• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Errata
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Florida today
 Florida tomorrow
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Part I: Florida's dramatic growth...
 Part II: The east coast of...
 Part III: The west coast of...
 Part IV: The central section of...
 Part V: The northwest section of...
 Part VI: Miscellaneous data and...














Title: Quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077081/00006
 Material Information
Title: Quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: 7 v. : ill. (some folded) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.,
s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahasse, Fla
Publication Date: October 1930
Frequency: quarterly bulletin of the department of agriculture
quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 39, no. 4 (Oct. 1929)-v. 45, no. 1 (1936).
Numbering Peculiarities: None published 1932?
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Each no. has also a distinctive title.
General Note: Issues occasional supplements.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077081
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473185
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Bulletin

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Errata
        Errata
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Florida today
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Florida tomorrow
        Page 7
    Foreword
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Table of Contents
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Part I: Florida's dramatic growth and development
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Part II: The east coast of Florida
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Part III: The west coast of Florida
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Part IV: The central section of Florida
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Part V: The northwest section of Florida
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Part VI: Miscellaneous data and information
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
Full Text

I .


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FLO AL
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4r: Uie


__________________________llC)IU - 04




ERRATA
On page 125, under the heading "Marianna," sec-
ond paragraph, appear two errors. First, the word
"Blountsville" is used instead of "Blountstown."
Second, the sentence beginning: "Here, too, is
Natural Bridge," was misplaced and should be asso-
ciated only with the paragraph headed "St. Marks,"
on page 133. Natural Bridge is on the St. Marks
River, in Leon County.
On page 70, under illustrations, it is erroneously
stated that the scenes are on Paradise Key, but these
are in Royal Palm Park, 45 miles southwest of Miami.
On page 157, Clearwater is the county seat of
Pinellas County, instead of Clermont.
























oF IFE-GIVING, health-building,
ever-invigorating sunshine-
Florida's greatest natural asset
-tempered by breeze-cooled salt
sea air and enhanced by the
happy combination of fertile soil
and equable climate has endowed
this scenic wonderland with every
factor of livability. Florida-the
land of opportunity-may be truly
called "the Empire of the Sun."




































TEXT BY
CARITA DOGGETT CORSE
COMPILED AND EDITED BY
BERNAL E. CLARK




























NOTE
This book is being published as Volume 40, Number 4, the
Quarterly Bulletin of the Department of Agriculture for
October, 1930. NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner of Agriculture,
T. J. BROOKS, Assistant Commissioner ... Entered January
31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June, 1900. "Acceptance for
mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized September ii, i918"










FLORI DA













A DESCRIPTION OF THE*
LIVING ADVANTAGES OF FLORIDA
CITIES . THE PLEASURES, RECRE-
ATIONS AND RESORT FACILITIES
NOW AVAILABLE TO VISITORS
AND PROSPECTIVE RESIDENTS









Published by the
FLORIDA STATE HOTEL COMMISSION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


1930
































































DOYLE E. CARLTON
Governor of Florida





PAGE 5


FLORIDA TODAY

By DOYLE E. CARLTON


FLORIDA today is a country of such vast poten-
tialities that few there are who fully realize the
broad scope of her ultimate destiny. So many of
Florida's resources are as yet undeveloped, so much
of wealth lies hidden in her soil, so great an area
of wilderness beauty is yet to be discovered and
appreciated, that only those with an intimate
knowledge of her manifold advantages may hope
to measure the strides of her progress.
For this reason, Florida is often classified as a
pioneer state. Oldest in historical background,
yet youngest of all the states in point of develop-
ment, Florida offers a colorful and interesting set-
ting for either seasonal visit or permanent resi-
dence. In a way of speaking, the Florida people
have specialized in welcoming visitors from other
sections of the country. They have cultivated the
spirit of hospitality because they believe that in
no better way can Florida's marvelous assets be
broadcast to the world.
Throughout every channel of government ad-
ministration and private business enterprise, the
people of Florida are working to enhance those
advantages which constitute this state's natural
endowment. Today, Florida is. awake to her
possibilities and to the opportunities everywhere
available--and in this spirit the people of Florida
invite all the world to come and enjoy here a fuller,
healthier and happier life.































































BEN H. BOSTAIN
State Hotel Commissioner





PAGE 7


FLORIDA TOMORROW

By BEN H. BOSTAIN


IN ORDER for them to understand what the Florida
of the future may be, and what the possibilities of
her development are, tourists and visitors must
come to Florida, inspect the state at first hand and
thus see for themselves the tremendous scope of
the empire building process which is now under
way.
Knowing Florida as we who live here do, it is
easy for us to realize the ultimate trend of her des-
tiny, and to predict that this state will become the
wealthiest and most populous commonwealth in
all the country. The consummation of this des-
tiny, we believe, will be hastened in ever-increasing
ratio as more people learn of the living advantages
and health benefits which are to be enjoyed here.
Comparing Florida with regions of similar area
in Europe, we find that this state could accommo-
date a population of twenty millions of people.
Captains of industry will learn, as many already
have learned, that manufacturing enterprise will
profit where living conditions are more favorable.
Agriculturists will discover the benefits of more
fertile soil and a year-round climate. And, distri-
butors of merchandise will more fully utilize
Florida's great harbors in supplying the growing
markets of South America.
Florida's climate is her greatest asset, and
will exercise a tremendous influence in the future
development of the state's resources. The millions
of people who visit Florida for pleasure and relax-
ation will become tens of millions as the message
of Florida's living advantages is spread throughout
the land.




PAGE 8


FOREWORD


IN PRESENTING "Florida, Empire of the Sun," the
Florida State Hotel Commission is motivated by a
sincere desire to provide an informative description
of the tourist advantages of the state, which at the
same time will reflect something of the tradition
and atmosphere surrounding its early history and
growth.

Everywhere in Florida there is so much to see,
so many forms of entertainment to enjoy, that the
tourist needs must visit every section of the state
to experience the complete repertoire of pleasure.
It is hoped that this book, through its brief de-
scription of the characteristics of each Florida
region, will assist the traveler or tourist in his
search for pleasure, and help him to enjoy the mul-
titude of entertainment facilities to be found every-
where throughout the state.

The name "Florida, Empire of the Sun," was
selected not only because Florida has always been
called the "Sunshine State," where the beneficent
and healthful effects of year-round sunshine are so
justly famous, but also because its unquestioned
climatic advantages are helping Florida to become
a truly great empire of commerce, industry and
agriculture.
Figures just released following the 1930 census
indicate a Florida population very close to a mil-





PAGE 9


lion-and-a-half people. The fifty per cent increase
in resident population during the past decade clear-
ly emphasizes the permanency and stability of the
commonwealth. It proves that in addition to the
normal birth increase, Florida has attracted thou-
sands of families who came here to visit and re-
mained to make this their permanent home.

Climate, soil and water have combined to make
Florida the ideal place to live, but in addition, the
wide-awake communities, the wealth of opportu-
nities and the progressive spirit of her people have
supplied those other necessary ingredients which
provide the true zest and purpose in living.

In Florida, there is a chance for the development
of a hundred and one different enterprises and room
for energetic workers in many fields. Agricul-
turally, this state ranks supreme in the growth
and shipment of winter vegetables. Citrus fruits
have long been a primary source of wealth, but in
recent years, tobacco, live stock, poultry, lumber,
minerals, fish and dozens of other products have
brought huge incomes into the state. Industrially,
Florida has begun to manufacture many articles
and products used and in demand everywhere, and
her commerce has grown to include traffic with all
the countries of the world.

This Florida, of great destiny, cannot be pictured
in any mere volume and it is not the purpose here
to delve at length into the process of growth or
development. Rather, it is the hope of the Hotel
Commission that this book, as a short review of
Florida's advantages from the tourist's point of
view, may result in arousing the interest of those
untold thousands who have yet to visit Florida,
the Empire of the Sun.




PAGE 10


Functions Florida is one of the few states in the Union
of the having governmental supervision of its hotels,
Hotel apartments, rooming houses and restaurants-
Conmmission protecting the interests of the tourist and the trav-
eler, serving these Florida visitors through the
operation of the department known as the Florida
State Hotel Commission.
The functioning of the State Hotel Commission
in the administration of the hotel laws falls logic-
ally into two departments: "Department of Archi-
tecture and Supervision of Construction" and
"Department of Maintenance."
Under the jurisdiction of the first department
the state is divided into five districts with a regis-
tered architect in each, in this way enabling the
Commission to keep a careful check on all building
and construction work. Certain standards must
be met before approval for building is given by
the Commission. Under the second department
are the regulations regarding maintenance and
operation, including methods of sanitation, safety
features, facilities and guest accommodations.
By means of carefully-ordered inspections, educa-
tional instruction and cooperative assistance
wherever possible, the highest standards are con-
stantly maintained.

Through this systematic effort, the tradition of
Florida hospitality has earned a high reputation
among the traveling public everywhere. The
guardianship of this reputation and the continued
betterment of service is the most important obli-
gation of the Hotel Commission; the development
to maximum efficiency of the operation and facili-
ties of Florida's hotels, apartments, rooming houses
and restaurants is its most sincere ambition.






