• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Letter of transmittal
 Summary of expenditures
 Summary of analysis
 Standards for fertilizers
 Immature citrus fruit
 Some results of citrus fruit...
 Self-rising flour
 Commercial state values of...
 Market prices of chemicals and...
 Factors for conversion
 Commercial state values of feeding...
 Market prices of feeding stuffs...
 Average composition of feeding...
 Definition of feeding stuffs
 Standards for wheat by-product...
 Detailed report of analysis --...
 Detail expenditures of the chemical...






Group Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture.
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture. Vol. 32. No. 1.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077080/00002
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture. Vol. 32. No. 1.
Series Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture.
Uniform Title: Report of the Chemical Division
Physical Description: 9 v. : ill. (some folded) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Manufacturer: T. J. Appleyard, printer
Publication Date: January 1, 1922
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Statistics   ( lcsh )
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Each no. has also a distinctive title.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division
General Note: Issues occasional supplements.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00077080
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473180

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 5
    Summary of expenditures
        Page 6
    Summary of analysis
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Standards for fertilizers
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Immature citrus fruit
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Some results of citrus fruit inspection
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Self-rising flour
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Commercial state values of fertilizer
        Page 37
    Market prices of chemicals and fertilizer materials
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Factors for conversion
        Page 42
    Commercial state values of feeding stuffs for 1922
        Page 43
    Market prices of feeding stuffs at Florida seaports, January 1, 1922
        Page 44
    Average composition of feeding stuffs
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Definition of feeding stuffs
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Standards for wheat by-products
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Detailed report of analysis -- fertilizers, feed stuffs, food and drugs
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
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    Detail expenditures of the chemical division
        Page 187
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        Page 190
        Page 191
Full Text



VOLUME 32


FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN



January 1, 1922

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE


REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION.



R. E. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST


Entered January 81, 1908f at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class matter
under Act of Congress of June, 3900.


These Bulletins Are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them.


T. J. APPLEYARD, PRINTER, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


NUMBER 1











CONTENTS


Page
Letter of Transmittal ............................. 5
Summary of Expenditures ...................... 6
Summary of Analyses .......................... 7
Standards of Fertilizers ........................ 13
Immature Citrus Fruit ......................... 20
Some Results of Citrus Fruit Inspection............ 33
Self-Rising Flour .............................. 35
Commercial State Values of Fertilizer............. 37
Market Prices of Chemicals and Fertilizer Materials. 38
Factors for Conversion..:........................ 42
Commercial State Values of Feed Stuff............ 43
Market Prices of Feeding Stuffs .................. 44
Composition of Feeding Stuffs ..................... 45
Definitions of. Feeding Stuffs.................... 49
Standards for Wheat -By-products ................ 60
Detailed Report of Analyses-
Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs, Food and Drugs....... 62
Detailed Expenditures of the Chemical Division.... 187


,3l9 /










STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT 1921


Tallahassee, Fla., January 1,. 1922.

To His Excellency,

Cary A. Hardee, Governor,

Tallahassee, Florida.

Sir:-I have the honor to submit the following report
of the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida, for the year ending December 31,
1921.
The report of the State Treasurer shows the sale of
inspection stamps covering 291,618.32 tons of commer-
cial fertilizers and cotton seed meal-
Amounting to ...:.........................$ 72,904.58

And 166,388.72 tons of Commercial Feeding
Stuffs-
Amounting to ............................ 41,595.73

A total revenue of........................$114,500.51
paid into the State Treasury to the credit of the General
Revenue Fund; from which is to be deducted the total ex-
penses of the Chemical Division incident to the execution
of the Fertilizer, Feed Stuff, Pure Food and Drug, Imma-
ture Citrus Fruit and Gasoline Laws. The total expenses
of the Chemical Division, as audited and approved by
the State Chemist and approved by the Commissioner of
Agriculture, in accordance with the opinions of the At-
torney General of December 7, 1917, August 1, 1919, and
October 3, 1919, being $25,291.08, showing a balance of
$89,209.43 paid into the General Revenue Fund of the
State. A summary of these expenses will be found on the
succeeding page. A detailed financial report will be found
in the last pages of this report. For expenditures of the
funds charged to the State Chemist, and paid upon the ap-
proval of the Commissioner of Agriculture only, I would
*respectfully refer to the Report of the Commissioner of
Agriculture.











SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES AUDITED AND
APPROVED BY THE STATE CHEMIST, 1921, AS
PROVIDED BY SEC. 2411, REVISED
GENERAL STATUTES, 1920.
Salary of the State Chemist .................$ 3,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Fertilizers...... 2,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Foods and Drugs 2,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Stock Feed..... 2,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Oils (6 months). 1,000.00
Salary of three Food and Drug Inspectors..... 5,400.00
Salary of Clerk Chemical Division ............ 1,200.00
Salary Janitor ........... ............... 540.00
Samples and incidentals, Pure Food Depart-
m ent .................................. 1,190.28
Chemicals, apparatus and incidentals, State
Laboratory ............................ 560.68
Traveling expenses State Chemist and Assist-
ants ................................... 747.00
Postage, State Chemist ....................... 122.94
Citrus fruit inspection, apparatus, etc........ 111.69

Total, audited and approved by State Chem-
ist and Commissioner of Agriculture.... $ 19,872.59
ITEMS APPROVED BY COMMISSIONER OF
AGRICULTURE ONLY.
*Traveling expenses Food and Drug Inspectors.$ 3,487.38
*Salaries and expenses, Citrus Inspectors..... 1,931.11

Total, approved by Commissioner of Agri-
culture .............................$ 5,418.49
Total expenses, Chemical Division......... 25,291.08
To credit General Revenue............... 89,209.43

Gross Revehue .........................$114,500.51
Appropriation, 1921 ...................... $ 25,865.00
Expenses Chemical Division. ............... 25,291.08

Unexpended appropriation ..............$ 573.92
Respectfully submitted,
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
*NOTE-See opinions of Attorney General, Dec. 7, 1917,
Aug. 1, 1919, Oct. 13, 1919.









SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL REPORT, 1921.

The following analyses were made during the year:
Official samples fertilizers..................... 151
Special samples fertilizers' (sent in'by citizens).... 246
Official samples feed stuff...................... 258
Special samples feed stuff (sent in by citizens).... 18
Official Food and Drug samples................ 266
Special food and drug samples (sent in by citizens). 61
Official samples citrus fruit ...................... 103
Special samples citrus fruit.... ................. 233
Gasoline .................... ................ 926
Kerosene ................. ...... ............. 294
Samples, collaborative ......................... 27
Miscellaneous samples (sent in by citizens)....... 78

Total number analyses...................... 2,661

SPECIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY PURCHASERS.

The Florida law is peculiar in this respect, permitting
citizens, purchasers of lawful feeds and fertilizers' that
are duly registered, under oath with' the Commissioner
of Agriculture as evidenced by the guarantee tag and
stamp upon each package, to draw samples of the same,
according to law, rules and regulations, to prevent the
submission of spurious samples, and obtain, without cost,
a certificate of analysis by the State Chemist. In case
of deficiency in the goods so purchased, the sample being
properly drawn, packed and transmitted, according to
law and regulations, the purchaser" can, upon proof of
the fact, obtain a judgment for double the amount of the
price of the goods, while the dealer will be subject to the
penalties of the law. This provision of the law, however,
does not apply to illegitimate goods sold by unregistered,
unlawful dealers or their agents; consumers who purchase
such unlawful goods having no recourse under the law,
for damages.











FERTILIZERS SUMMARY.

GORDON HART, B. S., ANALYST.

Official samples fertilizer ..................... 151
Special samples fertilizer ..................... 246

Total analyses fertilizer department ............ 397

The 110 samples of complete fertilizer drawn by the State
Chemists and Inspectors had the following average com-
position and guarantee:
Avail.
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Potash
Official analysis ........ 4.34% 8.75% 4.38%
Guarantee ............. 4.08% 7.56% 3.94%
Excess above guarantee. 0.26% 1.19% 0.44%

Average State value found, per ton ..............$ 37.47
Average State value guaranteed, per ton......... 34.14

EXCESS 0.20% ABOVE GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
0.20% (twenty points) as follows:

In Ammonia ................. 67 samples, or 60.99%
In Available Phosphoric Acid.. 79 samples, or 71.81%
In Potash .................... 76 samples, or 69.02%

DEFICIENCY 0.20% BELOW GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers below guarantee 0.20%
(twenty points) as follows:
In Ammonia ................. 11 samples, or 10.00%
In Available Phosphoric Acid... 24 samples, or 21.81%
In Potash .................... 12 samples, or 10.90%











SUMMARY COMMERCIAL STOCK FEED.

B. J. OWEN, ANALYST.
The following analyses have been made during the year:
Official samples feed stuff...................... 258
Special samples feed stuff...................... 18
Collaborative samples ......................... 22

Total analyses Feed Department............... 298

The average composition of the official sam les was as
follows:
Nitrogen-free
Protein. Extract. Fat.
Official analysis ........ 16.19% 51.11% 3.71%
Guaranteed analysis .... 15.50% 48.15% 3.12%

Average excess ...... 0.69 2.96 0.59

We find the official samples of feed stuffs exceed the
guarantee 0.20% (twenty points) as follows: *

In protein ................... 170 samples, or 66.53%
In nitrogen-free extract........ 37 samples, or 77.09%
In fats .................... 154 samples, or 64.70%

There was a deficiency of 0.20% (twenty points) as
follows:

In protein ................... 38 samples, or 14.96%
In nitrogen-free extract........ 8 samples, or 16.60%
In fats .................... 20 samples, or 8.40%











10

FOOD AND DRUG SUMMARY.

A. M. HENRY, B. S., ANALYST.

Official food and drug samples. ........., 266
Special food and drug samples......... ...... '61
Collaborative samples ...................... 5


Official citrus fruit samples............... 103
Special citrus fruit samples................ 231



Grand total food and drug samples.........

CITRUS FRUIT SUMMARY.


332



334

.666


Special Official

INSPECTORS




W. R. Griffing, Sutherland..... 33 16 34 18 101
J. M. Keen, Lakeland .......... 60 49 1 7 117
C. E. Johnston, Daytona....... 57 6 27 4 94
S. D. Moon, Floral City........ 3 7 2 10 22


Total samples 1921 ............ 153 7V 64 39 334
Total samples 1920............ 40 37 27 13 117
Total samples 1919........... 155 103 127 30 415
Total samples 1918...........'. 2391 112 67 25 443
Total samples 1917............ 135 24 163 10 332
Total samples 1916............ 238 87 199 25 549

Total samples 1915............ .... ... ...... 304

Total samples since adoption
U. S. Standard............. .. .... 2493











SUMMARY OF OIL ANALYSIS.
E. T. CASLER, B. S. ANALYST.
Special gasoline samples analyzed ........... 49
Official gasoline samples analyzed............ 877

Total .................................... 926
Special kerosene samples analyzed........... 14
Official kerosene samples analyzed........... 280

Total .................................. 294

Total samples analyzed.................... 1220

Illegal official gasoline samples ................. 6
Per cent .................................. 0.685
Illegal special gasoline samples ................ 0
Per cent .................................. 0.00
Illegal official kerosene samples................ 1
Per cent .................................. 0.358
Illegal special kerosene samples ................ 1
Per cent ...................... ............ 7.15
NOTE-The entire shipments of the six illegal official
samples of gasoline, drawn by inspectors, Nos. 1509, 1510,
1526, 1527, 1712, 1713, were immediately withdrawn from
the State by the manufacturers.
The two illegal samples of kerosene, official sample No.
560, and special sample No. 11, were found upon investi-
gation to have- been taken from contaminated containers.
Official samples from clean containers were found to be
legal and in full compliance with the standards fixed by
law.
OFFICIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY INSPECTORS.
SGas Kerosene Total
Inspector W. S. McLin....... 188 53 241
Inspector E. M. Johns....... 364 118 482
Inspector G. B. Hills........ 151 51 202
*Inspector G. T. Spear...... .. 174 58 232

Total .................. 1157
*Mr. Spear was appointed Oil Inspector in June, 1921,
to succeed Mr. G. B. Hills, resigned.









