Title: Florida monthly bulletin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00007
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: October 1901
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
/1 A6 4-


I. a.~I


Vol. I1.


No. 72.


FLORIDA


(Department of Agriculture.)




..Monthly Bulletin..


OCTOBER, goi. I


B. ~ McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crope,
Part II. FeVrtilizers.
Part III. WAeather Report.
Part IV. M&I1V ellanoum.


These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them .


TALLAHASSEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE. TALLAHA88EE, FA.
..I


.r










County Map of the State of Florida.
(Fox ohe Bulletin.)


















Notice.


With the issue of this number of the Monthly Bulletin its publication
will be suspended till March of next year, 1902, in accordance with the-
usual custom. A number of improvements have been made in the Bulle-
tin during the past season, which, it is hoped, as was intended, has added.
greater value to the paper; such improvements will continue to be made
in the future as occasion requires, omitting no opportunity compatible with
the limited space at command to impart information of interest or scientiffe
value to those engaged in the several branches of agriculture in our State,,
and to make attractive to others the advantages and inducements that
Florida offers for home or business investment that shall result in build-
ing up our State to the highest standard of industrial and commercial
importance.
To our corps of correspondents who so generously and patriotically
give of their time and labor, and on whom the success of the Bulletin soc
much depends, the Commissioner extends his sincerest thanks, indulging
in the hope and the wish that all may find the coming season one of health,
prosperity and happiness.












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HoN. B. E. McLIN, Corn. H. S. EI.Lor, Chief Cle-k


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-The weather is very dry, and fall crops are suffer-
ing for rain. Crops are yielding a good average. Syrup making has
commenced.
BAKER COUNTY-Crops in this county will come up to fair average, ex-
cept cotton, which is very short.
BRADFORD COUNTY-Except cotton, the crops of this county are good,
and the yields will reach in most cases a full crop. Cotton is very short
of even an average crop.
BREVARD COUNTY-We have had a fine growing year and the trees have
made a large growth of good wood and top, but the crop of fruit is ahori
of what it would have been but for heavy frost last spring, which injured
the bloom bud. We have had no storm this year. Crops of all kinds have
yielded well.
CALHOUN COUNTY-Owing to the dry fall sweet potatoes hqve not done
as well as expected, neither has Sea Island cotton; upland cotton is about
all gathered, and the quality is fine, though short in quantity; standard
crops generally very good.
CLAY COUNTY-All crops are fine, and will yield above the usual aver-
age, except cotton, which is short.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-The hay crop was unusually good, but the weather
was so unfavorable for cutting it, that much of it got. too old; cotton is
quite short, but the yield of other field crops will be very good.
DADE COUNTY-We have had very favorable seasons and the crops we
grow are all very fine; the fruit crops are yielding well, so are vegetables,
and the trees have made a fine growth.
DE SOTO COUNTY-The harvest is good; the fine yields are attributable
to both a most favorable season and increased acreage, well cultivated; no
crop has been a poor one, but all have reached above the average.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY-The yield of cotton is above the average and qual-
ity fine; sugar cane is unusually fine, and will yield a heavy crop; all
the field crops are yielding well; cassava and velvet beans have been grown
for the first time, and have done well.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-Crops are all turning out well; fall crops are
planted and growing rapidly; frost has hurt some of the cane.









GADSDEN COUNTY-The weather has been too dry for sweet potatoes,
and the crop is short; field crops will average pretty well. Cotton crop is
fairly good.
HERNANDO COUNTY-The seasons have been favorable and crops are
generally very good; fruit trees growing finely.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-Both field and fruit crops are turning out
well. Strawberry growing has grown to be quite an industry in this county;
the acreage is largely increasing; the condition of the crop is good, and
indications are that the crop will be fifteen days earlier than usual.
HOLMES COUNTY-The dry weather has enabled the farmers to finish
picking cotton, which is progressing rapidly; the crop is shorter than ex-
pected. Other field crops are turning out very well.
JACKSON COUNTY-Both long ond short cotton will yield less thanaver-
age crop; other field crops are about an average, and hay is a very fine
crop; unfavorable seasons and scarcity of labor has made short crops this
year.
JEFFIaSON COUNTY-All crops are very short; sugar cane will possibly
yield better percentage of sacharine matter than usual because of the dry
weather in which to mature.
LAKE COUNTY-Crops, except field peas, will yeld a fair average; fruit
is fine, and trees doing well.
LEE COUNTY-All crops have done well, and are turning out good
yields. The fruit crop is fine in quality and quantity; the trees are grow-
ing fast. Fall planting of vegetables is well under way.
LEON COUNTY-The cotton crop is about 15 per cent. short; the corn
crop also short about 20 per cent; other field crops a fair average, except
sweet potatoes, which are also short on account of long dry season.
LEVY COUNTY-The cotton crop is short, but food crops are generally
all good, and the yields are turning out satisfactorily.
MADISON COUNTY-The cotton crop, both Sea Island and Upland, are
very short; sugar cane, field peas, sweet potatoes, peanuts and hay are
good and will make full average crops. The weather has been very favor-
able for gathering crops.
MANATAEE COUNTY-Have had dry weather all through the month;
crops have done well; the orange crop is being rushed along for some un-
known reason; certainly it is not on account of the ripeness of the fruit;
it is a great mistake.
MARION COUNTY-The crops of all kinds have done well; the seasons
in the main have been favorable for growing the crops, and the dry fall
has enabled the farmers to gather the crops without loss; the yields will
average up fine all around.
NASSAU COUNTY-The dry weather continues, which will have the ef-
fect of making many crops on high land light; those on low lands will be
better, and many of them will yield fine crops.









ORANGE COUNTY-Crops on the average have done well; fruit crops
are turning well, much better than expected; the weather has been fine
for gardens, which are coming on rapidly. All live stock look well, and
are healthy, no disease reported among them.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-Crops have generally turned out well; fruit trees
growing well, and will have a good crop under the conditions.
POLK COUNTY-Heavy rains at harvest time prevented the farmers cut-
ting as much hay as they would otherwise; cassava, peanuts, velvet beans
have been largely planted this past season and they have returned fine
yields. Oranges and grape fruit average much finer than last year, and
the crop is also much larger.
PUTNAM COUNTY-Crops are turning out a fair average; the county
will produce about ten thousand boxes of fruit this year; last year there
was no crop made; condition among farmers are generally good.
ST. JOHN'S COUNTY-A good many of the crops we grow are very good,
and some have done poorly; a small crop of oranges and other citrus have
been made, and the trees are growing finely.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-The cotton crop is turning out only fair, but the
field crops have done very well, and the yields in most parts of the county
is satisfactory; sweet potatoes are shorter than usual, on account of un-
favorable season.
SUMTER COUNTY-The Sea Island cotton is a much better crop than
usual; field crops in general have turned out a fair yield; velvet beans have
made a large crop; fruit trees are doing well.
SUWANNEE COUNTY-The cotton crop is very short, the weather ha:
been very good for picking, and has enabled the farmer to gather it
clean; almost no rain for the past month; corn is also short, but other
crops are good and we think our county will be self-sustaining. The
Broom Factory is very successful, which is encouraging, and it is being
well patronized by our local merchants; the next crop will be grown from
entirely new seed.
WAKULLA COUNTY-Owing to worms, the hay crop is poor; the un-
favorable spring made all crops short; there will scarcely be more than
three-fourths of a crop made by any farmer in the county.
WALTON COUNTY-On account of the prevailing dry weather the cot-
ton crop of this season is mostly picked; there will be very little top crop.
Sugar cane is being rapidly worked up into syrup; the crop will not aver-
age over 75 per cent. this year; velvet beans is a new crop in this section,
but is a successful one, and it is thought our farmers will plant largely of
them another year.
WASHINGTON COUNTY-Upland cotton is not yielding as well as ex-
pected; sugar cane is not up to last year, but a little more was planted.
Velvet beans and cassava are coming to the front, and the acreage will be
greatly increased next year; farmers are finding out that hay is their best
crop, and hundreds of tons have been housed in good condition.











Report of Prospective Yield of Crops for October, 1901,
compared with an average.