PAGE II


CONTENTS




PART ONE

FLORIDA'S DRAMATIC GROWTH AND
DEVELOPMENT
PAGE FIFTEEN



PART TWO

THE EAST COAST OF FLORIDA
PAGE THIRTY'NINE



PART THREE

THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA
PAGE SEVENTY THREE '"



PART FOUR

THE CENTRAL SECTION OF FLORIDA
PAGE NINETYSBVEN



PART FIVE

THE NORTHWEST SECTION OF FLORIDA
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEEN



PART SIX

APPENDIX

MISCELLANEOUS DATA AND INFORMATION
PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN



























- -; "I-.s,z~


UENU lGED IN CEREMONY OF SUIIN A WORSHIP.
ENGAGED IN CEREMONY OF SUN WORSHIP


HUNDRwEDS of years before
European explorers discovered
Florida, the natives of this
country, who called themselves
"Children of the Sun," observed
an annual ritualistic ceremony
in honor of the Sun God. After
the ceremony, dancing, feasting
and games were enjoyed
throughout the day.
























PART ONE
FLORIDA'S DRAMATIC GROWTH
AND DEVELOPMENT
































































































BOK SINGING TOWER AT MOUNTAIN LAKE, NEAR

LAKE WALES


I .





PAG t


FLORIDA
Empire of the Sun

ADVENTUROUS sea rovers, intrepid Span-
ish explorers, courageous French colonists
and sturdy English settlers have left their
imprint on more than four centuries of Four
colorful Florida history. The mystery of Centuries
the tropics, enhanced by the magic allure of History
of breeze-swept shores and moss-hung
forest depths, has drawn to Florida the
pioneer spirits of many countries and races,
weaving a mosaic background for her
dramatic growth and development.
Today, with all her modern progress,
her smooth-paved highways, her splendid
hotels, busy harbors and bustling cities,
Florida still retains that delightful atmos-
phere of elusive tropic enchantment pos-
sessed by no other section of the United
States.
Everywhere in Florida there is the
startling contrast of an ancient past and a
vivid present; traces of old Spanish ruins
peer from dense palm thickets at the end-
less parade of modern motor cars; pirate






























UL'v -. -- L" .'- ._:


RUINS OF OYSTER SHELL HOUSE ON FT. GEORGE ISLAND
NEAR OLD SAN JUAN MISSION


RCINS OF OLD SPANISH SLAVE HOUSE ON FT. GEORGE ISLAND





PAGE 17


treasure is still occasionally unearthed
almost within the shadow of tall sky-
scrapers; orange seeds carelessly tossed
into the jungle by armored soldiers of
the Old World now represent a great
citrus industry and the vast fossil deposits
of prehistoric fish in Florida today supply
eighty-four per cent of the phosphate used
in this country.
The climate of Florida owes much of its
charm to an almost perfect equability. In
summer, the unfailing trade winds blow
shoreward, cooled and cleansed by their
journey over thousands of miles of open
sea. In winter, the glorious sunshine
brings constant warmth for outdoor living
and the enjoyment of those sports which
in other regions are limited to the summer-
time. Each season blends so gently into
the other that sudden changes in temper-
ature or unpleasant climatic conditions
are unknown.
Americans have only recently learned to Curative
appreciate the therapeutic value of the value of
actinic rays of the sun. Physicians pre- Sunshine
scribe periodic exposure to sunlight for
certain ailments, and it is now more gen-
erally realized that outdoor activities
under the direct rays of the sun will
develop keener, more energetic and men-
tally active bodies. Even 'sun rays lamps"
are being used indoors and in climates
where plenty of sunshine is not available.
These fundamental principles of health
were known and practiced in Florida cen-
turies before the advent of the white man.
The native Floridians called themselves
"Children of the Sun," and offered their
first-born as a sacrifice to the Sun God.
Each spring, the annual feast to the Sun
God was celebrated by the Timuquan

















































OLD CITY C.ATEl BL rLT \ THE SPANIARDS ARE STILL
ST.ANDiNC AT ST. AUGUSTINE


T H I A A S



OLDEST HOUSE IN AMERICA AT ST. AUGUSTINE









Indians, most prosperous of the Florida
natives, with a dance and ritualistic cere-
mony, held in a large open space. A stag
skin, stuffed with fruits and garlanded
with flowers, was placed in the center,
mounted upon a tall pole and facing to-
ward the east. As the first rays of the
rising sun appeared, the entire tribe bowed
to the ground and prayed for the contin-
ued growth of crops and a greater abun-
dance of game.

The ceremony of the Sun Festival con-
tinued through the day as, unclad, the
worshippers played their ball games in the
full rays of the sun. Records of the cus-
toms and rites of these early natives have
been handed down by Florida's first ex-
plorers and missionaries who, considering
the scanty attire of the Indians a menace
to health, continued to wear the heavy
clothing and quilted jackets of the Old
World. These early explorers failed to
learn that the secret of health could be
found in the beneficent sunshine of the.
new land and was not the result of bathing
in the magic waters of some imaginary
spring.
The legend of the Fountain of Youth
was first told to Ponce de Leon by the
natives of the Bahama Islands who, en-
vious of the great stature and strength of
the Florida tribes, had made many voy-
ages to the Florida mainland in search of
the "magic spring," in which they felt
certain the Floridians bathed.
Ponce de Leon was so impressed by their
tales that his voyage to the new land was
planned, its discovery and exploration
being actuated by his search for health,
rather than the greed for gold which had
sent so many Spanish voyageurs to the


Florida
Sun
Worshippers


PAGE 19













































CORNER OF OLD FORT SAN MARCO AT ST. AUGUSTINE
WOODLAND ROAD ON FT. GEORGE ISLAND


SCENE ALONG EAST COAST INLAND WATERWAY





PAGE 1.1


shores of South America. When he first
saw the low, white sand dunes and rolling Discovery
surf of the mainland, he named it Florida, of
after Pascua Florida, the Easter Sunday, Florida
March z7, 1513, on which he landed.
During his explorations in Florida,
Ponce de Leon bathed in many of the
springs which are famous tourist resorts
today, trying in vain to find the one with
magical powers. Upon his return to
Spain, he asked the king for permission
to found a colony in Florida but it was
eight years before his expedition could be
organized. The adventurous Spaniard,
with four hundred men and a shipload of
horses, cattle and sheep, sailed for the
New World, only to have his project end
in disaster when he was mortally wound-
ed by an Indian arrow shortly after his
arrival. The first permanent Florida set-
tlement was thus postponed for a period
of fifty years.
During the years following Ponce de Pirates
Leon's landing, Florida was often visited and
by roving pirate ships. These fierce sea Slave
robbers, preying upon the Spanish treas- Traders
ure fleets, found ideal hiding places in
the bays and inlets of Florida's long,
lonely coast. Later, in the eighteenth
century, such famous pirates as Black-
beard, La Fitte, Black Caesar and Gaspa-
rilla also made their headquarters in
Florida waters.
Slave traders, descending upon the coast
at periodic intervals, would lure the na-
tives on board their vessels with gaudy
gifts and then sail away to the West
Indies, where there was a constant demand
among the Spanish planters for slave labor.
Often the natives were found to be wearing
gold trinkets they had salvaged from












































SCENES ALONG FLORIDA EAST COAST


SHADY PICNIC GROUNDS NEAR EUSTIS, FLORIDA





PAGE 23


wrecked ships. This gave rise to rumors
of gold in Florida and several expeditions
were organized to explore the interior in
search of treasure.
Two of the greatest military expeditions Florida
to the New World were led by Narvaez in Oranges
I528 and De Soto in 1539, both landing on
the west coast of Florida. Although end-
ing in disaster,they left a richer harvest in
golden citrus fruits than that which they
so vainly sought in mineral wealth. The
Spanish had stored their ships with a plen-
tiful supply of rough-coated sour oranges
and on the long marches across Florida the
seeds left behind on the fertile soil soon
grew into thousands of wild orange trees.
Sweet oranges have since been grafted
upon this wild stock to produce the lus-
cious and juicy Florida orange of today.
The value of the citrus crop of Florida is
now estimated at more than fifty million
dollars a year.
After numerous Spanish attempts at French
colonizing Florida, Jean Ribaut, the first Settlement
French explorer, returned home from a
voyage to this country and reported:
"This is the fairest, fruitfulest, pleasantest
land of all the world." This was in 1562.
and two years later Rene de Laudonniere
established a colony of Huguenots at the
mouth of the St. Johns River, naming it
Fort Caroline. Unfortunately, the French
settlement aroused the ire of King Philip
of Spain, and Pedro Menendez de Aviles
was commissioned to "fortify the Florida
coast, destroy the French and convert the
Indians."
Menendez established a settlement at
St. Augustine in 1565 and marched north
with five hundred men to Fort Caroline.
He arrived at the St. Johns River shortly
after Ribaut who, with reinforcements for



























LOOKING ACROSS LAKE WEIR IN MARTIN COUNTY


r


i^S


TWILIGHT SCENE AS THE DUSK DESCENDS ON LAKE WORTH





PAGE 2.5


Fort Caroline, had reached Florida a
second time. A storm destroyed most of
Ribaut's fleet, enabling Menendez to cap-
ture the fort and to slaughter its defenders.
In 1568, Dominique de Gourges of France
organized an expedition to avenge his
countrymen, and after razing Fort Caroline,
which had been rebuilt by Menendez, he,
in turn, killed the Spanish garrison.
In the years that followed, the Spanish Sassafras
fort at St. Augustine was greatly strength- Tea
ened. The Spaniards enjoyed a remark- in
able record for health, which they thought Florida
was due to their habit of drinking sassa-
fras tea, brewed for them by the Indians.
All of Europe soon began drinking the
new beverage and cargoes of sassafras sold
for fabulous prices. The French and
English traders often risked their lives in
slipping through the vigilant Spanish
coast patrol to secure the precious root
from the Indians.
Spain's efforts at colonization were now
directed toward the conversion of the
Indians. More than forty missions had
been established in Florida before the first
priests were sent to California. The early
fathers brought figs, sugar cane, oranges,
pomegranates and bananas with them,
and though their great missions, built of Spanish
coquina rock and oyster shell, were after- Missions
wards destroyed by the English traders
and slave hunters, the Spanish fruits flour-
ished and grew in the fertile soil and con-
genial climate. The horses, cattle and
hogs of the Spaniards also thrived in the
new land and great wild herds of these
imported animals roamed Florida before
the Seminoles came down from Georgia to
take the place of the vanished Mission
Indians.
























