Title: Florida monthly bulletin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00003
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: June 1901
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text





Vol. 11.


No. 68.


FLORIDA


(Department of Agriculture.)




..Monthly Bulletin..


JUNE, 1901.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


Part I. Crops.
Part II. Fertilizers.
Part III. Weather Report.
Part IV. Miscellaneous.


These Bullptins are furnished free
to those requesting them I


|J TALLAHASBEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, TALLAHA EE. FLA.
I--


(- e





I .





County Map of the State of Florida.
(For the Bulletin)










A Suggestion.


While we know nothing of the actual results to crops, of the torrid
wave, which has spread itself over a dozen of the great grain producing
States of the Mississippi Valley and the northwest, because of -the con-
tinuance of the destructive condition, enough is known to justify the opin-
ion that there will be a heavy shortage in the corn, hay, oat and wheat
crops of the country. The daily news from the great grain section re-
ferred to, shows the situation to be growing worse, with scorching winds
and increasing temperatures, till in many sections all hope of crops worth
harvesting have been entirely abandoned. Such a condition of affairs
is much to be deplored, and to the people of this stricken region the
sympathy of the entire country goes out with universal accord. In view
of these conditions, we offer the suggestion to the farmers of Florida,
that they make every effort to secure the fullest crops of corn and hay
particularly, that is possible, and not fail to harvest and store them for
use the coming winter and spring. In all probability the price of these
two commodities will increase in value anywhere from fifty to thirty per
cent. and the improvident or careless farmer who hesitates to believe or
realize the situation until too late, will see his hard earned dollars slip
through his fingers for a purpose which he could easily have avoided;
therefore take heed while you may, consider well our suggestion and
provide for your needs as will be necessary; prices of allj farm food sup-
plies are certain to be high.
There are a considerable number of industrial enterprises in our State,
such as turpentine manufacturers, timber culture and others, who are
large consumers of these products; why should not the farmers of our
State supply the demands when they have the surplus, and the ability to
meet them if they will make the effort? It is your opportunity to show
the world that you can be self-sustaining and put money in your purse at
the same time. Try it, and also take warning.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
HIoN. B. E.,McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Ciief Clerk.

CORRESPONDENT S NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-There has been very little change in condition of
-crops since last report; cotton has gained a little, but corn has lost some
on account of the continued dry spell, other crops about the same and
doing well.
BAKER COUNTY-Cotton and corn have both lost some since last re-
port, but otherwise crops are generally in about same condition as last
month; seasons are rather unfavorable.
SBRADFORD COUNTY-Some cotton has been drowned out by continuous
heavy rains; corn in some localities have suffered similarly; most of the
other field crops are doing very well. Fruit crops and watermelons are
very good.
CALHOUN COUNTY-There has been some falling off in both corn and
cotton since last report, owing to unfavorable seasons, but other crops
are doing well.
CITRUS COUNTY-There has been an excess of rain in most parts of
this county, which has caused corn on light sandy land to fire, but on the
heavy land it is in excellent condition; other crops are up to the average
generally; corn, fodder will soon be ready to strip and promises a fine
yield of excellent quality. Fruit is turning out well, and citron fruit
trees growing finely.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-Excessive rain have materially injured the cotton
crops, and cut the corn crop short on low lands; the fruit crops are not as
good as last season.
DADE COUNTY-Crops in this county have been harvested and mark-
eted; the continued heavy rains, and moderate sunshine and heat have re-
sulted in extraordinary growth of citron and other fruit trees.
DESOTO COUNTY-We have had considerable rain this month which
has caused a wonderful growth in all citron fruit trees and other fruits,
and the field crops that are generally grown in this section; everything is
looking well.
ESCAMBIA COUNTY--We are having plenty of rain now, and crops are
looking well and very promising.
GADSDEN COUNTY-There have been considerable and continuous rain,
which if they still keep up will damage the cotton crop; no harm of conse-
*quence has yet resulted to any crops, and the majority are in good condition.
HERNANDO COUNTY--There has been little change with condition of
-crops; all continue to.do well. Fruit promises a good yield, and citrus
trees coming on nicely.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-Considerable rain and excessively hot weather
mnay damage some crops should it continue, but no serious loss is appre-
,hended. Fruit and trees doing well, all crops generally good.
HOLMIES COUNTY-Owing to a threatened drought, crops were begin-
nming to look bad, but since the rains began all crops have improved con-








siderably and are looking well, seasons continue good. Fruit crops fairly-
good except pears.
JACKSON COUNTY--Never before in this county have there been such aE
wide range in condition and prospective yield; the condition of field crops is
far below the average; corn is very poor on uplands but looks very well.
on bottom land; cotton is fully 21 days behind last season and the stands
are not near so good. Fruit crops are medium.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY--Crops are not doing well; if the rain and winds
continue much longer there will be very short crops of corn and, cotton,
as it is both are failing very fast; peaches are a fair crop.
LAKE COUNTY--Vegetable crops have all matured and been shipped
to market; condition of the growing crops is good.
LEE COUNTY-All crops are in fine condition and promise good yields_
Fruit trees doing very fine, and will give a large crop of fruit.
LEON COUNTY-The condition of corn and cotton is considered to be-
about 20 per cent. better than last year; the average is good, other field
crops are also good. Watermelon crop is above the average in condition.
and quality; pear crop is poor, peaches only fair.
MADISON COUNTY-Crops will average about as usual, most of them'
are in pretty fair condition, and the seasons are not unfavorable to any
extent; peach and pear crops are only medium, but watermelons are fine.
MANATEE COUNTY--Crops are generally good, but the seasons have been
unusually wet; sugar cane looks very well, but the stand is poorer than usual;
citrus fruit trees doing well, and a fine crop of oranges may be expected.
NAsSAu COUNTY-Up to the present time the seasons has been one of
the dryest ever known but the rainy reason has just begun and half a crop-
of most products may be expected.
POLK COUNTY-The vegetable crops have all been shipped to market;-
the yield was good and prices satisfactory except for cantaloupes, which
were much injured by heavy rains toward last of season. Field crops
are growing fine.
PUTNAM COUNTY-Field crops are in a very good average condition,
and the prospect promises good yield generally. Fruit trees doing well.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY-The seasons have as a rule been favorable, and-
crops are in good average condition. Watermelon crop is fine, but other
fruits are generally poor.
SUWANNEE COUNTY--The weather has been fine for growing crops;,
some localities have had a little too much rain; broom corn is looking fine;.
the crop will be harvested in August; the broom factory at Welborn will.
take all that is grown in the county. Crops of all sorts will average good.
WAKULLA COUNTY-We are having too much rain but crops are doing:
well as a general thing; fruit pool.
WALTON COUNTY-Owing to the dry weather in some parts of'the-
county, the corn crop will be short, though the rain just commenced wilL
help a great deal yet; other crops in general good condition; fruit poor
but good watermelon crop.











Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for June, 1901,
Compared with an Average.

Upland island Co Sugar Rice Sweet
Cotton Cotton Cane ce Potatoes

Counties g g


o 0 0 *0 0 0
oooooo
r 0 0 0 0


Alachua ...............
Baker..................
Bradford............,.
Brevard ...............
Calhoun...............
Citrus .................
Clay ...................
Columbia ..............
Dade ...................
T-Soto..................
E cambia ..............
Franklin........ .....
Gadsden ..............
Hamilton ............
Hernando.............
H'illsborough............
Holmes ...............
Jackson ............
Jefferson ..... ........
LaFayettee..........
Lake................
Lee.'..................
Leon ........... .......
Levy ...................
Madison................
Manatee............ ..
Marion ...............
Nassau................
Orange.................
Paco ...... ..........
Polk . .............
Putnam ......... ......
St. Johns.............. I
Santa Rosa..............
Sumter........ .........
Suwannee..............
Taylor ..............
Volusia................
W akulla...............
W alton ...........
Washington............


60




100

80


95
65
80


90

90







100


.... ... ..
85
90
90


General averages ....... 85


85
50
70

75

80
70



80
50


70
90
80



S90
80
..... ...



100



90


80
75




79


75
50
60
100
75
100
90
80

95
150
90
100
60
100
105
100
80
85
70
100
100
90
100
75
110
110
75
110
100
160
95
60
105
100
80
80
100
80
95
90

99)


80
75
100
100
90
75
90
80

100
100
90
110
75
100
80
80
80
100
80
60
120
100
90
100
90
110
50
75
80
100
100
70
90
80
90
75


70
80
100
100
75
100
1('0
100

95
100

100
75
100
100

80

1006

100
100
75
90
100
100
50

100
105



"- 0
50


100 ........
90 90
100 80

--89 90


90
50
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
150
90
110
75
100
100
80
70
100
... i66
100
90
100
100
110
100
100
8......

100
100
100
90
75
100
100
80

100
95
100

96







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Field Cassava Egg Peanuts Hay Velvet
Peas Plants Beans

Counties a

0 o o '0

-00a00


Alachua ... .........
Baker ....... .......
Bradford................
Brevard..............
Calhoun.... .....
Citrus ............. .....
Clay ........ .......
*Columbia...............
Dade .......... ......
DeSoto ..............
E eamlia..............
Franklin...............
Gadsden ............
Hamilton... ..........
Hernando..............
Hillsborough .........
Holmes..............
Jackson... ...........
Jefferson..............
tLafayette ............
Lake............ ......
Lee......... .......
Leon .. ........... .
Levy................
Madison....... ......
Manatee ... .. ......
Marion........ .........
Nassau ............
Orange................
Pasco..................
Polk.............. ......
Putnam .............
St. Johns.................
Santa Rosa...........
Sumter...............
Suwannee..............
Taylor......... ........
Volusia................
Wakulla..... ......
"W alton..................
Washington ...........

General averages.....


90 60
40 ........
100 ........
100 ......... .
100 75
50 100
100 100
90 60
100 .......
100 90
100 100
90 ...... .
110 ........
75 .........
S...... ..... ..
100.......
100.
90 . .......
100 ........
90 ..... .
80 100
90 100
80 ... ....
100 ........
95 ..........
100 ........
110 100
........ .. .....
100i6 125
100
100 .......
110 150
90 100
....... ......
100 .........
100 100
100 ........
75 80
....... 100
75 .........
100 ........
100 100

98 96


150

85
100










1200



100


50



100

90

100
100
90
125
75
100
90

95
85

100
......ioo..

100
100
100
75

100



100
100
50
100
100
100
50


90
80

90
90


10C


100
............

. .. .. .




105
100

100
10C
10oc

6C
100
100


110


100
100
90

100

100

150



85
50



100

98
98


100
75
100
. . . i o
100
125

. ...io5
105
90
80


200
100

.. 125
100
250

100


100
100
110
100
175
100
60

100,


120
80
100
105

111
111





8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Cbntinued.


Guava Baananas Orange Lemon Lime Graui
Trees Trees Trees Trei

Counties a
S o o o o0
0 0 0 S


Alachua...............
Baker..................
Bradford..... ........
Brevard..............
Calhoun..............
Citrus........ .......
Clay...................
Columbia........ ......
Dade.................
DeSoto................
Escambia..............
Franklin..............
Gadsden...............
Hamilton..............
Hernando.............
Hillsborough ..........
Holmes................
Jackson................
Jefferson.... .. ......
Lafayette.............
Lake ...... ...... .....
Lee..................
Leon...............
Levy...................
Madison .............
Manatee................
Marion................
Nsiau....... ........
Orange.................
Pasco.................
Polk...................
Putnam...:....... ..
St. Johns......... ...
Santa Rosa............
Sumter.......... .....
Suwannee.............
Taylor..... ...........
Volusia.......... ....
Wakulla..............
W alton................
Washington ..............

