Title: Florida monthly bulletin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00006
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: September 1901
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
rb 5 b U.

1Nor1 I
'I. *1


Vol. 11.


No. 71.


FLORIDA


(Departnment of Arlculture.)




..Monthly Bulletin..


I SEPTEMBER, 1901.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crops.
Part II. Fertilizers.
Part III. VWeather Report.
Part IV. Miscellaneous.


SThese Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them . I


TALLAHABBEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAHASSEE,FLA.








County Map of the State of Florida.
(For the Bulletin.)












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


Hox. B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.

ALACHUA COUNTY-Cotton has regained nothing of the loss; it will
be considerably short of an average. Sugar cane, field peas and vevet
beans making a fine crop. Hay and potatoes are making fine average-
crops; orange trees doing well. Fine weather for saving hay and a good!
supply is being harvesed
BAKER COUNTY-Cotton crop is very short, fully twenty-five per
cent. short of the average crop. Sugar cane, rice and velvet beans will
make fine crops; sweet potatoes only medium, and all other crops
more or less short.
BRADFORD COUNTY-We have had so much rain that cotton will
yield little more than half as much as last year. Too wet also for sweet
potatoes; sugar cane generally gooa and doing well; corn not more than
half a crop. More hay is housed than ever before. Rice and velvet
beans also very fine crops.
BREVARD COUNTY-Seasons are good this year; we have had no
storm and all crops are good. Pineapples are more promising than
for years past; weather fine and cool, and general good health prevail-
ing; live stock, hogs and cattle are healthy and the range is fine.
CALHOUN COUNTY-Cotton is very short, and so injured that it will
not be able to recover much if any. Sugar cane, rice and sweet potatoes
will make fine crops, also hay. Orange trees in this section are too
young to bear much fruit yet, though they are growing rapidly, with
prospects for fine groves in the near future; also the same can be said
of grape fruit.
CITRUS COUNTY-In some sections of the county the stand of
sugar cane was very poor, but there will be an average crop, with an
increased acreage. Other field crops are very good. Oranges doing
remarkably well.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-The cotton crop will be quite short, a great
many bolls died on stalk when about half grown. A kind of rust or









blight appeared on cotton about September 1st, which spread very
rapidly, doing much damage, as above stated. The hay crop is good,
but the rains have prevented the harvest, and causing some farmers to
lose much of what they cut; the rains have also cut short the sweet
potato crop. Live stock generally in fair condition.
SDADE COUNTY-The seasons have been the most favorable for all
crops that we have had for several years; crops are good, and the fruit
trees are thriving the very best, a good crop of all kinds of fruit.
DESOTo COUNTY-This has been a good year for crops and fruits of all
sorts; we have had no extreme of either drouth or flood, thus making
conditions favorable for growing everything in season. Preparations
are beginning for fall vegetable planting.
EscAMBIA COUNTY-The cotton crop was damaged about half by the
August storm, .and heaps of rotten corn in the field, caused by the hot
wind on the 12th of August. Crops are not going to be as good as
believed at one time. Hay is very fine, and so is the sweet potato crop.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-All the crops that are planted in this county
are in fine condition, and bid fair to make a successful yield. No
cotton is grown in the county.
GADSDEN COUNTY-Upland cotton is short of last year in yield
about 30 per cent.; .sea island is in much better condition, and prospect
for yield is better, but it is also short. Potatoes and peanuts are un-
usually good, and field peas, rice and hay are a fair average.
HERNANDO COUNTY-Field crops are generally good over the county,
the average will be much better than last year. Fruit trees are coming
on rapidly.
HOLMES COUNTY-Weather warm and conditions for gathering the
crops are fine; nearly all are gathered except cane and potatoes, and
all are more or less :short, with one or two exceptions.
JACKSON COUNTY-The top crop of cotton has been eaten by the
caterpillar; corn crop is poor because of drought; sugar cane and sweet
potato crops fair; hay and peanuts fine, and worth more to the farmer
than for years before. Peas, rice and velvet beans will make fine crops.
JEFFERSON COUNTY-Cotton crop is very short, in fact, all crops
are much short of usual average.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY-Sea island cotton crop very short, will hardly
yield more than half a crop. All the other field crops are a good
average.
LAKE COUNTY-With the exception of field peas, the field crops in
the county will average up well. Fruit trees are growing well.
LEE 'COUNTY-We have had rather too much rain for sweet potatoes









to make full crop, but all other field crops are fine, and fruit trees
and fruit are in excellent condition; there will be a fine crop of fruit.
LEON COUNTY-The cotton crop of this county will be from 20 per
cent to 25 per cent. short of last year, and 10 to 15 per cent. short
of an average crop; corn is considerably short; hay will yield probably
the largest crop ever cut in the county. Sweet potatoes are about 25
per cent. short, owing to too much rain; sugar cane and other crops are
very good.
LEVY COUNTY-Both kinds of cotton are short in the county; pro-
vision crops will average well; velvet beans and hay are the best for
several years.
MADISON COUNTY-Caterpillars are badly injuring the top and middle
crops of cotton, which will cut the yield down to almost if not
quite one-half; the provision crops are all very good, except sweet
potatoes, the crop will be short; too much rain.
MANATEE COUNTY-Everything is very much the same as usual; very
heavy rains during last of September drowned out all young crops, but
there were not many of them. The main food crops have done well,
and the fruit trees and fruit are in fine condition; there will be
a very fine crop of fruit this season.
NASSAU COUNTY-Sugar cane is doing well, the dry weather in first
part of season kept it back, but plenty of rain since will give a fair
crop; sweet potatoes are looking well, but dry weather will make them:
late in maturing; hay is short on account of drought, but with plenty
of rain crops will average well. Orange, lemon and other citrus fruit
trees are looking fine.
ORANGE COUNTY-Crops of all sorts are generally very good; fruit
trees are growing rapidly and looking fine. Live stock of all kinds in
good condition.
OSCEOLA COUNTY-The crops of this county are in a very fine average
conditionn; the yield of a number of them will be above the average. The
fruit trees are in fine shape, and a good crop will be gathered.
PAsco COUNTY-This has been an exceptionally fine season for all
,crops raised in this county. Tobacco has done unusually well. Orange,
lemon, lime and grape fruit trees have made the finest growth since
1894 aid '.95; a large acreage will be planted in this county the coming
winter. Strawberries, which is the principal money crop at present
in this section, have done better than for several seasons. Other crops
good.
POLK COUNTY-Heavy rains have injured sweet potatoes some, but
no other crop; the hay crop is fine, nearly all has been cut and housed;
cassaya, ye]yet beans and sugar cane are all in fine condition. Orange