4


SPANISH CARAVEL USED IN PONCE DE LEON CELEBRATION
AT ST. AUGUSTINE


THE "CHANGE OF FLAGS" IN THE
PONCE DE LEON CELEBRATION AT ST. AUGUSTINE





PAGE 17


By a strange chance, the most interest- The First
ing description of this Spanish Florida, a Sun
quaint blending of medieval Europe and cre
primitive savage, comes from one Jonathan
Dickinson, a Quaker, who was wrecked
on the Florida coast near Cape Canaveral
in December, 1697. The Indians promptly
deprived him, his wife and infant of their
voluminous clothing and they were forced
to walk up the beach to St. Augustine,
exposed to the elements. The honest
Jonathan had little hope that he and his
wife would survive and firmly believed
that their "ailing child" would perish
at once. Daily, he recorded his wonder
at the increasing appetite and strength
of the baby and when they all arrived
safely in St. Augustine, he was able to
attribute it to nothing less than "God's
protecting providence." This was prob-
ably Florida's first sun cure, and despite
the hardships and dangers of Jonathan's
experience, he departed reluctantly for
Philadelphia, with many a curious back-
ward glance at the fair land so jealously
guarded from English eyes.
Oglethorpe, of Georgia, on his way to
besiege St. Augustine, was a more intelli-
gent observer. He said that the healthful
ocean breezes sweeping over Florida
seemed to him to be a source of benefit. He
was among the first admirers of Florida's
beaches, where he said a horse race might
be held on these marvelous hard white
stretches, without a care as to how far the
horses should run. What would have
been his sensations at viewing the speed
and endurance tests of automobiles and
airplanes on those same beaches today?
The short twenty years of the English
occupation of Florida is like a forecast of

































MEMORIAL PARK ON THE ST. JOHNS RIVER AT JACKSONVILLE


METROPOLITAN SKYLINE ALONG JACKSONVILLE WATERFRONT


--""- ~P~CII)~I,
...~
~;-- ''~2~~.*ud E*,~3i~P~,.?~*~~,,








its bright future. Great plantations lined
the rivers and St. Augustine was crowded
with Tory refugees from the Northern
colonies, for Florida was the only pro-
vince south of Canada which remained
loyal to England through the American
Revolution. It was a dreadful blow when
all of this prosperous land had to be ceded
back to Spain in 1784, and more than
fifteen thousand English planters left
Florida.
Troubles, too, were waiting for Spain
when she resumed control here, for so few
Spaniards came to Florida that she offered
the fine English plantations, standing
tenantless, to Americans who poured over
the boundary in the first great land rush,
making a conquest literally by coloniza-
tion. By 1821, weakened from revolutions
in South America and American uprisings
in Florida, Spain was forced to cede Flor-
ida to the United States. The whole great
territory was sold for five million dollars,
and the United States paid this by assum-
ing the war indemnities of American citi-
zens, claimed against Spain.
The Americans suffered tremendous
handicaps in colonization due to the long
and ruinous Seminole wars, which resulted
in the building of a chain of forts and
stockades throughout Florida. These rude
log forts were the beginnings of most of
Florida's cities of today, for many soldiers
returned to their old barracks and took up
home sites where they had lately fought
against the Indians.
The same thing happened after the War
Between the States and the Spanish-
American War. Soldiers returning to
their Northern homes from Florida camps
told such glowing tales of the rich lands,


PAGE 19


English
Occupation


American
Colonization












































SCENE AT JACKSONVILLE BEACH NEAR MIDWAY
AMUSEMENTS


TOURISTS ENJOY DRIVING THIS UNIQUE STEED





PAGE 3


mild climate and wonderful waterways,
that their families consented to undertake
pioneering in the far South.
By the early eighties, tourists were The
coming regularly to Jacksonville and the Tourist
St. Johns river towns, and such writers as Era
Sidney Lanier and Theodore Irving, neph- Begins
ew of Washington Irving, were telling an
interested country about the bright sun-
shine, the splendid fish and game, the
marvelous beaches and unfailing trade
winds here. Two great pioneer financiers,
Henry M. Flagler and Henry B. Plant,
finally became interested in these resort
features of Florida and started a friendly
rivalry, Flagler developing the East and
Plant the West Coast by constructing rail-
roads and erecting great resort hotels.
Though Mr. Plant did a great service for
the West Coast, Mr. Flagler's achievement
was considered the greatest program of
resort development in the world-the
construction of a railroad 52-- miles long,
extending through the tropic wilderness
of the East Coast and beyond the main-
land over the ocean to Key West, together
with the erection of a great chain of resort
hotels.
After the World War, the nation became
suddenly Florida-conscious as never before.
Its accessibility to the great eastern and
mid-western centers of population, its
wonderful hotel facilities, its varied re-
sources for amusement on land and water
were described by newspapers and maga-
zines all over the country. Even the
California gold rushes and Southwestern
oil booms faded into insignificance in
comparison with the great population
trek to Florida during 1925 and 192-6.
From 1920 to 192-5, the population of
Florida increased four times as fast as the

























AQUAPLANING IS GREAT SPORT AT MIAMI BEACH


FAIRWAY IN FRONT OF TIMUQUANA COUNTRY CLUB


uC~,




PAGo 33


country as a whole. Miami in 1900 had Population
a population of 2,ooo; in 192.0, 30,000; in Increases
192-5, 71,419; in 1930, IIo,000. All other
cities of the state received their quota of
newcomers also, who continued to come
through the summer months as well as the
winter, thus discovering Florida's advan-
tages as a year-round resort state. Al-
though the orgy of land speculations
resulted in a period of deflation, tourists
have continued to come in steadily in-
creasing numbers and the unfailing attrac-
tions of Florida-incomparable sunshine
and the refreshing ocean breezes-con-
tinue to win hundreds of thousands of
new friends every year.
Like a gigantic amusement pier, the Outdoor
great peninsula of Florida stretches out Sports
into the tempering waters of ocean and
gulf, providing a natural year-round play-
ground for the nation. Here all kinds of
sports which elsewhere are played only in
summer, may be continually enjoyed amid
beautiful scenic surroundings-polo among
the palms; horse racing and greyhound
racing under an azure sky; bowling on a
green which never knew the blight of
snow; shuffleboard, horseshoe pitching,
volley ball and hand ball in tropical parks
where daily throngs meet in carefree com-
petition.
Jai Alai, a game imported by way of JaiAlai
Cuba and South America from Spain, adds from
a typical Spanish note to the list of Florida spain
amusements. It is said to be the fastest
game in the world, and is a thrilling spec-
tacle to Northern visitors. The golfer
will find it possible to play on fairways
wherever he may go, throughout the
entire length of the state. The tennis
enthusiast finds breeze-cooled courts beside

























GOLFING AT ORMOND BEACH WHERE JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER
PLAYS EACH WINTER


1I


BOWLING ON THE GREEN AT LAKELAND, FLORIDA








ocean, lake and stream in every resort.
National tournaments, participated in by
the foremost stars of golf, swimming and
tennis are held in Florida during the win-
ter months.
For birds as well as men, Florida is a
refuge in winter time and great flocks of
dusky mallards, geese and other migratory
birds are to be found on the lakes and
streams. Wild turkey, quail, deer and
bear are plentiful in the Florida woods and
a permanent supply is always assured as a
result of ten large game preserves which
have been established in different sections
of the state.
Above all, Florida excels in her water
sports, whose variety is as infinite as their
settings are beautiful. Surf bathing and
motoring on wide, white, gently-sloping
beaches is unequalled anywhere else in
the world. Great crystal springs, found
in almost every part of the state, provide
the setting for ideal health resorts. Deep-
sea fishing for huge silver tarpon or giant
sailfish in Florida waters is considered
one of the most thrilling sports ever en-
joyed by amateur fishermen.
Another sport which has recently be-
come popular is inland waterway cruising
on Florida's widely distributed system of
canals, rivers and lakes. Skimming over
the winding streams, it is possible to reach
every portion of the state and to explore
hitherto inaccessible and beautiful retreats
where black bass, bream, trout and perch
may be had in abundance. A fisherman
could traverse these waterways for an
entire season without passing the same
spot twice, for Florida's thirty-five thou-
sand lakes, with myriad rivers and canals,
form a veritable network of navigable
waters, unsurpassed in picturesque appeal.