General averagss......


300




105
110










40
120



100















125


100
.6..... 6




i6..... 6

110




100






100



100




100
10 i6

'i66


....i..


80

100
125
i..... 6
100
125
...... ii
110
120




100oo
100




80
120



100
110
loo
100
110
100
150
100
50



... 00..


101 104


.....i.. .


120




105








110








100
........i66













100
100


60









100


...... ..... .

...... 100.
100 125

100
........ .......i66

.. ioo ..... ii

105 110'


. ......... .......o
............
........ 100.
........ 100,

........ .....""i6..


100 120'
.......... ... ..




100. 100
100 120

........ ..... .
100 100
100 165
..... ....100

........ . 100
18 100
100 1065
...... l .10








9

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Tobacco Tomatoes Pears Peaches

Counties I t l t
10 0

0 Q 1 0 .
Alachua............. ............. 75 70 40 40 50 40
Baker ....... ............ .. .. .. ....... 50 50
Bradford .. ............ ..... 70 70 25 25 100 100
Brevard ....... . ... ... .... i ". ..... ......
Calhoun..... ......... ...... ..... ..... ...... 100 100 100 60
Citrus ................. ... 100 105 10 100 100
Clay ........ ... ...... 100 90 25 25 100 100
Columbia........ ........ ... .. .. 90 90 75 75 70 70
Dade ... ................ ..... .
DeSoto ................ 80 60 90 105 105 120 100 110.
Escambia ..... ....... 100 100 100 100 ..... ..... 100! 100
Franklin........... ......... .... .. ... ..... 1001 90
Gadsden ........ ... 100 90 ...... ...... ...... ........ ***-
Hamilton...... ....... . ............. **.
Hernando.. ..... ......... 100 100 ............. 100 100
Hillsborough....... .. ........... 100 100 ..... ...... 100 125
Holmes........ ...... 85 90 75 95 60 55 40 30
Jackson .... ...... ... ......... .. ...... ...... 60 60 65, 75
Jefferson ........ ..... ........ ... ....... ... .. 20 25 ........
Lafayette................ ............................ 100i 125
Lake ............... ...... ..... .. ....... 10 10 50 50
Lee.................. 100 100 120 120 120 120 100 100
Leon ................... 75 75 75 70 25 30 75 50
Levy. ............ .. ....... ..... 85 80 40 25 50 25
Madison .... ... ........... .... ... ......... 75 75 50 50
M anatee........ ........... ...... ....... ....
Marion................. ......... 100 100 100 110 100 100
Nassau........ ....... ...... ...... 50 50 ..... ..... 100 100
Orange........... 6 9090 100 10 110 115
Pasoo ........... ............. 100 100 25 25 50 50
Polk......... ........ 100 100 200 160 100 100 160 175
Putnam.................... ... 85 80 50 40 90 75
St. Johns....................... 100 100 00...... ..... 90 85
Santa Rosa............. 100 100 ......... 50 50 751 75
Sum ter ....................... ....... 100 100 ..... .... ......
Suw annee.............. ... . ..... .. ............ ... ...... ........
Taylor...... ....... .. ...... ............. ..... ...... ....... 50 50
Volusia ........... ...... ..... ....... .... .. ...... 90 90
Wakulla........... .................. ...... 25 25 ..... ...
Walton ..................... . . . . . . .. 85 85
Washington....................... 100 100 ............ 25 30

General averages....... 92 89 94 94 6 52 821 82





10 -


Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Watermelons Pine Apples Grapes


Counties a a "
*e 12 *2 .. ....
W 1 .

______C__L C 0 CPH
Alaoaua ................... 75 70 ......... ... 75 50
Baker .................... 40 25 ....... ........ 50 25
Bradford. .... ......... 100 100........... 100 100
Brevard ..... ............. ........ ...... 10 150 ........ ... ...
Calhoun ................ 100 100 .... ........ 100 50
Citrus ................ .... .100 10 ... .... ...... .. ... 100 90
Clay........ ............. 90 90 ........... . 100 100
Columbia................. 85 80 ... ....... 100 100
Dade........ .......... 100 100 11 110 100 100
DeSoto. ................. 100 130 110 250 100 110
Escambia........... ....... 100 150 ........ ............
Franklin.................. 100 95 .. .... .. ..... 100 90
Gadsden............ ..... ........... ....... ........
Hamilton .................. 95 90 ..............
Hernando................... 100 125 .... ... ....... i00 110
Hillsboro ................. 100 100.......... .. 100 100
Holmes ... .............. 100 100 .............. 100 120
Jackson ..... .......... 6 70...... . .... 50 50
Jefferson .... ... .. 65 7..... ..... 100 100
Lafayette......... ............... ..... ....... ........ .
Lake .................... ........ ..... 100 100
Lee ..................... 00 100 110 110 100 100
Leon.......................... 100 110 95..........
Levy. .............. 100 100 ....... ........ ............
M adison ... ....... ...... 100 110 .......... .......... .... ....
Manatee ................... 100 100 10 00 125 100 100
Marion. .................. 100 125 100 100 10 125
Nassau. ................... 50 75............... 100 100
Orange .................... 90 75, 110 115 80
Pasco..................... 100 10 ....... ...... 50 50
Polk ..................... 100 10 140 1 5 0 100 150
Putnam ................... 90 75 .............. 95 100
St. Johns................. 90 80................... 100 100
Santa Rosa................ 100 100 .... .... ....... ........ ****
Sumter ........ ............ 50 65.......... ........ ........
Suwannee ................ 5 75.......... ...... ...... ...
Taylor............ ..... 50 50 ................ ***
V olusia ..................
Wakulla................ ... 7 60. ........ .......
W alton ............ ... 75 75.............. ....
W ashington.... ............ 100 ....... .... .. 100 1

General averages.......... i 881 91 109 134 931 92












BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

W. A. RAWLS, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1900-1901.
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. 44 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, KO0.) ..........5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. 90 cents per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ..............20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash .................. ............$1.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We find
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x.90 ................ $ 5.75
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.1.5x.20 ............... .23
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.00 .............. 7.11
Mixing and bagging .................... ......... 2.0

$29.88
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these prices at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers are bought at interior points, the additional freight to
that point must be added.














BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.


W. A. RAWLS, State Chemist.


C. G. HELLMAN, Assistant Chemist.


Analysis of Special Samples under Sec. 903, Rev. Stat.
S(Samples taken by purchaser.)


Name of Fertilizer



Fertilizer ............. ......
Fertilizer............ ......
Tankage......... ............
Fertilizer .................
Tobacco Dust................
Fertilizer ..... ...... ......
Fertilizer ........... 4.59
Pure Ground Bone..........
Special Mixture.............
Ground Bone ........ ......
Acid Phosphate.......... ...
Nitrate Soda... .......
A, id Phosphate........... ......
Acid Phosphate........ ......
Fertilizer............. ......
Fertilizer............ ....
Blood&Bone (Tankage) 7.47
Cotton Seed Meal..... ......
Fertilizer............ 6.90
Fertilizer.............. 9.69
Tobacco Stems..... ......
Tobacco Dust......... .....
Tobacco Dunst..... .........
Acid Phosphate....... ......
Ashes, from furnace... ......
Tobacco Dust,' 'Osceo-
la brand".......... ......
Tobacco Dust, 'Sem-
inole brand ......... ......
Tobacco Dust.............
Tobacco Dust......... .....
Cotton Seed Meal..... .....
Castor Pomace ........ ......
Fertilizer.......... 11.64
Tobacco Dust......... ....
Ground Tobacco Stems ....
Acid Phosphate...............
Cotton Seed Meal..... ... ..
Acid Phosphate ....... ...
Acid Phosphate..... ......
Ground Tobacco Stems ......
Ashes............ ..... 17.28
"H. G. Blood & Bone" ......
C. S. Meal, "Selma
brand"... ..............
Tobacco Dust...............
Fish Boneand Potash. 5.98


"0 V


eo 0 0
--I P, 4 4 A


..... ........


6.10J 8.74


Name of Sender


F. J. Magill, Jupiter, Fla
F. J. Maeill, Jupiter, Fla.
Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
W. J. Chambers, Orange Lake, Fla.
Armour & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. King, Miami, Fla.
W. S. Preston, Auburndale, Fla.
Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Jno. D. Green, Seaside, Fla.
Jas. Holmes, Jensen, Fla.
E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. O Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fia.
E. O. Painter & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
J. Gates, Manatee, Fla.
J. Gates, Manatee, Fla.
P. F. Kelliher, Tampa, Fla.
C. S. Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
F. B. Turner, Parrish, Fla.
W. F. Martin. Ft. Ogden, Fla.
H. Benedict, Orlando, Fla.
E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
E. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Geo. S. Giles &Co., Orlando, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
WilEon & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wilson& Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, hla.
Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
M'f'd. by Kansas City Oil Works, K C, Mo.
T. J. Bachman, Braidentown, Fla.
Sterling & Russell, Delray, Fla.
Vertess & Co., Palatra, Fla.
B. O. Painter & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer Jacksonville, Fla
Little Bros. Fert. APhos. Co., Jacksonville
Little Bros. Fert. & Phos. Co., Jacksonville
Tampa Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
C. B. Tysen, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
MT''d. by Alabama C. Oil Co, Selma, Ala.
Wilson & Toomer, Jacksonville, Fla.
M'f'd by Lee &Co., Pensacola, Fla.


NOTES-Moisture not determined in samples sent in paper, or wood boxes.
Tobacco stems and tobacco dust contain some phosphoric acid, but it is bought for the pot-
ash and ammonia content.
Cotton seed meal contains some phosphoric acid, and some potash, but is bought for the am-
monia content.
Where only the insoluble phosphoric acid is given, in the table, it has been determined as
total phosphoric acid.







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.

A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Climatological Data tor May, 1901.


Stations Counties


IC

0
Cd

0
a

a1 "
?.4


1 0
M
r1 h

> aD


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer............ Alachua...... 92
Bainbridge..........Decatur, Ga .....119
Federal Point....... St. Jchns...... 10
Fernandina......... Nassau....... ......
Fort George ....... Duval.......... ..
Gainesville........ Alachua........ 175
HunTington........ Putnam........ 50
Jacksonville....... Duval............ 43
Jasper ........... Hamilton...... 165
Lake Butler..b.... Bradford ...... ..
Lake City........... Columbia..... 201
Maccienny.... ..... Baker......... 140
McAlpin.... f ...... Suwannee.........
Micanopy ........ Alachua.........
Middleburg......... Clay.......... ...


17
9
5

14
15
3
29


13
4

7
1


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit

Pa re a cipit



Iii 5 .01
-5

Soo as" .





76.0 +1.095 8* 50 1 39 4.18 1-0.40 1.00 9 13 17 1
74.2 +0.292 2* 49 1 40 4 08 0 20 1.92 10 ........
74.4 +0593 3 50 1 35 68 1 00 088 9 23 1 7
75. .. ... .. .... ..0 ... .. . ... .. ... . . . ..
75.8 + 1.29 3 6 7 7 .. ...... ... .. ....
76 1 0.595 4 5228 34 2 03 -0 95 0 87 7 2-2 2 0
74 6-0.995 4 47 1 41 3441-026 152 6 25 4
75 4 0.093 :3 55 1 30 5 31 1 63 1 26 12 9 17 5
74.8 -0.793 3* 53 28 38 6 22 -3 03 2 00 5.........
74 0 -1 996 25 49 28 39 2 91 0 08 1 10 12 ......
74.4 -1.895 2* 51 1 40 5 16+22 2 34 8 8 18 5
75.2 -0.697 4 461 45 5 33+3 61 1 98 8 ..........
75.6 ....... 98 24 51 1* 45 5 75 ... 2 00 ... .
75.4 -0.995 25 49 1 43 2 3-1 69 1 15 3 18 11 2
72 5. ..94 2 4328 4 586...... 2 60 7 7 16 8


__


SW



1e
. Cv
sw




iw

sw





Climatological Data -for May-(Continued.)