12

OFFICIAL SAMPLES'.

Official samples of Fertilizer, Feeding Stuffs, Food and
Drugs were drawn as follows:








R. E. Rose, State Chemist ........... 34 8 2 44

A. NIM. Henry, Assistant. .'........... 29 4 94 127

Gordon Hart, Assistant............. 4 0 0 4

B. J. Owen, Assistant............. 9 13 0 22

J. Frank Smith, Inspector.......... 13 96 44 153

,John Mullady,, Inspector ........... 15 80 27 122

A. M. Lewis, Inspector ............. 13 8 0 21

,A. C. Harllee, Inspector........... 0 5 1 6

Ellis Woodworth, Inspector......... 34 44 98 176

Totals ........................ 151 258 268 675

,Mr. John Mullady was succeed by Mr. A. M. Lewis on
July 6, 1921.
,Mr. A. C. Harllee was succeeded by Mr. Ellis Wood-
worth on January 22, 1921L










STANDARDS FOR FERTILIZERS.

High Grade vs. Low Grade Formulas.

BY R. E. ROSE, STATE CHEMIST.

The economy of high grade fertilizers, both to the con-
sumer and the manufacturer, has long been recognized by
Agricultural Experiment Stations, Agricultural Chemists
and many well informed consumers, particularly citrus
growers and truckers of Florida noted for intelligent use
of commercial fertilizer, who demand high grade goods for
their intensive cultivation of fruits and vegetables; and
who have recognized that the valuable portion of a ton of
fertilizer depends solely upon the percentage of available
nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash in a bag or the ton;
and who buy their goods based upon the percentage, or
pounds, of plant food contained, and not upon some par-
ticular brand or trade name.
This problem was fully discussed by the writer in his
Annual Report for 1906, pages 7, 8 and 9. One hundred
and forty-six official samples were classified as follows:
Low Grade, with an average of......... 11.9%
Medium Grade, with an average of..... 14.4%
High Grade, with an average of........ 19.7%
"The medium grade goods, for an eighth advance in
price over the cost of the low grade brands, offer a fifth
more plant food and nearly a third more commercial, value.
"The high-grade fertilizers for but little more than a.
third advance in price over the cost of the low-class goods,
furnish two-thirds more plant food and five-sixth more
commercial value."
Mr. George V. Leonard, the Chairman of the Committee
on Fertilizers of the Florida Horticultural Society (1920),
reported the conclusions and recommendations of a com-
mittee called for the purpose of considering this problem
at the Florida Experiment Station, Gainesville, as fol-
lows:
Gainesville, Florida, May 3, 1920.
"The committee appointed on Standardization of Fer-
tilizer Formulas met in the Experiment Station building
at Gainesville, Florida, continuing their deliberations in
the forenoon and afternoon of May 3. After examining










large amounts of records and data, we beg to make the
following recommendations:
1. That standard complete fertilizers in Florida shall
be made of the following formulas:
Ammonia Phos. Acid Potash
0 10 4
2 10 3

3 10 2
3 8 3
3 9 3
3 6 5
3 8 5


"2. That no standard brand be made to contain frac-
tional percentages of plant food.
"3. That in stating percentages of ammonia it shall be
stated in proportion of the water soluble, nitric nittogen
and organic nitrogen.
"4. That we recommend the following combinations for
ammoniaswith reasonable tolerances:
First, one hundred percent water soluble;
Second, seventy-five percent water soluble, twenty-five
percent organic; ;
Third, fifty percent water soluble, fifty percent organic;
Fourth, twenty-five percent water soluble, seventy-five
percent organic;
Fifth; one hundred percent organic.
t












'"5. That the Horticultural Society recommend that the
necessary' additional analysts be provided by legislative
appropriations from funds accruing from 'the fertilizer
tag tax.
"By the committee,
P. H. Rolfs, Chairman,
Geo. V. Leonard,
A. G. Hamlin,
W. F. Miller,
Geo. P. Thomas,
B.' F.'Floyd,
R.' W. RTprecht,
R. E. Rose,
J. N. Harper,
S. C. Warner."

After full discussion by Dr. J. N. Harper, Prof. P. H.
Rolfs, Geo. V. Leonard, W. T. Miller, L. B. Skinner, W. W.
Others, S. C. Warner, R. E. Rose and others, the recom-
mendations of the committee were unanimously adopted;
and referred to the Legislative Committee of the Florida
Horticultural Society, with power to act; see proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society at Orlando, May
4, 5, 6, and 7, 1920, pages 28 to 40, inclusive.
These discussions have occupied the attention of citrus
growers, truckers, farmers, chemists of the Experiment
Station, Agricultural workers and the agricultural press
for years; and have been frequently discussed at the meet-
ings of the Florida Horticultural Society, a society com-
posed of probably the most intelligent users of commercial
fertilizer in America, or any other country, with a mem-
bership of from 1,000 to 1,600 in attendance upon its
annual conventions. Citrus growers, truckers, agricultural
workers and writers, fertilizer manufacturers and deal-
ers, citrus and vegetable marketing associations, Experi-
ment Station workers, agricultural chemists, and other
scientific horticultural and agricultural workers were in
attendance on the annual convention of this' association,,
Orlando, May 4, 5, 6, and 7, 1920; with an enrolled mem-
bership of 1,373.
The writer has long contended that the numerous brands,
frequently of the .same formula, made of identical mate-
rials, were unnecessarily cumbersome and confusing; that.
standards should be adopted, fixing the minimum percent-











age of nitrogen (ammonia), available phosphoric acid, and
water-soluble potash; that any fertilizer containing 10%
or less available plant food should be conspicuously
branded "Low Grade;" that brands containing 15%
should be branded "Standard;" that brands containing
20% should be branded "High Grade;" that fractional
guarantees of less than one percent should not be per-
mitted.
To show the wide-spread demand for the elimination of
low-grade formulas, and unnecessarily large number of
brands of commercial fertilizer, often of identical mate-
rials and similar composition, I quote the following from
various competent authorities:

