Title: Florida monthly bulletin
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077082/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida monthly bulletin
Alternate Title: Bulletin Florida Agricultural Department
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Dept.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse Fla
Publication Date: April 1901
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with v. 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1, 1905)?
Numbering Peculiarities: From vol. 14 numbering changes.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 66 (Apr. 1, 1901); title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077082
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 43189044
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture

Full Text
V6 I//


VoL 11. t No. 66.


FLORi 5A o. %l5Jj


(Department of Agriculture.)



..Monthly Bulletin.



SI APRIL, 1901.


B. E. McLIN, Commissioner of Agriculture,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.



These Bulletins are furnished free
to those requesting them . .

TALLAHASSEEAN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE TALLA
I&i 7





























2.4












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE....


HON. B. E. McLIN, Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Clief Clrkli


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY-Rain is plentiful, too much to save- fodder; no
hay cut yet; crops are doing well. Live stock in good condition.
BAKER COUNTY-There has been some improvement in crops lately,
and with more favorable season it is hoped condition will. continue to
grow better. Pastures are good and live stock doing well
BREVARD COUNTY-Groves are doing finely, but crop is short, owing
little change in the condition of the two crops since last report. About
all of the other crops are in fine condition. Fruit trees are doing well;.
live stock is generally in fine condition.
BREVARD COUNTY-Groves are doing finely, but crop is short, owing:
to spring frost, which cut the bloom short in some sections; other fruits
are doing well; all farm crops are very good. Season is fine and live-
stock in good condition.
CALHOUN COUNTY-We are having too much rain at this time; crop:
are growing well and look well. Live stock is in fine condition through-
out the county.
CITRUS COUNTY-Sugar cane, fom some unaccountable cause, came-
up badly, giving a poor stand; corn crop in fine condition and is quite
well matured, much of it being dry enough to use; the season is fair,
the continued rains insuring a good crop of hay. Live stock is in un-
unusually good condition.
COLUMBIA COUNTY-Crops on an average are splendid, with prospects
of excellent yields; we have good season; grass is plenty in pasture,
and live stock in fine condition.
DADE COUNTY-We are having fine growing weather plenty of rain'
and well distributed; crops and fruit trees doing well.
DESOTO COUNTY-Prospects for all kinds of crops and fruits are-
very good; plenty of grass on ranges and live stock in fine condition..








ESCAMBIA COUNTY-Crops are not at all uniform in their condition,
in some places they are good, in others not so good. Live stock is in
good condition, except hogs, which are in some localities affected with
cholera.
FRANKLIN COUNTY-All crops grown in this county are in excel-
lent condition; fall planting of vegetable crops has commenced.
GADSDEN COUNTY-We have a good deal of rain, and in some sections
too much, but as yet no damage of account has been done; crops are
doing well. The condition of the pasture is good and stock is in ex-
cellent condition.
HERNANDO COUNTY-Field crops are in fine condition. Tobacco
is not planted any longer in this county. Wild honey is so plentiful that
that it does away with the necessity of domesticating bees, so little
is raised. Live stock in good condition; grass crop is fine and there
will be a good hay crop saved.
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY-We are now and have for some time had
unusually heavy rainfall, which has in some instances damaged crops
to small extent, and seriously interfering with transplanting straw-
berry plants; crops are generally good. Live stock is doing well.
HOLMES COUNTY-All crops are doing well, except cotton; so much
rain is causing it to shed in some fields, and in others it is being at-
tacked by "wilt" and lice. Live stock is in a good average condition.
JACKSON COUNTY-Most field crops have greatly improved since last
report, though corn and cotton, particularly the former, was too badly
damaged in some localities to recover; the continuous rains have in some
places damaged cotton, and reports of caterpillars are heard, though
not general. Live stock is in only fair condition to what it usually is
at this season.
LEE COUNTY-We are having an abundance of rain, which is fine for
corn, sugar cane, velvet beans, hay, guavas, bananas and citrus fruit
frees. Live stock was never in better condition than now.
LEON COUNTY-All reports are to the effect that up to this time the
cotton crop was never better, but we have been having too much rain
recently, and should it continue much longer, cotton will be damaged.








Labor is scarce. Corn crop is about 15 per cent. short of last year.
Some crops are very fine, others only medium. Live stock generally is
in fine condition.
LEVY COUNTY-Crops are all doing well, though the rains are very
heavy, too wet to save fodder and hay much; crops will be a fair average
generally. Live stock is in excellent condition.
MADISON COUNTY-Cotton was putting on fruit finely up to ten days
ago, but since then we have had rain almost every day, which if it keeps
up will likely cause bad results. Some crops are fine, while others are
only fair. Live stock is in good average condition.
MANATEE COUNTY-Everything is in about its normal condition;
crops of all kinds are good. The rains were long in coming, but are now
plentiful. Live stock is in as fine condition as it has ever been.
ORANGE COUNTY-There is more corn raised this year than has ever
been raised in this county. Pineapples are the principal crop now; other
crops are very good. Live stock is in extra fine condition.
POLK COUNTY-Corn has never been better, in fact, all field crops
are extremely good; hay is being harvested, and it is the general opinion
that the hay, corn and fodder crops will double anything in the past for
many years Live stock is in better condition at this time than for
several years.
SANTA RosA COUNTY-At present all crops are in good condition,
and the prospects are fine for good average yields of crops. Live stock
is in very good condition. We are having a little too much rain.
SUWANNEE COUNTY-The corn crop promises to be short, but it is
generally believed there will be enough to supply all home demands.
Other field crops will yield a good average. Live stock is in very fair
condition.
TAYLOR COUNTY-Field crops are in very good average condition;
we are having a little too much rain, but no damage of account has been
done yet. Live stock in good condition and doing well.
WAKULLA COUNTY-We are having too much rain, which has hurt
cotton somewhat; corn also a little short; other field crops are very good.
Live stock in good condition, except hogs, which are afflicted with
cholera in some sections of the county. Sheep raising would be a very
profitable business, but for so many dogs.







6

WALTON COUNTY-All crops are generally good, though poor in some
localities on acocunt of drought; we are now having plenty of rain.
Live stock owners consider that stock is in better condition than ever
before.
WASHINGTON COUNTY-Recent rains have helped late corn, rice,
potatoes and grass; there will be more hay cut this year than ever before.
All kinds of stock are doing well












Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops for July, 1901,
also Condition of Live Stock, compared with an average.


Upland
Cotton

Counties 0


o
00.,


Alachua..............
Baker.................
Bradford..............
Brevard .............
Calhoun...............
'C itrus............... .
Clay............... ...
Columbia .............
D ade ....................
DeSoto........... ..
Escambia ..............
Franklin.............
Gadsden ..............
Hamilton ............
Hernando.............
Hillsborough...........
Holmes ...............
Jackson ...............
Jefferson..... ........
LaFayette............
Lake...................
Lee ... ...............
Leon .................
Levy .................
Madison................
Manatee...............
Marion ..............
Nassau.................
O range........... .....
Pasco ........ ........
Polk .................
Putnam.............
St. Johns ..............
Santa Rosa......... ....
Suwannee..............
Taylor................
Wakulla ..............
W alton ..............
Washington............

General averages .......


85 87


Sea. Sugar I Fid I _.


Island orn
Cotton

0 0-


o ._

801 85 75 75 100
75 75 80 80 50
65 70 65 75 100
.. . ... 100
75 75 90 85 85
S100 100 75
100 100 90 90 100
95 85 100 95 95

|.i ... 1:00 110 110
1100100 100
S90 90 90
85 85 100 105 90
60 75 75 85 90
.. .... 110 100 100
. 100 110 75
75 85 90 95 90
80 80 75 90 95
90 85 85 95 100
85 80 80 80 95
.... .... 100 100 100
110 110 110
. .I ...... 95 90 100
90 90 100 100 100
80 75 60 60 100
.. ... 100 100 90
100 100 100 110 100
80 85 75
.. 100 105 70
100 105 85
... ... 160 165 100
90 90 90 95 100
........ 50 60 75
75 85 100
90 90 70 70 80

80 8 80 80 100
...... 95 100 85
100 85 80 751 100

83 84 90 92 92


ane Peas








100 10 100
1010 0 7 100
100 U.O 100
90i 100 100
75! 100 100

100 110 110
100 100
120 90 100
100 100 100
10U 100 100
90 100 100
90 90 100
100 .......
70 100 100
95 85 95
95 100 110
100 100 100
100 100 100
1 100 100 100
110 90 90
110 100 100

S100 90 85
95 100 100
110 100 110
75 .... .... .
70 100 100
9d 100 100
100 125 125
100 90 95
85 25 40
100 90 95
80 90 90
90, 50 60
100 100 100
901 5 95
100 100 1005

94 92 95


Rice



4a

0
u

70 100
50 50
100 100

75 75
100 100
100 100
100 100

100 95
100 100

100 100
85 90
126 100
.. i
95 95
100 100

100 100

100 100
100 100
85 85
100 100
100 100

60 70

100 10o
100 100


80 80
70 70
50 50
:00 100
85 65
90 80

91 91







8

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.

Velvet Sweet Eggaa
V eang Potato's Peanuts Cassava Hay EPlants

Counties o g a
-ouo,, .
0 0 0 C 0 0 -0 -4

Alaohua ............ 90 100 100 75 80 75 75 80 85 85 80 85
Baker................ 75 80 100 100 40 40 .................
Bradford...............100 200 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Breard ............. ........ 100 100 ........ 100 100 100 100.........
Calhoun... .............. .. 100 100 100 100............... ....
Citrus.................. 100 100 100 100 0100 00 90 100 100 100 .... ....
Clay................ 110 120 100 100 100 100 ......... 100 100 .... ....
Columbia.............. 95 95 100 95 100 100 110 100 125 125 100 10
Dade ........... ..... .... . 100 100
DeSoto .............. 90 100 100 110 95 90 95 105 110 10 .ii
Escambia................ 100 150 100 150 100 100 100 150 200 200 100 100
Franklin............... 90 95 90 100 100 100 .... .... .... ........ ..
Gadsden ............ .... .... 110 110 120 120 .... .... 100 100 ... ...
Hamilton ............ ... ... 90 95 90 85 .... .... 100 110 ... ...
Hernando ............ 115 110 110 100 100 100 .... .... 100 100 ....
Hillsborough.......... 100 200 100 100 ....... ....... ........... ..
Holmes............... 95 95 110 100 1001 100 ... ....
Jackson... ........... 100 100 80 80 90 100 .... .... 90 100 ........
Jefferson................. .... 100 100 90 .......... 100 00.......
Lafayette.............. 100,120 100 100..... ...... .........
Lake ...............1. 100 100 100 80 85 75 80 .... ....
Lee.......... ....... 100 150 100 100 90 90 100 10 110 115 100 100'
Leon .. ............. .. .... 100 110 100 100 ... .... 100 115 ... ......
Levy..................100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100.... ...
Madison ............ .. .. 100 110 80 80 ........ 100 100 ......
Manatee.... ......... 100 100 100 100 .. ..... ....105 105... ...
Marion................. 100 110 100 100 100 100 100 100 ........ 100 100
Nassau.......... .... 1100 100 100 100 ........ ....
Orange.............. 100 110 75 80 ....... 100 105 100 10 80 80
Pasco.................. 100 100 100 100 ....... .
Polk............. ...... 150 150 150 160 100 100 125 130 112 10 150 150
Putnam ... .......... 100 100 100 100 10 00 1 100 100 .... ... ...
St. Johns................ ... 50 50 .... ... .... .... 75 75 25
Santa Rosa.......... ............. 95 100 100 100 ......... 90 90 ........
Suwannee........... ...... 90 90 100 100..........
Taylor................. 100 100 100 100 50 60 ........ 60 65 ........
Wakulla............... 100 100 110 110 80 80 ........ 75 75 ........
Walton................ 100 100 100 110 95 95 ........ 80 80 .......
Washington............ 125 150 110 125 100 100 100 150 110 125.........
General averages.. ... 101 11 99 102 93 9 98 107 101 105 98 93






9

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


1_[ Pine- I


Tobacco Iananas aj







Baker .................. ...
Bradford ..... ......... 1001
Brevard ... ... ... ... 125 150
Calhoun ...... .. ...... 75 .