Upland island Sugar Field Rc Velvet
Upland Island Rice
CCotton Co Cane Peas Beans

Counties .

aa aI a a a

Alachua........... ............. 60 95 100 70 ; 100
Baker......... ... ... .. .. .. 50 75 80 751 100
Bradford.......... .... ..... 65 100 100 120 120
Brevard....... ............ ... ....... 100 -100 100 ....
Calhoun................ 60 75 100 100 80 ..
Citrus.................. .... ........ 100 100 100 100
Clay................... ........75 100 100 100 110
Columbia ............ .... 50 90 1 901 100 100
Dade............. ..... .. .... ....... ....... 100 100
DeSoto ..... ....... . . . ......... 120 100 105 110
Escambia ............... 100 .......... 200 100 100 200
Franklin........ ..... ..... ....... 90 90 ....... ...
Oadsden .............. 80 75 100 100 100 100
Hernando ....... ............ ........... 80 100 75 100
Hillsborough............ ...... ...75 10u 70 200
Holmes ................ 70 85 110 110 110 125
Jackson............... 60 75 90 100 100 100
Jefferson ............... 50 75 80 60 ........ .....
LaFayette.......... ... ....... 60 100 80 100 150
Lake ............. ..... .. .. ... 80 50 ...... 100
Lee ................... .... ...... 100 100 110 150
Leon .................... 75.... 100 85 100 300
Levy.................... 70 65 90 100 I 90 110
Madison................ 60 65 110 105 .. .
Manatee ....................... 100 100 100 200
Marion........... .. 110 85 105 100 100 120
Nassau........... .. .. ...... .. ..... 90 80 ....... ........
Orange................ ................ 75 80 ..
........ .. .. .75 75
Osceola ..... .. ...... 90 100 1001 120
Pasco ................. .... ..100 100 85i 100
Polk .............. .... ...... 1001 110 100! 150
Putnam ......... ...... ....... 80 100 75 80
St. Johns................... ......... 100 75......
Santa Rosa............. 85 ........ 85 7 85 100
.Sumter ................ ...... 150 100 75 100 200
Suwannee ............ ...... 601 90 100 80 50
Taylor ................ ...... 60 75 75 50 85
Walton ............ 85 85 95 90 95
Wakulla. ................ 0 55 100 60 100 100
Washington. .......... 75 ........ 85 90 90 200

General averages. ...... 75 72 97 91 80 121








8

Prospective Yield of Crops--Continued.


S o'weet Peanuts Cassava
Potato'sI

Counties .

cL a


Alachua.... ......... 80 90 70
Baker............... 90 0 .....
Bradford............... 100 100 100
Brevard................ 100 ....... 100
Calhoun.... ....... 90 100 .......
Citrus.................. 100 100 .......
Clay.................. 100 100 100
Columbia.............. 95 100 ............
Dade ............ ...... 100 .. .
DeSoto .............. 110 80 90
Escambia................ 150 150 150
Franklin .............. 90 90 ......
Gadsden .......... .. 65 110 .......
Hernando ............. 100 80.......
Hillsborough.......... 70 ....... 100
Holmes............... 105 105 100
Jackson... ..... ...... 70 80 ........
Jefferson............... 80 80 ........
Lafayette.............. 80 90 ...
Lake ................. 100 75 90
Lee .................. 90 90 100
Leon .. ............. 95 90 .....
L-vy....... .......... 100 100 100
Madison....... ...... 100 95 ......
Manatee.... ......... 100 .... 100
Marion............... 100 105 105
Nassau... ... ..... .. 75 .. ......
Orange............... 90 . ... 110
Osceola... .... .... 90 ........ 100
Pasco............... .. 10o 75 90
Polk ................. 115 110 125
Putnam ......... 90 90 .....
St. Johns... ............ 100 ..... 100
Santa Rosa............. 75 100.......
Sumter ................ 100 75 50
Suwannee.... ......... 100 0 .......
Taylor ............. ....5 60 100
W alton............. ... 90 85 .......
Wakulla.......... .... 100 60 75
Washington........... 50 95 250

General averages.. I 98 921 105


Hay Broom Bananas
Hay I Corn


10

a-
100


125


100
110
100

120
200

I00
100
100
110
120
100
100
100
140
105
100
100
100
50
100
104)
100
175
100
110
100
100
100
95
90
60
300

113


a -

0,2 W
PH

100 .....

100 100
... .. 150



... . .. .. .. ..
..... . . ....
...... 100.
'.... ... 1140

.. .. . .......

. . . 100



........ .. 75..

.... 30
....... 110





....... o .. .....
100 100

....... 100
100 100







5 ........75
..... ......





91 98


~







9

Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Orange Lemon Lime 'Frae
Trees Trees Trees Trees

Counties "
oa- g .a


Alachua... ...................... .. 40 ................. .......
B aker ................. .... ..... .... 40 .1 . ........ .. ....
Bradford..... ........................ .... ... .... ** *
Brevard.... .......... ................. 75 ........ ........ 50
Calboun......... .................... .... ........ .......
C itrus................ ..... .......... 150 ...... ......... ....
Clay ................................... ........ ... .........
Columbia................ .... ....... .....
Dade ............................... 110 105 100 110
DeSoto ... ....... .................... ..: 110 1 2 110 90
Escambia ............. ............. I .... ...... .. .....
Franklin ......... ... .............. . ..... ........
G adsden ..... ... ......... .... .. ... ... .... ........ ........
Hernando ............ ...... .... ........ ...... 5 ....... ..............
Hernando ..........................
Hillsborougb .......................... 75 .. .... 75
Holmes............. .................... .. * ........... ........
Jackson .................. ........... *......... ........ . ......
Jefferson ............... .............. ... ... ........ ........
Lafayette......................... ... .
Lake 40 ........... ... .......... 60
Lee .................... ........... .. 110 120 120 120
Leon .. .............................. ........ ..... .....
L evy ................ ............ .... .... .... . ....
Madison .....................................
Manatee ................ .............. 100 90 90 75
Marion. .................................. 1100 100 100 110
Nssau ............... ............. 100 100 100
Orange........ 100 ..... 100
Oscola .................................. 70 70 90 40
Psco..... .......... ..... 100 100 100 100
Polk.......... ............. 110 135 125 160
Putnam... ........ ................................................
St. Johns. ............................ 50 .0
Santa Rosa............................... .. ..... .................25
Sumter ................................. 100 ..... ..
Suwannee............................... ....... ...........
Taylor................. .......... ..... ....... ..... ......
W alton ........ ................... .. .. .. ... .. .
Wakulla......... ......................... .....
W ashington ................................ .. . '" .

General averages.. .............. ... 88 97 104 84









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

S VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1900-1901.
Available Phosphoric Acid................ 5 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ......... 5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid ................ $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash.......... .... .................. $1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We find
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39xl.00. .:............ $ (i.39
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20 ................ .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.10............... 7.82
Mixing and bagging ......... .......... ........ 2.00

$31.23
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
!Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these price i at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers are bought at interior points, the additional freight to
thAt point must bo added.
If purchased in car load lots for cash, a reduction of twenty
per cent. can be made in above valuations, i. e.:
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 80 cents per unit
Potash (K20) ........................ 88 cents per unit
Ammonia (or equivalent in nitrogen)....... .$2.40 per unit
The valuations and market prices in succeeding illustra-
tions, are based on market prices for one ton lots.








BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.
chemist. C. G. HELLMAN, Assistant Chemist.