t







6

and lemon trees also in fine condition, and the prospects bright for a
good yield.
PUTNAM COUNTY-All crops except cotton are in a very fair average
*condition, and promise good average yields; the hay crop is fine and
about 75 per cent. of it is now saved. Fruit trees are looking well.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-Considering the unfavorable season, storm
and drought, the crops of this county are doing very well, and will
show up fair returns. Some crops are very .good, but a few have been
injured by too much rain or by drought. Farmers will have enough to
carry them through.
SUWANNEE COUNTY-The cotton crop has fallen off in this county
very materially, and corn is also short, but other crops will make a
good average yield. Owing to inferior seed, the straw of the broom
corn is not quite as good as last season, but our people can make it
to perfection without a doubt. Rice crop promises a good yield; the
mill is running and will continue through the season on full time.
TAYLOR COUNTY-The cotton crop in this county is very short, and
-will hardly make much more than half a crop; the seasons have gen-
erally been unfavorable for most crops, and none of them are up to the
usual average.
VOLUSIA COUNTY-Crops such as are grown in the county are in good
condition, and will average a good yield. Fruit trees are doing well, and
.some good fruit will be had in some sections of the county.
WALTON COUNTY-Except cotton, which is quite short, there will
'be a good average yield of crops in the county, as most of the food
crops are in fairly good condition. It is generally considered that there
will be a considerable increase in acreage of all crops for another year,
-specially velvet beans, peas, sugar cane and corn.
WASRINGTON COUNTY-The cotton crop is fairly good, and the stand-
:ard crops are nearly all up to a good average; velvet beans, peanuts,
cassava -and hay are specially good crops; there is a very large crop of
'hay being saved, and farmers will have plenty to go through the winter
zand -spring on.











Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for September,
1901, compared with an average.


Counties


Alachua...............
Baker .................
Bradford.......... ...
Brevard ...............
Calhoun...............
C itrus .................
Clay ..................
(;olumbia ............
Dade......... .........
DeSoto.......... .....
Escambia ............
Franklin........ .....
Gadsden ..............
Hernando........ ..
Hillsborough..........
Holmes .............
Jackson.............
Jefferson ..............
LaFayette......... ...
Lake...... .............
Lee...................
Leon ..................
Levy.................
Madison ...............
Manatee.............. .
Marion...............
Nassau................
Orange.................
Osceola ...............
Pasco................
Polk ... ........... .
Putnam..............
St. Johns..............
.anta Rosa.................
-Suwannee..............
Taylor......... ......
'Volusia............. .
Wakulla........ ......
W alton ..............
Washington...........

'General averages.......


Upland eland Sugar Field i Velvet
Cotton Cotton Cane Peas ce Beans



Q" a o _




. .. .... .... 120 120 1 100 100 100 ...
. 60 60 80 8 100 100 75 80 100 100 1.
..... .......... 80 100 100 100 0 100 100
0 5 0 75751 100 1000100

.......... 0 95 100 100 100 110 100 100 110 10

.......... 90 80 9 95 100 100 10 105 10....5 11
. . .. . 100 100 . . . ... ....
.... ..... ... 105 120 100 100 110 105 100 11
75 75 .. 100 10 10 0 100 100 110 1


.. .... .... 90 85 90 90 .... 90 90
80 90 0 80 90 100 0 100 100... 10.



. .. .......... .... 80 80 100 90 75 100 100 100
.... .... 75 80 100 100 .... .... 10000
0 85 100 8 95 100 95 100 90 10 100 120
750 0.. 7 90 10 100 00 100 1 100 100
0 60 7 75 80 85 0 50 ....... 90
80 65 90 90 80 90 100 100 100 100......


.... .... 6 0 0 100 9 0 120 100 140 10
... ....... .... 100 100 50 50 ... 100 100


..... .... .... .... 100 100 100 100 90 90 100 100
70 75 .. .... 0 100 9 100 90 100 100 110
S80 0 70 70 90 98 100 100 100 100 100 150
S 0 0 60 60 100 810 100 .... ...
.............. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100


. 80 100 80 100 100 100 1001 100 100 100 110 120
. .... ...... . .... 90 100 75 80 . ...... ...-
.. ... ..... .... 70 75 75 75 25 80 100 100
... .. ... ... 100 100 100 100 90 90 101


.. .. ........100 10 100 95 100 8100 100 110
O ... ..... ... 15 110 115 125 100 150 170
... .... 70 70 100 100 00 10 ... .... 9



. . . . ...... 80 85 80 80 . . . . ......
90 i 0 ... 11 ... 100 100 0 0 5 5 10 100
8100 100 100 100 100 100 110 120



.. .... 60 60 80 800 90 100 100
.. .... 5 60 70 75 75 75 25 80 851
...1 .... .. 9 100 ...... .... ... 100 1 0

5 60 00 55 100 100 50 60 100 10 100 100
12b 185 110 115 125 100 150 170






80 85 .... .... 70 100 85 80 80 8 85 90
.... .. 85 80 80...




95 90 .. ... 100 100 9 0 5 65 100 150

78 73 72 71 94 98 91 89 92-8 108 11








8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continuedl.


Sweet Peanuts
Potato's

Counties



U 4


Alaohuu ............
Baker ...............
Bradford................
Brevard..............
Calhoun.... ......
Citrus...................
Clay. ....... ........
Columbia ............
Dade ........... ......
DeSoto ..............
Escambia................
Franklin...............
Gadsden ............
Hernando .............
Hilliborough..... ....
Holmes ..............
Jackson... ...........
Jefferson...............
Lafayette ............
Lake ...............
Lee.. ...............
Leon .............
Lvy ................
Madison.... .........
Manatee............
Marion.................
Nassau ............ ....
Orange...............
Osceola..:.............
/Pasco.... ......... ..
Polk ... ........ ... ..
Putnam .............
St. Johns ...............
Santa Rosa............
Suwannee...........
Taylor.................
Volusia .................
Wakulla.......... ......
Walton ............ ....
Washington...........

General averages..


95 91 91


70
50
100

80

10l
100

180
150
95
125


95
80

90
100
100
95
100
100
100
100


70
110


75
100
60

50
95
100

91


Cassava Hay Bananas OTreea


z 5 a
no i3 "6- 0
10 20
... .. 90 90 .... .... 80

110 14 .... .... 110
100 100 100 150 120 150 120
...... . 90 90 .... .... ...
100 100 .. ... 100
.... .... 110 120 ... .... 120
100 100 105 95 ...... 125
. ... . . 100 100 10
95 90 110 120 100 110 100
100 100 150 150 ........ ....
.. .. .... .. .... .... ...
.. ... 100 100 ............



. 100 100 .... .... ...
100 00 ..... . ..
100 80 100 100 50 .... 100
100 100 110110 120 120 120
...... .. 100 140 ... ...
100 100 100 105 ..........
.... . 100 200 ... ..
100 100 100 100 100 100 100
1001100 100 95 .. .... 110
. 50 50 .... .... 100
100 10Q 100 110 ... .... 100
140 125 150 150 ... .... 110
90 90 100 100 .. .. 100
125 125 150 180 125 125 160
. 90 75 .... .... 100
.. ..... 90 90 ... .... 50
100 100 100 100........ ..
100 100 .100 100 ... .......
100 100 .... ... .. ... ..
100 180 90 75 .... .... 100
75 75 50 50 ....... ....
...... 75 80 .... .... ....
99 200 110 250 ....... ...