Stations


Savannah, Ga....... Chatham, Ga..
St. Augustine...... St. Johns.......
Sumner.......... Levy...........
Switzerland ........ St. Johns ......
Thomasyille, Ga.... Thomas, Ga....
Waycross, Ga...... Ware, Ga ......


CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow............
Brooksville ........
Clermont...........
DeLand... ........
Earnestville ........
Eustis............. . . .
Ft. Meade..........
Fort Pierce........
Inverness ..........
Kissimmee .........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smyrna......
Ocala.............
Orange City........
Orlando...........


Polk.... .... ..
Hernando ......
Lake...........
Volusia........
Pasco.........
Lake....... .. .
Polk..........
Brevard.......
Citrus ..........
Osceola.........
Brevard.......
Volusia..........
Marion .......
Volusia........
Orange ........


7 ....
7 ....
1 ....
577 6
9 78 0
1677 8
.. 74 6
174 4
875 0
1876 6
1474 0
1175 8
976 1
876 4


+2 7
-1 4
-0 5
+1 7
-0 3

-0 2


2 71
3 34
2 59
5 17
2 17
4 41

4 10


-0 06
-0 11
+0 79
+2 47
-1 84
+1 65

+0 91


nw




sw


19 60
23* 48
2* 51
2* 50
3* 52



4* 50

4 ...

23 56
15 53
15* 47
4 52
5 54
3* 55
4 60
3 52
4 51
3* 51
4 58


-0 4 94
..... 96


+0 998
+2 595
-2 495
.... 92
-3 093
+0 92
-0 895
+1 196
-0 695
+0 293


2 90 0 33

5 87 +2 87

1 45-1 80
5 97+3 17
4 40+0 48
6 92 +2 62
3 29.....
2 96-0-02
3 12-0 45
1 50-1 17
3 24+0 33
3 13 +0 80
2 05-1 11


0 81

2 42

0 65
2 84
1 10
3 35
0 98
2 30
1 80
1 25
1 10
1 45
0 67


1 w

1 8W



7se
3bW

"4e

1w
3sw
11w







Plant City..........
Rockwell..... a....
Sebastian..... b....
St. Francis.........
Tampa .............
Tarpon Spri gs....
ritusville.........


SOUTHERN SECTION.

Flamingo ........
Havana............
Hypoluxo ..........
Jupiter.............
Key West..........
Manatee...........
M arco..............
Miami....a.... ....
Myers ...........
Nassau............
Nocatee... ........
San Juan..........


WESTERN SECTION.

Carrabelle....a ....
Daphne...... b....
DeFuniak Springs..
Marianna .........
Mobile ..............
Montgomery ....
Monticello .........


Hillsborough... 12
M arion......... ...
Brevard ...... 3
Lake........... 2
Hillsborough.... 2
Hillsborough .. 2
Brevard..........

Means.........



Monroe........ ...
Cuba ...... .. 5
Dade... ..... ...
Dade......... .
Monroe.... .... 2
Manatee........ 1
Lee.............. ...
Dade .............
Lee... .. ..... ....
N. P. Bahamas. ...
DeSoto.... ......
Puerto Rico....


Means. .. ..


747 0

i 3 75 4
4 ....









4 75 3
1375 8
30 77 2
1872 5
.... 77 0
... 75 0
15 74 8
......
175 8
... 802
..17-5


-2 2 95
. 95
-0 492

0 0'90

-0 995

-0 4


Franklin....... 12 474 4-1 2
Baldwin, Ala........... 73 6-0 6
Walton'........ 193 3783 -0 8
Jackson....... .... 1 74 2
Mobile, Ala... 35 30 73 5 0 0
Montgom'y, Al 219 28 72 8 0
Jefferson......... ............ .


6 6E
6 00C
5 26


4 31
1 66


+2 68

+1 44

1i 42

-3 67


3 931+0 461


2 05 9
3 00 4
1 78 8

255 7

0 89 2

...... | 6C


2 00
4 03
3 17
2 02
1 65
0 67
1 00
3 44
0 76
1 90
1 00
1 49


3 15
10 10
7 11
3 63
2 74
1 75
1 88
10 42
2 30
7 28
3 88
4 85

4 10


2sw
w


6w

23 se

5w



5sw
3e

5 v
4n
2nw
4 w
Oe
1 sw


3 se

4 sw-w


... 1w
3sw
3 ......
2 sw
3 sw
6w


+5 63
- 0 32
-1 52
-0 83
-1 55

+4 30
-1 06


+60 27

-0 06



+0 09
+5 79

-1 52
+1 52






Climatological Data for May, 1901-Continued.


Stations


Counties


Newton ........... Dale, Ala.... ...
Pensacola.......... Escambia ......56
Quincy.............. Gadsden..... ...
St. Andrews Bay... Washington.......
Stepliensville ...... Taylor............. ..
Tallahassee.... .... Leon........... 193
Wausau ...d.. .... Washington... 250
Wewahitchka...... Calhoun....... ....

Means...... ....
APRIL, 1901. State Means ......

Federal Point..................... ....