Plenty
of
Wild
Game


U


PAGE 35














































The Sectional
Divisions of
Florida

BECAUSE of topographic and other
physical differences, the state of Florida
may be roughly divided into four sec-
tions, as indicated in the diagram
above. These divisions are purely
imaginary and have been made only to
assist the reader in visualizing the
various sections in their relation to
the state as a whole, and to facilitate
the description of the characteristics
and advantages of the different locali-
ties discussed in the following pages.

























PART TWO

THE EAST COAST OF
FLORIDA








































r- rrS


WINTER VISITORS GETTING A FASHIONABLE TAN AT
MIAMI BEACH


----S


OCEAN FRONT AUTO DRIVEWAY AT ATLANTIC BEACH
NEAR JACKSONVILLE




PAGE 3 9


The East Coast
of Florida

THE long, double coast line is an out-
standing feature of the East Coast of
Florida, a series of lovelyislands and palm-
fringed peninsulas forming a protective
barrier for its great salt-water lagoons-
Matanzas River, Halifax River, Indian
River and Lake Worth. Connected by
canals, these comprise what is known as
the Florida Inland Waterway, favorite
yachting route in Southern waters, where
more than five thousand fine boats cruise
annually. The United States has recently
appropriated more than four million dol-
lars to maintain a depth of eight feet at
low water along this popular water-
course.
The resorts of the East Coast are of in-
finite variety, but are particularly notable
for the hard white sand beaches and
splendid rolling surf of the ocean and the
sheltered salt rivers for fishing and boating
along the Inland Waterway. All of this
delightful coastal playground lies far


































NIGHT VIEW ACROSS ST. JOHNS RIVER AT JACKSONVILLE


j gfl "gj^^ gggi"''. ...c .-iS....
SUNDAY AFTERNOON MOTORISTS FISH FROM JETTIES AT
MOUTH OF ST. JOHNS RIVER


~ Irr I ~g~L~C~B~i~3CI~~





PAGE 4X


south of the southernmost part of Cali-
fornia, so that it must be compared as to
tropical foliage with Egypt, India and
Mexico. In climate, however, it is unique
because of the tempering influence of the
trade winds. The Gulf Stream and the Tempering
intricate maze of waters threading the Trade
coast also prevent extremes of temper- Winds
ature and give the East Coast a climate
remarkable the year round for its equa-
bility and refreshing mildness.
When Florida first became established
as a resort state in the early eighties,
Jacksonville was the Mecca of tourists.
Luxurious steamers ran up the St. Johns
River as far as Sanford, stopping at many
little resorts among the orange groves,
from one of which, Picolata, a stage coach
ran to St. Augustine, still buried in the
obscurity of its dim past. Many famous
visitors made the trip to Florida, includ-
ing Presidents Grant and Cleveland, whose
retinue of news correspondents wrote rap-
turously of the climate, and photographed
the tropical river scenes for publication
in Northern magazines.
To this Southern frontier came Henry M.
Flagler, a millionaire, who had pioneered
with Standard Oil and whose appreci-
ation of beauty was as keen as his financial
judgment. Jacksonville charmed him and
he thought of building a hotel there, but
as several large, fine hostelries already
served this cosmopolitan little resort, he
finally decided to build in St. Augustine.
After draining an old marsh in the small
village, he erected the beautiful Ponce de
Leon Hotel, still one of the most magni-
ficent buildings in Florida.
Flagler showed himself a man of imagi-
nation by preserving in his buildings an












































DUNGEONS UNDER FORT CLINCH NEAR FERNANDINA

DUNGEONS UNDER FORT CLINCH NEAR FERNANDINA


OLD FORT DALLAS AT MIAMI HAS BEEN PRESERVED FOR
POSTERITY








architectural blending of the atmosphere
of ancient Spain with the glamour of the
New World. Continuing his railroad
building program, he pushed southward
to Palatka, then across to Daytona, next
to Palm Beach, and finally to Miami; the
world deeming him mad. The traveling
public, however, followed him as if he
were a Pied Piper. By the time Flagler,
an old man, reached Key West with his
overseas railroad, public criticism had
turned to praise and he lived to enjoy the
satisfaction of a tremendous dream
achieved.

FERNANDINA-Yachtsmen coming down
the Inland Waterway through Cumberland
Sound enter the Amelia River and pass
Fernandina, located on the most magni-
ficent natural harbor of the East Coast.
During the war of 1812., it was the habitat
of filibusters, pirates and slave traders,
against whom the Spanish fort on the
north end of Amelia Island was powerless.

Fort Clinch, a great fortress, built before
the War Between the States, stands on the
site of an old Spanish fort and Fernandina,
a quaint old town on the west side of the
island, is now the center of a thriving
oyster industry. Fleets of picturesque
fishing boats also bring in great quantities
of large, delicious deep-sea shrimp. A
chain of beautiful sea islands, where once
were Spanish missions, then English forts,
and later great cotton plantations, stretches
along the coast southward to the mouth
of the St. Johns River, where the little
fishing village of Mayport is located. A
monument to Jean Ribaut, in memory of
the French settlement in this vicinity,
stands just outside of the town.


Resort
Development


PAGE 43














































APPROACH TO ST. JOHNS RIVER BRIDGE AT JACKSONVILLE
TYPICAL OLD WORLD STREET SCENE IN ST. AUGUSTINE


PLAYING MINIATURE GOLF BESIDE THE OCEAN AT
JACKSONVILLE BEACH








Fort George Island, across the river
from Mayport, is a favorite resort of
yachtsmen and deep within its wooded
wilderness may be found the interesting
oyster shell ruins of an old plantation,
now owned by the Fort George Club.
A beautiful scenic golf course on the island
is the property of the Ribaut Club, sea-
sonal home of millionaire sportsmen.
JACKSONVILLE-Twenty miles up the St.
Johns River, Jacksonville's impressive in-
dustrial waterfront overlooks the broad
expanse of its deep-water harbor. From a
mere trading post in i82o, Jacksonville has
grown to be the largest city in the state,
with industrial advantages which by no
means hamper its appeal to tourists. It
has been called the Gateway City of
Florida because of its position at the focal
point of transportation routes entering
Florida by land, sea and air.
The St. Johns River, which extends
southward from Jacksonville for two
hundred miles through a chain of lakes,
offers infinite possibilities for fishing,
boating and water sports the year round.
Five golf courses, one of them municipally
owned, seventy city parks, a zoo and a
well-equipped municipal airport are fea-
tures of interest to the visitor.
Just eighteen miles away, are the wide
white stretches of Jacksonville Beach and
Atlantic Beach, where surf bathing and
midway amusements attract throngs of
visitors. A picturesque golf course and
clubhouse has been built south of Jack-
sonville Beach on the Atlantic Coastal
Highway. The many fine hotels in town
and at the beaches are fortunate in having
available year-round vegetable crops and


PAGE 45


Jacksonville
Harbor


Jacksonville
Beaches
















































HEMMING PARK IN HEART OF BUSINESS SECTION AT
JACKSONVILLE


FLORIDA ALLIGATOR FARMS PROVIDE TOURISTS WITH THEIR
ONLY VIEW OF THIS UNIQUE SAURIAN








a plentiful supply of fresh-water and salt-
water fish from this vicinity. The tourist
may feast on pompano, shrimp, oysters,
little-neck clams, stone crabs, shad and
many other delicacies, with the appetizing
knowledge that they are fresh from their
native habitat.
Many yachtsmen refuel and provision
their boats here and continue to St.
Augustine by the Inland Waterway, which
is now being deepened and widened by
government dredges. The motor tourist
on his way southward proceeds either
along the Atlantic Coastal Highway from
Jacksonville Beach to St. Augustine, a
beautiful drive beside the ocean, or takes
the inland route over the Old Spanish
Trail.
South Jacksonville, just across the great
million-dollar bridge on the south shore
of the St. Johns River, has an airport al-
most in the heart of the business section,
and several beautiful residential suburbs.
The alligator and ostrich farm, said to be
the largest in the world, attracts many
tourists each year. San Jose, farther
south on the highway to St. Augustine,
is the site of the Florida Military Academy
and the San Jose Country Club.

ST. AUGUSTINE-As the oldest city in
America, preserving its ancient charm
even in its modern sections, St. Augustine
is worthy of more than casual interest.
Founded by Pedro Menendez de Aviles in
1565, the little Spanish village struggled
for years against unfriendly Indians, and
fought off the attacks of freebooters of all
nations. Sir Francis Drake burned the
town in 1586 and Captain Davis again
destroyed it in 1665. The great stone
fort, the most interesting and impressive


PAGE 47


Oldest
City
in
America














































HORSE RACING AT ST. JOHNS PARK, BETWEEN
ST. AUGUSTINE AND JACKSONVILLE


FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH AT ST. AUGUSTINE




PAoG 49


relic of European occupation in North
America, was begun in 1638 as a protec-
tion against the growing menace of English
settlers at Charleston. It was finally com-
pleted after one hundred and eighteen
years, interrupted periodically by strife
and hardship.
Though the town was burned many
times thereafter, the fort sheltered its
inhabitants against all attacks. Governor
Moore of South Carolina, in 1702, and
Governor Oglethorpe of Georgia, in 1740,
were both forced to withdraw after lead-
ing great expeditions up to its frowning
walls. St. Augustine received a great
influx of Tory refugees during the Ameri-
can Revolution, but after the war, when
Florida again became Spanish, it was de-
serted by nearly all the English residents,
leaving only the Spanish garrison, a
handful of Spanish villagers and a large
colony of Minorcan farmers from New
Smyrna, Florida.