101 155 101 112 105 115 105


75

150

105
110



80








100
120

100
90
100
145.




1250



109I








9

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Lemon
Trees


Lime
Trees


t(rape
Fruit
Trees


Counties .

o S a a

A lachua.... .. ....... .... ...... ..... ...... ......
B aker.................. .......... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... .....
B radford .. ............. .. .. .. .. ... ...... ...... . .. .... ...
Brevard ............... ............. .. ...... 120 50
C alhoun .. ... .. .. ....... ..... . . .... .. ...... ...... ......
C itrus...... ... ......... .... .... .. ...... ...... ..... ...... ......
C lay .... . .... ....... .. . 100 ..... .. ....... ... ...
Colum bia.. .. .... ....... .... ... ..........
Dade..... ......................... 105 105 100 100 105 105
DeSoto....... ....................... 100 120 100 110 110 90
E scam bia .. .. ........... .. ...... ...... ..... ..... ...... ......
F ran klin ... ..... ............ . .... . . ...... ......
G adsden...... .............. ..... .. .... ...... ...... ...... ..... ......
H ernando .. .. ........... ... ........ .. ............ ...... 100 .
Hillsborough ... .......... 10 ...... ...... .............
Holmes............ ............... ... ..... .. ...... ............
Jackson ... .................. ... .......... ... ......
Jefferson...... ... .. .. ........ ...... ..... .... .... ..
Lafayette......................... ....... ............. .. .. .. ..
Lake ............ 100 ................. ... .
Lee..... ....................... 10 100 110 110 10i 100
Leon .. .. ....................... ... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... I ......
Leon...
L evy . . ....................... ...... ........ ...... ..... ......
Madison .... ................... .... ...... ................
Manatee ..... ... ...... .... .. 100 100 100 100 1001 90
Marion............................ .. 110 120 0 120 110 120
N a au.... .... ............ . . 100 ..... 100 ...... ...
Orange. . ............. ........ ......... ... .. ... 100 100
O ceola................... .......... 1 5 7 100 100 180 70
Pasco........ .................. .. 100 100 100 100 100 100
Polk....... ...... ............... 110 100 100 100 150 135
Putnam ...................... ... ... ...... ...... ........... 100 ......
St. Johns .............. .. ................................ ......
Santa Rosa...... ..... ............. .......... ............... ...
Suwannee................. ........... .. ............
Taylor.shin ........................ .............. .
Volui average.. ................ .. 105 103 102 105 108
Walton ...... ... ... ...
Walton...... ................................... .. .... ............
Washingtoa...........-.*...

General averages. ............- ......I 1052 1010 10 99











.:,BUREAU OF. FERTILIZERS.

R`. Rpst, State cbemi t. 'E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

; 'VLUATLONS.
'For Available' arid Insolu le Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
.... ;.. Potash for thf Season of 1900-1901.
SAauableT Phouphorin Aci4 .'. . ..... ...4j cents a pound ,:
I..psoluble Phoiphoric Acid .. .. ...... ...' cent a pound :,.
....Ammona (or its equivalent in nitrogen) ...... 15 cents a pound '
Potash (as actual-potash, *]20.) ..... 5 cents per pound ,: '
If calculated, by units- :
SAyaillable 'Phosphorie,'Acid :;.. ......... 90 .cents. per unit.
SInsoluble PhosphoricAcid .... ..... ..20 cents per unit''
Ammonia (or itsequivalent :i nitrogen) . .$3.00 per unit',
: $ ;si } . :. : . 1:.: :.:;... .. .. .. .... ,$1.00 per unit .
With a uniform allowance of $2.00. per ton for mixing and
baggingi ..... : J
A iA.i:t is twenty oua Ind or. .per cent in a ton., We find:
this to te the easiest.and. quickest. method for calculating th '
i,' val o ;,i fertilizer. iTo illustrate this take for example'a a i
... fertilize whhich. analyzes a f follows: ..
Availabe .Pho.phori Aoii 6.39j.90... .... .... ...$ 5.75 .
,' InsQlub .Phop 'ori;Aci ,A15.20; : . . .;. . .. 23,'
ir Am ionia,; i 4.93*3.00. :'.'. . . . 14.79 ,
; Mag d g ...;... .. .... .... 2.00,
' I .' i i= i, i .~ . ....... .. ........ .. ....
he above valuatipns ari for cash for materials delivered at
F foida sea po ts, an d the)' c1an 'be bought ii one' toin 10lt at,
.th ese .prI1Ce' atitbe, cate'f'i g tii B ,T lX:tin Where. fer-
ti izers r bought a interior po nts, .the additional freight to '
S ttt lpoih A-t b .- added.. .... ... .. ....... . ....... .......... ,

.. . . ... .







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.


R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.


ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZER.


MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist.


Phos. Acid GUARANTEED ANALYSIS.


Nxu o FRsTILIMRE. -
NA_ X oF FERTILIZER. By Whom and Where Manufactured.