FROM AGRICULTURAL LEADERS.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Washington

December 17,' 1921.
The stand taken by the fertilizer industry for the elimi-
nation of low-analysis mixtures and the useless, wasteful
multiplicity of brands must ultimately react to the benefit
of manufacturer and consumer alike.
HENRY C. WALLACE,
Secretary.
Comments from the Soil Fertility Field.-Experiment Sta-
tion Workers Commend the High-analysis Resolution.

J. H. Stewart, Commissioner of Agriculture, Charleston,
W. Va.: "I approve of the resolution adopted by your
Association in regard to high-class fertilizers. I have be-
lieved in this for a long time. It is the unit of "fertility"
which should appeal to the agriculturist, and on that alone
should be based his purchases instead of on tonnage. This
will save freight rates, haulage, and labor. I am in full
sympathy with this effort and assure you of my active co-
operation with the Association to put it into effect in West
Virginia.
L. E. Call, Agronomist, Kansas State Agricultural Col-
lege: "This (the resolution) is certainly a step in the
right direction."











H. D. Haskins, Chemist, Fertilizer Control, Massachu-
setts Experiment Station: "The furthering of the pur-
chase and use of high-analysis brands of fertilizer has al-
ways been a prominent part in our campaign of education
in connection with our fertilizer bulletins. We shall be
glad to continue urging the consumers to buy high-grade
fertilizers."

B. W. Sebring, Chief, Division of Feeds and Fertilizers,
Ohio Department of Agriculture: "It (the resolution)
shows beyond any doubt that the manufacturers and State
departments are in full accord in acknowledging the de-
sirability of high-analysis fertilizers."

George Roberts, Agronomist, University of Kentucky:
"I am indeed glad to see that the Association has taken
such an attitude on the matter."

H. B. McConnell, Chemist, University of Maryland: "I
certainly shall do what I can to promote this policy of
high-grade fertilizers."

Professor A. T. Wiancko, Chief in Soils a-nd Crops, Pur-
due: "We are as much interested as ever in higher grade
fertilizers and reduction in the number of analyse, and
elimination of the low-grade analyses as completely as
possible. High labor costs and the present high freight
rates make it more desirable than ever to eliminate low-
analysis and low-grade fertilizers. We are going to con-
tinue to keep this matter before our farmers. I have been
very well pleased with the attitude of your Committee
and leading fertilizer manufacturers on this subject, and
am very glad you are going to keep up the fight."

T. C. Johnson, Director, Virginia Truck Experiment
Station: "We have been using a fertilizer which analyzes
7 per cent ammonia, 8 per cent phosphoric acid, and 5 per
cent potash. * This mixture answers very well for
potatoes, cabbage, cauliflower and several other crops. The
same elements, mixed in somewhat different proportions,
answer for other crops; as, for instance, sweet potatoes."

Dr. E. H. Jenkins, Director, Connecticut Experiment
Station: "I have just sent to the printer our fertilizer











report, which shows that nitrogen to the farmer in the low
grades costs twice as-much as in the higher grades of mate-
rials."
J. W. Turrentine, in Charge Investigation of Fertilizer
Resources, Summerland, California:. "I regard it (the
resolution) as a very wise move, indeed, and it is some-
thing I have been advocating ever since I have been con-
nected with the Government's fertilizer researches. The
advantage .are so obvious that it is hard to see how the
considerations against it have been permitted to prevail."

Dr. William Frear, Vice-director, Pennsylvania Experi-
ment Station: "It has taken a long time to persuade many
of the farmers to buy by the unit of plant food rather than
by the ton. I congratulate you on this valuable piece of
work. '
Fred Rasmussen, Secretary of Agriculture, Harrisburg,
Pa.: "This (the resolution) is a great step in advance
and can only be to the good of the farmers
and the fertilizer trade. You can be assured of
the full co-operation of the Pennsylvania Department of
Agriculture in this project."

Dr. H. J. Patterson, Director, Agricultural Experiment
Station, College Park, Maryland: "This is a proposition
in which we all should co-operate, to further it in every way
possible.''

G. L. Schuster, Agronomist, Delaware Experiment Sta-
tion: "I shall find it a pleasure to encourage the use of
high-analysis fertilizers wherever the opportunity presents
itself."
G. E. Adams, Dean, Rhode Island State College: "I am
pleased at the forward step taken by the National Fer-
tilizer Association, and will be glad to bring this matter
to the attention of some of our State agricultural organ-
izations."
H. .0. Wilson, Commissioner of Agriculture, Baton
Rouge, La.: "We heartily agree with you in the matter of
the higher analysis of. fertilizers. In fact, in our opinion,.
no fertilizer should be sold that contains less than 3 per
cent nitrogen."