Phos. Acid


Name of Fertilizer a




Armour'sH.G.Blood &Bone,ortank'g 9.00 1.70 0.90
Bone, Fine Ground..... 8.82 12.35 12.15
Blood, Bone and Potash ............ 8.88 5. I 6.40
Blood and Bone, Pig's Foot Brand .. .24 2.61 2 0.64
Bradley's Orange Tree Fertilizer.... 9.1 6.98 2 17
Bradley's Fruit and Vine Fertilizer... 7.44 7.- 3 40
Bradley's Bone Meal .......9.70 6. 3.65
Bradley's Vegetable Fertilizer ..... 8.27 6.7 2.81
Blood, Bone and Potash .......... ... 8.88 5.11 6.401
Complete Vegetable Fertilizer......... 838 2.24
Coda y's Tankage ........... 6.79 7.67 4 93
Dark Cotton Seed Meal................ 9.42 ... 45
S a. /............ 4 9
Florida Special Pineapple ............ 5.15 4.80
Florida Bean Special.................. 7.58 6,8t 1.73
Fruit and Vine Fertilizer. ............ 10.42 7.10 2.37
Gonlding's Vegetable Compound ..... 11 7. 48 .6
Goulding's Bone Compound......... 12.81 10.51 4.73
olding'3 percent Potash Acid.... 13.7 13.56 0.90
Goulding's Potash Mixture 12 2 p ct 13.76 15.67 2.11
Goulding's percent Pottr h Acid.... 109 14.58 2.11
Goulding's English Acid Phos, hate... 1487 15.10 2 94
Goulding's H. G. Acid Phosphate.....4.95 17.78 1.28
Goulding's Atlas Acid Phosphate.... 14. 15.10 2.94
Gounlding's H.G. Acid Phos & Pot 12 & 1 12,96 14.71 2. 05
Garbage Tankage. .................6.24 2.62 0.64
High Urade Vegetable Fish Guano.... 11.82 6.58 2.69
Orange Fruiter Special... ............. 91 6.411 2.56
Simon Pure No. 1 .................. 7.32 6.5 0.38
Strawberry Fer'ilizer ... 9.41 5.891 4.54


W A. RAWLS, State Ch


ANALYSES OF FERTILIZERS.

Guaranteed Analysis
O

Sg 3 By Whom and Where Manufactured
o a S. 30 0
I I E


10.03 ...... 4 to 5 7 to 8 ........ 0 ........ Armour & Co, Jacksonville, Fla
4.5 .... ....... 0 to 2 4 to ........ Standard Guano & Chemical Jo. New Orleans, La.
425 495 ......4 to 2 to 4 4 to 6 4 to 6 Pampa Fertilizer Co., rampa, BIll.
4.75]* 4 to 5 5t ........ Wilon & Toomer, ,lacksunvll e, Fla
4.79' 52 10 to 20 6 to 1 2 to 33%to4" 5 to 6 American Agricultural Co., Boston, Mass.
2.72 9.99 10 to 20 5/to7T 3 to 4 24to510 to 12Amiican Agricultural Co Boston, M sd.
10. 54... ...... .... ........ Americau Agricultural Co., Boston, Mass.
4.2 6.... to 5 American Aricultural Co., Boston, Maas.
4.25 4.5 4 2 to 4 to 4 to 64 to 6 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Ta-pa, Fla.
4.76 9.0812 to 6 to 8 to 2 5 to 6 to 8G. Ober & Sons Co., Baltimore, Md.
8.33 ........... 6 to 7 10 Cudahy Packi g Co., So. Omaha, Neb.
5.61 1.75 8 to 2 ........ 2 to 3 5 to 7 to Florida Manufacturing Co, Madison, Fla.
5,611033 6 to 8 4 to 5to 7 4 to 5 7 to Wion & Toomer, acksnnville, Fla.
3.23 7.30 8 to 10 to 7 1 to 2 3 to 4 6 to Wils n &Toomer, Jack-onvill! iFla.
2.12 1.61 8 to 10 to to 2 2 to 4 12 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla,
4.42 39410 to 157 to 8 1 to 3 4 to 5 4 to Gouldng Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
2.55 3 16 10 to 15 10 ro 12 1 to 3 2 to2% 1I to 2 Goulding Fertllz-r Co., Penacol, Fla.
..... 353 ....... 8 to 12 3 to 4 Uonldiug FertilizerCo., Pensacola, Fla.
.. I 2.95... 12 t to 2 4 2 to 3 Goulding tertilizr Co., Pensicol, Fla.
.... 4.31 12 to 15 to 1 to 4 o Goulding Fertilizer Co., Penacola, Fla.
...... .................... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fl1.
S15 ................ Gouldlng Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, ila.
13 to 15 ...................... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
'2.12 ..... 12to 15 ............. 4 to 2 Go Iding FP rtillzer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
4.76..... ........4 to 3to 5 ........ Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
408 4.62 ..... 5 t. 7 3 to 4 4 to 6 1 to 6 Tampa Ftrtiliz, r Cv., Tampa, F'a.
2,'89 16.10 8 to 10 6 to 8 1 to 2 2 to 3 16 to 18 Tampa Fertll zer Co., Tampa, Fla.
4.59 12.04 6 to 2to3 4 to4 12 to 13 0. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
2.89 8 .... 6 to 8 2 t t4o 2 t, 4 8 to 1 r mpa Fe -tizer Cr. "'lmn. PWim.





BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

W. A. RAWLS, State Chemist. C., HELLMAN, Assistant Chemist
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 903, Kev. Stat.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


Name of Fertilizer.



Ashes....... ........
Acid Phosphate.......
Acid phosphate.......
Acid Phosphate.......
Acid Phosphate ......
Acid Phosphate...
Ammoniated Fertilizer
Double Superphosphs.
Bone Meal...........
Fish Scrap... .......
Fish Scrap............
Fish Guano.........
Ground Fish Bone....
Special Mixture......
Special Sample..
Special Sample.......
Special Sample.......
Special Sample..........
Special Sample.......
Special Sample.......
Special Samp'e... ...
Special Sample ......
Special Sample ......
Special Sample ......
Special Sample... ..
Tankage .... ......
Tankage .............
Fertilizer.............
Fertilizer..........
Tankage ....... .....
Fertilizer ....... ....
Tobacco Dust..........
Fertilizer..............
Fertilizer ............
Pure Ground BoL.e....
Special Mixture.......
Ground Bone ........
Acid Phosphate..........
Nitrate Soda... ....
A. id Phosphate..........
Acid Phosphate........
Fertilizer..............
Fertilizer ..........
B nod&Bone (Tankage)
Cotton Stel Meal......
Fertilizer...... .......
Fertilizer...........
To a..o Stems......
Tobacco Dust.... ....
Tobacco Dust..........
Acid Ph)aphate.......
Ashes. Irom furnace...
Tobacco Dust,' 'Oeceo-
It brand"..........
Tobacco Dust, "Sem
inole brand"........
Tobacco Dnst..........
Tobacco Un-t..:......
Cotton Seed Meal.,...
Castor Pomace........
Fertilizer ......
Tobacco Dust..........
Ground Tobacco Stems
Acid Phosphate...........
Cotton Seed Meal.. ...
Acid Phosphate........
Acid Phosphate........
Ground Tobacco Stemr
As' .e....... .....
"H. G. Blood & Bone"
C. S. Meal, "Selma
brand"..............
Tobacco Dust.........
&lsh Bone and Potash.