Cotton Seed Meal............! ...... 7.6 ...... ...... 8 76 ......... ...... 8 to .......... Harmon Oil Co., Harmony ove a.
Cotton Seed Meal .......... ....7.70 .........2.55 8.85 167 7.65 .. ........... .22 .24 1.96 Jefferson Mf. Lo. Jefferson, Ga.
Cotton eed Meal ............... 7.2 ........ .... 2.80 8.61 1.27 7.65 ........ ...... 3.22 8.24 1.9 Alabama Cotton Oil Co., Pelma, Ala.
Cotton Seed Meal..... 7. ........... 3.07 8.5 169....... ...... .. 2 to2 7vio8g l3 to Alabama Cotton Oil Co.. Mobile,.Aa.
Cotton Seed Meal. Jersey brand 8.31 ...... ..... 2.96 .67 1.67 ............ ...... 2 to 3 8.to9 1 to 2 Decatur Cotton Oil Co., Decatur, -ia.
High Grade Blood and Bone... 6.4 3.62 7.51 1.13 10.29 ...... 5 to 1 ...12 to 1 9%to0 ..... Cudahy Mfg C. Co.. Omaha, Neb.
High Grade Blood and Bone ... 6.09 361 5.1 8.74 10.30 .................. ..... 8 to1010 to 12......... Nelson Mason & .Cicago, ll
High rade Blood and Bone ... 6.0 5.13 4.85 9.98 10.75 ..... 5 to 7 .. ............ 8 1 to 13 t .......... Wilson & Toomer Frt. Co., Jacksonville
Bloodand Bone................. 6.99 4.07 14.48 18.55 5.87 ...... 5 to 7 ..... .... 1 to 206% to8 ......... Cdahy Mi. Co., S. Onaha, Neb.
Bloodand Bone......... ....... 6.50 3.58 7.51 11. 10.24 ...... 5 to 8 ........ ... 11 to 129to 10 ........Cudahy Mfg. Co., Omaha. Neb
Blood and Bone..... ......... 5.00 3.01 11,42 14.43 6.82 ...... 5 to 7 .............. 15 to 20 6% to 8 .. ... da Co., Omaha, Ne.
Dried Blood ................. 10.38 ...... ...... ...... 16.4 ................ .. ... ... ........ Cuda ., maha, Neb
Muriate of Potash. .. 3.06 ...... ............ ..... 50.72 ....... ............... ..... ........ 48 to 62 Delaware Rive Chemica Works.-
High Grade Sulphateof Potash. 1.7 ........... ...... 48.51 ............................... .48 to 52 Tampa Fert C. importers, Tapa.
High GradeSulhbate of Potash. 2.49 ........... 48.40 ....................... .......... 48 to 50 American Agrll. and Ch.m. C(o N. Y.
Nitrateof Soda... & 2e .... ... . ..... ... 17.60 ...... 7 to 19 E.O. Painter Fert. Co importers, Jackv'e
Acid Phosphate .............. 18.8 14.99 8.19 18.18 ...... ...... 12 ........ .. GouldingFertilizerCo., Pensacol
Acid Phosphate........... ..... 1.02 18.92 0.19 19.11 ... ...... 12 17 1 .................... Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensco
Nitrateo Sof a ............... 0.76 ......... ...... 18.0 ......9.00 ....... Gouldng Fertilizer Co.. Pensacola;
Fruit and Vine Fertilizer....... 5.6 6. 2.60 8.93 2.20 1.45 8 to 10 6to 8 .1to 3........ 2 t 4. 1 to 14Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa. -
Ideal Frit and Vine Manure.. 8.88 6.88 0.41 7.2 2.96 10.86 8to 10 6to 8 1 to 3........ 3 to 4 10 to 12 Wlson&ToomerFert. Co., Jacksonville
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure.. 9.24 8.00 0.87 8.87 38.28 12.57 8 to 10 6 to 8 1 to 3 ....... a to 4 10 to 12 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Cb Jacksonville
Mapes' Fruit and Vine Manure. 7.02 4.55 2.61 7.16 2.388 1111 8 to 0 5 to 7 2 to 4 ........ 2 to 8 10 to 12 Mapes' Formula&Peru. Quano Co., N. Y.
Amerlous Spl. F'uit&Vlne Man. 12.02 6.681 1.30 7.98 3.80 9.85 ........ 6to7i 3 to 41 ........ 4to5 1to 12 Amer. Agricultural & Clhem. Co., N. Y.
Bradley's Spl. Fruit&VineMa 11 24 6.65 1.22 7.87 4.02 9.87 ........ 6%to7X 3 to 4 8X-113 4to56 10 to 12 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co., N. Y.
Ideal F;itt and Vine Manure .. 10.94 7.37 1.09 8.46 4.81 8.58 ........ to 8 1 to 2 ........ 4 to 8 to 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Oo., 3acksonvllle
Amerions Strawberry Fertilizer 10.84 7.08 1.68 8.71 3.2 6.04 ........6 to 8 1 to 2 .. 8 to 4 6 to 8 Williams & Clark PFert Co.,N. Y.
Peapple Manure.......... .. 7.00 7.62 2.56 10.08 5.86 9.52 8to10 4 to 5... .... ..... 6 to 6 7 to 8 Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa.
tTpelal Strawberry Fertilizer... 7.14 6.79 1.87 8.16 5.27 8.37 8 to 10 6 to 8 ................By 3to 5 3 to 5 Wilson I Toomer Fert. Oo., Jacksonv'e.
Ideal Fertilizer .' ... ... 11.87 60.68 1.80 7.98 3.85 5.97 ....... 5 to 7 ............ .. to 8to 8 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonv'o.
Simon Pure Fertiliser No. 1... 8.811 6.Q 1.: 7.45 4,42 11.71 5to8 7to 8 to 2 .....4to 4ji1 to 1E.O. Painter Fert. Co.. Jacksonville.
Bradtey' Nursery Stock Fert .. 9.(6 10.50 1.47 11.97 4.910 .81 ....... 8 to 10 2 to 310 to 18 4,4K 8 to 4 Amer. Agricultural & Chem. Co.. N. Y,
Peruvian Vegetable Manure.... 10.90 7.89 2.84 10.28 4.30 6.01 8 to 10 7 to 9 2 to 4 ....... 4 8 to 8 10 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonvilla.









BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.


R. E. ROSE, Atate Chemist.


MARION G. DONK, Assistant Chemist-


Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 9, Act approved May 22, 1901.

sampless taken by purchaser.)

Phosphoric Acid


Name of Fertilizer Name of Sender




H. G. Blood and Bne. 7.15 .. ........ 10.28 9.6 .... Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
H; G. Blood and Bo e. 6.76 ......... 14.7 10.20 ..... Wilson & Toomer, Fort. Co., Jacksonville.
H. G. Blood and Bone. 6.50 .......... 14.7 10.15 ..... Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Blood and Bone .......... 5.45 8.60 6.37 15.31 7.14 ..... Wilson & Toomer, Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
Dried Blood.. ........ 12.87 ..... ..... 0.7517.0 ... E. Painter Pert. Vo, Jacksonville, Fla.
Special Mixture..,..... ........ ..... 1.90 .20 10.90 Win. Y. Douglass, Dunedin, Fla
SBat Guano............ ..... .. ...6.5 10.81 1.95 E Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Adid Phosphate....... 88 13.14 6.74 19.88 ........ 0 Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Asbes,.. ................ ;......... 4.06 W. H. Cox, Boyton, Fla.
Fertizer................ ....... 6.43.18 .19W. H. Cox, Boyton Fla.
Castor Pumace........ ... .... .... 2.0 7.82 4.67 E. Painter Fert;.Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Canada, H. W., Ashes. .... ..... ......... 3.76 H. H. Harvey, Beffner, Fla.
Bat'Man re or Guano..... ..... .... .1 10.44 1.71 Lyle & Co., Bartow, PFla
SCan. H' d Wood Ashes. ..... ..... ..... 3.471E. O. Painter Fert. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
STobacco Dust. .. ....................1.29 4.38 E. O. Painter Pert. Co ,Jacksonville. Fla.
Acid Phosphate..... ... 12.5 .51.............. Goulding Fertilizer Co., Pensacola, Fla.
SFertilizer............. ... 0.40 0.84 1.24 3.8121.95 Manatee Lemon Co. Palmetto, Fla.
Cottn Seed Meal ..... 8.6 .... ...... .... 8.5 1.40 Wilson & Toomer Fert Co., Jacksonville.
Cotton Seed Meal ..... 6.98 ..... ..... & 87 1.71 Wilson & Toomer Fert. Co., Jacksonville.
H..G.Blooa nd Bone. 7.87 4.5 6.130.31032..... Ankeney FruitCo., Ankona, Fla.
H. G. BloodandBone. 6.34 1.78 2.86 4.58 9.41 .... Ankeney Fruit Co., Ankona, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal..... 10.54 2 ... .... 8.86 1.56 Tallahassee Cotten-Oil Co., Tallahassee.
H. G. Ground Tankage .... 5.08 4.64 9.72 10.48 Chase & Co., Banford, Fla.