Dr. W. F. Hand, State Chemist, Agricultural College,
Mississippi: "The resolution points in the direction of im-
provement, and we indulge the hope that we may see its
effect before very long in better goods."
R. E. Rose, State Chemist, Florida: "I have long con-
tended that high-grade fertilizers were most economical to
the manufacturer and the consumer."'
F. D. Gardner, Professor of Agronomy, Pennsylvania
State College: "This (high analysis) is what we have all
been working for, and I am pleased that the Association
has taken this stand. I have passed the resolution to the
Extension Department, and a note relating to it will appear
in the next Weekly News Letter, which goes to all county
agents in the State, as well as all others connected with the
Extension Service."
Dr. A. G. McCall, in charge of Soil Investigation, Mary-
land Experiment Station: "The resolution is an advanced
step in the fertilizer industry, and you will have our hearty
co-operation in an effort to establish in the mind of the
consumer the advantages to be gained by the purchase of
high-analysis goods."
Professor E. VanAlstine, Agronomist, Vermont Agri-
cultural College, Burlington: "I think no one can ques-
tion that the use of high-analysis fertilizers is a step in the
right direction, even under conditions when freight rates
and high cost of labor do not make it absolutely necessary."
By MILTON WHITNEY,
Chief, Bureau of Soils, U. S. D. A.
Having been in close touch for many years with the fer-
tilizer industry and with the farmers' progress in the use
of fertilizers, I am fairly familiar with the problems which
have arisen and the efforts which have been made to over-
come them.
Therefore, I consider that in adopting by unanimous
vote the resolution for high-analysis fertilizers the industry
has passed a milestone in its career. It is a step of such
constructive importance that it is difficult to form any ac-
curate estimate of the beneficial results which must surely
follow. The limiting factor, as I see it, is the extent to
which the farmers give this movement their support and
co-operation.










IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT.


No problem of greater magnitude has vexed the citrus
growers of Florida, since the crop of oranges and grape-
fruit has increased from less than five million boxes to
more than twenty million boxes. Large shipments of
immature citrus fruit-generally by speculators who pur-
chase the fruit upon the tree under contract to remove
the same. before a fixed date (generally December 1 to De-
cember 31) ; persons who had little or no interest in the
production of citrus fruit or the reputation of the Florida
orange for excellence-lead to a convention of citrus grow-
ers, called by the Florida Commissioner of Agriculture in
June, 1912; which convention (representing the entire in-
dustry) unanimously adopted what is now known as 'The
Florida Citrus Fruit Standard," now adopted by the
United States Department of Agriculture as Food Inspec-
tion Decision No. 182, September 30, 1921.
Previous to this date, on March 28, 1911, owing to the
shipment of immature citrus fruit in large quantity, to the
disgust of the consumer, and the detriment of the industry
and health of the consuming public, the U. S. Department
of Agriculture issued F. I. D. No. 133, prohibiting the ship-
ment of artificially colored immature citrus fruit, as
follows:

F. I. D. 133. Issued April 6, 1911.
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Food Inspection Decision 133
THE COLORING OF GREEN CITRUS FRUITS.

The attention of the Board of Fobd and Drug Inspec-
tion has been directed to the shipment in interstate
commerce of green, immature citrus fruits, particularly
oranges, which have been artificially colored by holding
in a warm, moist atmosphere for a short period of time
after removal from the tree. Evidence is adduced show-
ing that such oranges do not change in sugar or acid con-











tent after removal from the tree. Evidence further shows
that the same oranges remaining on the tree increase
markedly in sugar content and decrease in acid content.
Further, there is evidence to show that the consumption
of such immature oranges, especially by children, is apt
to be attended by serious disturbances of the digestive
system.
Under the Food and Drugs Act of June 30, 1906, an
article of food is adulterated "'if it be mixed, colored,
powdered, coated, or stained in a manner whereby damage
or inferiority is concealed. IT Is THE OPINION OF THE
BOARD THAT ORANGES TREATED AS MENTIONED ABOVE ARE
COLORED IN A MANNER WHEREBY INFERIORITY IS CONCEALED
AND ARE THEREFORE, ADULTERATED.
The Board recognizes the fact that certain varieties, of
oranges attain maturity as to size, sweetness, and acidity
before the color changes from green to yellow, and this
decision is not intended to interfere with the marketing
of such oranges. *
H. W. WILEY,
F. L. DUNLAP,
GEO. P. MCCABE,
Board of Food and Drug Inspection.
Approved:
JAMES WILSON,
Secretary of Agriculture.
Washington, D. C., March 28, 1911.

The last sentence of the first paragraph of F. I. D. No.
133 has never been successfully denied nor controverted.
At that time (1911) no study had been made nor standard
fixed for mature citrus fruit. Not until the convention of
citrus growers at Gainesville, Florida, July 6, 1912, was a
standard fixed by any state nor by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture.
The artificial coloring of citrus fruit being prohibited
by F. I. D. No. 133, "green fruiters" soon discovered a
means to circumvent the provisions of F. I. D. No. 133 by
shipping immature citrus fruit in unventilated cars-
shipped "Released, Vents Closed and Plugs n "-thus in-
suring holding "in a warm moist atmosphere for a short
period of time after removal from the tree;" this, period
9










of time being from five to ten. days and longer, when the
car was diverted from one destination to another; thus in-
suring the arrival of the fruit "artificially colored,"
though as stated in F. I. D. No. 133 "such oranges do not
change in acid or sugar content after removal from the
tree" and further "That the consumption of such imma-
ture oranges, especially by children, is apt to be attended
by serious disturbances of the digestive system."
In the meantime, the Immature Citrus Fruit Law of 1911
was enacted by the Florida Legislature, as follows:

IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT LAW.

CHAPTER 6236-(No. 117) 1911.

AN ACT to Prohibit Certain Dispositions of Citrus Fruits
Which Are Immature or Otherwise Unfit for Consump-
tion, and the Misbranding of Citrus Fruits.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of theState of Florida:

Section 1. That it shall be unlawful for anyone to sell,
offer for sale, ship or deliver for shipment any citrus
fruits which are immature or otherwise unfit for con-
sumption, and for any one to receive any such fruits
under a contract of sale, or for the purpose of sale, or of
offering for sale, or for shipment or delivery for ship-
ment. This section shall not apply to sales or contracts
for sale of citrus fruits on the trees under this section;
nor shall it apply to common carriers or their agents who
are not interested in such fruits and who are merely receiv-
ing the same for transportation.