Name of Sender


7.41 C. R. Tyseal. Jacksonville, Fla.
.. .O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville,
.... Southern Fertilizer Co, OrlandaFla.
.... Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla.
.... -.oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
... Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlanda Fla.
2.42 Goulding Fertilizer Co Pensacola, Fla.
.... oulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Ela.
.D. R Knight, Lemon City, Fla...........
0.54 Stephen I.ee. Pesacola, Fla.
.W DeC. Kessler, Pensacola. Fla.
S.. har. Harbor Fish. Co., St. James City.
0 54 Stophen Lee. Pensac lna, Fla.
5.55 D. it Knight. Lemon City, Fla.
L1.13 S. S. Lamb. Palmetto, Fla.
3.07 Hugh Gallagher, Dover, Fla.
L 30 Warren Oliff, Welcorn, Fla.
12.49 P. 0. Miller, Palmetto, Fla.
5.95 J. W. Bobbs. DOver, Fla.
1.65 W. S. Simms, Bristol, Fla.
2.45 W. S. Simms, Bristol, Fla.
3.01 W. S. Simms, Bristol. Fla.
3.03 W. S. Simms, Bristol, Fla.
4.5 Jno C. Heard, St, Petersburg, Fla.
9.72 E. E. Thomson, Avon Park. Fla.
... Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville. Fla.
..... E. 0. Painter&Co., Jacksonville, Fla,
7.36 F. J. Magill, Jupiter, Fla
9.89 F. J. Mavill, Jupiter, Fla.
.... Tampa Ferilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
11.03 W. J. Chambers, Orange Lake, Fla.
4.29 Armour & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
9.62 E. King. Miami, Fla.
13.69 W. S. Preston, Auunrrdale, Fla.
..... Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
25.90 Jno. D Green, Seaside. Fla.
.... Jas. Holmes. Jensen, Fla.
... . Pinter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.. .. E O. Painter & Co., Jacksonvi,le, Fla.
.... O. Painter & Co ,Jacksonville. Fla
... E. Painter & Co Jacksonville, Fla.
15 24 J. Gates, Manatee,Fla.
11.41 J. Gates, Manatee, Fla.
.. P. F. Kelliher, Tampa, Fla.
..... CS. Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
16.30 F. B. Turner, Parrish, Fla.
9.71 W. F. Martin. Ft. Ogden, Fla.
5.91 H. Benedict, Orlando Fla.
1.9.2 0. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
4.08 E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.... . Painter & t'o., Jacksonville, Fla.
0.70 Geo. S. Giles & Co., Orlando, Fla.
1.16 Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
5.50 Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
0.80 Wlson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
1.32 Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
S... Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
.... Md.by Kansas City Oil Works, K C, Mo.
9.8 T. J. Bachmau, Braidentown. Fla,
1.16 Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
4.64 Vertess & Co, Palatea, Fla.
..... E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
..... Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville. Fla
.... Little Bros. Fert. & Phos. Co., Jacktonvlle
..... little Bros. Fert & Phos. Co., Jacksonville
5.76 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
S99 C. R. Tysen, Jacksonville, Fla.
...... Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
... M''d by Alabama C Oil Co. Selma, Ala.
2 44 Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
6.52 M'f'd by Lee & 'o., Pensacola, Fla.






SULPHATE OF POTASH.


I0

S S Name of Sender.




High Grade Sulphate of
Potash .............. 50.49 93.41 J. L. Carney, Lake Weir, Fla.
High Grade Sulphate of
Potash ............. 48.98 90.61 L. D. Baldwin, Denaud, Fla.
High Grade Sulphate of
Potash ............ 49.56 91.67 German Kali Works.
BRIGHT COTTON SEED MEALS.
0

I Name of Sender



"Star Brand"......... 9.01 Sledge Wells & Co., Memphis, Tenn.
"Sunny South Brand" 4.76Sledge Wells & Co., Memphis, Tenn.
C. S. Meal........... 8.50 Traders Cotton Oil Co.. Union Springs.
C. S. Meal ........... 9 18 B. Rogers Co Jacksonville, Fla
C. S. Meal...... .... 9 69 White Walton Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
C. S. Meal.......... 9 35 Baker & Holmes, Jacksonville. Fla.
C. S. Meal........... 9.01 Sledge Wells& Co, Memphis, Tenn.
C. S. Meal............ 9.35 J. K. Williams & Co., Jacksonville,Fla
C. S. Meal .......... 9.69 Geo. W. Pryor & Sons. Pensacola, Fla
C. S. Meal ........... 8 W J. Chambers, Orange Lake, Fla.
GROUND TOBACCO STEMS.


SName of Sender



Tobacco Dust No. 1 0.68 0.53 A. N. Hoofoagle, Fort Pierce, Fla.
Tobacco Dust No. 2 1 19 1.07 A. N Hoofnagle, Fort Pierce, Fla.
Tobacco Dust...... 1.19 0 57 Zaring & Jones. Jacksonville, Fla.
Tobacco Dust...... 2.38 4.65 J. K. Williams & Co., Jacksonville
Tobacco Dust.... 3 06 1.20 rampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa. Fla
NITRATE OF SODA.


3 Name of Sender



NitrateSoda 0.90 18.70 L. D. Baldwin, Denaud, Fla.

NOTES-Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid. but it is bought
for the potash and ammonia content. Cotton -eed meal contains some phos-
phoric acid, and .ome potash, but is bought lor the ammonia content.
Wher only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, it has been
determined as total phosphoric acid.


.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.


R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS.


MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.


Phos. Acid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.
0

NA O FERTIIZER. By Whom and Where Manufactured.

_____ Or FERILIER -_____

Cotton Seed Meal.......... .......... ........................................ 8 to .......... Harmon Oil Co., Harmony Grove, Ga.
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 7.70 .......... .5 8.85 1.67 7.65 .............. .22 8.24 1.96 Jefferson Mfg. to.. Jefferson, Ga.
Cottou Seed Meal ............... 7.62 .............. 80 8.61 1.27 7.65 ........ .... 3.22 8.24 1.9 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., elma, Ala.
Cotion Seed Meal..... .. 7.64 ............ .07 8.15 1.69 .......... ... .... 2 to27%to8 I to 2 Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile, Ala.
Cotton Seed Meal, Jersey brand 8.31 ...... ..... 2.96 8.67 1.67 ....... .............. 2 to 3 8 too% i to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, Ala.
Hieh Grade Blood and Bone... .40 3.62 7.51 11.13 10.2 ...... to .............. 12 to 1 9%tol .......... Cudahy Mfg. Co., S. Omaha, Neb.
High Grade Blood and Bone ... 6.09 3.61 5.13 8.74 10.30 ...... .................... 8 to 1010 to 12 .......... Nelson Mason & Co., Chicago, I1.
High Grade Blood and Bone ... 6. 5.13 4.85 9.98 10.75 ..... 5 to .............. 8 to 13 to 11 ........... Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
Blood and Bone. ................ .9 4.07 14.48 18.55 5.87 ...... 5 to 7 .... .. .... 15 to 20 6% to 8 ......... Cudahy MfR. Co., 8. Omaha, Neb.
Blood and Bone......... ....... 6.50 3.5 7.51 11.09 10.24 ...... 5 to 8 ........ ... .... 11 to 129to 10 .......... Cudahy Mfg. Co., S. Omaha, Neb.
Blood and Bone..... ........... .00 3.01 11,42 14.43 .82 ...... 5 to 7 .............. 15 to 20 6% to 8 ...... CudahyMfg. Co., S. Omaha, Neb.
Dried Blood .................. 10.33 ...... ...... ...... 16.4 ............................ ........ 16.00 .......... Cudahy M g. Co., S. Omaha, Neb.
Muriate o Potash. .. ......... 3.0 ...... ..... ....... .. 50.7 ...... ..... .... ......... 48 to 5 Delaware River Chemical Works.
High Grade Sulphate of Potash. 1.7 ...... .. ... ..... 1 ....... ....... ....... ....... .... 48 to 52 Tampa ert. Co., importers, Tampa.
High Grade Sulphate of Potash. 2.49 ............ .. 48.40. ........... ...... ....... 48 to 50 American Agricul. and Ch-m. Co N.Y.
Nitrateof Soda... ............. .2 .. ..... ...... 17.0 ...... ........ ........ ... ...... 17 to 9 .......... E Painter Fert. Co. importers, Jackv'e
Acid Phosphate .............. 13.8 14. 3.19 18.18 ............ 12 13 2 ........ ........ ........ Goulding Fertilizer 'o., Pensacola.
Acid Phosphate........... ..... 13.02 18 92 0.1 19.11 ...... ...... 12 17i I .... ....... ... ..... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola.
Nitrateof Sola .............. 0.76 ...... 18.50 ........ ..... ............. 19.00 ....... Goulding Fertilizer Co.. Pensacola.
Fruit and Vine Fertilizer....... 5.66 633 260 8.93 2.20 13.45 8 to10 6 to 8 to 3 .. 2 to 12 to 14 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
Id al Fruit and Vine Manure ..8.8 6.88 0.41 7.29 2.96 10.16 8 to 10 6 to 8 1 to 3...... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Wilson &Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure .. 9.24 8.001 0.37 8.37 3.28 12.57 8 to 10 6 to 8 1 to 31 .. .... 3 to 4 10 to 12 Wilson &Toomer Fert. Co Jacksonville
Mapes' Fruit and Vine Manure. 7.02 4.55 2.61 7.16 2.33 11 11 8 to 10 5 to 7 2 to 4 ........ 2 to 8 10 to 12 Mapes' Formula&Peru Guano Co., N. Y.
Americus Spl. Fruit&VineMa. 12.02 6.68' 1.30 7.98 3 80 9.85 ....... to7 3 to 4 ........ 4to5 10 to 12 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N.Y.
Bradle's Spl. Fruit&VineMan. 11 24 6.65 1.22 7.87 4.02 9.87 ........ 5to7 3 to 4 8x-ll 4%toS 10 to 12 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
ideal Vegetable Manure ........ 10.94 7.37 1.09 8.46 4.31 8.58 ....... 6 to 8 1 to 2 ........ 4 to 5 8 to 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville
Americus Strawberry Fertilizer 10. 7.03 1.68 8.71 .25 6.04........ 6 to 8 1 to 2...... 8 to 4 6 to 8 Williams & Clark Fert. Co. N. Y.
Pineapple Manure............. 7.00 7.52 2.56 10.08 5.36 9.52 8 to 10 4 to 5 ...... ...... 5 to 6 7 to 8Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
Special Strawberry Fertilizer... 7.14 6.79 1.7 8.16 5.27 3.37 8 to 10 a to ....... ..... 3% to 5 8 to 5 Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonv'e.
Ideal Fertilizer ........ ... 11.87 6.68 1.30 7.98 3.85 5.97 5 to 7.............. 4%to% 6 to 8 Wilson &Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonv'e.
Simon Pure Fertilizer No. 1... 8.81 6.20 1.85 7.45 4.42 11.71 5 to 8 7 to 8 1 to 2 .......4 4 11 to 13 E. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Bradley's Nursery Stock Fert 9.( 10.50 1.47 11.97 4.90 3.81....... to 10 to 10 to 134Xto5i 3 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. IN. Y
Peruvian Vegetable Mgnure.... 10.90 7.89 2.34 10.28 4.30 6.61 8 to 10 7 to 9 2 to 4 ........ 4X to 61 8 to 10 Wilron & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksoiville.










BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. Rosa, State Chemist. MAiao G. Donx, Assistant Chemist.
Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.
(Samples taken by purchaser.)


Name of Fertilizer




H. G. Blood and B"ne.
H. G. Blood and Bo e.
H. G. Blood and Bone.
Blood and Bone..........
Dried Blood............
Bat Guano................
Acid Phosphate.......
As es ...........
Castor Pumace........
Canada, H. W., Ashes
'Bat Man re or Guano.
Can. H' d Wood Ashes.
Tobacco Dust.
Fertilizer ...............
Cotton Seed Meal .....
Cotton Seed Meal .....
H. G. Blood and Bone.
H. G. Blood and Bone.
Cotton Seed Meal.....
H. G. Ground Tankage
Special Mixture ......
Fertilizer........ ........
Acid Phosphate.......
S'Big 4" Bone Phos.
Castor Pumace......
H. G. Blood and Bone
H. G. Blood and Bone
Tobacco Stems........
Cotton Seed Meal......
Acid Phosphate.......
Fertilizer .............
Acid PhosDhate.......
Fertilizer No. 2........
Fertilizer No 1. ......
Fertilizer No.1...........
Fertilizer No. 2.......
Kainit................
Muriate of Potash ....
H. G. Blood and Bone


Phosphoric Acid




0 0
. E 0
I E s


0.20 .....
.0.15 .....
7.14 .....
17.0
10.81 1.95



10.44 1.71
.... 3.47
1.29 4.3
3.81 21.95
8.59 1.40
8.87 1.71
10.32 ....
9.41 ....
8.86 1.56
10.48
3.1810.90
5.20 3.18
5.46 6.10I
6.99 1.17
10.03 .....
b.66 .....
2.72 7.19
8.57 2.07
4 06 5.93
8.04 11.23
2.3611.68
2.05 0.31
2.39 1.46
..... 12 22
.:. 50.52
8.s3


Name of Sender


Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Wilson & Toomer, Fort. Co., Jacksonville.
Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
E. O. Painter Pert. Co Jacksonville, Fla.
E O. Painter Pert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. O Painter ert Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
W. H. Cox, Boyton, Fla.
E O. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
H. H. Harvey, Seffner, Fla.
Lyle & Co., Bartow, Fla.
E O.Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. O, Painter Fert. Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Manatee Lemon Co., Palmetto, Fla
Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonville.
Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonville.
Ankeney Fruit Co., Ankona, Fla.
Ankeney Fruit Co., Ankona, Fla.
Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.
Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.
Wm. Y. Douglass, Dunedin, Fla.
W. H. Cox, Boyton, Fla.
Goulding Fertilizer Co.. Pensacola, Fla.
Nellson, Morris & Co. Chicago, Ill.
Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
Benedict Pineapple Co., Orlando, Fla.
E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville
E, 0. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonvil e-
Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee
Goulding Fertilizer Co, Pensacola, Fla.
W. W. Vincent, Inverness, Fa.
S0 Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville
J. D. Green, Sea Side, Fla.
J, D. Green, Sea Side, Fla.
J. T. Jaudon, Alapatta, Fla.
J. r. Jaudon, Alapatta, Fla.
Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
Goulding Fertilizer Co.," Pensacola, Fla,
Cudahy Packing Co., Chicago, IlL


For values see heading 'Bureau of Fertilizers. "
NOTE.-This department is not aware of the source of the goods, or the names of man-
ufacturers of the "Special -amples" sent In by purchasers. Dealers frequently send in sam-
ples of goods for examination before purchasing. A 'Special Sample'' sent in by a dealer or-
manufacturer, hence is not an evidence that the goods are offered by him for sale. The "Of-
ficial Samples" taken by the State Chemist, or his assistant, on precedilig page states the name-
of the goods and the manufacturers, the guaranteed analysis, and the amount of fertililing in-
gredients found by the State Chemist.







Composition of Fertilizer Materials.

SNITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


Pounds per Hundred


Ammonia Phosphorc Potash
Acid

Nitrate of Soda........ .................. 17 to 19.....................
Sulphate of A monia..................... 22 to 24 ................ .....
Dried Blood ....... ..................... 12 to 17 .. ...............
Concentrated Tankage..................... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ..
Bone Tankage ............................ 6 to 9 10 to 15 .........
Dried Fish Scrap ... ....................... 8 to 11 6 to 8..........
Cotton Seed Meal ....................... 7 to 10 2 to 3 11 to 2
Hoof Meal .......... .......... ... 14 to 17 1 to 2 ............
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred

Available nlusoluble
Ammonia Phosphor c Phosphoric
__Acid Acid
Florida Rock Phosphate ......................... ... 33 to 35
Florida Pebble Phosphate .............. ..... ................. 26 to 32
Florida Superphosphate................ ............. 14 to 19 1 to 6
Ground Bone............ .................. 3 to 6 5 to 15 to 17
Steamed Bone............................ 2 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone.............. ............. 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds per Hundred

Actual Amr - Phosphoric
Potash inomia Acid Lm

Muriate of Potash ................... 50 .......
Sulphate of Potash.. ............. 48 to 52 ........ ..................
Double Sulphate of Potash & Magnesia 26 to 30 ........ .......
Kainit .... .. ....................... 12 to 12 ......... ..... .. ........
Sylvinit....... ...... ...... .... .... 16 to 20 .............. ....... ...
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes ............. 15 to 30 ... ..... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached.............. 2 to 8 .......... 1 to 2 30 to 85
Wood Ashes, leached................ 1 to 2 1 to 1I 35 to 40k
Tobacco Stems ............ ........ 5 to 8 2 to 4.... ...... 31
Cow Manure (fresh) ................. 0.40 0 to .41 0.16 0 31
Horse Manure (fresh) ................ 0.53 0 to .60 0.28 0.21
Sheep Manure (fresh)................ 0.67 1 00 0 23 0.83
Hog Manure (fresh)... .............. 060 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh) .... ............. 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Mtnurp ......... .. 0.63 0.76 0 26 070












Suggestions to Purchasers.