S For values see heading "Bureau of Fertllizers."


~
a.



i. 1;.,-
~1 "~
rl t
r. ;?








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Climatological Data for August, 1901.

u Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit
.0


Stations Counties =
C ounte 0.0.a 7 ;
Q- as g0 ca m g g. I S 3




NORTHERN SECTION.
Archer.......... Alachua..T.... 92 17 80.0-1.7 94 1 651 210.01 +2.84 1.8 20 9 22
Bainbridge.......... Decatur, Ga ..... 119 9 79.2 -2.0 92 1* 65 4 21 7 31 +1 20 1 70 16.. ... ......
Federal Point I..... St. Jchns ...... 10 5 80.0-0 8 92 1*6831 23 9 62 +2 34 1 20 21 12 9 10 sw
Fernandina........ N. assiu. ..... . ... ....... ........ .. .. ..... ...... ... "... . .. .. .. .. ...
Fort Georget.... Duval.. ...... 14 ...... . ..
Gainesvlloe....a.... Alachua....... 175 15 80.0-1.0 92 1*664 21 9 54 0 78 1 43 17........ ......
Huntington....... Putnam........ 50 3 81.4--0.1 95 1*67 4 25 1075 +2 28 177 18 7 20 4se
Jacksonville........ Duval........... 43 29 80.5-2.0 93 8 6831 21 6 12 --0 07 2 32 21 7 14 10 se
Jasper............ Ham ilton ...... 165 2 ...... . . .. . ..... ... .... . .. .. . ... ....
Lake-Butler .b.... Bradford ....... 4 80.2-1.5 95 1*6581 26 9 57 -0 38 2 86 15 .. ... .
Lake City........... Columbia ..... 201 13 80.7--0 7 99 67 3* 25. 872 +247 2 66 17 1 21 9se
Macclenny. ....... Baker......... 140 4 81.2-1.5 97 9*66 2* 30 10 96 +3 45 2 67 22 12 -19 Ose
McAlpin......... Suwannee...... ... .. .... ... ... . .... ...
Micanopy a........ Alachua........ ... 7 80 2.... 93 2*6429 26 1374 +42 230 11 ....
i4dleburg.........Clay.............. 1 80.0... 99 1 641 0 10 18 ...... 2 52 18 2 16 1e






Climatological Data for August-(Continued.)


Stations


Counties.


Savannah, Ga....... Chatham, Ga.. 36
St. Augustine...... St. Johns....... 10
Sumner ............ Levy.................
Switzerland ........ St. Johns...... .
Thomasyille, Ga.... Thomas, Ga.... 380
Waycross, Ga...... Ware, Ga...... 181

Means...... ....
CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow............ Polk....... .....
Brooksville ......... Hernando...... 328
Clermont........... Lake........... ...
DeLand........... Volusia..........
Earnestville ....... Pasco.......... 193
Eustis............... . Lake............. 180
Ft. Meade... ... Polk........... 125
Fort Pierce......... Brevard....... ....
Inverness ..... ...... ... ......
Kissimmee......... Osceola ......... 65
Merritt's Island .... Brevard....... 20
New Smyrna..d...... Volusia.......... 20
Ocala.............. arion.......150
Orange City....... Volusia........ 50
rlando............ range.... .... 98


nperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


80 8-0 81 91

81 i4-1'8 95
80 4 .... 95
81 4-1 3 95
82 0-0 2 98
80 8-0 3 97
79 68-3 0 90
79 9 -1 4 94
80 8-1 8 95
80 8 -0 8 90
79 1 -0 6 93
81 0o+0 1 96
80 91-1 1 95
80 5--1 31 92


Ter









30 79.8
52 82 2
10 79 6
15 80 1
23 79 2
19 79 6

... 80 5


7 71

29*68
868
7*68
8 69
7* 67
1* 68
9 68
31 68
1*72
5 66
23 66
8 68
8 70


Precipitation, in inches


0
.e


s|

Q


6.44
4 01
15 97
6 57
11 59
8 18

9 68

12 39

7 78

19 75
13 00
19 60
9 43
14 3-
9 91
4 71
6 35
13 46
12 87
13 18


-1.51
-0 35
+7 39
+0 47
+5 55
+1 78

+2 10

+4 65
-0 84

--S 1:6
+5 98
+11 41
+2 38
+5 75
+1 25
-0 74
+0 21
-5 54
+5 71
+5 67


I. .



0 ^


Sky



0a0


Z0o o A.
.1 ,o


58

6 sw



6se

2sw

2 w
.... ......
12 se
79so
4e
15 e
.... se
4se

12 e
10 se
4 e


: 0I
4-
Qu i* F^O








Plant City..........
Rockwell..... c ....
Sebastian ..........
Tampa ...........
Tarpon Springs...g
Titusville ..--....;-



SOUT-HERNB SECTION.

SFlamingo:;; -.-..
-Havi-na.-....-.. ..v;.
Hyo uxo. ..........
Japiter.. .-. ..... .
Key West .........
Manatee............
Mareo:;; --:-.-... .. .-
SMianmi......: . . '..
.* -Myers-.....; .. .-:.
. *Nassau.. ; ;...
--Noestee.-.. -;-..; .
San:-Juan.-...;-.:...


WESTERN SECTION.

Carrabelle...........
Daphne.... e....
DeFuniak Springs..
Marianna .........
Mobile-.. .......
Montgomery....
Monticello .........


Hillsborough...
Marion ........
Brevard ......
Hillsborough....
Hillsborough ..
Brevard........

Means.....



Monroe .- .....
Cuba ..- ... .. .
Dade... .....
Dade-.....,-.. ..
Monroe... i ...
Manatee ........
Lee.-..........
Dade .... .... ..
Lee-. . ......
*NP. -Bahamas.
DeSeto.......
Puerto Rico....

S-Means:. .


Franklin...... 12
Baldwin, Ala .......
Walton........ 193
Jackson........ ...
Mobile,--Ala.... 35
Montgom'y, Ala 219
Jefferson.............


121 7










57 10
4
38 13
22 30
16 18
.. . .


81 0
81 6
79 8
80 4
80 9
79 5

80 6



81 9
81 0
81 2
80 0
81 2
80 7
82 9
81 2
79 0
82 8
81 2


81 0


4 79 5
.. 80 2
8 79 0
1 78 8
30 80 4
28 79 9
.... ......


-0.8 1961 7
..... 9711
-1 5 90 5
0 0 92 9
-0 3 93 9*
-0 5 92 1

-0 9... ...



.... 96 8
-1 0 9217
-0 2 9320
-1 0 9031
-3 0 88 8
-0 5 9424
.... 98 24
-1 6 90 1*
-2 3 9024
.... 90 5*
. 96 8


-1 4 . .


