100 80



ii110 100 120
...... 100 90
...... 100 100




100 105 100
80 .. ....
60 100 100

100 100
....o too..


.... 100
.... 100



90 103


95


Water- Canta-
melons loupes


Straw-
berries


0 a

0 0 0 o 0
B B .- c
So o

75 90 90 80 100
100 95 100 95 125
100 100 .... .
100 100 ... ... ...
10L 90 ....... 100
100 100 100 100 100

.. .. .. . 100
110 100 0 100 180
150 100 150 100 100
90 100 90 100 90
100 100 ........ ..
...... 160 100 .....
60 100 ... ... 125
100 125 100 100 95
100 100..... ... ...
120 100 120 100 ....

15C 100 50
100 90 100 120 100
100 100 100 100 100
100 90 100 90 ..
100 80 50 80 100
100 100 100 100 120
150 110 150 110 110
100 110 . .....
100 80 100 90 125
130 85 100 80 200
200 100 200 100 200
100 85 100 80 100
110 100 100 100 110
100 100 100 100..

too 80 .......
100 100 ...... 100

110 100 ......

108 91 107 96 109










11

Acreage and Condition of Crops-Continued.


Counties


Alachua................ u......
B radford . .....................
Brevard .. . ... .... ....
C alhoun ......... ..................
C itrus.......... ............. ...
C lay ... . . .... .............
Columbia ........................
D ade ..... ......................
DeSoto .............................
Escam bia ...... .. ............
F ranklin......... .............
G adsden....... .............. .....
Hernando .............. ..... ......
Hillsborough.. .................. .
Holmes...........................
Jackson............................
Jefferson............... .........
Lafayette.........................
L ake ...... ...... ...............
L ee............ ........ ..........
L eon ... ...........................
Levy................................
Madison...........................
Manatee............................
Marion ............................
Nasiau ......... ......... ...........
Orange. ............................ .
Osceola................... .......
P olk .... ... ......................
St. Johns ....... ...............
Santa Rosa ........................
Sum ter ................ ............
Suwannee ..........................
Taylor................. ..........
Wakulla............................
Walton.............................
Washington............................

General averages............. ...


a a ra a a a






S0 .. ...... .
1015 ... ... 105 ...... .....

1025 100 100 105 80 100
10 1. ......

90.. .... . . . .. . o


S100 901 90 110 100 100

50... .. .... .... ...

0.... .... .... .... ....
50 ... .. 50 .... ...
,100 100 . . 100 . . ......

100 ... ... .. ....
110. ........... .....
75 ...' ... ".... .... .....
150 1 150 150 .... 110





620061 1 O100 1 20"0'i66
110 ..... .. ... ... ...
100 ... ... 0 ...... ......0
11 100 .... 125 ... 100o
120 120 .... 125.. 50
200 100 100 100 100 200
100 .... .... .... .... ... .
.. ... ... .... .... .....



. 1 .. .... .... ....



1-05 1-07 1-071 1061-86 1-09


.... 85 90
80 50 ...
... 100 ....
.. 110 100
.... 125 125
S 125 125
190 .... ...
90 110 110
... 00 75


.... 100 ....
100 ....
.. 125 ....



... 100 50
150 150 110
100 50
.... 110 100

.. 100....
.... 110 110
.... 125 125
. 125 ....
50 150 200
100 200 100
.... 100 100
100 100
.... 150 100
...... 150 100
.. 100 75
... 100 100
... 100 95
...... 125 80

95 114 101








-BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1901-19 2.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) ..... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20)...... .... 5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
.Available Phosphoric Acid ................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) ....$3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... ................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
tagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We fin1
'this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x1.00 ...............$ 6.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20. .............. .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.10 ............... 7.82
Mixing and bagging .......... .......... ......... 2.00

j$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price- at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers are bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that point must be added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.













BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. MABION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist-
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer g By Whom Sent