By carefully studying the foregoing analysis of fertilizers, noting their
actual content of the necessary fertilizing elements, namely: ammonia,
potash (K2 0), available and insoluable phosphoric acid,-the only in-
gredients of any value to the grower-discarding all '"Fancy Brands"
"Names" or "Trade Marks;" paying no attention to "Equivalents of
Bone Phosphate of Lime" or equivalent of '"Sulphate or muriate of Pot-
ash" or equivalents of "nitate of Soda" or "'Sulphate of Ammonia;" baa-
ing his caluculatons solely on the agricultural and commercial values of
the good. offered as shown by the percentage of the three elemetns of
fertility required, and comparing the tables and analysis given with the
commercial values, the planter, knowing from experience the particular
elements his crop or soil demands, can intelligently select the goods re-
quired, and approximate closely the commercial value thereof.
The State Law requires that:
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commercial fertilizers
cotton soed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust, or tobacco
meal manufactured, sold in, or imported into this State, shall have se-
curely attached or labeled, and plainly stamped thereon the number of
net pounds of fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark
under which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of the manu-
facturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percentage of ammonia,
and the source from which the same is derived, the percentage of potash
soluble in water, the percentage of available phosphoric acid and the per-
centage of insoluble phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contain-
ed therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein, and all
other ingredients from whidh it is compounded, also the stamp showing
the payment of the license fee provided for in this act.
The Sheriffs of the counties of this State are hereby authorized, and it
is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at public sale,' each and every
bag, barrel or package of commercial fertilizer,cotton seed meal, castor
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, im-
ported into or sold in this State, which shall not have securely attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Section; Provided, That
should the owner show to the satisfaction of the Sheriff that such tag or
label or stamp had been. attached and the same had become detached, the
Sheriff shall release the same without cost to the owner.
When "Phosphoric Acid" only is given on the tag, or the "equivalent of
Bone Phosphate of Lime," it may be taken as insoluable to a large ex-
tent. Florida Rock Phosphate contains 26 to 35 per cent of "phosphoric









acid" equivalent to 501 to 86 per cent of "Bone Phosphate of Lime." Its
commercail value is $5.20 to $7.00. The same rock converted into
"'Superphosphate" or "Acid Phosphate" with 14 to 19 per cent "avail-
able" has a commercial value of $12.60 to $17.10, while its agricultural
value is proportionally much greater as raw or untreated rock, has but
little agricultural value
The Phosphoric Acid of "Superphosphate," "Acid Phosphate," and
"'dissolved bone" are identical chemical and agricultural. Large quan-
tities of "Acid Phosphate" are used and sold as "Dissolved Bone," ad-
vantage being taken of a prejudice existing against a name or term, the
available phosphoric acid of "Acid Phosphate" is equally valuable as that
.from "bones," commercially and agriculturally.
On this subject the following quotation from the report of ihe State
'Chemist of Georgia, for 1899-1900. Serial number 36 is pertinent:
"It should be borne in mind always that State valuations are relative
.and approximate only, and are only intended to serve as a guide. It is
much to be desired that farmers should study the analysis giving the ac-
tual percentages of plant food more, and pay no attention whatever to
names and brands. They should realize, for instance, that in nine cases
out of ten, brands known as "Pure Dissolved Bone" contain not a particle
of bone, but are made simply out of phosphate rock. They are every
"whit and grain" as good as if they were made from bone, the available
phosphoric acid from rock being just as available and identically the same
as the available phosphoric acid from bone. The proof that such brands
are not made -from bone is that they contain no ammonia, and if they
were made from bone the percentage of ammonia would be stated, and
it would be charged for. This is only one instance of the folly of being
influenced by names and brands-many might be given. Remember that
a multiplicity of brands is also expensive to the manufacturer, and you
have to pay the cost in the long run. Study the markets, select a time for
purchasing when general trade in fertilzers is dull, club together with
some of your neighbors whose credit is of the best, or, better, who have
a little spare cash, and then order from a reliable manufacturer, stipulat-
ing, if you have a preference, just what materials the goods shall be made
from, and especially the guaranteed percentage of ammonia phosphoric
acid and potash. Let the maker call it anything he pleases. In this way
you will be sure to have a first-class goods bought at the lowest market
price. But if you are going to wait till the last minute to buy your fer-
tilizers, at the very time when everybody else wants his, and are going to
buy on time and pay interest, why then be. assured your fertilizers are go-
ing to be expensive just as your clothing or any of your household goods
would be if bought in the same way."
The following price list of manural chemicals is quoted by reputable
dealers and importers in Jacksonville in lots of one to ten tons.


t











The same figures can be made in Pensacola or Tampa. For Spot cash
F. O. B. cars.
Less than 5 to 10 10
5 tons tons tons
High Grade Potash 90 to 95 per cent.Sulphate (4S to 50 per cent. K20)...... $5200 $51 00 $5000
sulphate Potash, 4 to 55 per cent. sulphate (25 to 3:1 per cent. (K20)...... 3200 :3100 3000
Muriate Potash, 80 to 85 per cent. Muri.te (42 to 45 per cent. K 20) ......... 4t t( 45 () 4400
Kainit, 12 to 13 percent. Actual Pota h...... ................... ....... 15 10 14 50 1300
Blood and Bone, 6(i per cent Ammonia.................................. 26 00 2550
Blood and Bone. 7 to 8 per cent. Ammonia.......... ...................... 2750 .7 (00 2650
Blood and Bone, 10 per cent. Ammonia..... ..................... .. 32 00 31 50 3100
Raw Bone Meal, 2 to 4 prr cent Ammonia, 22 to 25 per cent, total Phos-
phoric Acid.. ........................ .2 (I3 31 50 31 00
Boneblack, 16 co 1S per cent. available Phosphoric Acid.................... (-I 24 00 2400
AcidPhos. hate, 14percent. Phophoric Acid ....................... 1300 1250 1200
Nirrate Soda, 18 to 11 per cent. Ammonia.... .... ..................... 4700 46 O 46 00
Sulphate Ammonia, 24 to 26 per cent. AmmoniA.. ....................... 72 0 1 00 7( 00
Dried Blood, 17 per cent. Ammonia .................... ........... 47 00 46 .(1 46 00
Ground Casto Pomace, 63. to 8,% per cent. Ammonia.............. .... 2100 20 50 200
Canada Hard Woxo A hes, 2 to 8 per cent K20 (PotaWhl................. 1500 14 f 1400
Pulverized tobaccoo Stem, 5.to 8 per cent. K2O (Poth).............. ...... 15 0 1450 1400
Tobacco Stems (Baled) 5 to S per cent K(20 (Pota-h) ..................... 16 1530 1B (K)
Tobacco Ilut. High Grade. 5 to s per cent. K20 (Potash)................... 1 ( 2050 2000
Steamed Bone Flour, 3 to 4 per cent. Ammonia, 25 to 28 per cent. Phos-
phoric Acid ......................... .. ... .... ....... . 25 0 24 50 24 00
Bright Cotton seed Meal. 7 to 9 per cent. Ammonia........... ............. 2400 23 50 23 00
Dark Cotton See I Meal, ( to 8 per .cent. Ammnia ..................... 2 215) 1 00
FORMULAS AND VALUES.

A favorite formula, much used in Florida, and put up by most of the
manufacturers who cater to the delllads of our vegetable and fruit grow-
ers has the following average composition:
Ammolnia ......................................... 3 per cent
Available Phosphoric Acid ........................... 7 per cent
Insoluabll 'le osphoric Acid ......................... 2 per cent
Potash (K20) .................................... 10 per cent
Its commlnrcial value as given is $2;.40 per ton. This formula may be
compounded from high grade chemicals and standard material at a cost
well within the limits of the commercial values given, paying the market
prices quoted on proceeding page.
Nc. 1.

375 tbs Nitrate of Soda 17 per cent allnuonia equals 3.16 per cent am-
monia.
1200 lbs Acid Phosphate 14 per cent available equals 8.40 per cent avail-
able.
S' lbs Acid Phosphate 2 per cent insoluable equals 1.20 per cent in-
soluable.
425 lbs Sulphate of Potash (48 per cent K20) equals 10.30 per cent
potash.

'2000
Commercial value, mixed and bagged $31.34.
Market price of material (ton lots) $27.65.