Under American ownership, St. Augus- Many
tine became an important military post Points
during the Seminole Wars and the War of
Between the States, but declined after- Interest
wards until Flagler opened the East Coast
with his railroad and made it a leading
winter resort. The principal points of
interest are Fort Marion, formerly called
Fort San Marco, the old city gates, St.
Francis Barracks, the Military Cemetery,
the historic Spanish Cathedral and the
old house next to the fine library of the
St. Augustine Historical Society. The
Ponce de Leon Hotel is a model of Spanish
Renaissance art, inside and out, and the
Flagler Memorial Church is of outstanding
architectural beauty.























a a-fl


RAY KEECH, WITH RECORD-BREAKING TRIPLEX AT
DAYTONA BEACH















-i -


FULL WIDTH VIEW OF AUTO SPEEDWAY BETWEEN ORMOND
AND DAYTONA BEACH





PAGE 51


Many other fine hotels, the golf club,
sea wall and especially the beautiful drives
on Anastasia Island, where Joseph Herge-
sheimer has a winter home, are note-
worthy. The alligator farm, lighthouse
and old coquina rock quarries are interest-
ing sights to see. Farther along the
Coastal Highway, just before crossing
Matanzas Inlet, the old Spanish fort,
Matanzas, may be seen on the right, pre-
served by the United States as a historic Fort
landmark. Matanzas means "place of Matanzas
blood," in memory of Ribaut's four hun-
dred shipwrecked men who were massa-
cred by Menendez at the mouth of the
inlet in 1565.
FLAGLER BEACH-Farther south, Flagler
Beach faces directly on the ocean, with
boating and fishing on the Inland Water-
way nearby.
ORMOND BEACH-Facing both on the
ocean and the beautiful Halifax River,
with its tropical banks where magnificent
roads run through dense hammocks (In-
dian word for good land) and out to the
wide hard beach, Ormond Beach is known
for its motoring and bathing. It was
named for James Ormond, who came from
the Bahamas in 1816 to settle here.
A mission town of the early Timuquan
Indians called Pueblo de Atimucus, was
located on the banks of the Tomoko River
near Ormond Beach. Long a fashionable
resort, it is also the winter home of John
D. Rockefeller, and shares its popularity
with Daytona Beach and Jacksonville
Beach as a favorite summer resort of the
neighboring Southern states.
DAYTONA BEACH-In early American
days a great sugar plantation mill was
built in the ruins of a Spanish mission,







































S -. -...


RUINS OF ANCIENT SPANISH SUGAR MILL NEAR
DAYTONA BEACH


TURTLE MOUND AT NEW SMYRNA, CONTAINING INTERESTING
INDIAN RELICS








which was destroyed during the Seminole
War in 1835, and in 1870 Mathias Day
of Ohio settled on the site of the now
prosperous city of Daytona Beach. The
famous ocean beach here is noted through-
out the world for its auto speedway and
water sports. Many beautiful ocean front
homes add to the wealth and stability of
the city. Thousands of Northern visitors
spend the winter here.

NEW SMYRNA-This is the site of one of
the largest early Franciscan missions,
whose crumbling arches still stand in the
woods nearby. During the English occu-
pation of Florida, Dr. Andrew Turnbull, a
Scotchman, brought fifteen hundred Medi-
terranean farmers to this section and
named the town of New Smyrna in honor
of his Greek wife's birthplace, Smyrna,
Asia Minor. Quarrels with the British
authorities during the American Revolu-
tion ruined the colony and the settlers
later moved to St. Augustine.
In this thickly-wooded section is a game
preserve, which provides an abundance of
game for the season. On the beach is
Turtle Mound, an interesting example of
the great burial mounds of the early In-
dians.

INDIAN RIVER-From New Smyrna in-
let to Jupiter, a distance of one hundred
and sixty-five miles, extends the famous
Indian River section, noted for its orange
groves, its beautiful semi-tropical foliage
and the abundance of fish and game. This
unforgettable country offers every variety
of river and ocean view, with bathing and
boating always available. From Merritt's
Island, largest of the shore-guarding keys,
projects the famous Cape Canaveral,


International
Speed
Tests


Indian
River


PAGO 53





























CANOEING ON ONE OF FLORIDA'S WOODLAND STREAMS


FAMOUS BRIDGE OF LIONS AND PARK AT ST. AUGUSTINE


i~~g~a-g^, :. : i** ,-:,::'* ^ ;
.. . S:-. ..r.. .'." ,jo;- "
..'- D.' m __.,,,.iF j .




PAG E 55


(meaning reedy point), where Ribaut's
French fleet was wrecked in 1565.
Nearby, one of the great treasure fleets Spanish
also went aground with a vast store of Treasure
gold and jewels from South America, and
a royal expedition under Admiral de
Villafane was sent from Spain to salvage
it. English freebooters fought with him
for the spoils, the Indians carried off a
portion and much of the treasure is be-
lieved to be still hidden along this beau-
tiful shore.
TITUSVILLE-This is a delightful little
Indian River town, with comfortable ac-
commodations, a pleasant headquarters
for side trips through the surrounding
countryside.
CocoA and RoCKLEDGE-The twin cities,
Cocoa and Rockledge, offer unusual views
from high rock ledges and from the splen-
did winding shore drives. The tourist is
often invited by signs to stop and drink
the fresh chilled juice from the famous
Indian River oranges. With bathing and
motoring on a twelve-mile-long beach
and golf and fishing nearby, many trav-
elers find this an ideal vacation spot.
Canaveral Harbor is also the site of a
large fish and shrimp industry.
EAU GALLIE-Located on the west bank
of the Indian River, where the Banana
River rounds the point of Merritt's Island,
is Eau Gallie. The fisherman finds an
infinite variety of sport awaiting him in
the four nearby rivers, the ocean and Lake
Washington. Two fine golf courses, ocean
bathingtwo miles from town, as well as
hunting and camping facilities, are to be
found here.
MELBOURNE-The Indian River narrows
to two miles at the mouth of Crane Creek,































SPANISH ARCH ENTRANCE TO OCEAN PROMENADE AT
DAYTONA BEACH


L1~


SPLENDID POOLS AFFORD FINE SWIMMING AT
WEST PALM BEACH




PAGE 57


near Melbourne. Boating and fishing
attract many tourists each year.
There are two golf courses here, while a
bridge across the Indian River provides
access to Indialantic Beach and another
eighteen-hole course. Melbourne, called
the "Midway City," has many beautiful
homes amid orange groves and palms.
VERO BEACH-A fine beach and splendid
casino is located at Vero Beach. Two golf
courses, tennis courts and other amuse-
ments are to be found here. Pineapples
and bananas grow luxuriantly in this
section. Vero Beach is a modern city,
with adequate facilities for guests.
FORT PIERCE-A great causeway across Fishing
the Indian River from the sea leads to from
Fort Pierce. Fishing is permitted on the Jetties
causeway bridge and the jetties. The
tourist may enjoy hunting, bathing, boat-
ing and two golf courses. A Seminole
War fort, where portions of the "dead
line" fence, beyond which the Indians
might not pass, still remains in this vicin-
ity. In the park is mounted an ancient
cannon, believed to be a relic of one of
Ribaut's ships, as well as a great anchor
from a ship of the Spanish Treasure Fleet.
STUART-Located opposite St. Lucie
River inlet, Stuart has long been famous
for delicious food, as well as fishing and
yachting. President Cleveland came here
for winter fishing. A golf course and
good hotels enable the sportsman to enjoy
a comfortable and interesting vacation.
Tame pelicans, fed by the nearby fish
houses, are a comical and unusual sight
attracting the interest of tourists.
The PALM BEACHEs-Flagler built
Whitehall, his own home, as well as a
great resort hotel at Palm Beach and es-














































AIRPLANE VIEW OF LAKE WORTH LOOKING TOWARD
WEST PALM BEACH


LOOKING DOWN ON THE ROLLING SURF NEAR CITY OF
LAKE WORTH









tablished this as one of the world's fash-
ionable winter resorts. Many homes of
the country's noted financial leaders are
located here. Lake Worth, a lake twenty-
five miles long and averaging a mile in
width divides Palm Beach, an exclusive
resort of never-ending social activities,
from West Palm Beach, a city of charming
homes with an extensive business district.
The outstanding annual events of inter-
est to tourists here are the Seminole Sun
Dance, the Yacht Club Regatta, the
Mardi Gras and Flower Festival and the
Palm Beach County Fair.
LAKEWORTH-The town of Lake Worth,
almost adjoining West Palm Beach on the
south, has a casino, alligator farm, golf
course and good hotels. Many beautiful
homes, among which the Spanish design
predominates, enhance the residential sec-
tion.
BOYNToN-Good fishing and surf bath-
ing attract vacationists to Boynton.
DELRAY-This is the only mainland
town of the East Coast located directly on
the ocean. A mile of ocean front, dedi-
cated as a public park, provides one of the
safest bathing beaches on the coast. A
golf course, fishing and tourist amuse-
ments add to this enterprising little re-
sort's natural attractions.
BOCA RATON--On the inlet at Boca
Raton is the splendid resort and club
colony known as a social rendezvous dur-
ing the winter season. Deerfield and
Pompano are farther south, attracting
their favorite groups of tourists each year.
FORT LAUDERDALE-A stockade, where
the coast guard station now stands, was
named in 1837 for Lieutenant Lauderdale


PAGE 59


Fashionable
World
Resort





















TEA IN THE WARM WINTER SUNSHINE AT
WEST PALM BEACH


CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS MATCHES AT WEST PALM BEACH


Irl




PAGE 6I


of Seminole War days. The little trading Fort
post grew up two miles inland and as late Lauderdale
as 1895 had but one store and a popula-
tion of twenty-five whites and a hundred
Indians. Today, it is a charming resort
city with good hotels, a fishing club,
three golf courses and unequaled ocean
bathing. Tarpon are caught within the
city limits in New River, so called because
an Indian legend says it appeared over-
night. A new deep-water harbor, called
Port Everglades, has just been completed
here at a cost of six million dollars. A
giant banyan tree is one of the sights near
the city.