I I
Bright C. S. Meal..... 7.22 ...... 3.31 8.44 1.83 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.
Dark C. S. Meal....... 9.55 ... .... 2.03 4.76 1.65 Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.
Fertilizer.............. 6.78.. ..... 2.43 6.12 7.80 H. K. Farrell, Pnnta Gorda.
ertilizer.............. 7.00 6.79 2.00 7.79 11.50 0.48 E O. Pointer Fertilizer Co.. Jaaksonvllli
Ground Bone.......... 6.00 11.41 9.57 20.98 4.66 ..... Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
Dissolved Bone Black. 10.60 18.62 0.19 18.81 ......... The Atwood Co., Manavista. Fla.
ExtraFruit&Vine Fert 6.50 6.88 2.69 9.57 2.31 14.18 S(uthern Fertihzer Co., Orlando, Fla.
Kainit........... ... 1.881 .. .. .... .... 12.50 Frank Adams, Jasper,'Fla.
Double Manure Salt.. 3.50 ........... ....... 30.92 Frank Adamn. Jasper, Fla.
Bone Compound ..... 16.56 9.42 4.06 13.48 1.83 ..... Goulding Fertilizer Co.. Pensacola, Fla.
Nitrate of Soda.... 1.18. ........... 1.43 ... D. R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
H. G. Sulphate Potash 1.80 ..... ........ 51.73 D R. Knight, Lemon City, Fla.
Dissolved Bone Meal.. 3.26 17.S0 1.'9 19.39 2.77..... D. R. Knight. Lemon City, Fla.
Fine Grou'd 'ri'd Fish 11.08 6.87 4.59 11.46 9.41 .....D R. Knight, Lemon City. Fla.
Dissolved Bone ....... 10.14 1.75 1.07 22.82 ......... E, Painter Fertilizer Co.. JackEonvill a,
Fertilizer..... ... 11.68 8.(6 1.28 9 34 2.23 8.38 James Henry. S Petersburg. Fla.
H. G. Tobacco Dust... 5.40 ..... ... 3.28 10.33 Florida Fert. Mnf. Co., Gainesville, Fla.,
Acid Phosphate....... 11.26 13.72 7.41 21.131....... ... Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tamp Fla
Mixed Fertilizer...... 9.96 6.80 0.87 7.7 1.54 12.75 Tampa Fertilizer Co, Tampa, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer ..... 9 24 6.20 2.19 8.3 3.84 7.49 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Blood, Bone & Potash. ..... 5.47 2.15 7.62 10.97 0.78 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
Acid Phosphate Pot-
ash and Ammonia.. ..... 12.09 1.51 13.60 1.73 4.31 Sterling and Russell, Delray. Fla,
Asbes. .............. ... ..... .. 4.24 Sterling and Russell, Delray, Fla.
Blood, Bone & Potash. .. 745 7.69 15.14 6.48 0.84 Sterling and R sell, Delray, Fla
Fertilizer ... .... 10.22 7.26 4.52 7.78 2.10 12.62 W. L. Foster, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Guano........... 9.18 8.15 2.1410.29 2.4 2.36 A. L. Willson Co. Quincy. ila.
Mixed Fertilizer No. 1 9.40 7.24 0.76 8.00 2.27,11 84 fampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer No. 2. 9.74 7.15 1.25 8.40 4 21' 5.9 sTampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
H. G Su.phate Potash ..... ............. 49.28 Mrs. Hellen Wright, Orlando, Fla
H. G. Sulphate Potash ..... ..... ..... .. ..40 60 Mrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
H. G. Sulphate Potash ..... .......... 50.4 Mrs. Hellen S. Wright, Orlando, Fla.
Fertilizer........... ...... 6.80 0.42 7.22 2.45 4.72 E. D, Luter, Wildwood. Fla.
Fertilizer........ .. .. 6.98 6.51i 0.79 7.25 3.43 12.50 J H. Loyd, Winter Hven, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer No 1. 12.2 10.07 1.70 11.77 3.21 3 67 S. R. Shomaker, Cotton Dale, Fla.
Mixed F rtilizer No2. 11.30 10.92 0.64 11.56 2.25 1.89 S. Shomaker, Cotton D-le. Fla.
Palmetto Ashes....... .......... ........... 057 Arthur Cornwell, Palmetto, Fla.
Ground Garbage....... 42 3.5616.95 20.51 ... 1.35 Souhern Fert. Mnf. Co, Gainesville,Flr ,
Fertilizer .. .. 10.78 3.37 1.31 4.6- .:... 1.81Schroeder & rguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer..... ...7.68 7.02 1.58 8.60 4.61 5.01 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh. Fla.
Fertilizer................ 8.84 4.6313.47 3.38 0.6 E. C. Lanier & Co., Miami, Fla.
Fertilizer.......... 10.30 2.16 1.73 3.9 . 3.26 Schroeder & Arguinbaw. Quincy, Fla.
Fertilizer ... .... 12.65 7.801 2.99 10.59 4.20 4,21 M. Jacoby, Marianna, Fla.
For values see heading ''Bureau of Fertilizers. "
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or t'e names of man-
ufacturers cf the "Special -amples" sentin by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A "Special Sample" sent in by a dealer oL
manufacturer. hence is not an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The 'Of-
ficial Samples'' taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on preceding page states the name
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing ib.-
gredients found by the State Chemist.
Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosohoric acid, but it is bought for the-potash
and ammonia content. Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid, and some pooashl but i
bought for the ammonia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, it has been determined. a
total phosphoric acid.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS. MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.
Sa nples taken by State Chemist under Section 1, Act approved May 22, 1901.


Phos. Acid GoA


NAME or BRAND. 0 0

0 5 I .


Cotton Seed Meal.......... ........
Cotton Seed Meal .............
Cotton Seed Meal .............
Cotton Seed Meal.....
Cotton Seed Meal..........
Cotton Seed Meal ..............
Cotton Seed Meal..... ......
Mape' Fruit and Vine Manure.
Ideal Potato Manure...........
Amour'S Vegetable Fertilizer..
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer.
Ideal Fertilizer..................
Map-'s Fruit and Vine Manure
M ape's Vegetable Man u re......
Mape's Oranee Tree Fertilizer..
Ideal Fertilizer .................
Bradley's Fruit &Vine Fertilizer
Fruitand Vine Fertilizer........
Bradle.v's Nursery Stock........
H. G. Vegetable Fish Gusano...
Ideal Vegetable M nure. ......
Mace's Vegetable Manu e......
Mape' s Fruit and Vine Manure.
Blood. Bone and Potash .......
Nitrate of SoJla................
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure..
Special Orange Tree Manure....
H. G. Tobacco Dust............
Osceola Brand Tobacco Dust...
Special Mixture (Tobacco).....
H. G. Sulphate of Potash.......
Kainit...... .. ....................
Ideal Fertilizer..................
,. G. Tobacco Dust...........


8. 42 .....
11.14 ..........
9.06 .... . .
7.60.... ...
8.18 ..... ..
S10.1 .. ....
S.8 .... .. ......
9.20 7.42 1.9?
11 8 7.84 0.91
9.31 8.24 2.36
10.7 6.86 2.06
10.4 7.09 1.07
13. '0 7.12 2.03
10.68 6.93 2.57
13.20 7,71 2.992
10.1 7.32 0.94
12.9. 8.57 1.05
15.60 1.81 2.21
10.51 7.97 2 64
8.60 6.44 1.41
13 95] 7.60 0 90
11.15 6.78 2.91
10.95 6.67 2.23
11.75 7.70 0.88
1.80 .
9.00 6.24 0.61
12.35 7.15 2.01
8.86 .. . .....
7.90 ......
17.8 ..........
1.44 .. ......
5.81 ...... ......
6.32 7.00 4.58
7.20 ...... ....


2.90 8.01
2.41 8.91
2.91 8.36
2.39 8.34
S2.71 8 38
2.57 8.24
3.31 8.73
9.34 2.48
8.7 4.2.3
10.60 4.21
8.92 4.13
11 4.26
9.15 2.52
9.50 4.86
10.63 4.14
8.26 4.22
10.22 2.55
9.02 2.11
10.61 4.63
7.86 4.22
8.51 3.86
9.69 5.16
8.90 2.32

18.32
6.85 3.55
9.16 2.54
... 2.31
1,44
..... 1.48


...... 2.97


1 8i ........
1.79 ......
1.92 ..... ..
T.78 ........
1 97 ........
1.82 ......
2. 1 ...
1.45 8 to 10
8.30 ........
7.5' 5 to 10
5.13 .......
7.1 . .
11.32 8 to 1(1
4.79 lo to 12
3.79110 4o 12
6 69 ........
9.74 .. .
11.76 8 to 10
3.52 ........
6.17 10 to 12
0.14 ........
5.1b 10 to 11
10.84 8 to 10
5.59 5 5o 10

12.69 .......
9.79 10 to 12
2 42 8 to 10
1.61 ..
4.40 .....
50.28 ... ..
18.54 ........
12. 54.
6.32 8 to 10
10.06.....