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


62 9 -4 2


iThermometers are not self-registering and readings are
made at 7 a. m,. 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau.
Not used in obtaining means.


ce 0 t8 e
o oa


89 2 52
98 24 48
92 2 54
95 6* 50
91 25 50
97 24 50
90 25 52



87 2 41


Precipitation, in inches Sky
a


0- C a
o







S0 z z z Ao


5 50
4 90
4 26
3 32
5 07
8 76
6 4C

5 97
4 38


+2 51

+1 81
+2 18
+1 59
+4 74


-3 10
+1 47


1 111-2 52


3 95
4 00
2 35
1 42
2 90
5 20
4 00



0 97


.... .... ....
5 17 11
3 19 9
5 28 1
4 19 9
6 23 7
7 19 8
7 7 11

5 18 9
6 18 9

2 24 2


nw

2isw
3 sw
1 uw
4 ......
131s

4sw
4sw

4 nw


All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
only such stations as have normals.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.


t


11












SALIENT CLIMATIC FEA'1 URES.
FOR MAY, 1901.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
The mean pressure for the month was 29.90 inches, which is 0.12
below normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.11 inches, at Pen-
sacola on the 1st; the lowest 29.62 inches, at Pensacola on the 21st;
monthly range for the State was 0.49 inch.
TEMPERATURE,
(Degrees Fahrenheit.)
The monthly mean temperature for the State was 75.10, 0.50 below
normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 74.9'; Central 75.7;
Southern, 75.4; Western, 74.20. The highest monthly mean tempera-
ture was 78.0, at Eustis; the lowest monthly mean temperature was
72.00, at Sumner. The highest temperature during the month was 98,
at Eustis on the 15th; McAlpin on the 24th and Quincy on the 24th; the
lowest temperature during the month was 43, at Middleburg on the
28th; absolute range for the State was 55.
PRECIPITATION.
(Inches and hundredths.)
The average precipitation for the State during the month was 4.38
inches, 1.47 inches above the normal amount. By sections, the averages
were: Northern, 4.10 inches; Central, 3.93 inches; Southern, 4.10 inches;
Western, 5.97 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 10.42 inches,
at Miami; the least was 1.45 inches, at Earnestville. The greatest
amount for any twenty-four hours was 5.20 inches, at Wausau on the
31st.
WIND AND WEATHER.
The prevailing winds during the month were from the southwest. By
sections, there were: Northern, 16 clear days; 11 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy
Central, 17 clear; 9 partly cloudy; 5 cloudy. Southern, 20 clear; 7 partly
cloudy; 4 cloudy. Western, 18 clear; 9 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy.
Rainy days: Northern section, 7; Central, 6; Southern, 6; VWestern, 5.






18

PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Wind Velocity, Relative
Atmospheric Pressure in Miles Humidity

A.
Stations v s a




Jacksonville............. 29.88 30.10 1 2964276.380 35w 18 100 20 74
Jupiter. ................. 29.90 30.04 1 29.66215.995 36se 21 95 57 77
Key West.............. 29.91 80.07 4 29.68214,901 31nw 9...... ..
Pensacola .............. *29.91 0.11 1 29.62 217,781 48nw 20 93 0 72
Tamp .................. 29.90 0 09 1 29.64 21 4,831 34sw 20 93 139 73


*8 a. m. readings only.


tLow humidity due to fire of 3d.


COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR APRIL, DURING
THE PAST TEN YEARS.
Mean Average Rainfall.
Year. Temperature. Inches and hundredths.
1892.................... 75.3 .................. ... 2.19
1893 ........ ..... ...... .. 76.3.................... 3.92
1894 ............. ........ 74.6 ................... .2.51
1895 ........ ......... ... 75.9 .................... .4.46
1896 ............ ......... 74.7 ................... .2.7
1897 ..... .... ......... . 74.0.................... 2.25
1898 ..................... 76.4 .................... 1.60
1899..................... 78.2 ........ ........ 1.22
1900. ............. ....... 75.5.................... 3.83
1901 ................. ... 75.1 .................... 4.38
The normal temperature for May is 75.6; normal rainfall is 2.91
inches.









CHAPTER 4975-[No. 91.]
An Act to Establish a Standard of Weights and Measures of the State
of Florida.
Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. The following standard of weights and measures shall be
the standard of weights and measures throughout the State:
One standard bushel shall contain 2,150 2-5 solid inches. One liquid
gallon shall contain 231 solid inches. The weights and measures shall be
as follows:
Wheat, per bushel, 60 pounds avoirdupois.
Corn, shelled, per bushel, 56 pounds avoirdupois.
Corn on cob with shuck, 70 pounds avoirdupois.
Sorghum seed, per bushel, 56 pounds avoirdupois.
Barley seed, per bushel, 48 pounds avoirdupois.
Oats, per bushel, 32 pounds avoirdupois.
Bran, per bushel, 20 pounds avoirdupois.
Corn meal, per bushel, 48 pounds avoirdupois.
Beans, shelled, per bushel, 60 pounds avoirdupois.
Beans, velvet, in hull, per bushel, 73 pounds avoirdupois.
Beans, castor, shelled, per bushel, 46 pounds avoirdupois.
Millet seed, per bushel, 50 pounds avoirdupois.
Beggar weed seed, per bushel, 62 pounds avoirdupois.
Irish potatoes, per bushel, 60 pounds avoirdupois.
Sweet potatoes, per bushel, 60 pounds avoirdupois.
Turnips, per bushel, 54 pounds avoirdupois.
Onions, per bushel, 56 pounds avoirdupois.
Salt per bushel, 6U pounds avoirdupois.
Peanuts, per bushel, 22 pounds avoirdupois.
Chufas, per bushel, 54 pounds avoirdupois.
Rye, per bushel, 56 pounds avoirdupois.
Apples, dried, per bushel, 24 pounds avoirdupois.
Apples, green, per bushel, 48 pounds avoirdupois.
Quinces, per bushel, 48 pounds avoirdupois.
Peaches, dried, per bushel, 33 pounds avoirdupois.
Peaches, green, per bushel, 54 pounds avoirdupois.
Cotton seed, per bushel, 32 pounds avoirdupois.
Cotton seed, bea Island, per bushel, 46 pounds avoirdupois.
Plums, per bushel, 40 pounds avoirdupois.
Peais, per bushel, 60 pounds avoirdupois.
Guavas, per bushel, 54 pounds avoirdupois.
Sec.2. All contracts hereafter made within this State for work to be
done or .anything to be sold or delivered by weight or measure shall be







taken and construed according to the standard of weights and measures
hereby adopted as the standard of this StaLe.
Sec. 3. All laws and part of laws in conflict with this act are hereby
repealed.
Approved May 30, 1901.