C itrus ....... ... ... .. .....
Clahua.......... ... ....... ......
ColumbBaker.ia ............ ... .. ........
Bradford... .......... ..... 1 00 50 0 .
DeSotoard ...... . ... 95 100 110 1
ECalhoun.............. 100 100 .... ... ...


FCitrusin......... ... .. . ....... .. .. ...
adsden..... ......... 12 ... .. ...

Ham ilton ..................
Hernando............. 00 125 ..
Hillsborough... ........... 90 100110
Holambia .... ....... 100 100 ...........
FJackson............ ....... ..


Jefferson ... .. ..... .. . ..
Lfayettn ............. .125



Lake ......... ...... 25 .....
Leel.. . . .... 100 100 125 125 100
Hlmon .. .......... 100 0
Levy ..... ... .. ......
Madison..... .. .... .. ..




tLake2 .... ...5 .. ...
aLees............... 125 100
eonlk .... .... .. .. 11 ..0 1.
PutnaLevy ...... ..... .. ...
St. Johns............ ... .
Manta Rosatee ..... ........ ..... .... 100 11
Suwannee....... ... ... .. ....
Taylora ................. . ..




Oragekua............. ..
alasco........ ......... ............
Polk........ .........75 75 100 1001 150






General averag.. ...... 8 89 97. 104 1
Walton...............100 100...........
Washington.............................

General averages.......98 89 97 104 1US


?les I ua




0 .
$, ~ -
"'2


i 2s 100

150 100







137 8
187 89


v Orange Lemon
S Trees Trees




* g s' ii
80 CA


.... 1 50 1... ....
800 125 80 .. .....
.. 00 2 .... ...
100 ... 100 ....
. 100 . 1 ..
100 10 105 100 00
110 1001 100 1 10



.... 11 ... ..
.... 11 75 110 ...
.... ....--- -- **


35 10 100 ...
10 1 115 100 00


200 115 100 105 100
. 110 ... 110

i. 100 ioo 1 00
100 .. 100 ....
100 150 160 125 115
100 .. 100....







132 10 105 4 10


- ---------







Condition and Prospective Yield of Crop-Continued.

Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Counties




Alachua ..................
Baker .................
Bradford ... ............
Brevard.......... .. ..... .
Calhoun...... .. ... ....
,Citrus ................... .
Clay .............. .
Columbia............ .. .
IDade .. ......... .......
DeSoto....................
Escambia...... ...........
Franklin ............... .
,Gadsden ..............
Hamilton..................
Hernando .................
bHillsborough...... ....
Holmes........ .........
Jackson......... .....
Jefferson...... .. ........
'Lafayette.....................
"Lake.... .................
Lee. .................
Leon ............. ........
'Levy ....................
Madison ...............
Manatee ... .............
Marion ......... ......
Nassau..................
,Orange.......... ..........
Pasoo............. ......
Polk........ ...........
Putnam ........ ..... .
St. Johns..............
Santa 'Rosa.............
Suwannee..............
ITaylor..... ..............
Wakulla................
W alton.................
Washington..............

General averages........


Grape Horses
Lime Fruit and Cattle Hogs Sheep
Trees Fruit I a__
Trees Mules



U5 P6 -3
a S c a o e
o C o o o


..... ... ... .... 100 90 70 100
... ... .. .... 90 100 75 100
100.... 100 .... 80 100 100 100
... ... 125 50 100 100 100 .....
... .. .... .... 100 100 70 100
..... .... 100 200 100 100 100 100
... .... .... .... 100 110 120 ..
.97 98 1 1 100 100
100 105 105 110 100 100 ....... .....
100 110 109 90 100 100 100 90
... ... . ... 100 125 ....... 100
... .. 90 90 0 ........
...120 1 125 100 100
. .. .. 100 100 90 .....
10 .... 100 110 110 100
. 110 .... .. .. 100 ........ ... ..
95 95 80 90
.. .. .. .... 90 95 85 100
.... ... ... 100 100 90 95
.. ... .... .. 90 85 90.....
100 75 80 100 .......
110 110 110 110 125 125 125...
.... .... .... 100 115 120 100
.... ... .. 100 95 100 100
.. .. ... 60 95 90 80
100 100 110 85 100 112 100 100
100 .. 120. 90 95 100 100
.. .. 90 90 95 100
.. ..... 100 80 100 110 100 .......
10 .... 100 ... 100 100 95 100
100 100 150 165 110 150 100 110
.......... 100 .... 100 95 90 100
.... .... ... .... 90 100 75 .......
... .... 100 100 75 90
...... ... .... ... 90 90 80 30
...... .. ... 100 100 100 100
.. ... 100 100 70 70
.... ... .. ...... 95 105 80 100
.. ... ... 100 105 100 100

101 105 110 111 94 102, 93 95
1 O ,1 11 _l 931 95








11


Condition and Prospective Yield of Crops-Continued.


Tobacco Honey Wool


Counties

c 0


A lachua ........... ..... ...... ...... .
Baker .................. ................
Bradford ............................
Brevard ..... .. .. .. ....... ... ..........
Calboun ................ ................
Citrus ............ ........... 1,000
Clay............ .................... ..
Colum bia......... ...... ... .............
Dade.... .............. .... .. ..
DeSoto................... .. 1.200
Escambia ..... ............. 2,000
Franklin............ ...... ......... .
Gadsden.................... 1,000,000
Ham ilton............... ... .. .. ........
Hernando........ ..... .. ...............
Hillsborough ............ ....
Holmes .............. ...... 3,000
Jackson ....... ............. 600
Jefferso ........... .................
Lafayette............ ... . ................ .
Lake ........................ ..............
Lee ................ .......................
Leon................ ............ 100,000
Levy. .............. ................ .
Madison ... ................. ........
M anatee.................. .... ....
Marion. .................. ......
N assau............. ........ ... ....
Orange ................ .... ........
Pasco................. ... .. .... .... .. ....
Polk..... ...................... 10.000
Putnam ..... ... ... ... ................
St. Johos... ....... ....... ..........
Santa Rosa ................ ........... .......
Suwannee .................. ..............
Taylor ............... .........
Wakulla. ......... ... . 500
W alton .................... 6,000
Washington ................... 1,000

General averages............ 1,125,300


50.000
11,000
.-- ............
10,000


20,000

................666




I ..5,600
...............
................


5,000



0..... ,000


0,000




.... ..... .. ..
2,000

15,000
15.000


8,000
20,00
5,000

233,000


......... ......



3,000y
..............

4,000,
50,000



8,000



................
...... ..... ..

............ ...
86,000


















75,000
1,000
.... ...... .. .....









50,000




10,000

343,700


1,000 300
...... --... . ., .........











BUREAU OF FERTILIZERS.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. E. E. McLIN, Clerk.

VALUATIONS.
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia and
Potash for the Season of 1900-1901.
Available Phosphoric Acid ..............44 cents a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ 1 cent a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... 15 cents a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20.)..........5 cents per pound
If caluclated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. 90 cents per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 20 cents per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .... $3.00 per unit
Potash .................. ............ $1.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $2.00 per ton for mixing and
bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We find
this to be the easiest and quickest method for calculating the
value of a fertilizer. To illustrate this take for example a
fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid, 6.39x.90 ................$ 5.75
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, 1.15x.20................ .23.
Ammonia, 4.93x3.00 .............. 14.79
Potash, 7.11x1.00 .............. 7.11
Mixing and bagging .................... ....... 2.00
$29.88
The above valuations are for cash for materials delivered at
Florida seaports, and they can be bought in one ton lots at
these prices at the date of issuing this Bulletin. Where fer-
tilizers are bought at interior points, the additional freight to.
that point must be added.










UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECTOR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Climatological Data for June, 1901.


Stations


NORTHERN SECTION.

Archer ........... Alachua ....... 92
Bainbridge.... ......Decatur, Ga ..... 119
Federal Point....... St. Johns...... 10
Fernandina......... Nassu ...... .....
Fort George ....... Duval...........
Gainesville.... e.... Alachua....... 17E
Huntington ........ Putnam........ 5(
Jacksonville ....... Duval........... 4;
Jasper ............ Hamilton ...... 16
Lake Butler...i.... Bradford ........
Lake City........... Columbia...... 20
Macclenny...... Baker ........ 141
McAlpin.... f...... Suwannee.........
Micanopy ........... Alachua.... ......
aIiddle burg....,.... Clay.......... ..


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches
Fahrenheit


0 I

0
u~Cd
In S- z -
4- a- oM ^ b
| g ags

. a d" o a-55


S
0-




93 Cd


a a-
z

B E

z z


28 8.14 +0.04 3.10 12
30 3 3i6 -2 0 74 9 .
25 9 77 +3 11 3 25 15


23 866 83 3 03 12
28 7 10 +1 73 3 37 12
21 9 64 +3 97 3 22 13
25 6 73 +0 82 2 00 7 .
29 1 78 .. 0. 70 k 5
28 8 36 92 3 16 10
31 8 61 -1 60 3 06 13
31 365 0 95 10
29 7 16 +2 38 2 50 9
31 1073 .. .. 9


Sky


0
o

a-.-

'3
aB
.E


se





e-se
e


sw



e


I





























Bartow.............
Brooksville.........
Clermont...........
DeLand... ........
Earnestville ........
Eustis............. . .
Ft. Meade..........
Fort Pierce.........
Inverness.........
Kissimmee .........
Merritt's Island ....
New Smyrna......
Ocala.............
Orange City........
Orlando...........


Polk ........
Hernando ....
Lake.........
Volusia.......
Pasco ........
Lake........ .
Polk..........
Brevard......
Citrus..........
Osceola .......
Brevard ......
Volusia........
Marion .....
Volusia ......
Orange.......


Climatological Data for June-(Continued.)


S Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
Fahrenheit



3 8 0 55 7
8 * .g 23 U



5 77 1 0 93 246210 7 8 07 1 92 2 51 11
1 1 1 i. SW :3lti ,0
_ Pa S in_ 1 Ic_ z z sZ Z
36 30 78.7 0.0 9725 64 1 21 675 +055 3 07 10 8 18 4
10 52 78 6+0 2 9024*62 3 19 8 27 +3 39 234 11..........
10 8 9j+1 1 9226 65 1* 27 17 51+11 31 13 32 6 4 22 4
S 15 77 7'-1 0 93 24* 62 10 27 8 07 +192 251 11 ... .....
330 23 79 6+0 2 9925*61 4* 2( 7 47 +2 60 4 46 11 .... .....
S131 19 78 65-1 8 99125 60 1 219 87 +4 94 3 07 1.. .........