Sec. 2. It shall be unlawful for any one to misbrand
any package or any wrapper containing citrus fruits; and
all citrus fruits shall be deemed misbranded if the pack-
age or the wrapper shall bear any statement, design or
device regarding the fruit therein contained which is false
or misleading either as to the name, size, quality or brand
of such fruit or as to the locality in which it was grown.
Sec. 3. Whoever shall violate any of the provisions of
this Act shall be punished by a fine not exceeding one
thousand dollars or by imprisonment for not more than
six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment, and











the fruit, whether immattire or oth'drise unfit for' con-
sumption or misbrarided, shall be subject to seizure and
disposition as in the case of adulteataed 'or misbranded
foods and drugs. '

'NOTE-Chapter' 6236, Acts 6f 1911, iin the case of Sligh
vs. Kirkwood, Sheriff, was decided consttiutional by the
Florida Supreme Court February 7, 1913, 65th Florida,
123; judgment affirmed by U. S. Supreme Court, April 5,
1915, U. S: Report 237, page 52.

Subsequent to the passage of the Florida Immature
Citrus Fruit Law in 1911, and the decisions of the Florida
and UnitedStates Suprieme'Courts' upholding the same, the
U. S. Department of'Agriculture issued "Item 144, Ser-
vice and Regulartory Anihouncement No. 15," September
23, 1915, as follows:

SDepartment of Agriculture,
Bureau of Chemistry,
Washington, D. C.
Sept. 23, 1915.

"SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.
ITEM 14.
"Defiinition of 'Immatury' as Applied to Grapefruit and
Florida Oranges.

"The Bureau of Chemistry has received repeated re-
quests to define the terms 'immatury' and 'matury' as
applied to interstate shipments of grapefruit and Florida
oranges. Such a definition seems desirable in view of the
uncertainty now existing regarding the meaning of those
terms.
"With the information now available 'the Bureau of
Chemistry considers grapefruit to be immature if the juice
does not contain soluble solids equal to, or in excess of,
7 parts to each -part of acid contained in the juice, the acid-
ity of the juice'to be calculated as citric acid without water
of 'crystallization;. The Bireau also considers Florida
oranges to be immature if the juice does not coritain soluble
solids p'qual to, or in excess of; 8 parts to. each part of acid
contained in the juice,'t:h acidity to be calculated as citric
acid without water of crystallization.'










"Owing to the fact that the investigations of the Bureau
have not been completed, the ratios set for grapefruit and
for Florida oranges are lower than those which are believed
to be the lowest for properly matured fruit. It may there-
fore be expected that the requirements will be made more
strict after data from several crops are available."



It will be noted that U. S. F. I. D. 133 prohibits only
the shipment of artificially colored (by sweating) citrus
fruits in the following language:

"It is the opinion of the Board that oranges
treated as mentioned above (artificially colored
by holding in a warm, moist atmosphere for a
short period of time after removal from the tree)
are colored in a manner whereby inferiority is
concealed and are therefore adulterated." Also
that

"The Board recognizes the fact that certain
varieties of oranges attain maturity as to size,
sweetness and acidity before the color changes
from green to yellow, and this decision is not
intended to interfere with the marketing of such
oranges."'

It will also be noted that the "Florida Immature Citrus
Fruit Law of 1911" prohibits only the shipment, or sale
or delivery for shipment, of immature citrus fruit and
specifically provides that

"This section shall not apply to sales or contracts for
sale of citrus fruit on the trees under this section."

While U. S. Service and Regulatory announcement by
the Bureau of Chemistry of September 23, 1915, adopted
the Florida Standards (as adopted by numerous food offi-
cials and health officers of various States and cities) it has
not the effect of law as has F. I. D. 133, which was adopted
before the study was complete by the National, Florida and
California Chemical Departments, which have recognized
that color is by no means satisfactory evidence of maturity,











and that immature citrus fruit, be it colored naturally or
artificially, is unwholesome and that "there is evidence to
show that the consumption of such immature oranges,
especially by children, is apt to be attended by serious
disturbances of the digestive system."

The Legislature of Florida in 1913 amended the Florida
Pure Food and Drugs Law adopting the definitions and
standards of foods, rules and regulations of the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture, made by authority of the National
Food and Drugs Law. Section 15 of Chapter 6541, Acts
of 1913, reads as follows:

Sec. 15. That the definitions and standards of foods
and drugs prescribed by the Act of Congress, approved
June 30, 1906; entitled "An Act for preventing the man-
ufacture, sale or transportation of adulterated or mis-
branded or poisonous or deleterious foods, drugs, medi-
cines or liquors, and for regulating traffic therein, and
for other purposes," and amendments thereto, be, and
the same are hereby adopted and declared to be the defi-
* nations and standards of foods under the terms and mean-
ing of this Act, and that no article of food shall be deemed
to be adulterated under the terms of this Act other than
those defined and found to be adulterated, poisonous,
deleterious or detriment to health under the provisions of
the Food and Drugs Act of Congress, approved June 30,
1906, and amendments thereto. That the Commissioner
of Agriculture, with the advice of the State Chemist, shall
establish such rules an regulations as shall not be incon-
sistent with the provisions of this Act; in conformity with
the rules and regulations formulated by the United States
Department of Agriculture, by authority of the National
Food and Drugs Act of June thirtieth, nineteen and six,
and amendments thereto.