-2 2 9010
-1 1 98 3
-1 4 9611
90 2
00 96 2
-2 0 93 9


3* 25
28 26
15* 15
18 20
34* 25
2* 23
jI| .


7019
69 30
70 10*
69 17
6911
68 19*
68 17
70 3*
70 2*
7417
69 17*


12.05 +2 78
13 40 ...
5 22 --1 46
8 03 -0 72
,T8 85..
6 30 +2 82

11 21 +3 65


12 65
12 65 .......
6 63 +0 61
10 07 +5 01
12 13 +6 57
5 75 +1 02
12 91 +3 55
9 34 ...
10 8' +3 13
12 41 +4 29
501 ...
12 53 ..


10 96 +3 93


69 4* 161 8 49
65 28* 24 16 75
64 4* 28 13 22
64 4 20 8 48
69 29 23 9 77
6629 24 6 91
. ".. ".. ......


260 1
9....
1 .. .
20 0



18 6


1 27
13 9
18 90
11 10
10 18


2s


11ine

.... se

7se



15se
10 e

6 se
6 se
4 se
7 se
5e
9s

22 ..


9 se


... w
.... sw
3 ......
98.
10 qw
8 se
... "..


-1 33
+7 441
+0 96

+2 52
+2 641
-,,...,






Climatological Data for August, 1901-- ontinied.


STemperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
^ Fahrenheit


Stations Counties g 0
a 7a *

c a-


Newton.............. Dale, Ala .... ....I
Pensacola.......... Escambia ...... 56
Quincy.............Gadsden...... ...
St. Andrews Bay... Washington.... ....
Stephensvillet ...... Taylor.......... ..
Tallahaseee... ... Leon.......... 198
Wausau........ .... Washington. .. 250
Wewahitchka ...... Calhoun...........

Means...... ....
JULY, 1901. State Means ......

San Juan. ................... . .. ..


81 0

801 i
77 9
78 5
79 8
79 4

79 3
80 4

80 0


8 6928

11 6530
9 70 1*
2*67 4
10* 65 3*
1*6530



V5 70 6


18 6.53

26 8 75
.... 12 64
20 13 40
251 10 10
271 9 72

... 10 14
10 58

15 10 96
... ......


-1.82 2.36 16

...... 1i75 18
+1 76 5 00 14
+5 96 2 45 20
+0 39 2 63 20
...... 2 10 21

+099 .... 17
+3 09 ..... 18

+5 00 4 04 22


"i 'i..
71
17 13
0 24
13 14
6 20
41 7

8 16
71 17

5 13


ne

sw
aw



S
se

e


All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
only such stations as have normals.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.


tThermometers are not self-registering and readings are
made at 7 a. m.. 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. SWeather Bureau.
Not used in obtaining means.








Salient Climatic Features.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
The mean pressure for the month was 30.00 inches, which is below
normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.12 inches, at Jackson-
ville on the 24th; the lowest 29.75 inches, at Pensacola on the 16th;
monthly range for the State was 0.37 inch.
TEMPERATURE.
(Degrees Fahrenheit.)
The monthly mean temperature for the State was 80.4 degrees, 1.0
degree below normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 80.5 de-
grees; Central, 80.6 degrees; Sothern, 81.0 degrees; Western, 79.3
degrees. The highest monthly mean temperature was 82.9 degrees, at
Marco; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 77.9 degrees, at
Stephensville. The highest temperature during the month was 99 de-
grees, at Middleburg on the 1st; the lowest temperature during the
month was 64 degrees, at DeFuniak Springs and Marianna on the 4th,
Micanopy on the 29th and Middleburg on the 31st; absolute range for
the State was 35 degrees.
PRECIPITATION.
(Inches and hundredths.)
The average precipitation for the State during the month was 10.58
inches, which is 3.09 above the normal amount. By sections, the aver-
ages were: Northern, 9.68 inches; Central, 11.21 inches; Southern, 10.96
inches; Western, 10.14 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 19.75
inches, at Earnestville; the least was 4.01 inches at St. Augustine. The
greatest amount for any twenty-four hours was 6.10 inches, at Rockwell
on the 16th.
WIND AND WEATHER.
The prevailing winds during the month were from the southeast. By
sections, there were: Northern, 6 clear days; 19 partly cloudy; 6 cloudy.
Central, 6 clear; 18 partly cloudy; 7 cloudy. Southern, 10 clear;
12 partly cloudy; 9 cloudy. Western, 7 clear; 17 partly cloudy; 7
cloudy.
Rainy days:Northern section, 17; Central, 18; Southern, 18; West-
ern, 17.
WEATHER FOR AUGUST.
Precipitation was greatest in Polk and Pasco counties, the monthly
totals exceeding nineteen inches. The least amounts were reported from
St. Johns and Brevard counties. The monthly average rainfall was
10.58 inches, about three inches above the normal; the mean tempera-
ture was 80.4 degrees, which was 1 degree below the normal for ten
years.










PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE

Wind Velocity, Relative
Atmospheric Pressure in Miles Humidity

Stations


_____ 7 2 0 Etcc

Jacksonville ............. 0.02 80.1224 29.92 15,298 86 w 16 96 7184
Jupiter ................. 29.99 0.0817 29.90266,234 88 se 10 95 7184
Key West.............. 29.99 0.06 8 29.87275,351 86 sw 11 100 6276
Pensacola .............. *29.98 30.1025 29.7516 7,148 70 sw 15 98 6680
Tampa................. 29.99 3009 8 29.87113.837 32 s 98 6484
*8 a. m. readings only.


*COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR AUGUST, DURING
THE PAST TEN YEARS.
Mean Average Rainfall.
Year. Temperature. Inches and hundredths. *
1892 .... ...... .... 80.9 .... ...... .... 7.84
1893 .............. 81.5 .............. 6.68
1894 .............. 81.0 .............. 7.33
1895 .......... .... 81.3 .............. 6.20
1896 .............. 82.0 ......... ..... 5.81
1897 .... ...... .... 81.6 .... ..... .... 6.68
1898 .... ...... .... 80.8 .... ..... .... 12.96
1899 .............. 82.2 .... .......... 6.62
1900 .............. 82.4 ......... ..... 4.20
1901 .............. 80.4 ......... .... 10.58E
The normal temperature for August is 81.4 degrees; normal rain-
fall is 7.49 inches.
AUGUST STORMS.
iNo severe local storms occurred during the month, but the uniformly
,quiiet conditions were broken on the 15th and 16th by a tropical dis-
,turbance which approached the west coast of Florida and Alabama on
the above dates. This disturbance slowly moved westward over South
'Florida on the llth,, progressing west northwest, reaching the Alabama
*and Louisiana coast on the 16th. Very high winds-hurricane velocities
-prevailed, Pensacola reporting 70 miles and Mobile 60 miles per hour.
Much damage resulted to cotton and corn from high winds and heavy
rains. Minima pressures in inches were: Pensacola 29,75 and Mobile
29.32.







Personal Experience With White:Fly.