CHAPTER 4976-[No. 92.]
An Act to Require all Merchants, Commission Merchants, Provision
Dealers and Storekeepers and all other Persons Selling or Offering tc
Sell Flour, Meal, Grits, Oats, Corn, Wheat, Rye, Bran, Beans, Pota-
toes and Peanuts, Already Put up, Placed and Packed in Sacks, Bags
or Barrels, in Original Packages, to have Marked, Stamped or Sten-
cilled on the Sacks, BWgs or Barrels the Exact Weight Thereof in
Pounds Avoirdupois; and to Prescribe Penalties for Failure to do so;.
and to Prescribe Penalties for Marking, Stamping and Stencilling False
Weights.
Be it Enacted by the.Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section I. All merchants, commission merchants, grocers, provision
dealers, storekeepers and other persons, before sellingor offering for sale,
any grain, flour, meal, grits, oats, corn, wheat, rye, bran, beans, Irish po-
tatoes, sweet potatoes or peanuts, already put up, packed or placed in any
sack, bag or barrel, in original packages, shall have marked or stamped
or stencilled upon such sack, bag or barrel so sold or offered for sale,
with its contents, in figures, at least one inch-in length, the exact weight.
in pounds avoirdupois of such bag, sack or barrel with its contents. If
the bag, sack or barrel is of a black or dark color such figures shall be-
marked, stamped or stencilled in light colored ink or pencil; if the bag,.
sack or barrel is of a light color then the marking, stamping or stencill-
ing, shall be in black or dark ink or pencil, but in all cases the stamping,
marking or stencilling shall be plain, legible, and placed conspicuously on
such bag, sack or barrel.
Sec. 2. Any merchant, commission merchant, grocer, provision dealer,
storekeeper or other person, or any officer, agent, clerk or employee of any
merchant, commission merchant, grocer, provision dealer or storekeeper
who shall offer for sale, attempt to sell or sell any of the articles men-
tioned in the preceding section already put up, placed or packed in any
sack, bag or barrel, in original packages, without having such sack, bag
or barrel marked, stamped or stencilled as in the manner prescribed in
the preceding section before offering for sale, attempting to sell or selling
the same, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction
thereof shall be punished by fine not exceeding two hundred dollars for
each offense.
Sec. 3. Any merchant, commission merchant, grocer, provision dealer,
storekeeper, or other person or any officer, agent, clerk or employee of any








merchant, commission merchant, grocer, provision dealer or storekeeper
who shall sell or dispose of any sack, bag or barrel with its contents, con-
taining any of the articles mentioned in the first section of this act upon
which the weight in avoirdupois of such sack, bag or barrel with its con-
tentshas been marked, stamped or stencilled as herein provided, and the
weights so stamped, marked or stencilled shall not be the true and correct
weight of such sack, bag or barrel with its contents, but the weight so
marked, stamped or stencilled shall be a greater weight than the true and
correct weight of such sack, bag or barrel with its contents, shall be
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be punished
for each offense by a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars or by im-
prisonment in the county jail not exceeding three months, or by both fine
and imprisonment.
Became a law without the signature of the Governor.


Value of Cotton Seed to the Farmer.
(From Farmers Bulletin, No. 124, U. S. Dept. of Ag.)
The results of two years' feeding experiments with mi.ch cows to de-
termine the value of cotton seed to the farmer are reported in a bulletin
of the Mississippi Station, of which the following is a summary:
The facts as demonstrated are: (1) A pound of cotton seed has a
greater value for feeding cattle than a pound of corn; (2) a pound of
cotton-seed meal has a feeding value about equal to 2 pounds of corn;
(3) that at least 85 per cent. of the fertilizing ingredients in the feeds
is excreted by the animals fed, and may be recovered in the manure; (4)
that nearly half of the fertilizing ingredients excreted is found in the
urine; (5) that both cotton seed and cotton-seed meal may constitute a
very important part of the grain feed of cattle without injury to their
health; (6) that cotton seed and cotton-seed meal, when fed to dairy cows
in proper quantity and properly combined with other feeds, do not injure
the quality of either milk or butter.
With corn at 40 cents per bushel (about the average price in this State)
a ton of cotton seed is worth $16.70 as a feed, for either beef cattle or
dairy cattle. At present prices for commercial fertilizers nitrogen costs
about 12 cents per pound and phosphoric acid and potash each 5 cen.s
per pound. Allowing these prices for the same ingredients in manure,
we have $9.09 as the fertilizing value of the manure for each ton of seed
fed, making for a farmer a total value per ton of $25.79. Farmers sell
their seed for $4 to $6 per ton. Some of them sell for $2 per ton.
In a-similar way we find the feeding value of a ton of cotton-seed
meal to be $28.56, and the manure to be worth $19.13 for every ton of
meal consumed, making a total value of $47.69 that a farmer might de-
rive per ton by first feeding the meal to cattle and applying the manure
to his land. *