5 to 7
(i to 8
6 to 8
i to 8
5 to 7
5 to 7
6 to S
6 to 8
5 to 7
51to74
6 to 8
8 to 10
3to 7
6 to 8
6 to 8
5 to 7
8 to 10

6 to 8
5 to 6




a;' 0.6


RANTEED ANALYSIS.


S0 9 0o By Whom and Where Manufactured.




........ to 3 8 to95 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
..... 3.2 8.24 1.96 Jefferson Mfg. Co.. Jefferson, Ga.
..... 3 22 8.24 1.9) Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Selma, Ala.
........ 3.22 8.24 1.96 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Mobile, Ala.
...... 3.22 8.24 1.98 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Mobile, Ala.
........ .5to2.8 7.5 8.95 1.5--1.85 Southern Cotton Oil Co.. Selma, Ala.
2 to20 8 to,) 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
2 to 4........ 2 to 3 10 to 12 Mapes' Formula & Peru Guano Co., N.Y.
1 to ..... 4 to 5 8 t, 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co Jacksonville
1 to 2 ........ 2to33' 11 to 13 .rmour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
....... 4 to 5 5 to 7 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y.
......... 4 5........ t 6 to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co,, Jacksonville
2 to 4.. 2 to 10 to 12 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
2 to 4........ 5 to 6 Mapes' Formula & Peru. GuanoCo,N.Y.
2 to 4 ........ 4 to 5 3 to 4 Mapes' Formula & Peru. Guano Co N.Y.
........ ........ 4to% 6 to 8 Wilron & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
........ 8X%-J 2to3W 10 to la Uradley's Form. & Peru. Guano Co., N.Y.
1 o 3 ... 2 to 4 12 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
........ i to 13 4to5% 3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
Sto 4 ...... 4 to 4 to Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
1 to 2 .. 4 to 5 8 to 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
2 to 4 5to 6 4 o 6 Mapes' Formula & Peru. GuanoCo., N. Y.
2 to 4..... 2 to 3 1 to 1 Mapes' Formula& Peru. Guano Co., N. Y.
2 to 4. 5to 6 7 tO 8 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville
.. .. 17 to 19 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
l to 3... 3 to 410 to 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville
Sto 3 ........ 2 to 310 to 11 Bauh Sons. Baltimore, Md.
........ ..... to3 to M Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
..... ..... to 3 1 o 5 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
... .... ....... I ampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
.. .. 48 to 51 Armour's Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
..... .. 12 to 14 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co.. Jacksonville'
... .. 4to5 6 to Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
... 3. 10 Florida Ferillizer Co., Gainesville, Fla,








Acid Phosphate................
Dark C. S. Meal.............
Dark C. S. Meal.................
Dixie Brand C. S. Meal..........
Kainit......................
Fish and Potash ..............
Piueapple Fruiter..............
Potato Manure................
Lettuce and Cucumber, Sl ecial.
Pu ivian Fish Guano. No. 1....
Special for Fruit...... ..........
No. 2, Double Strength of Potash
Blood, Bone and Potash.....
No. 1, Fellillzer........ ......
No. 2, Fertilizer..... ......
No. 4, Fertilizer... ............
Dissolved Bone................
Cotton Seed Meal............
Atnour's Practical Trucker.....
Armour's Orange Tree Manure..
Armour's Fruit and Vine Fert...
Armour's Blood, Bone & Potash.
Armour's Fruit&Root Crop,Spec.
Armour's Bone Flour............
Armour's Dried Blood...........
H. G. Tobacco Dust. ..........
Armour's Blood and Bone.......
H. G Blood and Bone...........
Blood and Bone......... ....
H. G. Blood and Bone......
Acid Phosphate .............
Strawberry Fruiter.............
Extra Fruit and Vine............
Cotton Seed Meal.......... ....
Cotton Seed Meal ................
Cotton seed weal...............
Cotton Seed Meal........ .......
H. G. Acid Phosphate ...........
A. L.Wilson' 6.60 Acid Phoiphati
Branley'sXXX Phosphate. ..
Dissolved Bone Phosphate......
Atlas Acid Phosphate...........
Acid Phosphate.................
Bradley's Valmrtto Phosphate
Cumberland Bone Super Phoa...
Gou'ding's Bone Compound.....
Gem Guano.. ..............
Lott's Compound ..............
unmher.and Festilizer..........
Mobile Stand ard Guano........ .
Raw Bone Super Phos:.nate... .
Goulding's H,G. Acid Phos.& Pot