.... .... 8 -0 8 ........ ... 8 74 2 84 11 11 10 9

5 80 2-1 1 95 1*9411 31 10 84 +2 77 2 21 16 4 22 4
328 7 79 8-0 2 95 25* 64 3 25 1025 +129 400 15 12 6 12
7 80 2--1 5 9630 61 4 24 7 51 +134 280 10 10 19 1
1 79 ....... 9325* 59 1 25 ...... ....... ......
S 193 5 .... ..... .... .....3 04 4 90 6 .... ...
180 9 80 5 0 97 27* 5 0 5 35 -1 02 1 8 16 6 12 9
125 16 80 4 1 7 97 8 64 3 28 16 27 +7 01 3 40 18 13 13 4
.. 78 9-0 9 96 22 65 5* 27 11 64 1 36 5 45 8 18 4 8
.. 1 78 6 ..... 9426 62 3 23 10 63 +2 48 2 00 13 6 16 8
65 8 78 7-1 8 9326 65 1* 25 8 78 1 67 1 66 12 .... ..
.. 20 18 79 2- 0 2 88 4* 68 2 19 9 89 3 93 2 56 12 14 7 9
20 14 77 7-1 3 9930 62 6 30 8 91 +2 81 2 06 8 .. ... ..
150 11 79 1- 0 9724 63 4 2 98( +1 38 253 14 12 8 10
.50 9 79 8--1 4 97 30 62 6 32 9 20 +2 07 7 13 1 7 5 8
98 8 79 6--02 9326 66 4 24 11 81 +5 13 310 16 15 9 6


Aw
ne
ne

e
e
ne
ne
ne


se
se








Plant City.........
Rockwell..... a....
Sebastian...........
Tampa .............
Tarpon SpriLgs....
Titusville .........



SOUTHERN SECTION.

Flamingo..... ..
Havana...........
Hypoluxo ..........
Jupiter.............
Key West .........
Manatee.............
Marco.............
Miami....c........
Myere .............
Nassau.............
Nocatee ........
San Juan.........


WESTERN SECTION.


Hillsborough... 121
Hfariori ...........
Brevard ...... 36
Hlllsborough... 20
Hillsborough .. 20
Brevard............

Means..... ..


Monroe .......
Cuba. ........
Dade .......
Dade...........
Monroe.......,
Manatee .......
Lee..............
Dade..........
Lee .. .... .....
N. P. Bahamas.
DeSoto.... ...
Puerto Rico....

Means...


Carrabelle ......... Franklin......
Daphne...... b.... Baldwin, Ala...
DeFuniak Springs.. Walton........
Marianna ......... Jackson........
Mobile.............. obile, Ala ....
Montgomery .. Montgom'y, Ala
Monticello ....... Jefferson.........


80 0-0 3 9630
80) ... 99 26
79 3 0 5 90 8
80 1 0 0 9426

78 4-1 3 91 17

79 5-0 5 ... ...



78 8 .... 88 2*
80 1-1 0 94 4
80 2 +0 90 18*
79 5 1 0 a9 9
.. .. ..... ... .- .
80 2 -0 1 9425
82 4 96 5
80 4- 9 9 89 2*
78 8 -1 1 94 5
79 8 .... 90 3*
81 4 .. 971 5*
80 2 0 0 90;17

80 2 0 0 ... ...


78 8 -2 0 92 17*
78 6 -1 6 100 17
79 4 -0 6 9917*
791 .... 9627
80 0 0 0 9917
80 2 0 0 9827
...... ... .. .. .. .


65 2*1
63 4
69 1*
66 2

65 4

.. ... .


2 27
29 17
2* 18
10 18

2 23
11* 22
3* 21
3* 24
13* 16
2* 27
15 16




1* 23
1* 28
1 32
1 26
7 27
8 27


10 95
9 05
9 17
7 52

9 97

9 88



19 75
6 55
21 28
17 41

14 38
17 27
21 72
20 28
15 50
10 87
7 05

17 87


-2 21


-1 72

1-2 12

+2 24




-0 61
+10 41
-+10 92

+6 14

+13 58
+9 44


+1 80

10 10


+3 44
-5 85
-4 21

-3 70
-2 91


2 A8f
2 00
2 00
1 91

2 80





2 70
2 25
9 71
7 45

4 85
9 77
8 25
11 70
2 82
4 25
0 90


15 8 15 7
9 . . .. .
12 .... ..
18 1 2U0 9

11 12 7
13 11 12 7



10 1 0 15
12 7 15
15 ...... .. .


16 8 16 6
13 '10 11" 9
16 20 7 3
10 .... .... . .
19 11 14 5
15 . .. ....
15 12 0 18
21 4- 10 160


e


ne

se

e



se
e

se

sesw
se
Be
8











n
se





Climatological Data for June, 1901-C-ontinued.


8 Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches Sky
h Fahrenheit a


Stations Counties 0 2 .
.@ -, ,
0 0 80

.) O 0 M UP


Newton............
Pensacola .........
Quincy..............
St. Andrews Bay...
Stephensvillet......
Tallahassee .......
Wausau... d.. ....
Wewahitchka .....


MA7, 1901.

Brooksville...........
.................. ..


Dale, Ala...... ....
Escambia ...... 56
Gadsden....... ....
Washington.... ....
Taylor............ ..
Leon........... 193
Washington .. 250
Calhoun....... ....

Means....... ....
State Means ......

........* ... "....... .. ..


iThermometers are not self-registering and readings are
made at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. :Weather Bureau.
INot used in obtaining means.


9717 6814 21 0 27 -520 0 2 4 1 10 5ne
9928 50 2 33 2 ...... 060 6 16 12 2e
9917*63 2* 32 384 -2 88 1 5 9 25 3 2isw
9825 653.... 19 +3 38 456 9 12 13 5sw
94 26 62 1* 23 5 61 -0 75 1 20 7 18. 9 3e
10327 62 1* 3 3 05 -1 69 1 1 8 15 3 12......
99 9*61 9 38 5 61 ...... 1 8 8 1 13 16s

....... ...51 1 13 .... 8 14 11 Ssw
7 62 ...... 12 11 7se

91 W0 5726* 30 4 05 +207 1 9 9 21 9 1w

All records, except stations outside of the State, are used
in determining State or district means, but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
only such stations as have normals.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.











SALIENT CLIMATIC FEATURES
FOR JUNE, 1901.


ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
The mean pressure for the month was 29.99 inches, which is 0.05 inch
below normal. The highest observed pressure was 30.15 inches at
Jacksonville on the 10th; the lowest 29.78 inches at Jacksonville on the
1st; monthly range for the State was 0.37 inch.
TEMPERATURE.
(Degrees Fahrenheit.)
The monthly mean temperature for the State was 79.4 degrees, 0.5
degrees below normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 78.8
degrees; Central, 79.5 degrees; Southern, 80.2 degrees; Western, 79.5
degrees. The highest monthly mean temperature was 82.4 degrees at
Marco; the lowest monthly mean temperature was 77.7 degrees, at
Switzerland and New Smyrna. The highest temperature during the
month was 103 degrees at Wausau on the 27th; the lowest temperature
during the month was 50 degrees at Quincy on the 2d; absolute range
for the State was 53 degrees.
PRECIPITATION.
(Inches and hundredths.)
The average precipitation for the State during the month was 9.77
inches, 2.62 inches above the normal amount. By sections, the averages
were: Northern, 8.74 inches; Central, 9.88 inches; Southern, 17.87
inches; Western, 4.51 inches. The greatest monthly amount was 21.72
inches at Miami; the least was-0.27 inch, at Pensacola. The greatest
amount for any twenty-four hours was 13.32 inches at Sumner on the
1st.
WIND AND WEATHER.
The prevailing winds during the month were from the southeast. By
sections, there were: Northern, 11 clear days; 10 partly cloudy; 9
cloudy. Central, 11 clear; 12 partly cloudy; 7 cloudy. Southern, 13
clear; 8 partly cloudy; 9 cloudy. Western, 14 clear; 11 partly cloudy;
5 cloudy.
Rainy days: Northern section, 11; Central, 13; Southern, 8; Western,









MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA.
(Dates of.)
Fog.-Wewahitchka, 1, 5, 6, 17.
Hail.-Gainesville, 1; Middleburg, 17.
Halos, Lunar.-Federal Point, 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, 29; Jacksonville,
23, 27.
Thundersiorms.-Carrabelle, 1, 3, 16, 18, 26, 27; Federal Point, 1,
6, 14, 15, 16, 19, 30; Flamingo, 20; Fort Meade, 2, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13;
Fort Pierce, 7, 10, 12; Gainesville, 1, 4, 6, 18, 24, 27; Huntington, 1,
6, 17, 18; Manatee, 27; Merrittt's Island, 1, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 29, 30; Miami, 3, 4, 13, 14, 16; Middleburg,
1, 3, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 23, 26, 27, 29, 30; Myers, every
,day except 1st and 14th; Orlando, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 19, 21,
30; Rockwell, 26, 30; Sumner, 1, 3, 12, 13, 16, 19, 22, 26, 27; Wewa-
hitchka, 3, 17, 18, 22, 26, 27.
WEATHER FOR JUNE.
The average temperature for the various stations ranged from 78
degrees to 80 degrees and the maximum from 88 degrees on the east
,coast to 103 degrees, the latter occurring over the interior western por-
tion of the State.
There was a marked and probably unprecedented range in the total
precipitation at the several stations, the minimum and maximum being
0.27 at Pensacola and 21.7 inches at Miami, respectively. Fortunately,
th3 excessive rains fell over a section of the State best able to endure it,
so far as crops were concerned, not, however, without considerable dam-
age being done.
Some excessive rainfalls were: Fort Pierce, 11.6; Manatee, 14.4; Fort
Meade, 16.3; Myers, 20.3; Marco, 17.3; Jupiter, 17.4; Hypoluxo, 21.3;
Miami, 21.7; and Flamingo, 19.7 inches.
The average rainfall for June for ten years is 7.15 inches; the average
for the current month was 9.77 inches. There was 0.5 deficiency in
temperature.










PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.

Wind Velocity. Relative
Atmospheric Pressure in Miles Humidity

Stations g .
l! I ''G 0 ^ i g a



Jacksonville............. 30.01 30.1510 2978 15,283 48 se 1 99 5179
Jupiter. .................. 29.98 30.1121 29.85176,264 36 se 12 100 7283
S.............. ..

K ey W est .............. ...... ..... .. ....... .. .. ... .. .... ...... .
Pensacola ............ 30.01 30.1210 29.83 15,494 30 ne 17 ..... .
Tampi .................. 29 98 300926 29.84184.087 36 s 3 941 5379
*8 a. m. readings only.



COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FOR JUNE, DURING
THE PAST TEN YEARS.
Mean Average Rainfall.
Year. Temperature. Inches aud hundredths.
1892 ................... 78.8 ................... 9.00
1893 ................... 80.2 .................. 8.02
1894 ................... 78.2 ................... 6.39
1895 ................... 79.8 ................... 4.46
1896 .................. 79.8 .................. 10.78
1897 .................. 82.0 .................. 4.96
1898 .................. 80.9 .................. 3.08
1899 ................... 80.4 ................... 5.43
1900 ................... 79.4 .......... ........ 9.57
1901 ................... 79.4 ................... 9.77
The normal temperature for June is 79.9 degrees; normal rainfall
is 7.15 inches.