HOLLYWOOD-Twenty miles north of
Miami, the comparatively new city of
Hollywood has grown rapidly since 1925.
Splendid surf bathing and luxurious hotel
accommodations bring swarms of tourists
here in winter time.

MIAMI-Approached by one of the most Miami,
beautiful boulevards in the world, run- the
ning four miles along the many-tinted Magic
bay, Miami, called the Magic City, has city
an unreal and magical appearance. Above
the four parked driveways along the bay
front, lined with Royal Palms and orna-
mental lights, rises the skyline of the
business section, with the towering Dade
County Court House shining silver-white
in the background. In 1896, there were
but two families in Miami; today, Miami
is the second largest city in the state,
playing the role of winter hostess to hun-
dreds of thousands of seasonal visitors.
Miami offers a fitting climax to the
tropical pageant of the East Coast. The
metropolitan business district overlooks
the causeways and palm-fringed islands of














































SCENES ALONG THE RIVER AT FORT LAUDERDALE


NIGHT SCENE ON THE BEACH AT HOLLYWOOD, NORTH OF
MIAMI








beautiful Biscayne Bay to Miami Beach,
one of the great winter playgrounds of the
nation. To the west lies Coral Gables, a
city planned to perfection, while just
north and west is Hialeah, a nationally-
known sporting center. Here is also lo-
cated the greatest international airport in
the United States. These cities, with ex-
clusive Coconut Grove on the south, com-
prise what is known as the Greater Miami
area.
Young as this beautiful metropolis of
the tropics is, its historic site has been
occupied for more than four hundred years.
The great Indian town of Tegesta stood
here when Menendez stopped in 1567 to
leave twenty-four soldiers and two priests
as a coast guard and mission station. The
only name which then foretold Miami,
was the name of Mayami,meaning"vast",
which was given to Lake Okeechobee by
the earliest Indians. These Indians did
not submit to Spanish control, but the
Seminoles, who supplanted them, were so
thoroughly converted by the mission
priests of Our Lady of the Grotto, which
stood at Coconut Grove, that they were
known as Spanish Indians, many of whom
went to Cuba when the United States ac-
quired Florida in 1821. Fort Dallas, now
preserved as a memorial on the Miami
River, was built in 1837 on a great cotton
plantation beside the bay and developed
into a trading post for a remnant of the
Indians after the Seminole Wars ended.
But modern Miami began when Flagler,
after the freeze of 1895, extended his East
Coast railroad here and erected another
of his great hotels.
The most remarkable period of Miami's
growth occurred after the World War,


PAGE 63


Early
Miami
History














































TROPICAL FOLIAGE IN BEAUTIFUL BAYFRONT PARK AT MIAMI






.W-


VENETIAN POOL AT CORAL GABLES NEAR MIAMI




PAGE 65


when it became the focal point of Florida
real estate activities and for the two years
of 1925 and 1916 strained every resource
to house the overflowing throngs pouring
in from the North. Following this period
the continued occupation of the many
splendid apartments and hotels proved
that tourist travel was increasing steadily
every year. Today, Miami's surplus of
transient guest accommodations is fully
utilized each season.
Each hour in the day at Miami may be Miami
filled with entertainment if the tourist de- Sports
sires. There are swimming pools, tennis
courts, golf links, polo fields, horse races,
bowling greens, boating with a speed
motor or by sail, air trips from several
aviation fields and incomparable drives
past miles of palatial homes. Scores of
Miami hotels have a reputation all over
the world for their perfect appointments,
and for the sea food and tropical fruits on
their tables. From nearby comes the
Florida lobster, a crayfish of more tender
meat and more succulent flavor than ordi-
nary lobster.
REDLAND DISTRICT-Thirty miles south
of Miami is Homestead, largest town in
the agricultural area known as the Red-
land District. Tourists motoring south
to Key West are astonished at the many
groves of oranges, grapefruit, cumquats
and limes. The avocado, or alligator
pear, is a luscious product of this region
as is the papaya, a table delicacy which is
found especially appetizing by Northern
tourists.
The overseas automobile highway
leaves the mainland a short distance from
the Redland District and follows the long
line of connected keys which parallel the

























































YACHT BASIN AT THE MOUTH OF THE MIAMI RIVER


ENJOYING THE SUN RAYS AT SOUTH MIAMI BEACH


c~U,-


~=


r;,- 3_




PAGE 67


coast and then swing off in a wide crescent
to the island city of Key West.

ROYAL PALM STATE PARK-South of the
Redland district of fruits and vegetables
lies this unique land of the tropics, where
rare birds, plants and trees are being pre-
served in what is planned as a national
park of two million acres. A lodge pro-
vides accommodations for visitors and
many famous naturalists come here to
study the unusual wild life.

THE KEYs-The new Overseas Highway
to Key West over the chain of coral islands
stretching one hundred and twenty-five
miles out into the ocean from the Florida The
Tropical
peninsula is a journey unique for even the Florida
experienced world traveler. The last water Keys
gap of this scenic motor highway, thirty-
six miles wide, is now spanned by ferry.
At Caesar's Creek stands the exclusive
Cocolobo Cay Fishing Club and opposite
it rises Black Caesar's Island, where a
negro pirate of the eighteenth century
was said to have made his headquarters.
Between the, keys and the mainland lies
Florida Bay, the sheltered cruising ground
of many beautiful yachts and smaller
craft. Besides the rich colors of the trans-
parent waters and their marvelous under-
sea growth, the foliage of the keys pre-
sents an unforgettable picture with its
beautiful assortment of tropical flora,
bearing such curious names as sapodilla,
.custard apple, mamey, papaya, and
tamarind. Here, indeed, "the wind is
in the palm trees," and the "flying fishes
play."
Pirates Cove Fishing Camp is a new
resort twenty miles north of Key West -

















































GOLF GALLERY FOLLOWING CHAMPION PLAY ON ONE
OF MANY MIAMI GOLF COURSES


POLO IS AN EXCITING SPECTACLE ON THE WINTER TURF AT
MIAMI BEACH




PAGE 69


on the Overseas Highway. It is equipped
with guest cabins, community dining
room and all facilities for comfort. Among
the game fish caught in the waters nearby
are the lightning-like bonefish, sailfish,
barracuda, kingfish, tarpon, bonito, and
African pompano.

KEY WEsT-Southernmost city in the
United States, Key West is located on the
island of Cayo Huesco (Bone Island), so
called from the piles of human bones found
there. In the days of treasure fleets and
freebooters, many a great ship ran afoul of
the coral reefs when warning lights were
hidden and wreckers lay in wait for the
spoils that washed upon the shore. Later,
however, this business of the piratical
wreckers became an efficient salvage fleet,
a boon instead of a terror to ships. The
Cuban insurrection brought many refugees
in 1868, resulting in the establishment of
large cigar factories in this little island
city.
Fishing, turtling and sponging fleets
lend color to the busy docks. With
its fine year-round climate and rare trees,
plants and flowers, Key West has a
charm for the tourist comparable to that
of Hawaii, and in fact, lies almost in the
same zone. Here is the only part of the
United States from which the Southern
Cross may be seen. The much-prized
green turtle soup, all varieties of fish,
crabs and lobsters delight the epicure,
while many interesting varieties of pre-
served tropical fruits are also available.
The government has an important naval
and aviation station here, and the busy
harbor is indeed a valuable asset to the
nation.


















































ROYAL PALMS GROW WILD IN ROYAL PALM STATE PARK
JUNGLE ON PARADISE KEY


LODGE AT PARADISE KEY, ROYAL PALM STATE PARK


;;


P.-O


























PART THREE

THE WEST COAST OF
FLORIDA
















































AIRPLANE VIEW OF THE BUSINESS SECTION OF TAMPA


AIRPLANE VIEW OF THE MUNICIPAL PIER AT ST. PETERSBURG




PAGE 73


--- -I








The West Coast
of Florida

THE West Coast of Florida opens into
many deep, splendid bays with islands by
the thousand dotting the serrated shore.
Before the War Between the States, its
rich lands boasted of enormous sugar
plantations and about its towns and vil-
lages still cling the glamorous atmos-
phere and cherished memories of the Old
South.
Tourist development along the West
Coast began at a later period than on the
East Coast, agriculture, industry and
commercial fishing occupying the atten-
tion of its people. Now, however, the
remarkable sport fishing, myriad island
beaches and winding, picturesque drives
are establishing an international resort
reputation for this beautiful section of
Florida.
TAMPA-The strategic location of Tampa
has resulted in its growth as the trade
metropolis and distributing center for an