12.02 15.72 4.07 19.79 ... .............. 15 ........ ... ....... ...... .Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
10.12 ..... ... 2.04 5.44 1.46 8 to 12 ............... to 5 to 7: to 1% Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison.
9.0 .......... .28 5.03 1.31 8 to 12 ....... 2 to 3 5 to 7 to 1I Florida Manufacturing Co., Madison
8.10 ......... .. .t 9.11 1.55 ........ ........... ........ S ......... Humphries,Goodwin &Co .Memphis,Tenn
9.)4 3.6 ............. .. . .. ........ . .. ..... 12 to 13 Litle Brothers, Jacksonville
4.20 3.48 2 .04 5.5 6.89 7 10 to 1 2 to 3 3 to 4 . 7 to 8 5 to 1 Florida Fort Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
4.2 724 5.7 13.00 3.42 11 10 to 12 4 to 5 6 to 7 ........ 3 to 4 12 to 13 Florida Fort. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
5.95 5.83 1. 7.80 3.5 8.9 10 to 1 5 t, i 2 8o 3 ....... 3 to 4 9 to 10 Florida Pert Mf. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
5.50 5.00 1.3;3 6.33 .60 5.7 10 to 12 5 o i to 2 ....... 7 to 8 4 to Florida Fort. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla
5.10 5. 2. 10 7.25 4.81 5.4 10 to 12 to e I to ....... 4to5 5 to (i Florida Fort. Mg, Co. Gainesville, Fla.
6.99 2.l 3 2.31 8.84 3.9i 12.60 .. .. to 8 1 to 2 ........ 4 to 5 12 to 14 Southern Fertilizer Co, Orlando. Fla.
6.25 6.10 1.87 7.7 2.3 0.8 to 1 5 to s 2to 3 ........ I3to 2 10 to 1 Florida Pert. Mig. Co.. Gait esville, Fla.
6.75 5.66 3.43 9.09 4.54 4.t 510 to 1 4 to 5 2 to ...... 4 to 4 to 5F'orida Fort. Mfg. Co. Gainesville, Fla.
8.00 7.13 5.11 12.24 4.54 3 ...... 5 to 2 to ... 5 to 4. to outhrn Fertilizcr Co., Orlando, Fla.
7.15 6.62 3.57 10.19 5 07 9.8 i to 7 2 to 3 ...... 5 to to 1Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando Fla.
8.05 6 89 3.72 10.61 3.01 10.30 .... 6 t 7 2 to 3 ... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Snuthern Fertilizer Co., Or:ando, Fla.
13.05 11.21 3.64 14.85 .2 1 I|' r, ?i 14 to 15 3 to 4 ....... 15 3 ......... Florida Fert. Mfg. Co., Guinesville, Fla.
7.65 ........... 2.7 8.46 1. t. .* ...... 2 to 3 ...... 8So a i 1 to 1'. A. Smith, A lanta, Ga.
7.80 7.13 5 33 12.11 3 4 9 ; r.. .. (i to 7 2 to 3 .... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
7.90 8.01 7.43 15.44 3.80 4.09 5 to 10 8 to 10 2 to 4 ....... 3i. o1 4 to 5 Armonr Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
6.85 8.12 5.90 14.12 2.87 11.02 5 to 10 i to 8I to 2 ........ 2t3 10 to 13 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacklonville.
8.70 7.13 4.58 11.71 5.32 7.53 5 to 0 8 to 1 1 to to 8 Armour Ferti izer Works, ,Jcksonville.
8.40 7.21 3.99 11.20 2.45 5.22 5 to 10 to 1 to ....... 2 to 35 to Armour Fertilizer Worl s, Jacksonville.
2.70 8.42 15.01 24.0 4.58 ..... 5 to 10 10 to 14 .... .... 24 to 28. 3 to 4 ... .... Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
12.35 ..... ... ........ 3 .. 10 t 13 ........ ... ....... 16 to 17 ..... 1 Armour Fertilizer Woike, Jacksonville.
.i 8U ..... .. ... 1.76 1.60 8 to 1 ........ ........ ........ o3 l to 3 Armour fertilizerr Works. Ji cksonville.
7 3.73 8.01 11.77 7.2i .... 6 o 10 ............... to 7 to ... .. Armour Fertilizer Works. Jacksonville.
9.65 5.46 5.91 11 3 9.14 .. 5 to .......... ... 1 to 15 ....... to lC 'o 0udahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
8.05 6.35 9.14 15.3i 7.27 ..... 5 to 7 ....... ....... 15 to 06 to 81 ......... Cudahy Packing Co., Jacksonville.
8.45 3.53 3.01 6.60 ...... ... .. ....... ....... ......... 4.5 lo .......... A mour Packig Co., Chicago, Ill.
7.85 16.9.' 7.10 24.02 ............ .. .. .. 14.00 ... ... .. . .......... I Little Brothers, Jacksonville
7.3 5.98 2.41 8.39 2.41 8.91 IIt to 1 5 to 2 to 3 ........ 2 to 310 to 1 Floiida Fert. Mfg. Co., Gainesville, Fla.
6.t1 6.37 2.11 8.50 2.31 13.73 8 to 12 li to 8 .... ... 2 to 314 to 16 Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.
5.80 ........... 3.88 9.43 ...... ........ 2. 7. 50 8. 1.85 Dothan Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala
7.80 ...... ... ... 2.1 8.99 1 28 1 5-. 75 ....... .... i', to 31 to | 1 to 2 Trader's Cotton OilCo., Union Springs,Ala
5.9 ..... ........ 2.2 8.1 1.0 ..... .... ............ 2- ' 7.t5 l9. 1 't( 2.85 Southe.n Cotton Oil Co, Montgomery, Ala
8.35 ...... ...... 2. 7.93 1.38 8.0 ..... 7 50 2 la'ama Cotton Oil Co., Montgomery, Ala.
13.60 17.57 1.30 18.87 .......... 12 to 15 15 to 17 1 to ................ ........oulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla.
12.30 14.77 3.71 17.53 ............ 12 to 5 14 to 1h 1 to 2 ... .................. Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
8.05 14 38 1.76 16.14 ..... ... .. 10 to 20 13 to 15 2 to 3 ........ ........ .. ........ Bradley Fertilizer Co., Boston, Mass.
14.65 13.67 1.51 15.18 ..... ...... 11 13 1.50 ....... .... ... .........Georgia Chemical Works, Augusta. Ga.
12.95 15 4 2.29 17.78 ........... 12 to 15 13 to 15 2 to 3 ....... ........ ....... oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
13.75 12.34 0.28 12.ti .... ..... 12 to 16 12 to 14 2 to 4 ...... ..... .. ......... Virginia, Carolina Chem.Co ,Richmond,Va
7.95 14.89 1.58 1.13 ...... ... 10 to 12 12 to 24 3 to ..... ..... ............ Bradley Fertilizer Co. Boston, Mass.
16.15 10.7 1.612 33 2.07 1.71 10 to 20 8 to I I t 2 ........ 2 to 3 1 to 2 Cumberland Bone Phos. Co., Pottland.Md.
13.96 9.73 3.98 13.71 2.09 1.51 10 to 12 8 -10 1 to 2........ 2 to 2'L. l'. to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co. Pensacola, Fla,
13.91 10.25 3.18 13.43 1.7 1.8410 to 12 8 to 10 1 to 2 ........ ... to Go Iding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
3-45 4.35 8.48 13.83 1.83 12.75 ....... 5 to 6 ... ....... to 31 M. Lolt Havana, Fla.
11.81 9.3 2.12 11 1 91 2 09 1 8 2.... 2 Mulual Fetilizer Co., Savannah, Ga.
7.4 9.68 4.74 14 43 2.62 2.6 11 to 16 8 to 1l 1%o to ..... 2 to to 3 Mobile Phosphace Co., Mobile, Ala.
13.5: 10.59 3.30 13.89 2.15 1.73 10 to 15 9tolO to 3 ... .. to 3 1 to 3Standard Guano &Chem. Co.,New Orleans
10.3 14.7 1.42 16 13 .. 1.3 10 to 15 12 to i 1 to ................ 1 to 2 Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla,










Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


Pounds per Hundred


Ammonia Phosphori Potash


Nitrate of Soda........ ............. 17 to 1 .......................
Sulphate of Ammonia.................. .. 22 to 24............ ..........
Dried Blood .......... .................. 12 to 17........................
Concentrated Tankage....................... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ..........
Bone Tankage.............................. 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap .......................... to 11 6 to 8...... ....
Cotton Seed Meal.......................... 7 to 10 2 to 3 li to 2
Hoof Meal .. ........ ....... ....... 14 to 17 1 to 2 ...........
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred

Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phosphoric Phosphoric
Acid Acid

Florida Rock Phosphate ................ .. ..... ......... 33 to 35
Florida Pebble Phosphate ................................... 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphat .............................. 14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone........ .................. 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone. ............ .... .. .. 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .... ........ ... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds per Hundred

Actual Ammonia Phosphoric Lime
Potash Acid

Muriate of Potash................ ... 50...
Sulphate of Potash. ............ 48 to 52 ...........................
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia 26 to 30 .................. .......
K ainit .... .. ....................... 12 to 121 ............ .................
Sylvinit..................... ... 16 to 20 ............ .. ... .......
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes .......... 15 to 30 ........ 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleache .............. to 8 .......... 1 to 2 30 to 35
Wood Ashes, leached ............... 1 to 2 .......... 1 to l 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ............ ....... 5 to 8 2 to 4............ 3
Cow Manure (fresh) ............ 0.40 0 to .41 0.16 031
Horse Manure (fresh) ............. 0.53 0 to .60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh) ............ 0.67 1.00 0.23 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh) ............ .... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) .. .............. 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure ......... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70







UNITED: STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Climatological Data for February, 1902.


Stations


Counties


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............ Alachua...... 92
Bainbridge...........Decatur, Ga ..... 119
Federal Point....... St. Je(is ...... 10
Fernandina..........Nass u...... .. 15
Fort Georget....... Duval...........
Gainesville ......... Alachua........ 175
Huntington ........ Putnam........ 50
Jacksonville ....... Duval............ 43
Jasper.. .......... Hamilton ...... 165
Lake Butler...f.... Bradford ...... ..
Lake City............ Columbia ...... 201
Macclenny. ........ Baker ........ | 140
Micanopy ......... Alachua....... 105
Middleburg......... Clay........... ...
Pinemont I... n. Suwannee...... ..


17 53.3
9 49.6
5 52.3
... 49.9
14 51.7
15 52 6
S3 53 2
29 50 6
2 50.1
4 52 3
13 51.4
4 51.1
7 53 4
1 49.6
...... 51.4


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit

8
2- A
S 0

SCO
00
g 0, t
asl Q 5_ Q_ I


-5.3 8127
75 1
-4.3 80 1*
.... 77 2
-5 1 80 1
-4 0 5 1
--3.9 aS 1
-7 0 77 1
-2.4 76 1*
-3 79 1*
-4.7 78 1*
-4.0 80 1
-5.5 81 1*
-3.2 75 27*
..... 7637


27 10* 44
30 12 31
2819 38
29 11 33
3011 ..
28 10* 39
29 19 a39
30 18 27
a27 10 a36
22 19 36
28 10 39
2211 46
28 10* 42
22 10 44
25 17* 41


Precipitation, in inches


0
I







3.06 -0.71 1. 9
7.570 7
3.72 +0.091 12 8
4.03 ...... 1 05 1
... ...... 1 5 4
3.43 -0 141.44 7
4.60 +0 72 1 44 7
3.64 0 34 1 61 9
6.52 +2 1)92 22 6
3.23 0 88
4.24 -0 40 1.25 8
3.93 -1 330 88 9
4 55 +1 35 2 00 4
3 73 -1 762 13 6
4 42 ...... 1 40 ....


Sky


=s"




z z






8 12 8


10 9 9


5 8 15
18 10 0
20 1 7
11 8 9


0




.5










se
nw
w





w

nw







Climatological Data for February-(Continuod.)


Stations


Savannah, Ga.......
St. Augustine......
Sumner ............
Switzerland ........
Thomasyille, Ga....
Waycross, Ga......


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow ............
Brooksville.........
Clermont...........
DeLand. .........
Eustis ............ ..
Ft. Meade.......
Fort Pierce........
Inverness..........
Kissimmee ........
Malabar..........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smyrna.........
Ocala.............
Orange City........
Orlando............


Counties


Chatham, Ga.. 36 30
St. Johns....... 10 52.
Levy........... ...... 10
St. Johns......... 15
Thomas, Ga.... 330 23
Ware, Ga...... 131 19

Means...... .....


Polk ....... ..
Hernando......
Lake............
Volusia ........
Lake......... ...
Polk...........
Brevard.... ...
Citrus .........
Osceola ......

Brevard.......
Volusia..........
Marion ... ....
Volusia .......
Orange........I


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


0d



Ia
520
g p
cy _


42o
bL42


5 59 -1 9 86 1 32
7 52 8+0 5 79 2* 31
7 58 4-2 4 841 34
1 53 7-2 1 811 30
9 56 6-4 1 831 33
16 57 4 -4 3 841 29
57 6-6 2 8227 31
1 52 4-0 8I 1* 27
8 57 1-3 5 831 33
58 6 ..... 83 1 30
18 57 2--7 0 80 1 35
14 54 5-4 9 84 1 28
11 53 8--5 6 84 1 26
9 56 1-4 1 84 1 25
8 56 9i--4 0 81 1 35


Precipitation, in inches



0

0 0"
SI a c Z
| -5 jis 3a
F Q C5


2.34
2 89
3 51
2 46
6 18
4 32

3 88


5 70
4 99
7 29

4 37
6 95
3 72
5 25
6 07
4 49
3 84
4 75
4 03
3 88
4 50


-0.94
-0 86



-0 50
-0 12


Sky





co, o

Z Zi *
z z a o-


0.75 9 10 10 8w
1 09 5 .. . ...... ...
1 40 6 11 7 10nw
0 69 9 ...... .. .... ...
S 91 10 .... .... .. . .....
S30 10 .. . ...