CHAPTER 4957-[No. 73.]
AN ACT for the Protection of Birds and their Nests and Eggs, and
Prescribing a Penalty for any Violation Thereof.
Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. No person shall, within the State of Florida, kill or catch
or have in his or her possession, living or dead, any wild bird other than
a game bird, nor shall purchase, offer or expose for sale any such wild
bird after it has been killed or caught. No part of the plumage, skin or
body of any bird protected by this section shall be sold or had in pos-
session for sale. For the purposes of this act, the following only shall
be considered game birds: The anatidae, commonly known as swans,
geese, brant and river and sea ducks; the rallidae, commonly known as
rails, coots, mud-hens and gallinules; the simicblae, commonly known
as shore birds, plovers, surf birds, snipe, woodcock, sand pipers, tatlers
and curlews; the gallinae, commonly known as wild turkeys, grouse,
prairie chickens, pheasants, partridges and quails, also turtle doves, tame
and wild pigeons and robins.
Sec. 2 No person shall, within the State of Florida, take or need-
lessly destroy the nest or the eggs of any wild bird, nor have such nest
or eggs in his or her possession.
Sec. 3. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this act
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be liable to a fine of five dol-
lars for each offense, and an additional fine of five dollars for each bird,
living or dead, or part of bird, or nest or eggs possessed in violation of
this act, or to imprisonment for ten days, or both at the discretion of
the court.
Sec. 4. Sections 1, 2 and 3 of this act shall not apply to any person
holding a certificate giving the right to take birds and their nests and
eggs for scientific purposes as provided for in Section 5 of this act.
Sec. 5. Certificates may be granted by the Commissioner of Agri-
culture of the State of Florida, or by any incorporated society of natural
history in the State, through such persons or officers as said society may
designate, to any properly accredited person of the age of fifteen years
or upward, permitting the holder thereof to collet birds, their nests and
eggs, for strictly scientific purposes only. In order to obtain such cer-
tificate the applicant for the same must present to the person or per-
sons having the power to grant said certificate, written testimonials from
two well-known scientific men, certifying to the good character and
fitness of said applicant to be intrusted with such privilege; must pay
to said persons or officer one dollar to defray the necessary expenses at-
tending the granting of such certificates; and must file with said per-
sons or officer a properly executed bond ih the sum of one hundred dol-
lars, signed by two responsible citizens of the State as sureties.








This bond shall be forfeited to the State, and the certificate become
void upon proof that the holder of such certificate has killed any bird,
or taken the nest or eggs of any bird, for other than the purposes named
in Sections 4 and 5 of this act, and shall be further subject to the pen-
alties provided therefore in Section 3 of this act
Sec 6. The certificate authorized by this act shall be in force for one
year only from date of their issue, and shall not be transferrable.
Sec. 7. The English sparrow, sharp-shinned hawk (commonly known
as the little blue darter), cooper's hawk (commonly known as the big
blue darter), great horned owl, crow, ricebird, meadowlark, jackdaw
and butcherbird are not included among the birds protected by this act.
Sec. 8. Nothing in this act shall prevent any citizen of the State of
Florida from destroying birds which are found injuring grapes, fruits,
garden or farm products on his premises, or from taking or keeping in
a cage any cardinal redbird or mockng bird for his own pleasure or
amusement; Provided, That the same shall not be sold or shipped out
of the State.
Sec. 9. All acts or parts of acts heretofore passed inconsistent with
or contrary to the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.
Approved May 29, 1901.

(From Bulletin No. 74 of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Stat'on )
Parturient Paresis-Milk Fever, Calving Fever.

BY SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY.
INTRODUCTION.
The accompanying pages upon the Schmidt treatment for Parturient
Paresis (milk fever) in cattle, are offered because of the remarkable
results obtained by the new departure in treatment.
Statistics, prior to its use, placed the number of recoveries from all
forms of treatment variously from 40 to 60 per cent.
Reports from 107 veterinarians using the Schmidt method, show 670
recoveries out of 770 cases treated--over 86 per cent.
Only seven cases were available for treatment in this neighborhood,
and of these six recovered.
Although the pathology is still obscure, the results of this treatment
are satisfactory and reports have been requested from those adopting
this method for further comparison with results from other forms of
treatment.
DESCRIPTION OF DISEASE.
As the name implies this disease of cattle is a form of paralysis
associated with the act of calving. It is manifested by a general paraly-








sis and loss of consciousness, without all-marked post-mortem lesions.
With the exception of the "germ" diseases, we have in this probably the
most fatal malady known to cattle.
It is a peculiar affection, especially prone to attack dairy animals,
and of these the best members of the herd seem most susceptible. It
rarely occurs in cows with their first calves, and not often in old animals
-from five to nine years appears to be the critical period. Well-fed
and especially well bred stock are more liable to the disease than those
in poor condition or with indifferent pedigrees. Strangely, too, it oc-
curs after easy delivery and rarely follows difficult labor or abortion.
Sanitary arrangements do not seem to exert any influence upon the
appearance or course of the disease.
The cause of parturient paresis has not been satisfactorily deter-
mined. Many theories have been advanced from time to time, but none
has been wholly acceptable. Among the most recent of these is that of
J. Schmidt, of Kolding, Denmark, which assumes the disease to be due
to the elaboration of toxin in the udder. His arguments, in a measure,
sustain his views, and his success in treatment demonstrates a relation-
ship, at least, between the milk secreting apparatus and the causative
factor of the disease.
Symptoms.-As already stated this is a form of paralysis associated
with the process of calving. It usually occurs wihin three days after
that act. First there may be noticed a vacant stare of the eyes, and
slight muscular twitchings over the body. She refuses food and drink,
and rumination ceases (loses her cud). She fails to nurse her calf and
becomes stupid. Nothing further may develop for six or eight hours.
During this period her appearance would not, to an inexperienced per-
son, suggest a serious termination. After this, however, the changes
occur rapidly. She indicates uneasiness or perhaps acute pain by an
alternate lifting of the hind feet toward the abdomen. She becomes
weak and staggers. The weakness increases rapidly and soon she lies
down or drops from exhaustion. She may regain her feet once
or twice, but eventually she becomes unable to rise. When down she
assumes a position which, in itself, is almost characteristic of the dis-
ease. Lying upon her breast bone, she bends her neck to the side and
places her muzzle upon the flank. If her position be changed she will
return her head to the flank. Her eyes become fixed and glassy
her respiration labored. She grates her teeth as if suffering acute pain.
Unless relieved these symptoms are followed by depression, extreme
weakness and death in from six to twenty-four hours.
Neither the temperature nor the pulse guides one in the severity of
the attack.
Complications are apt to appear in prolonged cases. These may be
in the form of digestive disturbances due to fermentation of the con-







tents of the stomach and intestines, or diseases of the respiratory organs
caused by foreign matter gaining access to the trachea.
As a sequel to this disease we may find a more or less severe attack of
Mastitis gargett), due to injuries to the udder, or perhaps to the un-
natural conditions following the Schmidt treatment.
Treatment: Inasmuch as the object of this bulletin is to present the
Schmidt treatment of parturient paresis for trial, it is necessary to re-
view the various methods formerly employed. Statistics gathered dur-
ing the.past two or three years show it to be a very valuable treatment,
and it is hoped that the results of the cases treated at the suggestion
of this bulletin will be reported in detail to the Veterinarian of the Ex-
periment Station.
Fortunately the necessary outfit for this treatment is inexpensive.
It requires a three inch funnel, four or five feet of one-fourth inch
rubber tubing and a small glass pipette or milking tube.
The following is the method of procedure:
1. Dissolve 120 grains of Iodide of Potash in one quart of water,
whiJh has bee'i boiled, and allowed to cool to about the temperature of
the body.
2. Introduce the funnel and. pipette into the ends of the rubber
tube and place in a bucket of antiseptic fluid.
3. Milk the udder dry; then place under the cow a piece of oil
cloth about a yard square (a carriage storm-apron may be made to
answer) so that the udder will be about the middle of the cloth.
Wash the udder and teats thoroughly with castile soap and warm water,
rinsing carefully with antiseptic fluid.
4. Insert the pipette into the end of a teat and fill the funnel with
Iodide of Potash solution. By passing successively from one teat
to another distribute the solution equally among the quarters of the
udder.
5. Rub the udder from the teat towards the body and massage thor-
oughly in order to distribute the solution throughout.
6. Eight or ten hours after the injection or when recovery is assured,
the udder should be carefully milked out and then bathed with warm
water (about 160 degrees Fahrenheit).
A second injection is rarely necessary; but if so, it should be done
at the end of six or eight hours.
If there should be a tendency towards hardness of the udder or
stringinesss" of the milk, baths of warm water should be applied every
three or four hours until relieved. If neglected, Mastitis (Garget) will
result.
In seven cases treated by the writer, as here indicated, six recovered.
Of these, two developed severe cases of Mastitis and one developed a
slight stringinesss" of the milk, which was easily corrected







Prevention: As a preventive measure it is advisable to restrict robust
animals to a moderate allowance of dry food for a week or ten days pre-
vious to the end of their term; and where there is a tendency toward
costiveness or constipation, correct it with a drench of Epsom salts.
FORMULAE FOR SOLUTIONS.
Iodide of Potash Solution:
Iodide of Potash (crystals) .... .......... 120 grains
Water (previously boiled) .... .... .......... 1 quart
(When thoroughly dissolved inject into the udder as described.)
Drench for costiveness:
Epsom salts ... ..... ......... ........ 1 pound
Ground Ginger .................. ...... 1 ounce
Water (tepid) .............. ........ ...3 pints
(Give at one dose administered slowly.)
Antiseptic Solutions
Creolin .................... .............1 part
Water ................... ............30 parts
Thymo-Cresol .... .... .... .. .... .... .... 1 part
Water .................................30 parts
Chloro-Naptholeum ................ .... .. 1 part
Water .... ....... .... ... .......... 30 parts
Any of these antiseptic solutions will answer for this treatment.


Mexican Clover.
One of the much abused and plentiful grasses in West Florida is the
Mexican clover. After testing it for fourteen years, I am free to say
that all things taken into consideration, for general purpose it has no
equal. It will be with you, wet or dry. Does well on poor soil, but far
better where land is good. It sends its roots deep in the earth, pene-
trates the clay subsoil and brings up fertility to feed the crops. It
makes good hay if properly cured and stock thrives on it. Prepare land
.after oats or rye are harvested and the hay is of more value than either.
It is sure to come after crops are laid by. Turn it well under with a
two-horse plow in winter or early spring and it will keep your land from
running together, and makes the best of fertilizer. It. shades the land,
and protects it from the hot sun in fall and early winter, which is
nature's way of doing things. It is one of the great blessings to the
5 farmer that has never been appreciated. It is readily killed by cultiva-
tion, but there is plenty of seed left that will germinate when cultivation
,ceases.
Crab grass is a nuisance compared to it. It beats red clover because
it gives a second crop every year for either hay, pasture, or to turn under
for fe ;zer.-G. A. DANLEY in the Stockman.


N














Acreage and Condition of Crops for April, 1901, as Come
pared with Same Month, 1900.