Last winter, as is well known, California sent one of her experts
to Florida to show us how to ararnge our tents and fumigate the white
fly-infested, trees in the grove known as the Bank of Kinwood grove.
Professor Woodworth was assisted by Prof. Gossard, of Lake City. Only
one row of trees, with a few scattered trees, were fumigated. I think
nearly every egg was destroyed, and some trees partially defoliated,
but as soon as the fly was on the wing, on the adjoining trees (limbs
touching), they could soon spread to the trees again that had oeen
treated. While these experiments perhaps were effective, it was consid-
.ered too expensive by a great many who witnessed the operation. The
trees cannot be treated with success while wet with dew; therefore they
must be fumigated in the day time. If the weather is cloudy, there
-is very little danger of burning the tree, but if the sun is shining I believe
it is necessary to have colored tents.
We had between seventy and eighty acres of young trees that were
covered, more or lesq. with the white fly; these trees were from four to
:ten feet high, and some few large seedlings. After gaining all the
information we could, we decided to spray with the rosin compound.
This we did, very thoroughly, once in the middle of December and once
in the middle of January, with a result that this spring we failed to
find a single fly, except a few (five or six), on a large tree standing
beside the fence dividing our grove from a badly infested grove belong-
ing to a neighbor. We were so well pleased that we shall continue to
use the rosin compound on any part of our grove that shows signs of
fly, and we think there is no better time than after the fruit has been
picked, in December and January. It will do no good to spray the
,outside of the tree, as in treating the rust mite, but you must get under
the tree and fairly deluge the foliage on both sides. If this can be
'done and twenty-four hours intervene without showers, the eggs and
larvae will be found dead. I think one need not fear the white fly
:any more than the red scale.
Some are willing to sit down and allow the fungus to eat up the white
fly, but I don't think it pays to do so. We have one grove of 640
trees and sixty small buds; this grove has been covered with white fly
in the grove for at least four or five years; there has been more or less
fungus in the growth for four years. The crop two years ago was about 600
boxes; last year it was 2,000 boxes; this year it will be over 5,000 boxes.
Each crop has been covered with sooty mold, and last spring it looked
ta if the fungus had about cleaned up the fly, so that the filu' wood
was clean, and we got this fine bloom and crop of fruit, but early in
August we began to see the sooty mold forming on the fruit, and upon
examination we found plenty of the fly on the wing. There were also
Jungus,








In order to save us quite an expense this winter in cleaning the fruit,.
we decided to spray with the rosin compound. This we did the first
week in September, with the result that fully nine-tenths of the fruit
will be smooth and clean of smut. This sooty mold retards the growth of:
the fruit and its ripening. We expect to thoroughly spray these trees
twice this winter, and while we cannot hope for the success we had with.
the small trees, we do believe that we can keep the fly in check, so that it
will not be necessary to spray or wash the fruit, and we shall expect
a fairly good crop the coming season. But had we not sprayed the trees.
in September, and should not spray again this winter, I don't believe,
we would secure 200 boxes the coming season of 1902-3.
From our own experience, we would advise every man to purchase
the best spraying outfit he can buy, and do thorough work, and he will.
secure a crop of fruit each year. One-half the trouble is in not having:
power enough in the pump, so that the force of the spray will turn the
foliage in every direction. If our State would legislate as the State of"
California does, each man would be compelled to rid his grove of all
injurious pests. As it is now, one man breeds enough insects (and little.
fruit) for his neighbors to fight the entire year. I believe the up-to-date.
South Florida orange grower will never lose a crop of fruit from the-
white fly, for he will use good judgment and spray his grove intel-
ligently.-F. D. WAITE, Manager Manatee Lemon Company, Pal-
metto, in Times-Union and Citizen.


Celery Growing in Florida.

Celery growing in Florida, though in its infancy, is attracting much
attention, both in Forida and Northern States. Not many years ago it
was thought impossible to grow celery in the South. This was, and is
still doubtless true of Southern States, too cold to grow it in the winter
months. Florida, however, is an ideal land for all such crops in winter.
Celery grows with us, under proper condition of soil and culture, as
readily as cabbage. Its growth and success as a money-making crop is
already beyond the experimental stage in South and Middle Florida,
There is but little doubt it can be grown equally well in most of the
Northern counties. My own experience and observation, however, is
confined to South Florida-extending from DeLand to Tampa. My
home and farm is at Lakeland, Polk county, where I and others have.
raised celery for the past three years. However, Mr. Neyland and others
of Tampa have grown celery for a much longer period. Mr. Neyland
had in about twelve acres three years ago. He shipped by the car-load,
and realized $1,500 per acre net that season. Since his great success
that year many sections of South and Middle Florida have fallen into









line, and much success, both in growing and selling, is reported from
-the Manatee section, Gainesville, Lakeland and other points.
I do not presume in this article to cover the entire field of celery cul-
.ture in Florida. Six articles the length of this would be required to do
that. A mere outline, therefore, is attempted, and this mainly taken up
\with the changes necessary to be observed in the method practiced by
,growers of celery North and those who grow the crop in Florida.
In the first place, we grow celery in the winter. The difference,
therefore, in starting a seed bed is most marked. We usually com-
mence seed beds in August. This is a most trying month in Florida,
,continual rains, with very hot sun, being the order, and seed can neither
.germinate nor grow without protection, both from rain and sun. It
:is absolutely necessary, therefore, to have a frame work over beds for sash
*or awning to rest upon. The sash, etc., must be so constructed as to
be readily taken off and put on. The cloth for awning or sashes should be
light in weight and color. This will make it unnecessary to remove
them 'until after the seeds are up. Heavy or dark cloth obstructs the
light and hinders germination. Beds should be slightly elevated and six
to eight 'feet wide, with walks or alleys between them. Three sowings
may be made. The first the last week in August or first week in Sep-
tember; three weeks later another sowing and in October the last and
the largest sowing. The first and second sowings need not be very large,
but should be pricked out for reset. The October sowing need not be
protected, and if properly thinned will make good plants without re-
:setting.
LAND FOR CELERY.
The best lands with us for celery growing are the timbered muck
lands. These are always full of moisture, vegetable decomposed matter
and humus, making an ideal condition for plant foliage development.
'This natural condition of soil, when supplemented by proper chemicals,
.gives a showy, highly flavored and tender plant.
These lands must be properly drained, cleared and prepared. It
may be found necessary to ditch deeply in order to remove trees, stumps,
etc., in clearing. In such a state ditches must be refilled with soil,
gates put in or some other system of irrigation put in. It is utterly
impossible to grow good celery in Florida without good water supply.
Rains with us in the winter are like angels' visits, very rare, indeed.
As a general rule, your water level should be within eighteen inches of
the surface. With this idea in mind no great mistake need be made.
If your plat is so situated that you can hold the water level at eighteen
to twenty inches, you are all right for moisture; if not, you had better
put in an irrrigating plant. The best condition, however, is a system of
drainage and subirrigation in one. This is called Cole's system of
subirrigation, and is quite costly and not much practiced on that acocunt.