On September 28, 1915, the then Attorney-General of
Florida, the Hon. T. F. West, now a Justice of the Florida
Supreme Court, after quoting the various acts of the
Florida Legislature on this subject, particularly the above
Section 15 of the Acts of 1913, rendered an opinion, as
follows:
Section 2 of Chapter 6515, Acts of 1913, also referred to
by you, is in the following language:











"That the execution and the enforcement of this law
and the Immature Citrus Fruit Law, Chapter 6236, Laws
of Florida, shall be under the general provisions, rules
and regulations, of the Pure Food and Drug Law, Chap-
ter 6122, Laws of Florida, and amendments thereto."
IN VIEW OF THESE STATUTES, AND WITHOUT UNDERTAKING
TO COMPARE AND ANALYZE THE VARIOUS STATUTES ON THIS
SUBJECT, I BEG TO ADVISE, THAT, IN MY OPINION, THE STAND-
ARD FOR IMMAIURE CITRUS FRUITS .PROMULGATED BY THE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, SEPTEMBER
23, 1915, MAY BE ADOPTED AS THE STANDARD OF CITRUS
FRUITS WHICH GO INTO INTERSTATE SHIPMENTS FROM THIS
STATE.
Respectfully submitted,
(SIGNED,) T. F. WEST,
Attorney General.

The above opinion was concurred in by Attorney General
Van C. Swearingen, August 12, 1918, as follows;

STATE OF FLORIDA
OFFICE OF THE
ATTORNEY GENERAL

VAN C. SWEARINGEN,
Attorney General. Tallahassee, August 12, 1918.

Hon. W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture, Capitol.

Dear Sir:
I am in receipt of your communication of the 8th instant-
enclosing letter from State Chemist, Hon. R. E. Rose, to
you under date'of August 6th with reference to the matter
of the enforcement of the immature citrus fruit law of this
State.
Replying to your communication, I beg to advise that
I concur in the communication from this office to you and
Hon. R. E. Rose, State Chemist, under date of September
28, 1915, upon the subject of your inquiry. This commu-
nication is found on page 5 of pamphlet "Immature
Citrus Fruits," etc.
By Section 15, of Chapter 6541, Laws of Florida, Acts
of 1913, the standard for immature citrus fruits promul-












gated by the United States Department of Agriculture
was adopted as the standards for such fruit in this State.
Yours very truly,
(SIGNED,) VAN C. SWEARINGEN,
Attorney General.

On receipt of U. S. F. I. D. No. 182, under authority of
Section 15, Chapter 6541, Acts of 1913, and Section 2,
Chapter 6515, Acts of 1913, the "Commissioner of Agri-
culture with the advice of the State Chemist" issued the
following:
Tallahassee, Fla., October 3, 1921.
NOTICE,
TO ALL FLORIDA GROWERS AND SHIPPERS OF
CITRUS FRUIT, AND ALL FLORIDA CITRUS
FRUIT INSPECTORS:
The Hon. Henry C. Wallace, U. S. Secretary of Agri-
culture, having approved and promulgated the following:
F. I. D. 182.
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY.
WASHINGTON, D. C.


FOOD INSPECTION DECISION 182.


CITRUS FRUITS.
The following definitions and standards for grapefruit
and oranges were adopted by the. Joint Committee on
Definitions and Standards, March 23, 1921, and were ap-
proved by the Association of American Dairy, Food, and
Drug Officials, October 7, 1920, and by the Association
of Official Agricultural Chemists, August 19, 1921.
Grapefruit, pomelo, is the sound, mature fruit of Citrus grandis
Osbeck. The juice of the mature fruit contains not less than
seven (7) parts of soluble solids to each part of acid calculated
as citric acid without water of crystallization.
Orange (common, sweet, or round) is the sound, mature fruit
of Citrus sinensis Osbeck. The juice of the mature fruit con-
tains not less than eight (8) parts of soluble solids to each part
of acid calculated as citric acid without water of crystallization.
The foregoing definitions and standards are adopted as











a guide for the officials of this department in .enforcing
the Food and Drugs Act.
HENRY C. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
Washington, D. C., September 20, 1921. I
fixing the minimum chemical standard for all mature
oranges and grapefruit shipped in interstate commerce,
inspectors will continue to test citrus fruit according to
both the U. S .Standard for interstate shipment, and also
the Florida Standard for intra-state shipment. Note your
finding of both the Florida, intrastate, and the U. S.,
interstate, standards on the official blanks, of official
samples of fruit being "sold, offered for sale, shipment,
or delivered for shipment," in interstate or intrastate
commerce, at packing houses or other places in your ter-
ritory. Make four copies of your report of "official
tests" of mature, or immature citrus fruit, sending the
original to this office; the first carbon to the "Chief of
the U. S. Food Laboratory, Customhouse, Savannah,
Georgia," delivering the second carbon to the owner, his
agent, or the manager of the packing house, and retain-
ing the third for your own files.
In case of dispute, or appeal from the result of the in-
spector's test, the inspector shall select two representa-
tive samples, each of twelve representative specimens of
the fruit under consideration, in the presence of two dis-
interested witnesses. Send, at the expense of the shipper
or owner, by express, one of the samples to the Chief of
the U. S. Food Laboratory, Savannah, Georgia; the other
sample to the State Chemist at Tallahassee, properly
identified by copy of the inspector's official report, in-
closed in the package, properly sealed.
You will continue to make "special tests" (page 21,
Rules and Regulations) of fruit delivered to you by the
owner or his agent "for information only," sending the
original as usual to this- office, giving a copy to the owner
or his agent, and retaining the third for your files.
The U. S. Standards having eliminated the "color
test," any mature citrus fruit that passes the U. S. "acid
to total solids" test can be shipped in interstate com-
merce. This releases all early, mature, green-colored
citrus fruit which passes the U. S. standard of maturity
for interstate shipment; Parson Brown's and other early
maturing fruit still having a green color; provided it