Upis:


Upla:
Cott

Counties





Alachua ................ ...
Baker .................
Bradford.......... ........
Brevard........... .... .
Calhoun .............. 90
Clay .....................
Columbia ............. ....
Dade .................. ...
DeSoto...... .. .............
Escambia ............. 100
Franklin.............. ...
Gadsden .............. 75
Hillsborough...........
Holmes ............... 100
Jackson ............. 75
Jefferson.... ......... 75
LaFayettee......... ...
L ake................... ....
Lee...... .................
Leon .................. 90
Levy .....................
Madison .............. 75
Manatee ................
Marion ................. 100
Nassau ............... ....
Orange ........... ... ..
Osceola ............... ....
Polk .... ... ..........
Putnam ............... ..
St. Johns .. ............. ...
Santa Rosa............ 100
Suwannee.............. ...
Taylor. ...... ......... .
Volusia............. ..
Wakulla............... 90
Walton ............... 90

General averages....... 88


nd
on


Sea
Island Corn Oats
Cotton

a a -




90 80 80 100 90 90
100 100 75 50... .
100 100 100 100 90 100
100 100 ... ...
85 80 95 90 100 100
90 85 90 85 100 100
95 90 100 95 105 110

... .... 100 95 100 100
.... ... 80 80 100 75
.... ... 90 90 90 90
85 60 90 75 120 150
.... .... 90 100 .. ... ..
80 80 90 75
75 60 90 75 100 80
50 75 90 75 100 100
90 80 80 90 85 90
.... .... 100 100 100 100
.... .... 100 100 90 95
.... .. 100 100 120 100
90 95 85 100 100 100
75 70 80 80 100 110
.... ... 100 100 ... ....
90 90 1001 90 110 100
... .... 100 90 ... ...
... .... 100 110 100 100
.. .... 100 95 100 100
100 100 100 100
80 90 90 90 90 90
.... .... 40 50 50 40
.... .... 100 100 100 100
90 100 90 90 60 90
90 85 100 100 75 85

80 90 75 50"90 90
.... .... 80 75 100 100

86 85 90 88 95


Sugar Rye
Cane Iye


90 100
0
o

1

100 100
110 100
100 100
100 100
90 95

95 90
100 100
95 100
100 100
100 100
100 90
100 100
100 100
75 100
"i 6 '
100 100
100 100
100 100
75 75
90, 85
110W 100
90 90
90 95
90 95
130 125
85 90
100 90
100 125
90| 90
100 90

110 100
100 100

93 96


0





90 95




100 80
100 100

i76 'i64

100. 100
100. 100


100 190
lOO ioo

ioob i6o




100 100
100 100

50 50

90"90
i.o.'''.'.
i... 'is


w







4

Acreage and Condition of Crops--Continued.

Rice Sweet e Peas Cassava Veetns Cabbage
Rice Potatoes eas

Counties a

o

.__________ ____ 1J 1Ji1JJJS C
Alachuu ... ......... .. .... 80 75 .... .. ... ..... 100 100 100 100
Baker ... ... ........ 50 50 50 50 ......... ... 75 75 .......
Bradford............... 90 100 100 100 .. ... 100 100 100 100 100 10
Brevard............ ....: .. 100 0 00 100 100 ....... 100 100 ......
Calhoun.... .. .... 100 100 100 90 95 ....... ..............
Olay ......... ........ . 0 90 95 90....... .. ..... 80 75
Columbia ............ 100 100 80 90...... ..... .. ...... ....
.iDade ......... .......... ... 100100 1 100 100 100 100 .... ... 100 100
DeSoto ....... ...... 90 80 95 90 90 0 95 90 100 95 100 95
Escambia................ 100 75 100 100 ........100 100 100 100 100 100
Franklin.............. ...... .. 100 100 100 100 .. .... ... .. ... ....
Gadsden ....... ... 100 100 . ........ .
Hillsborough.......... 100 100 100 100 100 100 ...... 100 100.......
Holmes................ .. 40 50 100 0 60 7 60 60......
Jackson... .... ...... 100 100 60 50 ...... .. ....... ....... ...
Jeffera on........ ..... .... ... .... .... .... ... ... .
Lafayette.......... .... 100 80 .... ... ..... ... 110 100 ....
Lake..................... .. .... 75 80 100 100 100 100 75 80
*Lee.... .... ............ 100 100 100 100.... ....100 100 ..
'Leon ................ 100 100 100 100 ...... .................75 75
'L-vy............... 100 100 100 100 100 100 ........ 105 100 .... ..
Madison .... ... ..... ........75 75 . .. .. . . ......
Manatee........... 75 60 100 100 100 100 ....... 110 100 100 100
Marion. ................ 100 100 100 90 100000 100 100 100 100 100
Nassau ............ ... ...... 75 50 .. ..... .. ....
-Orange ...... ............ 100 100 90 100 150 125 110 115 110 105
Osceola ................ .......... 100 85 120 100 130 100 100 100
Polk....... ............ 175 150 100 100 120 100 100 100 160 160 100 125
Patnam ........ ... ... 85 90 90 100 80 80........ 80 80
St. Johns ................ .....100 100
:Santa Rosa.......... 100 100 100 00.......... ... 100 100 100 100
Suwannee....... ..... 60 60 80 100 100 100 .............. 25 50
Taylor............... .. 80 75 90 90 ....... .... .... ..
Volusia.................. .... 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 130 100
akulla.......... ....... ..... 90 90 75 50 ........ 75 70 ........
Walton......................... 100 100 75 75 ........ 100 100 ..
General averages.. ... 96 91) 90 90 95 92 100 97 102 99 93 94










Acreage and Condition of Crops-Continued.

P Toes mato br Beans E plant Peanu

Counties a a a a




Alachua........... ...... 100 100 80 100 100 100 80 100 80 10..........
Baker ................ .. ... .. 50 -50
Bradford ............ 90 100 90 95 100 100 1100 10 100 i0 100 IO ,
Brevard.............. 100 100 125 100 .... .... 120 100 100 100 ........
Calhoun ........ ... ... ... .. .. .... .. .... ... 100 10
Clay................. 85 80 90 90 .... .... 90 70 .... .... 95 90
Columbia.............. 100 100 .. ........... 95 95....... ......
Dade ................. 105 110 105 105 100 1001 ...... 95 95 .. ..
DeSoto.............. ... 110 105 100 100 90 90 95 100 100 100 90 100
Escambia............ 150 150 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 150 75
Franklin.............. 75 100 90 95 90 90 85 90 90 95 90 95
ad den ............. 100 80 .. ........... .. .. .......... 100 100
Hillsborough...... .. 90 90 00 10 80 o 100 90 ............0
Holmes............... 190 90 .. ........................... 40 0
Jackson...... ..... ... .. .... .. 60 80
Jefferson ..... .... 90 95 100 100 ... .... 85 90.... ....100 100
Lafayette.................... ... .. ... .. ... .. ..
Lake.... ............... 50 85 75 ...... ... 100 11 .. .. .... .
Lee ................... 100 100 100 100..... ...10 90 100 100 .. ......
Leon .................. 100 100 90 85 10 100 1100 100............ ...
Levy ................ 100 100 0 100 90 100 95.... .... 75 100
Madison .............. 100 110 50 50 50 60 100 90 ........ 90 85
Manatee ............... 1 100 100 85 80 100 100 00 90 100 100......
Marion... ........... 110 110 100 110 100 100 100 100 100 100 110 1
Nassau............... 50 50 75 75 50 50 50 50 .... ........
Orange................ 115 120 110 100 ....... 100 100 90 75 .. ..
Osceola........ ....... 95 65 110 85 100 70 110 90 80 60..........
Polk ................. 100 125 100 100 100 100 100 150 100 100 100
Putnam.............. 100 75 100 100 .... ... 1 25 .... .... 90 90
St. Johns............. 70 50 100 100 75 60 80 75 ........ 70 7.
Santa Rosa............. 100 100 100 100 ....... 100 100 .. 100 100
Suwannee ............. 80 100 100 100 .. ..................100
Taylor .............. .... .. .. ....... 80 0 ...... 100 100
V olusia .............. ..[ :[. ... 100 8o .... I .... .... I ...... .. ...'
Wakulla .............. ........ .............
W alton ......... .. .... ... .... .. ... ...... . . ... 75 878
Walton ......average....... 95 5 5 8 0 88 95 89 99 94 88 88
General averages.......95 951 95 08 90 88 9 9 94 88 88,







6

Acreage and Condition of Crops-Continued.


Hay obaco traws Waer- Canta- Orange
Sbers melon loupes Trees

Counties a a
a 0

~ M r 1* r ~ r a r


Alachua.... ...........
Baker............... ....
Bradford......... ....
Brevard. .............
Calboun.............. ....
Clay.................. ...
*Columbia............. ....
Dade..... . ......... ..
DeSoto ................ 85
Escambia .... ........ 100
Franklin......... ..... ....
Gadsden .......... .. ...
Hillsborough ........ ....
Holmes ....................
Jackson.............. ....
Jefferson............. ....
Fafayette.............. ..
Lake............ ... ...
Lee .................... 100
Leon ... ............. ....
L ievy ............... .... ....
Madison...... ......... ....
Manatee..................
M arion................. ... .
Nss au................... ..
Orange.. ................. ....
Osceola ................
Polk ....... .........
Putnam... ....... . ..
St. Johns......... ....
Santa Rosa.............. ...
Suwannee......... .... ..
T o r ................. .....

W akulla ... . .....
W alton. .... .. .. ..... ....

General avernrao.. .. 9i


9'; IF 95


...... 80

100 100oo
.. 100
.... 100
.. 100
100 80
110 ....
120 95
100 75
100 100
"io6 ii6
100 110
.... 50
75
.... 75
75

90 100


... 90

100 90
50 90
110 100
130 100
125 100
75 100
80 100
100 lo1
510



...... 87

100 92


........ .
100

125
85
60

.....iio
100








125
..... i


100
...... "ii


110
100
125
120
160
125
75



150



107


ur~v~vvrvr
I









Acreage and Condition of Crops-Continued.

LemonPine
SLimes Fruit Banan's ple Guavas Peaches Grape
Trees Tree. Apple a

Counties g d

a a a a
D__j 8 J6___Q


Alachua ....
Baker ......
Bradford ..
Brevard ....
Calhoun ....
Clay........
Columbia....
Dade........
DeSoto ...
Escambia...
Franklin...
Gadaden....
Hillaboro. ..
Holmes ...
Jackson ....
Jefferson....
Lalayette. ..
Lake ........
Lee. ........
Leon ........
Levy. ......
Madison ...
Manatee ......
Marion. ....
Naasau ...
Orange ...
Osceola ...
Polk........
Putuam.....
St. Johns..
Santa Rosa..
Suwannee ..
Taylor .....
Volusia.....
WtkutHa.'..
'Walton; ....

Gen'l average


100
110



85|





100

100

100

..... ioo

120
100
125
80


100



100
110








100




110

100
120

125i
"...66
no...




."i66.

...i66





......


99 107


100
125

60

105
110



100


. ....
100
90




100


........ .......


125 95




... 11...... ..
100....... ........
110 ..... ..

10 ....
160
10 ........
125 .. ....


150



110
120











... ...




100
100


- 110



113


........ .......
........ 100
..... 100
150 ..... .
.. .... 75
...... 100
100
100 .......
120 100
.... ....... i66[
100
........ 751
90
...... 180
. .. .. 50
... .. .. 50
... . 110
..... .i. 50
110 . ...
........ 40


100 95
.. .... 100
........ 100
115 120
140 200
100 160
.......... 90
..... 125
.. .... 125
...... .. 90
....... 100
......... 120
..88 .

110 9W


100
100


100
100
100
110

100
100

80
85
100
100

95


100

100
100
160
100
125
100
100-
100
100
100

1<


I 9 1









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.