No. 2.
500 Tbs Sulphate of Potash (45 per cent K20) equals 11.2 per cent.
300 lbs Sulpl te of Ammonia (22 per cent ammonia) equals 3.3 per
cent.
1200 lbs Acid Phosphate (14 per cent available) equals 8.4 per cent.
' lbs Acid Phosphate (3 per cennt insoluable) equals 1.8 per cent.

2000
Commercial value, mixed and bagged $32.'98.
Market price of materials in toil lots $31.(0.
No. 3.
500 lbs H. G. Muriate of Potash (42 per cent K20) equals 10.5 per cent
potash.
300 lbs Sulphate of Ammonia (24 per cennt ammonia) equals 3.6 per
cent ammonia.
1200 lbs Acid Phosphate (14 per cent available) equals 8.4 per cent
available.
' s Acid Phosphate (2 per cent insoluable) equals 1.2 per cent in-
soluable.

2000
Commercial value, bagged and mixed $32,99.
Market price of materials in one ton lots $30.10.
No. 4.

800 lbs Cotton Seed Meal 8 per cent ammonia equals 3.2 per cent am-
monia.
' bs Cotton Seed Meal 2 per cent available equals 0.8 per cent avail-
able phosphoric acid.
800 lbs Acid Phosphate 14 per cent available equals 5.60 per cent avail-
able.
400 lbs Sulphate of Potash 50 per cent (K20) equals 10 per cent pot-
ash.
Commercial value, bagged and mixed $29.00.
Market price on ton lots $25.20.'
The foregoing formulas are sufficient to illustrate, they may be varied
to suit the peculiar demands of each crop and locality.
Bearing in mind that, what is wanted are the elements of fertility only,
all other substances simply add weight and not vilue to the goods. High
grade goods are relatively the cheapest. All reputable manufacturers will
furnish "mixed goods" of various combination at the above prices for
cash.






21

"Blood and Bone," Tankage," "Garbage" and tnuimerus other bye
products are excellent fertilizers, but depend solely on their Ammonia,'
"Phosphoric Acid" and "Potash" for their values, the "odor" or smell
has no value. Their analysis is the only safe guide as to their agricul-
tural value.


List of Oaths of Manufacturers of Fertilizers Filed in 1901.

April 13-H. J. Baker & Bro's. Vegetable Manure, American Agricul-
tural Chemical Co.
April 13-H. J. Baker & Bro's. Stawberry Manure, American Agri-
cultural Chemical Co.
April 13-H. J. Baker & Bro's. Fruit and Vine, American Agricul-
tural Chemical Co.
H. J. Baker & Bro's. Orange Manure, American Agrculitural Chemi-
cal Co.
April 13-Preston's Blood and Bone, American Agricultural Chem-
ical Co.
Aprli 13-Preston's Vegetable Fertilizer, American Agricultural
Chemical Co.
April 13-Preston's Fruit and Vine grower, American Agricultural
Chemical Co.
April 13-Preston's Orange Tree Food, American Agricultural Chem-
ical Oo.
Aprli 24-Crocker's Vegetable Fertilizer, Amercian Agricultural
Chemical Co.
April 24-Crocker's Fruit and Vine, American Agricultural Chemical
Co.
April 24-Crocker's Orange Tree Fertilizer, American Agricultural
Chemical Co
June 24-Williams & Clark's Blood and Bone, American Agricul-
tural Chemical Co.
June 23-H. J. Baker & Bro's. Tomato Special, American Agricul-
tural Chemical Co.
January 4-Bulk Acid Phosphate, Ashepoo's Fertilizer Co.
Sept. 6-Bowker's Hardwood Ashes, Bowker Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Dissolved Bone, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-H. P. & B. Cotton Hustler, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Soluble Potash Mixture, Mutual Fertlizer Co.
Oct. 15-H. P. & B. Dissolved Bone, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Chas. Ellis' Cumberland Fertilizer, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Dissolved Bone with Potash, Mutual Fertilizer Co.









Oct. 15-Potash Compound, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-German Kainit, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Ellis' Harvest Fertilizer, Mutual Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 15-Big Special bea Island Cotton, Mutual Fertliizer Co.
Aug. 31-Currie's Kentucky Phosphate, Currie Fertilizer Co.
Aug. 31-Currie's Complete Fertilizer, Currie Fertilizer Co.
Aug. 31-Currie's Standard Vegetable Grower, Currie's Fertilizer Co.
Fe 'b. 4-H. G. Fish Guano, Charlottee Harbor Fisheries Co.
Sept. 7-No. 1 Peruvian Fish and Guano Mixture, Florida Fertilizer
Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-No. 2 Double Strength of Potash, Florida Fertilizer Manu-
factuing Co.
Sept. 7-No. 3 Blood, Bone and Potash, Florida Fertilizer Manu-
factuing Co.
Sept. 7-Acme Orange Tree Mixture, Flordia Fertilizer .anufactur-
ing Co.
Sept. 7-Fish and Potash, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Potato Mixture, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Lettuce and Cake Mixture, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing
Co.
Spet. 7-Cantaloupe Special, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Strawberry Fruiter, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Special for Young Pines, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing
Co.
Sept. 7-Pine Apple Fruiter, Florida F.crilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Cotton Food, Florida Fertilizer Manufacturing Co.
Sept. 7-Cotton Special, Florida Fertiilzer Manufacturing Co.
Feb. 7-Maryland Dissolved Bone, Georgia Chemical Works.
Oct. 9-Goulding's English Bone, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's Vegetable Compound, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Samson and Phosphate, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's St. George Guano, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's XXX Potash, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's 4 Per Cent Potash, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's Potash Mixture, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's H. G. Phosphate and Potash, Goulding Fertilizer
Co.
Oct. 9-English Phosphate, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. '9-Goulding's Atlas Phosphate, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Gem Guano, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Muriate of Potash, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Genuine German Kainit, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Oct. 9-Goulding's H. G. Acid Phosphate, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Jan. 29-Blood and Bone, B. Hart & Co.









Nov. 6-Bovkin's DissoJved Animal Bone, Home Fertilizer Chemical
Works.
Nov. 6-'Home Fertilizer Chemicals, Home Fert iizer Chemical
Works.
Nov. (i-Crealite Top Dressing, Home Fertilizer Chemical Works.
Feb. 21-Pure Fish Scraps, Stephen Lee.
April 4-Ground Fish Bone, Stephen Lee.
July 24-Fish Bone and Potash, Stephen Lee.
Jan. 26-Melon Fertilizer, Lazerette Guano Co.
Feb. 8-Early Trucker, Lazerette Guano Co.
Feb. 21-Nitrate of Soda, Lazerette Guano Co.
July 10-Special Truck Manure, Louisville Fertilizer Co.
July 10-Tomato Special, Louisville Fertilizer Co.
July 10--Vegetable Grower, Louisville Fertilizer Co.
Aug. 23-Canada Ashes, C. R. Tyson.
Aug. 23-H. G. Blood and Bone, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Blood and Bone, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Dried Blood, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Blood, Bone and Potash, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Ground Bone, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Bone Black, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Acid Phosphate. C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23.-Ground Castor Pomace, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Tobacco Dust, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Nitrate of Soda, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-German Kainit, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Muriate of Potash, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Sulphate of Potash, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Double Manure Salts or Low Grade Potash, C. R. Tysen.
Aug. 23-Sulphate of Ammonia, C. R. Tysen.
Sept. 17-Mapes' Orange Tree Manure, Mapes' Formula & Peruvian
Guano Co.
Sept. 17-Mapes' Vegetable Manure, Mapes' Formula & Peruvian
Guano Co.
Sept. 17-Mapes' Pine Apple Manure, Mapes' Formula & Peruvian
Guano Co.
Sept. 17-Mapes' Fruit and Vine Manure, Mapes' Formula & Peruvian
Guano Co.
Jan. 12-K. K. K. Soluble Ammonia Bone, Mobile Phosphate Co.
Oct. 21-Big Four, Nelson Morris & Co.
Oct. 21-Ground H. G. Tankage, Nelson Morris & Co-
Oct. 28-Special Vegetable Fertilizer, G. Ober & Sons Co.
Oct. 28-Ober's Orange Tree Fertilizer, G. Ober & Sons Co.
Oct. 28-Ober's Fruit and Vine Fertilizer, G. Ober & Sons Co.