.... 1 7 91nw


+1 103 59
+0 94 2 40
+3 20 2 78

-0 79 1 34
+4 58 4 00
- 0 25 1 29
-0 05 1 O0
+1 9t 2 65
..... 50
+1 153 10
+1 82 2 00
+0 78 1 49
-f 0 2 1 70
+1 511 85


6 ', 17
7 1i1 7
8 14

7 7 5
4 16 9
6 13 5
9 2 15

7 17 7
7 26 "/
7 15 7
9 9 12
6 -8 1
9 17 1


4 w
9 w
5 nw

16 nw
3 w-nw
10 nw
11 ne-sw

4sw
Snw

7w
91sw
10 w


I








Plant City.......... Hillsborough...
Rockwell........... Marion........
St. Leo ........... Pasco.......
Tampa.............. Hillsborough...
Tarpon Sprii gs.... Hillsborough .
Titusville .......... Brevard.......


SOUTHERN SECTION.

Avon Park.........
Flamirgo........
Havana...........
Hypoluxo..........
Jupiter............
Key West ........
Manatee............
Marco ............
M iam i......... ....
Myers ..............
Nassau...........
Nocatee ..........
San Juan.........


Means......




Monroe.... ...
Cuba ..... ..
Dade... .....
Dade......... ..
Monroe ........
Manatee ........
Lee..............
Dade..........
Lee...... .....
N. P. Bahamas.
DeSoto.... ...
Puerto Rico....


Means. ..
WESTERN SECTION.

Bonify ........... Holmes ........
Carrabelle.......... Franklin........
Daphne.... e ..... Baldwin, Ala...
DeFuniak Spr ngs.. Walton.......
Holt....... ...... Sana Rosa. ..
Marianna .... .... Jackson........
Mobile.............. Mobile, Ala ...
Montgomery ....... Montgom'y, Ala


116 ...
12 4

193 39
208 ....
85 1
35 30
219 28


-4.8 83
- 2 81
-1 2 83
-5 0 78
-6 4 81
-6 8 a82

-4 0 ...


oo. o .
63 8 .. .
68 9-3 0
63 6-1 4
62 0--2 0
66 2 -5 0
58 0 -3 5
62 4 -0 7
63 4-3 2
58 9 -5 6
18 6 .. .
58 8 -2 6


61 6--3 0


50 6 ....
51 8 --0 8
c48 4-4 4
48 6--3 1
46 4 .....
47 1--0 9
48 0 --6 0
44 31-7 0


4.78
d2 75
4 77
5 72
4 54
5 02

4 98



5.49
0 90
2 16
5 54
4 64
3 88
5 96
3 43
5 30
6 79
1 87
5 66


4 76


10 52
4 65
6 45
10 57
3 30
6 15
8 82
8 72


-+-0.95

+0 49
+2 94
+1 02
+-1 20

+1 43




-0.11
+0 84
+1 85
+2 24
+2 69
+1 19
- 2 49
+3 30
4:26i
4-2 01


+2 08


nw

11 w
11 w
0 sn-wn

.... ....
810w


e

nw
nw
nw
w
nw
s-w




Inw


...... 2.75 7 7 7 14 nw
--1 39 42 5 11 5 12 n
+1 14 55 7 .. .. ....nw
1 88335 9 6 13 ...
.... 2 10 4 .... ....
+1 29 42 7 14 4 10 nw
-+3 66 2 06 10 9 15 n
+3 234 51 10 7 7 14 nw


|I.-







Climatological Data for February, 1902-Continued.

STemperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit










Tallahssee...... Len .. .19 15 49 7--4 9 731 26 1 31 6 70 -{-0 97 2 32 6
Sat ions counties 0g ;4 2






( T h n rm o me t e rs a re.t y W o s el f -rh g i s t eringto n .r ea.i n., c e tr wo cu Cet t 1 7r

W a u sM oa r ..e..... . J Wa s i n to n h r . 5 . 4 9 4 -1 7 1 u7 2 2 6 II 3 4 4 7 9 . . . 1 00 7v 1 1 2 n o1r m5
PWewahitchka...... E alhoun ........6 21 4.2 8-4 7. 752 1 28110 25 5.74 1 04 218 9, 8 6 14 n
Quincy.......G....dsden ...... 60.... 48 7. 241 42 34 +051 81 6 5

Sthnsvil ....Taylor............. ......s .... ........ 45 2 00 3...... ... 8............
Tarlahl-ssee ........Leon.......... 19:315 49 7-4973 1 2611 81 670 +0 97282 8 13 9 6w
Waukeenah........Jfferson... 4 0 71 2 26 11* 34 4 70........1 90 5 12 6 10 nw
Wausau ...........Washington 250 494 -1 2 74 2810 876 47 -o 111 65 9 12 7 9.
Wewahitchka...... Calhoun.... .......... 46 8 4 2 75 1 21110 42 4 70 -1 222 00 7 11 2 15 n
Means...... S....9-28.589 +00l 71 11 6 11 ni
State Mean ......4 88 +1 09.... 71 13 7 8 nw
... . ..:. ....... ...... ......
.............. ....... .......... ........... .. .
iThermometers are not self-registering and readings are All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
S, in determining State or district means. but State and district
made at 7 a. .. m.. 2 m. and 9 p. daily, departures are determined hy comparison of current data of
*More than one day. tWeatlher Bureau. only stich stations as have normals.
TNot included in means. t QicAlpin di continue : instru- a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
ments transf, rr. d to Pinemont February, 1902. of days missing from report.











Salient Climatic Features.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
The mean pressure for the month was 29.8 inches, which is 0.11 below
normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.37 inches, at Pensacola on
the 3d: the lowest was 29.31 inches, at Pensacola on the 27th; monthly
range for the State was 1.06 inches.

TEMPERATURE. (Degrees Fahrenheit.)
The monthly mean temperature for the State was 54.4 deg., 4.6 deg. be-
low normal. By sections, the means were: Northern. 51.6 deg. : South-
ern, 61.6 deg.; Western, 48.9 deg. The highest monthly mean temperature
was 66.2 deg., at Key West; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 46.4
deg., at Holt. The highest temperature during the month wa, 8T dcg., at
Miami on the 2d; the lowest temperature was 21 deg., at Wewahitchka on
the 10th; absolute range for the State was 66 deg.
PRECIPITATION. (Inches and hundredths.)
The average precipitation for the State during the month was 4.88 in-
ches, 1.09 inches above the normal amount. By sections. the averages
were: Northern. 3.88 inches: Central. 4.98 inches; Southern, 4. 6 in-
ches; Western, 5.89 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 10.57 in-
ches, at De Funiak Spring,s: the least was 0.90 inch, at Flaming'o. The
greatest amount for any twentv-four hours was 5.06 inches. at Mvers on
the 20th.

COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE ANI) RAINFALL DATA FOR FEBRUARY, WITH
WITI DEPARTURES FROM NORM \L, DURING THE PAST ELEVEN YEARS.
The normal temperature for February is 59 0 (leg., the normal rainfall is S.79
inches.

Year 1892 1893 1894 18 189 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902

-I ---.--. -
Mean.... 61.9 6.91 62 6 52.1 59.0 63 01 57 r 58.9 58 .5 53.8; 54.4
Departure 2.9 +5.9 +3.6 -6 9 0 V +4.01 -1.5 -0.1 -0 b -3.2 -4.6
Total.... 1.40 9.921 2.03 8.19 3.06 6 57 2.04 5 69 4 42 4.44 4.88
Departure,- .39 -+0.13-l.76-0,600-0.73+2.78'-1.75-i+1.90 -0 63+0.65'1.09

*8 a. m. readings only.









PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE

Atmospheric Pressure Wind Velocity. Relative
Atmospheric Pressure i Mile Humidit
in Miles Humidity

Stations c
0/
____10___0 0 54

Jacksonville............. 29 9 30 27 3 29.4127 260 55 28 10034 70
Jupiter ................. 29.98 302211 29 572_ 8,968 48 w 26 9759 80
Key West.............. 30.00 30 2111 29.60127 7,408 36 "e 9 10057 80
Pensacola .............. 30.00 307 3 29.31 27 7,89 52 sw 27 9854 78
T-.np .. ........ ..... 299 9 0.9: 6 3 29.4827 452 49 28 9729 7

COTTON SEED MEAL.
The attention of consumers of cotton seed meal, either for stock feeding
or fertilizing purposes, is called to the analysis of various brands.
Pure, bright cotton seed meal shows a content of 8 per cent. and above in
ammonia, 2 per cent. or more of available phosphoric acid, and 1 per cent.
of potash. Such meal is now selling at $26.50 per ton at seaport. Its com-
mercial value is as follows:
8 per cent. ammonia @ $3.00........................... $24 00
2 per cent. available phosphate ((, $1.00. ................ 2 00
1l per cent. potash @ $1.10............................. 1.65
The commercial value being in excess of the market value.
There is a quantity of cotton seed meal offered in the State labeled for
"Feeding purposes only." These goods are guaranteed as follows:
4 to 5 per cent. ammonia.
1 to 2 per cent. phosphoric acid.
1l to 2 per cent potash.
Their commercial value compared to pure meal is as follows:
4 per cent. ammonia...................................$13 50
11 per cent. phosphoric acid ............................ 1 75
1. per cent. potash ....................... ........... 1 65

Commercial value ............... .................. $16 90
These goods are sold at $1.00 to $2.00 per ton less than prime meal. Their
relative value is $10.75 less than prime meal. There is no economy in the
use of such goods; on the contrary, a direct loss. This applies as forcibly
to the feeder, or dairyman, as it does to the planter, the value of the meal
depending only on its content of ammonia, phosphoric acid and potash in
both cases. Purchasers should buy according to the analysis, and pay for
the actual content of the valuable elements only.









SUGGESTIONS TO PURCHASERS.
By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluable phosphoric acid,-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all "Fancy Brands,"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of
Bone Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of "Sulphate or muriate of Pot-
ash"' or equivalents of "Nitate of Soda" or "Sulphate of Amnmonia;" bas-
ing his calculations solely on the agricultural and commercial values of
the goods, offered as shown by the percentage of the three elements of
fertility required, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the
commercial values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular
elements his crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods re-
quired, and approximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The following price list of manural chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons.
The same figures can be made n Pensacola or Tampa, for sport cash
f. o. b. cars:
Less than 5 to 10 10
5 tons tons tons
High Grade Potash. 90 to 95 per cent.Sulphate (48 to 50 per cent. K20O)......$52 00 $51 o0 $50 00
Sulphate Potash, 48 to 55 per cent. Sulphate (25 to 30 per cent. (K2,0)...... 3200 3100 3000
Muriate Potash, 80 to 85 per cent. Muriate (42 to 45 per cent. K2) .. ......... 46010 4500 4400
Kainit, 12 ro 13 percent. A actual Potah ....... ............ ...... ... 15 0 14 50 1300
Blood and Bone, 6!/ per cent Ammonia............................. 26 50 26 00 2550
Blood and Bone, 7 to S per cent. Ammonia..... ........... ......... 27 50 -7 00 2650
Blood and Bone, 10 per cent. Ammonia ............................... 3200 31 50 3100
Baw Bone Meal. 2 to 4 per cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per cent. total Phos-
phoric Acid.. ...................... ....................... 200 3150 3100
Boneblack, 16 to 18 per cent. available Phosphoric Acid.................... 25 00 24 00 24 00
Acid Phoshbate, 14 per cent. Phosphoric Acid.............. ....... 13 0) 1250 1200
Nirrate Soda, IS to 10 per cent. Ammonia........ ......... ............. 4 4700 4650 4600
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 per cent. Ammonia.. ................. ...7200 I 00 1 70 00
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia .. .... .. ................. .. 47 00 46 50 4 00
Ground Casto Pomace, 6)/ to S8 per cent. Ammonia.................. 2100 2050 2000
Canada Hard Wood Ashes, to8 per cent K 20 (Potash)................ 1500 1450 1400
Pulverized 'Iobacco Stem,, 5to 8 per cent. K20 (Potash).................. 1500 1450 1400
Tobacco Stems (Baled) 5 to 8 per cent. K20 (Potash) ....................... 1600 1550 1500
Tobacco Dust, High Grade, 5 to 8 per cent. K20 (Potash).............. 2100 2050 20 00
Steamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Ammonia, 25 to 28 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid...................... .. ...... ..................... ... 25 00 24 50 2400
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7to 9 per cent. Ammonia......................... 2650 2600 25 00
Dark Cotton Seel Meal, 6 to 8 per cent. Ammonia.......... .............. 2 00 2150 21 00
"Blood and Bone," "Tankage," "Garbage" and numerous other bye
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their "Ammonia,"
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their value, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricultural
value.
The phosphoric acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and "dis-
solved bone" are identical chemically and agriculturally. Large quantities
of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," advantage be-
ing taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the available
phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that from
"bones," commercially and agriculturally.








AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, STATE OF FLORIDA,
DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY,
Tallahassee, January 1, 1902.
To His Excellency, W. S. Jennings, Governor of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of this Division of
the Agricultural Department of the State for the year ending December
31, 1901.
During the year I find that sixty-two (62) analysis of officially drawn
samples have been made by this laboratory.
That one hundred and twenty-nine (129) special analysis of mixed fer-
tilizers, cotton seed meal and manurial chemicals sent in by purchasers
have been made.
That forty-seven (47) samples of rock, clay, soil, waters, and oils have
been examined and reported upon.
A total of two hundred and thirty-eight (238) determinations.
Of the total samples drawn by the State Chemist, I find that of the sixty-
two (62) determinations, nine (9) samples are deficient in one ingredi-
ent, four samples are deficient in two of the ingredients guaranteed, a total
of thirteen (13) samples materially deficient in the materials guaranteed,
or twenty per cent. of all samples officially drawn, show a deficiency in one
or more of the essential elements as guaranteed by their makers.
I do not attribute this deficiency to a desire to defraud the purchaser,
but to a lack of proper mixing of the materials, and possibly a too ready
acceptance of statements as to actual manurial value and chemical com-
position of the raw materials used in the composition of the mixed goods.
In several instances the same brand of goods found deficient in one case,
has been in another sample found well within the guarantee, and in some
instances in excess of the guarantee.
Previous to the enactment and enforcement of the present law (May 22,
1901,) much complaint was justly made on account of the sale within the
State of adulterated and fraudulent cotton seed meal, one of the most val-
uable fertilizers used in the State, and the ammonia base of many mixed
fertilizers. Large quantities of adulterated material was sold in the State,
analysis by my predecessor shows the value of this material to be but one
half that of pure meal either for cattle food or fertilizer. I am pleased to
say that recently these complaints have to a large extent ceased, while the
analysis of samples both official, and special, fails to show the presence in
the State of the goods complained of. Under the present law the consumer
can, if he desire, protect himself from adulteration and fraud, by sending
samples to this laboratory. I find that there are still a few dealers and
jobbers in cotton seed meal disposed to criticise the law, and attempt to
evade its provisions and the payment of the analysis fee. I am pleased to
say that they do not represent Florida manufacturers, nor manufacturers
of legitimate goods, all of whom are strictly complying with the law, recog-









nizing the protection it is to themselves, and their customers, from inferior
goods and unfair competition.
Considerable complaint has been made as to "leached" or "difused" to-
bacco dust or meal. Large quantities of tobacco stems and meal are used
in the State, particularly by our pineapple growers, until the enactment of
the present law this material was not subject to guarantee, and analysis.
Large quantities were sold that had little or no manurial value, much to
the damage of the legitimate trade and to the consumer.
This evident fraud has to a large extent been discouraged. With the as-
sistance of the purchaser and legitimate dealer it will soon be entirely pre-
vented. Tobacco dust (or stems) when unleached is a valuable insecticide,
and fertilizer, containing 5 to 8 per cent. potash and certain pungent or
aromatic properties, when leached or difused, as in the manufacture of
"Sheep Dip," for which thousands of tons are used, it has no value what-
ever as a fertilizer or insecticide.
During the year, all the prominent cities and towns of the State have
been visited, the larger seaports and manufacturing cities several times.
The various warehouses and factories have been inspected, particularly at
Pensacola, Jacksonville, Tampa, Port Tampa, Palatka and Miami, where
large distributing warehouses and factories are located; also Gainesville,
Orlando and other centers of manufacture and distribution. Many of the
larger vegetable, fruit and cotton centers have been visited and s.mpLs
taken direct from the consumer.
I am pleased to say that generally I find the manufacturer, dealer and
consumer satisfied with the present statute and anxious to assist the De-
partment in enforcing its provisions, recognizing the protection it affords
to the legitimate manufacturer or honest goods, and the consumer, in pre-
venting the competition of producers of inferior goods and its consequent
damage to the grower, and to the trade.
Some complaint is made as to the broad allowance between minimum
and maximum guarantees of some makers, in some instances from one to
five per cent. of a stated ingredient. It has been suggested that the guar-
antee should show only the minimum, or actual amount of an ingredient
guaranteed. Such has been the ruling of several States having a similar
law to our own. This ruling and the forbidding of the statement of equiv-
alents, in addition to the guarantees, has prevented confusion in the minds
of the farmers. Seldom a mixed fertilizer exceeds the minimum guaran-
tee, while the maximum is in rare cases reached. A goods bearing a guar-
antee of from one to five per cent. of a certain ingredient is misleading to
the purchaser. He hopes to get, and is charged for, more than the mini-
mum. The facts are, he will receive the minimum guarantee or very little
more. Such a guarantee is ,among others, taken from goods in this State
recently.









I would respectfully suggest that the Department rule on this import-
ant subject, that manufacturers be required to guarantee the minimum, or
actual amount of fertilizing ingredients in their goods, stating only those
ingredients as specified in the law; that all equivalents be discarded, and
prohibited, as they lead to confusion of terms and are used simply to add
Irength, and apparent value, to the guaranteed analysis.
This position is also assumed by the Association of Official Agricultural
Chemists and the Association of American Agricultural Colleges.
Very respectfully,
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, STATE OF FLORIDA,
DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY,
Tallahassee, January 1, 1902.
To His Excellency, W. S. Jennings, Governor of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the receipts and
expenditures of this division.of the Agricultural Department of the State
for the year ending December 31, 1901:
Total amount received for inspection fees, fertilizer stamps, on
fertilizers, cotton seed meal and manurial chemicals ....... $13,072 95
Paid salary of State Chemist ................ $2,000 00
Paid salary of Assistant State Chemist......... 1,500 00
Paid traveling expenses 1901................'. 360 60
Paid laboratory supplies and apparatus......... 534 81

Total expenses .......................... $4,395 41- $4,395 41

Balance to credit of general revenue.................... $8,677 54
Respectfully submitted,
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.




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