HON. B. E. McLIN,Com. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CORRESPONDENTS' NOTES.
ALACHUA COUNTY.-Both the stand and condition of crops is above
the average at this season of the year; the weather was not cold enough
to do any material harm to cotton, and the rains have come at right time
to make other crops grow finely; the vegetable crops are good.
BAKER COUNTY.-The stand and condition of cotton are both good ?
much better than last year; other field crops are not so good, from medium
to poor stand, and also condition; the peach crop is very good, and
so are the grapes.
BRADFORD COUNTY.-The stand of both field and vegetable erops.
average fine, and all are growing well; orange and grape fruit trees are
growing nicely; the peach and grape crops are also very promising.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.-Cotton and all field crops are growing well; the
stand is an unusually good average, and the condition is also fine. The
fruit crops are doing well, and the prospect is for a fine crop of peaches
and grapes; strawberries and melons are also fine.
DADE COUNTY.-The weather has been a little dry, though not enough
to hurt, and all crops are doing well; it is a fine growing season. Fruit
trees are doing very will, and a fine crop. is expected. Pineapples will
make a large and fine crop.
DESOTO COUNTY.-The season has been fairly good after a rather cool
spring; the stand of all crops will average up well, and the average condi-
tion is good. Fruit trees are in splendid form, with prospects for a large
ciop all around.
EsCAMBIA COUNTY.-Owing to late hard rain and cold, the stand of
some crops is bad, though the average is good; condition of crops will
also average good; all field crops are late. There will be about half a,
crop of peaches.
. FANKLIN CouNTY--There is a fair stand of crops, and tht ugh late
they are in gretty good condition.
G.4DSIDN COUNTY.--Damp and cool spring has caused poor stand of
sope, and slow growth of all crops, except oats, which look well. Therei
is a better stand of tobacco so far than last year, except that it is about two
weeks later in transplating than in 1900.






Hourwa CoinrT.-Th* freez# indtlieicton: dmanaged allycottroutSl*
some corn, which necessitated the replanting of cotton;; itcabsdB' '
bad '.stqa in-oorn; all U-cps are qolpinvery sll. Peachs des'd ,,
will .make.a fair crop. .. :
JACKSON CouNTY.-Owing to late cold spring and want of rain crcpw,
have. not. dpn well and grow very slow. Stands are fair, and crop" 0lt
improve with warmer weather and rains. Peach crop will be about bj&*
and melons an average crop.
JavEipsorw i GoUNr.-The stand and condition of field crops are'b!elW
good on' an average; watermelons and cantaloupes short about a quartei;
the general conditions are satisfactory.
LAKE COUNTY.-The stand of field and vegetable crops is .abover*r -
average, and the condition of the crops is also fine; all are looking asi
doipg well. Watermelons never looked -better, fruit trees doing *tee"I,
pineapples also fine. Vegetable crops are yielding good prices.
LBON CouNTY.-There is an increase in cotton acreage of about tebn
per cent; stands are fairly good with occasional replanting necessary; th,
nights have been too cold for rapid growth; condition of corn about easmew
as.last year, and at present outlook is promising for good crops of a-
kinds.
LEVY COUNTY.-Stand of crops generally good, also the conditions ar
favorable except that all crops are late about two weeks, and bud worms-
have in some localities injured corn. The melcn crops are generally
good.
MADISON COUNTY.-Stands of cotton and corn are fair, but backward
on. account of the late cold spring, and is growing slow; the oat crop is a,
very fine one, best for several years; other crops are about the same ase
above stated; strawberries and melons fine.
IMANATEE COUNTY.-Stand and condition of all field crops is gocdy
vegetable crops are fine, and return of sales satisfactory. Orange ands
o her.-rtit trees are in excellent condition, and prospects are good for ,.
large crop of oranges this year.
MARION COUNTY.-In one or two sections of the county the weather
has been dry, and while it is not thought that crops are suffering, rain,
would do a great deal of good. Good rains are reported in the north,
east and western sections of the county. Stands of crops are generally
good, and fruit trees are growing well; peach crop good.
NAssAU CourTY.-Stands of crops are fairly good, but the cool dry
weather has kept them back greatly; late showers which we are now get-
Ming will help them, and if they continue crops will come forward and'
Give a fie yield. Orange trees are growing finely, and a good peach
. eop aspromised.
QwOase-Co p .-The average stand of crops is very good, some awe
theteafor aygeral years. Vegetable crops are doing well and seeing.






forfair prices; fruits of all kinds d4~g well, and citrus fruit trees growing
finely. Peach crop fine.
OSCEOLA COrNTY L-Long continued cool and dry weather made al1
market crops lIte except fruit, of which there will be an abundance this
year,
POLK CouNrt.-Vegetable crqps are all a little late, but the prospects
are'good for the best yield for oBtYp years; they were kept back by late
spring, but are doing nicely now, and the prospect is good for a fine yield
and fair prices. Cantaloupes and'tomtoes are exceptionally fine; orange
and grape fruit trees looking well and will give big crop of fruit. Truck
farmers and fruit growers feeling goodpvier the bright prospects.
PUTNAM COUNTY.-Considering te Jate cool spring crops generally
have very good stand, and are in fair condition. Warm rain will bring
them out quick; indications favor good crops all around.
SANTA Res CorUNtY-The first planting of cotton was badly hurt by
the cold and had to be replanted, coapequently the stand is not so good,
and the. condition is not up to the usual standard; other field crops are /
doing well. Peaches and grapes promise a good crop of each.
SUWANNEE COUNTY.- The crop is at least one month later than' usual;
the stands are fairly good, also condition of all crops. Acreage in broom
corn ihas been increased to double that of last year. The factory is run-
ning on regular time, is located at Welborn, and bids fair to be a great
success;:it is turning out good specimens of manufactured material.
WA.ULLA COUNTY.-Stands of cotton are fair, but the crop is late
owing to cool backward spring; corn is not very good, and condition is
also low. Sugar cane is very good; crops generally are late and of slow
growth, and weather very dry.
WALTON COUNTY.-Stand and condition of cotton is very fair, but late
owing to cool spring. Cut worms have done some damage to corn; the
season has been generally favorable in most sections of the county. The
peach crop promises to be very good.


.. 'I














Explanatory.



The within pamphlet contains the law as now revised con-
cerning fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco
,stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal.
I have given marginal notes of subjects treated in different
.Sections for convenience.
Special attention is called to the duties of Sheriffs in Sec-
tion 3 of the Act of 1901.
Manufacturers will please note that they are required to
file in this office annually their oath of analysis. See Section
5. Parties not having filed same during this year will please
-comply at once. Blank forms will be furnished upon appli-
-cation to this office.
The present law leaves no longer any doubt as to cotton
seed meal being subject to the requirements of a fertilizer as
to analysis, tag and stamp tax.
Section 8 of the Act of 1901, specifically explains how to
order stamps. On application, I will furnish printed forms in
-ordering stamps in compliance with the present law. Stamps
will be furnished in the following denominations of weights.
,to-wit: '
One hundred, one hundred and twenty-five, two hundred
-and two hundred and fifty pound packages.
Manufacturers will please have their goods conform to these
weights, or complements of these weights. To illustrate:
A one hundred and a one hundred and twenty-five pound
-stamp placed on a two hundred and twenty-five pound pack-
age will meet the demands of the law. Parties using packages
-of fractional weights must lose the difference in ordering
*stamps.
Consumers of the goods herein described will find in Sec-
tion 9 of the act of 1901 what is required to properly take
samples for analysis by the State Chemist. Citizens of the
State are entitled to have samples analyzed free of cost.
No consumer should purchase a package of fertilizer or
-cotton seed meal that does not bear its analysis, plainly
printed, and the stamp showing the number of pounds the tax









12

%as been paid on. You purchase sucn goods at your own
risk with no guarantee that it is not a fraud. When the
guarantee is on the package you can send sample to this office
and know if your goods come up to the guarantee. This
Department is ready to aid you if you will use the law to
protect yourself. I certainly expect the Sheriffs of the dif-
ferent counties in this State to assist in protecting their
people as the law requires them to do, in Section 3 of the Act
of 1901.
B. E. McLIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.














Compilation of Laws
RKrLATING TO.

Inspection, Analysis, Manufacture and Sale of
Fertilizers, Cotton Seed Meal, etc., in this State.


891. APPOINTMENT OF STATE CHEMIST.-The Governor
shall appoint a State Chemist, who shall hold his office for the
term of four years, and until his successor is appointed and
qualified; he shall be an expert chemist, and have his office
at the Capital of the State of Florida, and his duties shall be
such as hereinafter provided. The Governor may appoint an
assistant to the State Chemist when necessary. Approved June
2, 1893.
904. CHEMIST TO REPORT TO GOVERNOR.-The State
Chemist shall make quarterly reports to the Governor of the
number of certificates rendered by him to the Commissioner
of Agriculture. (Revised Statutes.)
908. ANNUAL REPORTS TO GOVERNOR.-He shall also
make a report of the operations of his office to the Governor of
the State annually, giving the number of analyses made, the
amount and proceeds of his office, said report to be presented
to the Legislature at its bi-ennial sessions in the same
manner as the Auditor's and State Treasurer's reports are
made. (Revised Statutes.)
909. PENALTY FOR FALSE ANALYSIS.-In case the State
Chemist wilfully makes any false or untrue analysis, he shall
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction
thereof shall be fined- in a sum *not exceeding one- thousand
dollars ($1,000), and shall stand committed until such fine
is paid. (Revised Statutes.)
910. 'COMPENSATION OF CHEMIST AND AssISTANT.-The
State Chemist shall receive a salary of two thousand dollars .'
($2,000) per annum; the Assistant 'Chemist, who shall' .
be also Fertilizer Inspector, shall be paid eighteefi hldred
dollars ($1,800) per annum. (Act of June 2, 18931)










Act pf Legislature of 19o1, Approved May a2, g191.
*

AN ACTtto Provide for the Inspection and Analysis of and
to Regulate the Sale of Commercial Fertilizers, Manurial
Chemicals, Cotton Seed Meal, Castor Pomace, Tobacco
Stems, Tobacco Dust or Tobacco Meal, in this State; to
Prohibit the Sale of Fraudulent or Adulterated Cpmmer-
cial Fertilizers, Manurial Chemicals, Cotton Seed Meal,
Castor Pomace, Tobacco Stems, Tobacco Dust or Tobacco
Meal; to Fix Penalties for the Violations of the Provisions
of this Act, and to Provide for the Collection of a License
.or Inspection Fee from the Manufacturers or Dealers in
Commercial Fertilizers, Manurial Chemicals, Coton Seed
Meal, Tobacco Stems, Tobacco Dust or Tobacco Meal, and
to Repeal All Laws or Parts of Laws in Conflict with this
Act.
Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Powers given Section 1. The State Chemist and the Assistant Sate
drer supervision Chemist shall be Inspectors of Fertilizers; they shall be un-
of the o0m1 s- der the general direction and supervision of the Commissioner
culture. of Agriculture.
Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the State Chemist to ana-
lyze samples of fertilizers that may be offered for sale in this
State, and for this purpose he is authorized and directed to
duties of state take or have taken by the Assistant State Chemist from any
*Chemist. brand of fertilizers offered for sale in this State, from not less
than ten original packages of said fertilizers which may be in
the possession of any manufacturers, dealer or person using
the same, two samples not to exceed one pound each in weight,
one samln e to be returned by the State Chemist and the other
sample to be sent in a sealed bottle or can, to the Commissioner
of AgriPalture; who shall keep the same. And in case any
SmanufaCIurer shall request another analysis, then the sample
ighte of retained by the Commissioner of Agriculture, at the request
'M uecond of any mmufacturer, shall be sent to any Chemist to whom
analysis. the Commissioner of Agriculture, State Chemist and manu-
facturer shall agree upon.
Sec. 3. Every bag, barrel, or other package of commer-
Requirementa cit fertilizers, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems,
e onal.k *tobacco dust, or tobacco meal manufactured, sold in, or im-
aes. ported into this State, shall have securely attached or labeled,
and plainly stamped thereon the number of net pounds of