These muck lands must always be cropped by some grass feeder, such
as field corn, Irish potatoes, pumpkins, etc., before celery is attempted.
Cow-peas are great soil correctors and soil builders, but are thought to
be great propagators also of insects and fungus which attack the young
plant and sometimes work great disaster in the seed beds. This, how-
ever, has not yet been fully proved, but I think there is sufflient ground
for the idea to make us cautious in the use of the pea.
Propagation of the soil is much the same as practiced north, only
we do not use much stable manure, but use instead chemical mixtures of
ammonia, potash and phosphoric acid. The proportion of the individ-
ual ingredients are governed by soil conditions, but it is always presumed
that celery requires much more ammonia than is found available in any
soil, so we give a larger proportion of ammonia for this crop than for
any other.
NOTES.
Plants are set on raised beds four feet wide, double drills, eight to
ten inches apart in each bed.
Blanching is done altogether by boards. Ten-inch boards, sixteen
feet long, are usually used, setting them on the outside of the double
drills, making one set of boards do for two drills.
Shipping is usually done in barrels, eight'or ten dozen in a barrrel.
Usually they go through straight, but April shipments sometimes heat.
With us the self-blanching dwarf varieties are used, the dwarf golden
self-blanching being preferred. Henderson's white plume does fairly
well, but is not so sure a header.
The general presumption is that Florida celery is inferior in flavor,
aroma and crispness. I do not believe that this is proven by the facts.
Of course, in the present stage of experimentation, much of the stock
shipped is inferior. Much of the celery grown in the State is grown
by persons having little practical knowledge of celery growing, and so
their products are not first-class. But old growers and especially those
experienced in the requirement of the plant in Florida grow an article
that cannot be excelled. A trite old saw comes in here: "The proof of
the pudding is in the chewing of the bag." Our celery is good enough
to sometimes command two dollars per dozen, and a crop that nets a
manl $1,500 per acre can't be very bad either in looks or quality.
THINGS NECESSARY TO SUCCESS.
A man must know how to grow celery. A greenhorn won't do any-
thing but spend his money in trying to grow celery in Florida.
Get the right kind of soil, do everything in the way of preparation
just right and don't be afraid of your work or your money.
Raise your own plants and have good strong ones. Never set a weak
plant.








Plant Dwarf Golden self-blanching from a good seedsman.
Blanch with boards.
Keep a close watch on a successful grower in Florida and imitate him
until you know how better than he does.-L. D. JACKSON, in the Na-
tional Rural.


Nitrogen, Phosphoric Acid and Potash.

The proper proportion of these three fertilizing ingredients in any
soil assures good crops, says Prof. James S. Doty, in Massachuieisl
Plowman. Nature does not always place them in the r;ght places for
all plants, but occasionally we find some nook where the fertilizing
ingredients are properly distributed. Some plants need more of potash
than others, and again others need and demand an excess of nitrogen.
It has taken years to analyze the plants so that we can tell about the
needs of each class, and it will be many more years before their needs
will be so popularly known that every cultivator of the soil will mix his
fertilizing ingredients just right for the various economic plants. In a
general way, however, the needs of the plants can be understood so that
one can intelligently apply our scientific knowledge about potash,
phosphoric acid and nitrogen.
Potash forms the starchy part of the plants, and contributes toward
the growth of the woody part of the stems and fleshy portions of the
fruit. Plants that have woody stems and plenty of starch either in the
fruit or leaves require plenty of potash in the soil for them to do their
best. Those that are naturally deficient in these particulars get along
without so much potash. There is no other substance that can quite take
the place of potash for performing these functions.
Phosphoric acid enters less into the vital constituents of the plants
than either of the other ingredients. It might be said to supply the
salts and minerals to the plants-the iron to the system. It is tonic
in its action, and when applied it stimulates plants to quicker maturity.
It does this as most good tonics do to the human system, by helping
the plants to assimilate the food proper. Phosphoric acid applied to
the soil enables the plants to take up plant food that might otherwise
remain unassimilable for considerable time.
Nitrogen has been said to form the prime constituent of all plant
growth, and without it nothing could grow. It gives color to the
foliage, vitality to the stalk and stem, and food to the whole plant. It
enters actively into the very life of all plants, and very few fail to
respond to its quickening and beneficent action. It is the nitrogen in
the barnyard manure that makes the plants respond so quickly to it. It









is found in the air, soil and decaying plants. It is best applied to the
soil in the shape of green manure, Auch as clover, cow peas or beans, but
it can be added to it in an artificial way by applying nitrate of soda and
suplhate of ammonia.
MANURING SOILS NATURALLY RICH.
It may seem absurd to talk of manuring soils naturally rich, yet the
evidence of our official statistics tends to prove these naturally rich
soils have a very low productive power. The low average yields per acre
of wheat and corn on our rich prairie soils is often quoted as a kind of
natural reproach. There seems to be no doubt of the fact that these
soils are rich; there is certainly no denying that they give a very low acre
yield.
Low acre yields on rich soils is practically invariably due to incqaai-
ities in the supply of fertilizers or manures. A soil rich in organic
matter is likely to be rich in fertilizer nitrogen; but may be relatively
deficient in fertilizer potash and phosphoric acid. In a natural state
the potash and phosphates have been used over and over again in making
crops of grasses, more or less of which belong to the leg'ume family.
Thus, there has been a constant increase in the supply of fertilizer ni-
trogen, but no corresponding increase in the supply of potahl; and phos-
phate. The result is that the soil becomes charged with vegetable matter
moderately rich in nitrogen, but low in mineral fertilizers.
Under these conditions, fair crops of stalks of straw may result, but
the grain will be low in quantity. Potash and phosphate are the de-
termining fertilizer ingredients in producing the seeds of plants; if
there is present in the soil relatively more available nitrogen than
available potash and phosphate to properly accompany same, the yield
of grain (seed) is controlled by the deficient mineral fertilizer. The
strength of the chain is the strength of its weakest link. Even the yield
of straw and stalks cannot go beyond a certain limit with a deficient
supply of potash and phosphate, though the nitrogen be abundant.
Though such soils are called rich, they are chiefly rich as regards ni-
trogen only, and too much nitrogen is only a trifle less harmful than
too little, especially in grain farming. These rich soils will amply repay
manuring with mineral fertilizers. They do not require heavy manuring,
or fertilizing rather, as do the more exhausted soils of the Atlantic coast
line, but the small quantity needed is just as important as the larger ap-
plications found necessary in the east. One hundred pounds of acid
phospate and 50. pounds of potash per acre will make a great showing,
though doubtless twice as much would still show a handsome margin of
profit.
Any kind of chemical fertilizer supplying potash and phosphoric acid
may be used. Finely ground bone meal is very useful as a source of
supply of the latter, while muriate of potash would be cheaper per actual
pound of potash than kainit, on account of the high freight rate. The
Combination would show up well.--S. Cox, in Exchange.




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