II


SWIMMING POOL AT DAVIS ISLANDS AT TAMPA


BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED PARK SURROUNDING
OLD TAMPA BAY HOTEL




PAGE 75


immense surrounding territory. The Tampa,
tourist will find this city a convenient A Great
headquarters from which to take trips to Port
all parts of the peninsula. Its magnificent
bay attracted voyageurs from the earliest
times and four hundred years ago two
of the greatest military expeditions to the
New World landed their forces here-the
expedition of Panfilo de Narvaez in 1528
and of De Soto in 1539. "This port is the
best in the world," wrote Narvaez's scribe
and De Soto's chronicler was filled with
wonder at the endurance of the Indians,
who could "outrun even the mounted
scouts.
A boulder, recording Narvaez's landing,
stands in Bay Front Park, where is also
the De Soto oak, one of the earliest meet-
ing places of Indians and Spaniards. The
Indians of this region were implacable
in their opposition to white men, killing
missionaries and soldiers alike.
Not until the American Fort Brooke
was built here in 1823 were settlers able
to develop the fertile shore and pleasant
rolling countryside. A tablet marks the
place where this historic fortification
stood. During the Seminole Wars, Tampa
was the port from which the captured
tribes were sent west to new reservations.
During the Confederacy, the harbor was
several times blockaded and the city
shelled by the Union gunboats, which
were trying to prevent cotton-loaded ships
from slipping out to Cuba. After the war,
this section suffered because of lack of
transportation facilities and in 1870
there were only seven hundred and eighty-
six men in Tampa. When the first rail-
road came through from Sanford, in 1884,
a new era of growth and prosperity began
which has continued to the present day.


























LANDING OF THE PIRATE SHIP AT GASPARILLA CARNIVAL,
HELD ANNUALLY AT TAMPA


FLOATS IN THE GASPARILLA PARADE AT TAMPA


,a 4t r





PAGE 77


Henry Bradley Plant built the magni- Tampa
ficent Tampa Bay Hotel in 1891, with its Cigar
swimming pool, theatre and race track, Industry
while the cigar manufacturers moved in
to build Ybor City, that picturesque cen-
ter of the world's largest cigar industry.
During the Spanish-American War a
great camp of seventy-five thousand troops
was established near Tampa, which then
had only twenty-five thousand people.
Each spring at Tampa an entire week
is devoted to the festivities celebrating
the landing of the pirate crew of Gaspa-
rilla on the West Coast. This event at-
tracts thousands of tourists annually, and
is comparable to the great Mardi Gras at
New Orleans.
No mention of the Tampa section would
be complete without Davis Islands, a re-
markable residential suburb built on is-
lands in the bay, connected by a causeway
to the mainland. Golf courses, tennis
courts and recreational facilities of all
kinds are available to tourists in Tampa.
The new Tampa Yacht and Country Club,
now under construction, will have a
sea wall and concrete slips for yacht
anchorage.
SAFETY HARBOR-On the Pinellas penin-
sula, overlooking old Tampa Bay, where
the Espiritu Santo Springs draws hundreds
of health seekers who bathe in its wonder-
ful medicinal waters, is Safety Harbor.
The sanitarium is complete and up-to-
date in equipment and has thirty-six
different treatments available. Espiritu
Santo, or Holy Spirit, was the name given
by De Soto to Tampa Bay when he landed
here in 1539. There are six golf courses
within fifteen minutes' drive and fishing
for trout, tarpon, robalo and kingfish is a
popular sport.


































M&- 7---
TENNIS COURTS ON DAVIS ISLANDS ILLUMINATED FOR
NIGHT PLAYING


SAILING YACHTS ON LAKE PARKER AT LAKELAND
ANNUAL REGATTA




PAGE 79


PLANT CITY-The annual Strawberry
Festival at Plant City in March proclaims
the supremacy of that luscious fruit in this
fertile section of Florida. Five million
quarts were shipped from this thriving
little city to markets all over the country
last year. Golfing, fishing and hunting
draw many tourists to Plant City, which
is only twenty-two miles inland from
Tampa.
PINELLAS PENINSULA-Gandy Bridge,
the longest automobile toll bridge in the
world, connects the resorts of Pinellas
Peninsula with Tampa. These resorts
include the towns of Pass-a-Grille, St.
Petersburg, Cordova, Belleair, Clearwater
and Safety Harbor.
Almost entirely surrounded by water,
the Pinellas peninsular resorts enjoy an
unusually cool and refreshing climate
even in the warmest days of summer time.
Tall Australian pines and palm trees form
a verdant setting for many beautiful motor
drives on the peninsula and salt-water
bathing is a popular sport almost every-
where along the picturesque shore line.
Fish caught in these waters include tar-
pon, kingfish, redfish, sea trout, Spanish
mackerel, amberjack, grouper, robalo and
sheepshead.
ST. PETERSBURG-Called the Sunshine The
City, St. Petersburg has a climate so de- Sunshine
lightful that the largest newspaper gives city
away its circulation on any day that the
sun fails to shine. In nineteen years the
paper has been given away only ninety-
seven times, an average of five sunless
days a year.
In the many large shell mounds left by
the aboriginal inhabitants of the Pinellas
Peninsula, Smithsonian archaeologists














































GANDY BRIDGE, LONGEST AUTOMOBILE BRIDGE IN WORLD.
CONNECTING TAMPA AND ST. PETERSBURG


MISS FLORENCE SMOCK, OF EUSTIS, AMERICA'S HEALTHIEST
GIRL. WITH BEAUTY CHAMPIONS AT CLEARWATER




PAGB 8I


have found carved shells, weapons, bowls
and skeletons, together with European
coins and crocks. To this wild and beau-
tiful shore General John C. Williams
brought his family in 1877 and later, in
1888, induced a Russian exile, Peter De-
menschoff, to extend his Orange Belt rail-
road from Longwood to the coast. The
naming of this celebrated resort, in honor
of his native Russian city, is attributed to
Demenschoff. The well-known green
benches for tourists, the six miles of mu-
nicipally-owned waterfront, the million-
dollar pier and splendid yacht club are
interesting features of the city. Recre-
ational parks, boating, fishing, comfort-
able hotels and beautiful homes are among
its attractions. Big league baseball teams
have their winter training quarters here.
PAss-A-GRILLE-Reached by causeway "Pass
across Boca Ceiga Bay, lies Pass-a-Grille, of
ten miles south of St. Petersburg. In early the
times this was the favorite landing place Grillers"
of buccaneers, who roasted wild cattle for
their feasts here. As early as 1841, it was
called Pass-aux-grillarde on a government
survey, meaning "Pass of the Grillers."
This crescent-shaped isle, set in the deep
blue of the Gulf bay like a precious gem,
has become an up-to-date resort with all
conveniences and every form of recreation.
CLEARWATER-Located on the highest
coastal elevation of the state, Clearwater
was the site selected for the erection of
Fort Harrison in 1841, where sick soldiers
were cared for during the Seminole Wars.
The log buildings of the fort stood at
Harbor Oaks overlooking the water in
three directions, facing toward Old Tampa
Bay, Clearwater Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico.













































NATURAL BEAUTY IS CHARACTERISTIC OF THE WEST COAST


HUNTING IN FLORIDA'S VIRGIN WILDERNESS IS GREAT SPORT




PAGE 83


The first oranges grown here found no
market, but now Clearwater is the center
of some of the finest groves in the state.
In 1895, the Plant System built the beau-
tiful Belleview Hotel, which brought
many tourists to this section. With its
fine hotels, golf courses and beaches on a
chain of keys reached by a tropically-
planted causeway, Clearwater is indeed a
delightful resort city.
DUNEDIN-This is a charmingly land-
scaped community on the slopes of the
Pinellas Hills, overlooking Clearwater
Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, just twenty-
two miles west of Tampa. Outdoor sports
on land and water are enjoyed here the
year round. An eighteen-hole golf course
is located within the city limits and six
other courses are four to eight miles away.
INVERNESS, BROOKSVILLE and DADE CITY Inland
-These are inland towns of the West West Coast
Coast section which offer good accommo- Cities
dations to tourists. Much citrus fruit is
raised in this section, as well as papayas,
bananas, persimmons, avocados and grapes.
A Spanish moss factory is located at Inver-
ness.
BUSHNELL-Near Bushnell is the scene
of Dade's massacre, where an entire com-
pany of troops were attacked from am-
bush and killed by the Indians. This
occurred in 1835, during the Seminole Wars.
DUNNELLON-Phosphate deposits, the
fossil remains of millions of prehistoric
fish, were first discovered near Dunnellon
in 1889.
CEDAR KEYs-Directly south of Bronson,
Cedar Keys is noted for its Gulf fishing
and good hunting in the surrounding
forests.
















