fertilizer in the package, the name, brand or trade mark un-.
der which the fertilizer is sold, the name and address of th6e
manufacturer and the chemical analysis, stating the percent-
age of ammonia, and the source from which the same is de-
rived, the percentage of potash soluble in water, the percent-
age of available phosphoric acid and the percentage of insolu-
ble -phosphoric acid, the percentage of moisture contained
therein, also the maximum percentage of chlorine therein,
and all other ingredients from which it is compounded, also
the stamp showing the. payment of the license fee provided
for in this act.
The Sheriffs' of the counties of this State are hereby au-
thorized, and it is hereby made their duty to seize and sell at
public sale, each and every bag, barrel or package of commer- Dntiesof
cial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castoi pomace, tobacco stems,. SBeriffr.
tobacco dust or tobacco meal manufactured, impqrted,4into
or sold in this State, whici shall not have sp.curely."attached
the tag or label and stamp mentioned in this Sectionh;Pro-
vided, That should the owner show to the satisfaction of the
Sheriff that such tag or label or stamp had been attached, 'pd
the same had become detached, the Sheriff shall release. the
same without cost to the owner.
All fertilizer shipped in bulk to the consumers shall be sub-
ject to penalties provided for in this Section upon the attempt Cannot shipin
to evade the payment of such tax; Provided, That nothing in bl to con-
this act shall be construed to restrictoravoid salesof acid phos-
phate, kainit or other fertilizer material in bulk to each other
by importers, manufacturers or manipulators who mix fertil- Manufacturer,
izer material for sale, or as preventing the free and unre- 'S asi
stricted shipment of these articles in bulk to manufacturers other.
or manipulators who mix fertilizer material for sale. All
moneys or pro(-eeds derived from the seizure and sale of fer-
tilizers sh:nl be covered into the State treasury.
Sec. 4. Any manufacturer or dealer who shall misrepre- OR
sent the proportion of ammonia and the source thereof, phos- Penalties for "
phoric acid and potash, or other ingredients contained in msrepresent-
such fertilizers, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco analysis.
stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal, shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined
five hundred dollars for the first offense and one thousand
dollars for each subsequent offense.
Sec. 5. Any manufacturer or importer of or agent for the Oath ofan-
sale of commercial fertilizers, previous to offering the same lysis to be
for sale in this State, shall file with the Commissioner of witne o-
Agriculture annually a paper giving the name of his principal '.iAcultre
agtnt or agents in the State of Florida, also the naimeand a l





guaranteed analysis, upgdr oa,1t, of the gertilizer or fertilizer.
offered for sa~'Iby hiho, and any. manufacturer, importer or
agent who shOablreftpe t9 give.the information herein required,
shale*be. d(em.ed guilty of a i.pdemeanor, and upon.conaictiort,.
theaOf-Ehab be' fed4 Ate modred dollars for each o'onue.
Sec. 6. Every manufacturer, importer, agent or Bel,. f,
any commercial fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, to-,
penaly for bacco steis, ftobeco dxist or tobacco meal, shall pay to the
non-payment State. TIeaurer a fee of: tWYnty-fv e: cents for eaah and every
ton. offered :forissale:in this State; Provided, That when the
manufacturer or importer shall have paid the fees herein re-
quired for any person acting as agent or seller for any manu-
facturer. or impnorter, sucjhagqnt or seller shall not be re-
quired to pay the'fee named in this Section; and any manu-
facturer, importer or dealer, who shall fail to pay. the tax
provided in this Section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and
upon conviction thereof shall be. fined one hundred and fifty
dollars for the first offense and two hundred and fifty dollars
for each subsequent offense.
Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agri-
tamp furn- culture to furnish the manufacturers, importers or dealers
mies onYm- with stamps or labels to be attached by the manufac-
Agriculture. turers to each package of fertilizer sold or used in this State,
which stamp or label shall be accounted for by the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture in his monthly reports to the Governor;
such stamps shall be printed in such form as may be pre-
scribed, by the said Commissioner of Agriculture.
Sec. 8. Each manufacturer and. importer of or dealer in..
'fertilizers, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, to-
How to apply bacco dust or tobacco meal, shall forward the money for.fer-
for stamp tilizer stamps or labels with his letter of request, directed to
the State Treasurer. Said letter of request shall contain the.
statement of tons of fertilizers for which stamps or labels are
required and the number of packages contained in each ton,
The State Treasurer shall hand to the Commissioner.of Agri-,
culture the letter of request for fertilizer, stamps or labels,
which order shall be filled .by the Commissioner at, once, itf.
found correct.
Sec. 9. Any person purchasing. aiy.f'fertilizer from .an
o citizens manufacturer.or vendor in. this.:State. fr hie'own use, sacb.
may appeal to person being a citizen of this State.may .esb it.iair samples..
anr.Sy of said, feriiier tq the Com issi4e1 v o f. Agiculture for
analysis. But ,in porer to.protet_themanufadtiaer.or veadar.
front tbet.si esio~io f.analyis of spurionus4alampethopergop..
seecting, the.,l.slle,,dl s.o,taip-the,presenee,of,,twvormatse
SaipBneuriftez, Ws wh auanpge shall:beitakendrap O au<







or more packages and bottled, corked and sealed in the pres-
ence of said witnesses, and this sample package or bottle
placed in the hands of a disinterested person, who shall
forward the same, at the expense of the purchaser, to the
Commissioner of Agriculture when the person so desires; and
upon the receipt by him of any such sample package, the Com-
missioner of Agriculture is hereby authorized to require the
State Chemist to analyze the same, and he shall return to such
purchaser or purchasers a certificate or certificates of analysis.
The certificate shall in all cases set forth the component parts
of said fertilizers, with their respective qualities, date of an-
alysis and name or names of persons submitting the samples,
and to be signed by the State Chemist, who is hereby required
to keep an accurate account of the same, and the said certifi-
cate or record, when verified by the affidavit of the State
Chemist, shall be competent evidence in any court of law or
equity in this State.
Sec. 10. Any person purchasing any fertilizer or fertil-
izing material from any manufacturer or vendor who shall
upon an analysis by the State Chemist, discover that he has been Damage,. how
defrauded, by reason of adulteration or deficiencies of con- recovered.
stituent elements, either in quality or quantity, in the fer-
tilizing materials so purchased, shall recover in any action he
may institute, upon proof of the fact, twice the amount paid
to or demanded by the manufacturer or vendor for the fertil-
izer or fertilizing material so purchased. But in all cases
where the vendor is an agent of the manufacturer, or sub-
agent of such agent, the judgment of the court shall be ren-
dered against the manufacturer. In case any purchase be
mie of any manufacturer or agent of any person or persons
residing out of the State of Florida, manufacturing, com-
pounding or furnishing for sale, any such commercial manure
or ianir ltured fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor pomace,
tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal, the purchaser
thereof, may, at his option, proceed by attachment, as now
provided by law, in case of non-resident and absconding
debtors, against any such property, rights or credits of any
person .or persoDn selling, manufacturing, compounding or
furnisLing said m;niires or fertilizers, when such property,
rights or credits can be found within the limits of the State.
Sec. 11. The term commercial fertilizers as used in this
act, shall be taken to mean all substances contaixilg nitro-
gen,,pptash, or,pahoshoric acid; also cotton seed me, caster Definition of
pomace, tobacco stems, tobacco dust or tobacco meal, sold, ct to this act.
offered or exposed for sale and ordinarily used for manurial








purposes, excepting barnyard or stable manure and crude'cot-
ton seed.
Sec. 12. No person shall sell or expose for sale in this
State any pulverized leather, hair or wool waste, raw, steamed,
aeals no roasted or if any form as a fertilizer or as an ingredient of
ex1cep under any fertilizer or manure, without an explicit printed certificate
tonsn. of the fact, said certificate shall be conspicuously affixed to
every package of fertilizer or manure, and to accompany or
go with every parcel or lot of the same. A failure to comply
with the provisions of this Section. shall be deemed a misde-
meanor, and upon conviction the seller thereof shall be fined
one hundred dollars for the first offense and two hundred dol-
lars for each subsequent offense.
Sec. 13. The State Chemist, upon application, shall fur-
What the State nish at any time to an applicant a full analysis of any brand
Chemist is re-
,quired to furn- of fertilizer required. Said analysis shall set forth the per-
ish analysis of. centage of ammonia, potash soluble in water, of available and
insoluble phosphoric acid, with the statement of the com-
mercial value of each ingredient, which valuation shall be
uniform and not above the real value of such ingredient.
Sec. 14. The actual traveling expenses of the State Chemist
and his assistant incurred in the execution of this law and
Traveling ex. inspection of fertilizers, shall be paid on proper vouchers ap-
pen.ei paid. proved by the Commissioner of Agriculture; Provided, Such
expenses shall not exceed $750.00 per annum, and the Comp-
troller is hereby authorized to issue his warrant for the pay-
ment of the same out of any funds in the Treasurer's hands
derived from the sale of fertilizer inspection tags or stamps.
Sec. 15. The Commissioner of Agriculture shall have the
commissioner authority to establish such rules and regulations in regard to
has poer to the inspection, analysis and sale of fertilizers, chemicals and
regulate, cotton seed meal not inconsistent with the provisions of this
act, as in his judgment will best carry out the requirements
thereof.
Sec. 16.. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this
act are hereby repealed.
Sec. 17. That this act shall take effect immediately after
its passage and approval by the Governor.
Approved Mav 22, 1901.







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau-Florida Section.
A. J. MITCHELL, SECTION DIRECT OR, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cllmatological Data for April, 1001.

S Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inchee Sky
R Fahreih iit

So tn- ot->e
Stations Counties I


0 l ||i p I .l-
41 Z* g 16, 4
z z z~ j


NORTHERN SECTION.
Archer......... kla. hua......
Bainbridge....... Decatur, GA .....
Federal Point....... r. JrJns .....
Fernandina..... ... Nss u .......
Fort Georget....... puval...... ..
Gdinesvill ......a.. lachua........
Huntington....... PutnAm ........
Jacksonville ....... Duva ...........
Jasper. ........... Ha ilton ......
Lake Butler,.d..,. Bradford ......
Lake City........... Calujibia......
Macclenny........ Baer......
Mc lpin.... j...... Suwannee......
Micanopy .......... Alacha......
Middleburg......... Clay...........


2.80



1 60
1 02
1 08
8 74
2 05
1 88
1 70
2 40
1 95
109


-0.27 1.90 5 21 8 1 w

... .... .. .... .. .... ......
-1 75 0 9 6 28 4 ..
-1 70 0 61 6 22 7 1 he
-1 88 0 47 4 19 5 6
+0 92 275 4...........
-0 89 0 75 5 ............
-1 28 1 55 8 19 6 5
-1 75 1 06 26 4 0
...... 1 85 22 5 8......
- 0 09 1 10 2 .. .. .......
...... 0 68 28 1 6w








Climatological Data for April-(Continued.)
T-,=


'"(Stations


~a.analn. Ua......
St.- Augustine......
Sumne: ..........
Switzerland ..e ...
Thoinmaiille, Ga.....
Waycrdfs, Ga......

CENTRAL SECTION.