Jan. 12-Acid Phosphate with 4 per cent Potash, J. Rice Smith.
Feb. 13-Stern's Acid Phosphate and Potash, Standard Guano &
Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Pure, Ground, Raw Bone and Potash, Standard 'Guano
Chemical Manufacturing Co.'
Aug. 28-Standard Fruit and Vine Fertilizer, Standard Guano &
Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Mississippi Home Guano, Standard Guano & Chemical
Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Blood, Bone and Meat Guano, Standard Guano & Chem-
ical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Standard Ammoniated Soluble Guano, Standard Guano &
Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Standard Vegetable Fertilizer, Standard Guano & Chem-
ical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Orange Tree Fertilizer, Standard Guano & Chemical Manu-
facturing Co.
Aug. 28-Stern's Acid Phosphate and Potash, Standard Guano &
Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Kainit, Standard Guano & Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Stern's Dissolved Bone, Standard Guano & Chemical Manu-
facturing Co.
Sept. 13-Swift Sure Phosphate, M. I'. Shumaker & Co.
Sept. 13-Bone, Meal and Potash, M. L. Shumaker & Co.
Sept. 13-Swift Sure Phosphate, (Tomatoes), M. L. Shumaker & Co.
Jan. 18-Sea Island Cotton Food No. 1, A. J. Strickland.
Jan. 28-Sea Island Cotton Grower, A. J. Strickland.
Jan. 28-H. G. Georgia Melon Grower, A. J. Strickland.
Jan. 28-Dissolved Bone and Potash Mixture, A. J. Strickland.
July 3-Southern Fertilzer Co's. No. 2, Southern Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Southern Fertlilzer Co's. Cary's Special for Fruit, Southern
Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Southern Fertilizer Co's. Vegetable, Southern Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Southern Fertilizer Co's. No. 4, Southern Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Southern Fertilizer Co's. Extra Fruit and Vine, Southern
Fertilizer Co.
Aug. 28-Acid Phosphate, Standard Guano & Chemical Manufactur-
ing Co.
Aug. 28-Champion Farmers' Choice, Southern Guano & Chemical
Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Stern's Ammoniated Raw Bone, Phosphate, Standard Guano
& Chemical Manufacturing Co.
Aug. 28-Pure Raw Ground Bone, Standard Guano & Chemical
Manufacturing Co.









April 6-H. G. Sulphate of Potash, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
April 6-H. G. Acid Phosphate, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
April 6-Castor Pomace, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
April 12-Nitrate of Soda, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
April 12-Tampa Fertilizer Co's. Pine Apple Manure, Tampa
Fertilizer Co.
Anril 6-Double Manure Salts, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
May 7-H. G. Blood and Bone, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-H. G. Vegetable. Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Potato Fertilizer, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Blood, Bone and Potash, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Orange Fertilizer Special, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Strawberry Fertilizer, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 3-Fruit and Vine, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13-Tobacco Dust, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13-German Kainit, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13--Muriate of Potash, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13-Bone Meal, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13-Blood and Bone, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
July 13-Dissolved Bone, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
Aug. 23-Tobacco Stem Meal, Tampa Fertilizer Co.
Sept. 25-Tampa Fertilizer Co's. Special Mixture No. 1, Tampa
Fertilizer Co.
Sept. 18-Scott's Gossypium Potasso, Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.
July 25-German Kainit, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Muriate of Potash, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Sulphate of Potash, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-H. G. Sulphate of Potash, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Seminole Pulverised Tobacco Stems, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Canada Hardwood Ashes, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Dixie Brand H. G. Tobacco Dust, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Osceloa Brand Tobacco Dust, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ground Castor Pomace, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Damaraland Guano, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Blood and Bone, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-H. G. Blood and Bone, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Dried Blood, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Pure Dissolved Bone, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Pure Ground Bone, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Pigs foot Brand Blood and Bone, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Sulphate of Ammonia, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Nitrate of Soda, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25--H. G. Acid Phosphate, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Casava Fertilizer. Wilson & Toomer.









July 25-Ideal Sugar Cane Fertilizer, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Complete Sweet Potato Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Peruvian Vegetable Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Special Strawberry Fertilizer, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Florida Grass Special, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Cotton Fetrilizer, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Special Formula for Corn, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Florida Bean Special, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Fertilizer, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Vegetable Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal TIotato Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Speci 1 Fruit and Vine Manure, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Ideal Blood, Bone and Potash, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Special Mixture No. 2, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Special Mixture No. 1, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Special Mixture for McC. & Lawton, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Seminole Brand Pineapple Mixture, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-Florida Special Pineapple Fert., Wilson & Tooimcr.
July 25-Special Strawberry Formula, Wilson & Toomer.
July 25-McCall's Special Mixture No. 2, Wilson & Toomer.
July 19-Double Manure Salts, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Ground Castor Pomace, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Tobacco Dust, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19--H. G. Sulphate of Potash, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Nitrate of Soda, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Acid Phosphate, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Strawberry Fruiter, Armour Fetilizcr Works.
July 19-Armour's Genuine German Kainit, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Bone Flour, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Practical Pine apple, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's H. G. Blood and Bone, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Pure Raw Bone, Armour Fertiliber Works.
July 19-Armour's Blood and Bone, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Blood and Bone, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Dried Blood, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Vegetable, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Practical Trucker, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Blood, Bone and Potash, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Fruit and Vine, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Cotton Special, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Fruit and Root Crop Special, Armour Fertilizer
Works.











July 19-Armour's Cotton and Corn Grower, Armour Fertilizer
Works.
July 19-Armour's All Soluble, Armour Fertilizer Works.
July 19-Armour's Orange Tree Manure, Armour Fertilizer Works.
Aug. 1-Tobacco Stems, Armour Fertilizer Works.
Aug. 1-Armour's Pulverized Tobacco Stems, Armour Fertilizer
Works.
Aug. 1-Muriate Potash, Armour Fertilizer Works.
Aug. 1-CanadaHard wood Ashes, Armour Fertilizer Works.
Agu. 1-Armour's Golden Fruiter, Armour Fertilizer Works.
Nov. 4-Home Guano, Standard Guano & Chemical Manufacturing
Co.
Nov. 5-A. L. Wilson Co's. Acid Phosphate, Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Nov. '-A. L. Wilson Co's Ammoniated Guano, Gouiding Fertilizer
Co.
Nov. 5-Shumaker's Potash Mixture. Goulding Fertilizer Co.
Nov. 5-Shumaker's Pride, Goulding Fertilizer Co.


List of Oaths of Manufacturers of Cotton Seed Meal Filed
in 1901.

Cotton seed meal, Oct. 14, 1901, filed by Southern Cotton Oil Co.
Cotton seed meal, Oct. 18, 1901, filed by McCaw Manufacturing Co.
Dark cotton seed meal, Sept. 24, 1901, filed by Florida Manufacuring
Co.
Cotton seed meal, Sept. 14, 1901, field by Georgia Cotton Oil Co.
Cotton seed meal, Sept. 18, 1901, filed by Alabama Cotton Oil Co.,
Selma, Ala.
Cotton seed meal. Sept. 26, 1901, filed by Alabama Cotton Oil Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.
Bright cotton seed meal, Aug. 1, 1901, filed by Armour Fertilizer
Works.
Dark cotton seed meal, Aug. 1, 1901, filed by Armour Fertilizer Works.
Cotton seed meal, March 15, 1901, filed by Alabama Cotton Oil Co.
Cotton seed meal, March 16, 1901, filed by Booker & Gentry.
Cotton seed meal, March 15, 1901. filed by Georgia Cotton Oil Co.
Sea Island cotton seed meal, March 19, 1901, filed by Valdosta Guano
Co.
Cotton seed meal, July 3, 1901, filed by Tallahassee Cotton Oil Co.,
now known as the Florida Cotton Ooil Co.
Cotton seed meal, Nov. 13, 1901, filed by Milledgeville Oil Mills.
Cotton seed meal, Nov. 9, 1901, filed by Lathrop Cotton Oil Co.


















































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