The cotton crop for the South [in 1897-98] was 11,200,000 bales and
5,600,000 tons of seed, having a combined feeding and fertilizing value
of $144,424,000. At $5 per ton the seed would have brought $28,000,-
000. The farmers of the cotton belt lost $116,424,000 [on
this one crop].
The present disposition of the cotton-seed crop secures to the farmer
a very small part of its real value, and must of necessity give place to a.
practice that will secure to the farmer the maximum benefit which he
may derive from this product.
The time will come when the Southern farmer will realize that the
fertilizing value in cotton seed must stay on the farm to maintain its
fertility and productiveness.
He will not always regard the matter of hauling as of no consequence
-as something which he can lo without cost. If the best disposition
of cotton seed is finally demonstrated to be to extract the oil for human
food and other commercial purposes, and let the meal and hulls go back
to the farms to serve both as feed and fertilizer, then most likely there
will be a small oil mill at each ginnery and oil and lint will be the only
products of the cotton crop sent to the market. .iAs
The Southern farmer, however, need not wait for oil mills. He may
get the full value of his cotton seed by a judicious system of feeding, ac-
companied by the most'careful saving and proper use of the manure.
-THE EDITOR.

Legume Manuring.
To the farmer or planter the word legume means simply any plant be-
longing to the clover family, such as the various clovers, cow peas, Cana-
dian field peas, beans, lucerne or alfalfa, etc. All these plants possess
the power of taking nitrogen from thd air and changing it into such a
form or condition that it becomes available as plant food. Legumes
store this nitrogen in their substance only. They enrich the soil simply
by making a growth of substance fairly rich in nitrogen as plants go,
and directly or indirectly this substance finds it way back to the soil as
manure.
Legumes or clovers enrich the soil only in fertilizer nitrogen, as this
class of plants, or any other class for that matter, cannot add to the soil
a single pound of potash or phosphoric acid not already taken from the
soil in the shape of the crop itself. There is no potash in the air in the
form of gas, nor any phosphoric acid. The nitrogen which legumes con-
vert into plant food exists in the air, in inert forms-that is, in such form
that it is useless as plant food. The clover plants, through the aid of
certain lower organisms, take this nitrogen from the air and combine it
with oxygen making thereby a substance which is suitable as plant food.
So far as it is now known, only the legume family of plants possess this
property.









From the above, it follows that nitrogen may exist in such a state or
condition that though it may be present in abundant quantities, plants
cannot make use of it. In effect, much the same may be said of potash
and phosphoric acid. As these two plant food elements exist in the soil
naturally, they are of little use to gro-ving plants. Plant food must be
soluble in the water of the soil, in order to be available as the plant food.
Now the natural soil may contain enough potash and phosphoric acid to
grow a hundred crops, as shown by chemical analysis, yet fail to grow
one. This is because this potash and phosphoric acid is locked up in the
soil in rock particles which are insoluble in water, hence the fertilizer
cannot take such form as to be useful as plant food.
The importance of this latter point is that legumes or clovers cannot
assimilate nitrogen gas unless certain quantities of potash and phosphoric
acid are present in the soil in available form. As legumes store up nitro-
gen, they form vegetable growth-the nitrogen is a part of this growth
and.the quantity of nitrogen stored depends directly upon the quantity
of this growth. But this vegetable growth cannot be made without the
proper amount of potash and phosphoric acid needed. The following
table shows the pounds of potash and phosphoric acid required for every
100 pounds of nitrogen stored up by the legumes.
Every 100 pounds of nitrogen requires:
Phosphoric
Potash Acid
Clover .............. .................. 84 pounds 21 pounds
Scarlet clover .......................... 97 pounds 26 pounds
Cow peas............. ....... .. 69 pounds 22 pounds
Alfalfa...... .................. .... 88 pounds 17 pounds
Canadian peas ........................ 69 pounds 26 pounds
It will be observed at once that the potash greatly exceeds the phos-
phoric acid, whereas as a matter of fact commercial fertilizers commonly
show quite the opposite proportions. It is true that phospohoric acid
tends to take forms in the soil which place it beyond the reach of grow-
ing plants. At the same time, equal parts of phosphoric acid and potash
certainly restore the balance between the two elements, and even more
than restore it.
There is another point to touch upon here. It is quite impossible for
plants to take up all the plant food applied to the soil; indeed, the best
authorities practically agree that 50 per cent. of efficiency is fairly good
work. This means that to obtain 100 pounds of fertilizer nitroger from
the air, the following quantities of potash and phosphoric acid must be
used:







24


Phosphoric


Potash Acid
Clover ................................ 168 pounds 42 pounds
Scarlet clover.... ..................... t4 pounds 52 pounds
Cow peas............................. 138 pounds 44 pounds
Alfalfa................................ 176 pounds 52 pounds
Canadian peas......................... 138 pounds 52 pounds
'The4"int arises will it pay to use such quantities of plant food merely
to grom fertilizer nitrogen-considering also that the phosphoric acid is
made equal to the potash. The following table explains that potash and
phosphoric acid cost the farmer about 'five cents per pound, nitrogen,
fourteen cents. The first column shows what plant foods costs at most,
while column two shows what the nitrogen gained, to which must also
be added the value of the potash and phophoric acid contained in the
crop:


Cost Gain
Clover ......... ... ....... ................. ...... $16 60 $19 25
Scarlet clover .. ................................ 19 40 20 15
Cow peas ... ...................................... 13 80 18 45
Alfalfa............................... .......... 17 60 19 15
Canadian peas.................................... 13 80 18 75
The table shows that under the most unfavorable conditions legume
' nitrogen pays merely as a fertilizer problem. Of course the valbe of the
crop as forage or for other purposes is an additional value gained. Cer-
tainly it is important to note that this legume nitrogen is not all gain. It
costs something and if the potash and phosphoric aci4 are lacking or im-
properly proportioned, growing legume fertilizer very easily becomes un-
profitable. The farmer or planter must do his own thinking on this sub-
ject and mix it with a good grade of common sense.-R. Garwood in,
American Cultivator.




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