Bartow ............
Brooks file.. ......
Clermoft ..........
DeLand. .........
Earriesrille ........
Eustis ..........
Ft. Me"e..... ..
Fort Pi;ce........
Inverness ...........
Kissimm 6e.........
Merritts Island ....
New Smyrna......
Ocala .;...........
Orange fity........
Orlando' ...........


Counties


Chatham, Ga..
St. Johns......
Levy .........
St. Johns......
rhomas, Ga ...
Ware, Ga......


Means...... .... I


Polk .........
Hernando .....
Lake ...........
Volusia........
Pasco .........
Lake............
Polk..........
Brevard .......
"'itrus............
Osceola ........
Brevard ........
Volusia..........
Marion ;......
Volusia .......
Orange.... ....


52 .
1063
362
2362
1961

...63


Temperature, in degrees Precipitation, in inches
Fahrenheit







S-5 078 30 444 2 91 -14 112
0 94 -176 068 2
.2 -3 684 27* 3622 4 2 99 +0 07 1 70 4
.9 -2 481 3* 4222 33 4 48 -1 97 4 15
.0-6 283 30 41 4 33 2 83-091 162 5
.2 -8 583 2 3922 32 1 49 -054 0 78
S-3 7 ... .... 2 12 -0 09...... 4


-3 689
-4 186
-3 992
.... 88
-3 0 91
-2 490
-1 890
-5 189
.... 87
-5 987
-3 6 86
-5 890
-4 289
--5 7189
-3 2188


4322
4620
4719
3511
4321
4722
44 55
4322
3921
4410
51 21
3922
4122
3822
46J22


1 33
2 86

1 80
0 92
2 05
133
1 74
3 23
2 17
0.80
1 08
1 05
2 47


-0 14
-1 33
+0 44
-1 14i
-1 23
-0 05
--1 26
---2 20
+2 01
-090
-1 14
--1
--0 94
1+o


2 08
090
2 00

1 05
0 451
205
1 25
0 97
2 91
2 084
0 80
08
0 55
0 76
2 20


h


Sky

0 C0




za oa -.
,z Z '
15 7 8
22 6 2 ..w











ii. 15. 4..w

'29 w



21 6 8 ne.
22 7 e
25 4 Vw
29 1W


25 4 enw


^^ -


...


.v






Plant City..........
Rockwell..... b....
Sebastian .... d....
St. Francis........
Tampa ............
Tarpon Spriigs....
Titusville.... ......


SOUTHERN SECTION.

Flamingo..... ...
Havana...........
Hypoluxo. ..........
Jupiter .............
Key West ........
Manatee...........
Marco.... .........
Miami.............
Myers .............
Nassau............
Nocatee... .......
San Juan..........


WESTERN SECTION.

Carrabelle.........
Daphne..... e....
DeFuniak Springs..
Marianna .... ....
Mobile .............
Montgomery....
Monticello.........


Hillsborough...
Marion .......
Brevard ...
Lake ..........
Billsborough...
Hillsborough ..
Brevard........


I" Means......[.


Monroe ... ..
Cuba. .......
Dade... .....
Dade...... ..
Monroe.......
Manatee........
Lee........... .
Dade..........
Lee .. .. .....
N. P, Bahamas.
DeSoto.......
Puerto Rico....

Means .. .


Franklin.... ..
Baldwin, Ala...
Walton.......
Jackson........
Mobile, Ala....
Montgom'y, Ala
Jefferson .........


7 65 0 -5 088
1166 1 .. 88
367 3 -2 38;
462 2 -4 90
116 6 6-5 084
16 .. ... ..
...... 65 83 -5 7 86

....658 -4 1 ..
....5 8 --4 1


70 2 ...
72 0 -4 C
70 3 -1 8
69 0 -3 C
71 9-4 0
66 1 --4 3
69 4 ..
70 1 -2 8
68 2-3 9
73 4.....
67 2 ...
78 6 +2 0

69 2-3 2


63 0 -2 9
60 9-6 7
62 8 -1 6
62 3 ...
63 2-5 0
60 4 -5 0
.. . ....,..


78 24
86 30
87 30
83 11*
8 30
6 30
...


21* 43
32 38
20 27
22 40(
21 27

21 88




8* 29
5 23
22 32
21 25
21 10
30 39
5 27
22 32
22 32
22* 22
4 37
1 17


431
40
3627
421 3*
3*
4133


1 31
1 52
1 41
0 95
1 63

1 54

1 65


2 68
0 55
2 43
2 13
0 46
2 37
1 50
1 97
1 89
1 40
2 50
1 11

1 99


5 51
6 62
6 16
2 93
7 79
6 05


-1 55

0 21
-0 90
-0 54

-0 91

-0 65



-2 23
-0 06
-0 70
-0 76
+0 27


-0 74


-2 55

-0 60


4-2 94
+8 41
+1 36


+1,25


336 3 13
3 91 5 19
2 3 5 14
1 77 4.
3 52 8 16
3 31 6 12
.. -- -1.--..


1w
w

Ow
2 v

6 w

2 vw



4 se
I n

3w
1 nw
2 nw
Ow

1 w


Ose

2w


4w
6 w
5 ......

5nw
7,nw


~h?9







Climatological Data for April, 1901-Continued.
-- -,- 1-


Statians


Counties


Newton ............. ale,Ala......
Pensacola......... Escambia ......
Quincy............ Gadsden.......
St. Andrews Bay... Washington....
Stephensvillet...... Taylor............ .
Tallahassee.... .... Leon...........
Wausau....d ...... Washington ..
Wewahitchka...... Calhoun.......

Means..... .
MARCH, 1901. State Means.

Brooksville........... ....... ......


Temperature, in degrees
Fahrenheit


63 2-4 0
61 6 .....
62 4 +-0
61 1 -1 3
62 2 -4 7
62 4 -2 1
62 6 .....

62 4 -2 3
65 2 -4 2


... .... 62 6 -2 7 86


fThermometers are not self-registering and readings are
made at 7 a. m,. 2 p.[m. and 9 p. m. daily.
*More than one day. tWeather Bureau.
TTNot used in obtaining means.


MI Q


30 45
15* 37
30 44
10 40
2* 40
17* 37
12 35



19* 30


Precipitation, in


>>




t" (


- ---B


0

Qa


24 7 45 +4
38 2 00 ....
38 2 88 +1
. 2 00 -0
28 2 72 -0
37 5 02 +1
35 3 44 ....

.... 8 9t -1
....2 26 -0

39 4 88 +2
,,


09

14
60
27
46


45
27

01


inchesI


6 21t
2 1F 11
4 2 83
2 22 4
`4 24 b
3 .. .. ...
4 21 1

4 20 4
4 22 6

6 25 5


w
0.



.r
ac
C'*


I

&


Snw
4 . .. .
1aw
4 sw


8 n-s

4 4w-ew
2w

1 w


All records, except stations outside of the State, are ued
in determining State or district means. but State and district
departures are determined by comparison of current data of
only such stations as have normal.
a, b, c, etc., following name of station, indicate number
of days missing from report.


-


'


f


--~-


1-


I












SALIENT CLIMATIC FEA'IURES.
FOR APRIL, 1901.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.
TOM m i: pressuree for the month was 30.00 inches, which is below
normal' Cihe ighhest 'observed pressure was 30.37 inches, at Pensacola
on the 28th; te lowest observed pressure was 29.59 inches, at Pensacola
on the 18tI; monthly range for the State was 0.78 inch.
TEMPERATURE,
(Degrees Fahrenheit )
The monthly mean temperature for the State was 65.2, 4.2 below
normal. By sections, the means were: Northern, 63.6; Central 65.8;
Southern, 69.20; Western, 62.4. The highest monthly mean tempera-
ture was 71.90, at Key West; the lowest monthly mean temperature was
61.10, at Stephensville. The highest temperature during the month was
920, at Clermont on the 1st; the lowest temperature was 330, at St.
Francis on the 22d; absolute range for the State was 59.
PRECIPITATION.
(Inches and hundredths.)
The average precipitation for the State during the month was 2.2&
inches, 0.27 inch below normal amount. By sections, the averages were:
Northern, 2.12 inches; Central, 1.65 inches; Southern, 1.99 inches; West-
ern, 3.91, inches. The greatest monthly amount was 7.45 inches, at Pen-
sacola; the least was 0.46 inch, at Key West. The greatest amount for
any twenty-four hours was 4.15 inches, at Switzerland on the 18th.
WIND AND WEATHER.
The prevailing winds during the month were from the west. By sec-
tions, there were: Northern, 22 clear days; 5 partly cloudy; 3 cloudy.
Central, 22 clear; 6 partly cloudy; 2 cloudy. Southern, 23 clear; 5 partly
cloudy; 2 cloudy. Western, 20 clear; 6 partly cloudy; 4 cloudy.
Rainy days: Northern section, 4; Central, 3; Southern, 4; Western, 4.
MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA.
(Dates of.)
Fog, Light.-Carrabelle, 1; Eustis, 26; Wewahitchka, 21, 27, 28, 30.
Fog, Heavy.-Manatee, 1.
Frost, Light.-Carrabelle, 21; Eustis, 22, 23; Jacksonville, 21, 22;
Gainesville, 22; Middleburg, 22; Ocala, 22: Wewahitchka, 20.
Hail.-Flamingo, 30.
Hfalos, Lunar.--Jacksonville, 29; Middleburg, 4.29.









Ha# *Solar.-Earnestvile, 15, 1 7f 18.
Th /tdrstorms-Flamingo, ,18 Fort Meade, 18; Gainesyille, 18; .
Srv"u 29, 34i; Middlebqrg, 2, 19, 29; Myers, 13, 18, 30; OGandb, 19;
h L ka, 2, 17.
ftin, High.-Carrabelle, 11; Eustis, 1, 2, 3, 4; ort Meade, 18, V 18I. ,
20; Manatee, 19; Myers, 18; Middleburg, 13,. 17, 19, 20; Rockwell, 2, ?;:
Sumner, 6, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22; Wewahitchka, 2, 17, 19, 20.
---- ,* ^ ^ .1 '
*COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL DATA FORB p It Ut ..... *'*
THE PAST TEN YEARS. '
S Mean ,
Year. Tempeatre. nche and hulredths. "
1892................... ... 1.8 ... .... .......... 7 .
1893 .................. 72.7.... .... .2. 17
1894 ................... .70.0. ...... .... . . *. .' '
1895 ... '. ... .......... .... .. .4..... ..... 4 75 ''
1896............. .71.0.
1897..... ........ ...... ....... ... ... .4
1898 ............... ... . 67.0. . .. :8 .
1899............ ....... 6.7........... ........ .3140
1990 ......................70.0..... .... .. 4 [. ; .
-1901..................... 65.2......... ...... .. 2.21 .
The normal temperature for April is 69.40; the average rainfall is :58
inches.
PRESSURE AND WIND TABLE.
Atmosphec P e Wind Velocity,. elative
Atmospheric Pressure in Miles Humi

"f Stations

V ~4


Jacksonville..... ..... 80.00 80.8628 29.64197,805 42 19 99 26 64
Jupiter ........ .. 80.01 80.2128 29.88198,767 85 w 19 95 65270
Key West............... 8 298 80. 9.67198,452 40 19 95 8 68
Pensacola .............. *0.04 80.87 8 29.59188.004 836se 12 98 87 67
Tmp .......... .... 80.00 80 8028 29,7819 5.867 87 a 18 99 188 87


*8 a. m. readings only.

[NOTE. -Fertilizer Table left out of this Issue for Revision.-Editor.]
9iL~t


-1~


i:




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