AN AFTERNOON'S CATCH OF SILVER TARPON NEAR
TARPON SPRINGS


THESE BIG ONES REPRESENT A DAY'S CATCH IN GULF WATERS




PAGE 85


YANKEETOWN-One of the newest of
Florida towns, Yankeetown is located on
the Gulf at the mouth of the Withlacoo-
chee River. Six beautiful rivers with
innumerable creeks and branches empty
into the Gulf within six miles of here.
Fishing, hunting and boating are excel-
lent.
TARPON SPRINGS-Hundreds of small World
varicolored boats of the sponge fishing Sponge
fleet line the waterfront at Tarpon Springs.
Curio shops display marvelous varieties of
sea fans, ferns, sponges, odd fish and shells
brought in by the Greek divers. Turkish
coffee shops and the largest sponge ex-
change in the world are interesting points.
For twenty-six years, the Greek Epiphany
Service in January has drawn thousands
of visitors to see the head of the Greek
Church of America throw a gold cross into
deep water for divers to compete in finding.
George Ennis, the artist, who lived here,
has left a beautiful collection of his paint-
ings in the little church, where they are
open to public inspection every afternoon.
NEW PORT RICHEY-This is the winter
home of Thomas Meighan, Gene Sarazen
and other national figures and is located
beside the picturesque Cotee River. The
river was first named Pithlachascotee, so
called for the Indian Prince Pithla and his
betrothed Princess Chascotee, who died
on her wedding day. Golfing, boating
and surf bathing are enjoyed here the year
round.
LAKE JOVITA-The neighboring town of
Lake Jovita has five fine schools within a
half-mile. Game animals include squirrel,
opossum, fox and deer. Quail are plenti-
ful in open season and the lakes and rivers
abound in fish.













































OLD GAMBLE MANSION AT ELLENTON, NOW FILLED WITH
HISTORICAL RELICS


JOHN AND MABEL MINGLING MUSEUM OF ART, SARASOTA





PAGE 87


HOMOSASSA-Eight miles up the Homo-
sassa River, so clear that hundreds of fish
can be seen swimming over the grassy
bottom, is the town of Homosassa. It is
the site of the great sugar plantation of
Senator David Yulee, Florida's United
States Senator just before Secession. Union
gunboats raided the place in search of
Jefferson Davis' correspondence and ruins
of the buildings can be seen in the jungle
set aside as Yulee Park.
The five towns of the Manatee River, Manatee
including Palmetto and Ellenton on the River
north bank, Bradenton and Manatee on Cities
the south, form a charming group of cities
connected by a concrete bridge over the
Manatee River, which is several miles
wide here. On an island in the river, is
the fifth town, Terra Ceia. In 1854, Dr.
Joseph Braden built a stockade at the
junction of Manatee and Braden Rivers as
a refuge during the Seminole raids. The
walls still stand, as does an even more
ancient chimney at Manatee, so large that
an automobile could be driven into it.
On the outskirts of Ellenton is the old
Gamble mansion, where Judah P. Benja-
min, Confederate Secretary of State, was
concealed from the Federals until he es-
caped to Nassau. The Gamble house is
now a Confederate memorial, containing
an interesting collection of relics.
Bradenton has a popular recreation
ground, with a band shell and fine audi-
torium. A director of sports assists,,in
tourist activities, and the beach on Anna
Maria Island is equipped with bathhouses
and all conveniences. Golfing, tennis,
shuffleboard and bowling on the green are
some of the sports enjoyed at Bradenton.













































SEMINOLE CHIEF TRYING HIS HAND AT GOLF AT FORT MYERS


HENRY FORD AND THOMAS EDISON, WINTER NEIGHBORS,
ENTERTAINING MAJOR WONG AT FORT MYERS




PAGE 89


SARASOTA--On Sarasota Bay, where hun- Winter
dreds of tropical islands parallel the shore, Quarters
is the colorful city of Sarasota. March for Circus
brings the exotic Sara de Sota pageant, a
celebration based on a legend of the love
of De Soto's daughter for an Indian prince,
in which celebration the Ringling Circus,
wintering here, takes part. Ringling mil-
lions have spread a maze of resorts over
Sarasota, Lido, Venice and Treasure Island
beaches and have added materially to the
prosperity of this section.
In 1885, a young Scotchman, J. Hamil-
ton Gillespie, built one of the first golf
courses in America at Sarasota and many
others have since been completed. Palatial
homes of the Ringlings, the Potter Pal-
mers, Princess Cantacuzene, Oliver Cur-
wood, W. J. Burns, Stanley Field and
others are here. The John and Mabel
Ringling Art Museum ranks among the
finest in the United States.
PUNTA GORDA-The most famous of the The
West Coast pirates, Gasparilla, had his Pirate
stronghold near Punta Gorda at the Gasparilla
mouth of Charlotte harbor, where Pierre
La Fitte, brother of Jean La Fitte of New
Orleans fame joined him. Many attempts
have been made to find their buried treas-
ure, reputed to be worth eleven millions
of dollars. This is the home of the silver
tarpon, many of which are caught even
with hand lines from the concrete bridge
over Charlotte Harbor Bay. Hunting,
fishing and good hotels appeal to the
sportsman here.
FORT MYERs-San Carlos Bay and Pass,
at Fort Myers bear the name of the great
Indian chief of Menendez's time (1567)
who, when told that the greatest man in












































PLENTY OF FUN PLAYING SHUFFLEBOARD IN THE WINTER
SUNSHINE AT ST. PETERSBURG


OUTDOOR GAMES INTEREST OLD AND YOUNG ALIKE
ON THE WEST COAST




PAGE 91


the world was Charles V of Spain,
assumed the name of Carlos also. He
bestowed his sister upon Menendez,
who felt obliged to accept the gift, al-
though the princess was both old and
homely.
Fort Myers was established in 1850 and
named for Col. A. C. Myers, chief quarter-
master of the Florida troops who were
fighting against the Seminoles. The fort
also served as a base for Federals during
the War Between the States.
Modern Fort Myers is noted for the
hundreds of varieties of palms which line
its streets and especially the double row
of Royal Palms on its main thorough-
fare. It is the winter home of Thomas
Edison, whose experiments in rubber here
have attracted worldwide attention. Many
other celebrities, among them Henry Ford,
Harvey Firestone, Dr. Henry Miles and
Elsworth Milton Statler, have homes at
Fort Myers.

Golf, bathing at beach and pool, fish-
ing in Gulf and stream and scenic drives
through magnificent orange groves are
some of the principal attractions at Fort
Myers.
Barron Collier has started a tremendous
development program south of Fort Myers,
made possible by the opening of the
Tamiami Trail to Miami. In 1913, Collier
bought Useppa Island, the first link in a
chain of five resorts owned by him, where
millionaire fishermen come from all over
Good
the country. Hunting
and
EvERGLADEs-Headquarters of Collier's Fishing
great development is at Everglades, where















































GIANT TARPON FURNISH PLENTY OF THRILLS ON WEST COAST


PRIZE-WINNING ONE HUNDRED AND TWO POUND TARPON AT
VENICE, IN NATIONAL TARPON TOURNAMENT




PAGE 93


a rod and gun club offers unusual facilities
for sportsmen. Here the successful fish-
erman or hunter may, if he desires, taste
the savory prizes of his own prowess,
whether it be wild turkey, red snapper,
snipe, duck or quail.

SANIBEL ISLAND-Located in the Gulf,
near the mouth of the Caloosahatchee
River, Sanibel Island is noted for its tar-
pon fishing, and as the site of many beau-
tiful homes and estates.

NAPLEs-Farther south is Naples, where
tourist accommodations, surf bathing,
golf, fishing and hunting are available.

TEN THOUSAND ISLANDS--Off the coast
of Collier County lie the Ten Thousand
Islands, where the waters are literally
teeming with hundreds of varieties of fish
and the tropical jungles are thickly popu-
lated with many kinds of game.

CAPE SABLE-North of Cape Sable is the
largest of the Seminole Indian reserva-
tions, whose interesting inhabitants come
to the coast trading stations to barter for
their simple wants. Cape Sable is the
southernmost point of continental United
States.

TAMIAMI TRAIL-From Fort Myers south
along the coast and then eastward through
the great Everglades district, runs the
Tamiami Trail, connecting Tampa and
Miami. This is one of the great engineer-
ing feats of modern times, the roadbed
being built by excavating a canal and then
grading the material thrown up on the
bank.














































MEMORIAL CAUSEWAY AT CLEARWATER LEADING TO THE
BEACH


PLACID WATERS AND TROPICAL FOLIAGE AT ST. PETERSBURG

























PART FOUR

THE CENTRAL SECTION OF
FLORIDA















































SUWANNEE RIVER, FAMED IN SONG AND STORY,
NEAR LIVE OAK


ORLANDO SKYLINE LOOKING ACROSS LAKE EOLA




PAGE 97


The Central Section
of Florida

FROM the point where the famous Su-
wannee River, originally called by the
Spaniards Little San Juan or Sanjuanee,
crosses the Georgia line into Florida,
down the high limestone ridge to the vast
shallow bowl of Lake Okeechobee, is the
section known as Central Florida. A de-
lightful variety of rolling hills, enormous
springs and thousands of lakes characterize
this great agricultural and health resort
region. Florida ranks second in the United
States in number of lakes, having over
thirty-five thousand, the majority of which
are located in Central Florida.
LAKE CITY-Surrounded by lakes, where
good fishing is a year-round pastime amid
pecan groves of the delicious "paper shell"
nuts, this pleasant little city offers much
of interest. Falling Creek, nearby, is a
waterfall which disappears in a "sink
hole" or break in the limestone strata,
and White Springs, a lovely summer resort
















































NUTS READY FOR HARVESTING IN TUNG OIL GROVE NEAR
GAINESVILLE


BiliCKM.1N II \L. DORMITi.iR% .\T I .N! VE'-R'f OF FI.lIlODA,
LG, i NE4i' ILE




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