passes the U. S. "ratio of acid to total solids"; and pro-
hibits the interstate shipment of "half-colored" or fully
colored citrus fruit which fails to pass the U. S. standard
for interstate shipment.
You will promptly report by wire to the Chief of the
U. S. Food Laboratory, Savannah, Georgia, the interstate
or intrastate shipment of any immature citrus fruit, from
any part of your territory, stating the number of boxes,
the kind of fruit, grapefruit or oranges, the place of
shipment, the address of the shipper, the name and ad-
dress of the consignee, the destination of the car, the
initials and number of the car; making three .copies of
your wire, sending the original by wire to the Chief of
the Savannah Station, the. first carbon to this office by
mail, and keeping the second carbon for your files. See
attached form for wires to the Chief of the Savannah
Station of the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry.
You can obtain from the railroad agent all the neces-
sary information from the waybill; note conditions of
waybill, if car is consigned "released, vents open and
plugs in," or otherwise. It is the duty of all railroad
agents to furnish any officer of the law such information
under penalty for not doing so, under the "interstate com-
merce law," which reads as follows:

U. S. ACTS OF 1910.

"Chapter 309-To amend An Act to regulate
commerce (The Interstate Comnmerce Law).
"Section 12. Provided, That nothing in this
Act shall be construed to prevent the giving of
such information in response to any legal process
issued under the authority of any state or Fed-
eral Court, or to any officer or agent of the Gov-
ernment of the United States, or of any State or
Territory, in the exercise of his powers, or to
any officer or other duly authorized person seek-
ing such information for the prosecution of per-
sons charged with or suspected of crime; * *
Any person violating, any of the pro-
visions of this section, shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor, and for each offense, on con-
viction, shall pay to the United States a penalty
of not more than one thousand dollars."'










30

You will advise growers and shippers that while the
Florida citrus inspection season ends November 5,, the
U. S. Food and Drugs Law, and the Florida Pure Food
and Drugs Law continue to operate; and that the Na-
tional and State laws preventing the shipment of adul-
terated or misbranded foods continue to act, and apply
to immature citrus fruit at all times.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

FORM OF WIRE TO BE USED IN CASE OF SHIP-
MENT OF IMMATURE FRUIT.

J. O. CLARKE, Chief,
U. S. Food Laboratory,
Customhouse,
Savannah, Georgia.


.............boxes of............................

shipped today from ........................., Florida,

by ..............................................

Consigned to ........................................

at .................................................

Car initials...................., Car No................

Conditions of waybill ......................... .......



Citrus Inspector.

Collect,

Government rates.










Immediately after the promulgation of the Notice to All
Florida Growers and Shippers of Citrus Fruits and all
Florida Citrus Fruit Inspectors by the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture, dated October 3, 1921, numerous
wires and letters were addressed to the State Chemist and
to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, asking for inter-
pretation of U. S. F. I. D. No. 182 of September 20, 1921,
fixing definitions and standards for grapefruit and oranges.
The following wire was received from W. G. Campbell, Act-
ing Chief of the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry:

"Washington, D. C., October 14, 1921.
"Captain R. E. Rose,
"State Chemist,
Tallahassee, Florida.
"Report of Savannah Station and inquiries received by
Department from Florida Citrus Exchange and independ-
ent producers and shippers within State indicate campaign
by you based upon assumption apparently that as result
of standard for citrus fruit promulgated Food Inspection
Decision eighteen two interstate shipment unsweated citrus
fruit not in compliance with such standards violative Fed-
eral Law. Solicitors' opinion to Bureau prior promulga-
tion these standards was to effect that Federal Act did not
prevent shipment immature fruit if not artificially colored
and if not improperly represented with respect to its char-
acter. Opinion from him this date reaffirms former posi-
tion and states that promulgation standards citrus fruit
does not effect situation in so far as departments ability
under law to interfere with interstate consignments of im-
mature fruit. In such circumstances no action can be taken
by us on interstate shipments reported to Savannah by
you. Department is wiring or writing all concerns making
inquiry that unless immature citrus fruit has been arti-
ficially colored or misrepresented with respect to its char-
acter, no interference will be made.
"W. G. CAMPBELL,
"Acting Chief U. S. Bureau of Chemistry."

In due course of mail, the following copy of letter ad-
dressed to Hon. Duncan U. Fletcher, U. S. Senator, from
Hon. Henry C. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, was re-
ceived:











"Department of Agriculture,
"Washington, October 17, 1921.
"Hon. Duncan U. Fletcher,
"United States Senate,
"Washington, D. C.
"Dear Senator Fletcher:
"I have your letter of October 15, with enclosure of
copies of correspondence emanating from Chase and Com-
pany of Jacksonville, Florida, in reference to the recently
announced standards for citrus fruit.
"In accordance with your request, the Bureau of Chem-
istry has already advised your office telephonically of the
Department's interpretation of the Food and Drugs Act
as applied to interstate shipments of citrus fruit. Con-
firming the statements made by the Bureau of Chemistry,
I would say that the Act does not prevent the shipment of
citrus fruit which do not pass the so-called acid test pre-
scribed by Food Inspection Decision No. 182, provided such
fruit are not artificially colored by sweating or otherwise
to conceal immaturity, but are edible and are in no wise
misrepresented.
"Very truly yours,
"(Signed) HENRY WALLACE,
"'Secretary."
Considering the foregoing record, and the decisions of
the Florida Supreme Court in the case of Sligh vs. Kirk-
wood, Sheriff, February 7, 1913, 65th Florida 123, as con-
firmed by the United States Supreme Court, April 5, 1915,
U. S. Reports 237, page 52, as quoted in Chapter VI, Sec-
tion 2049, Revised General Statutes of Florida, 1920; and
the opinions of the Attorney-General of Florida, I must
respectfully decline to accept as final the opinion of the
Solicitor of the Bureau of Chemistry as to the authority of
the U. S. Department oC Agriculture as to its powers under
the Food and Drugs Act of June 30, 1906, and amendments
thereto, to enforce the definitions and standards author-
ized thereby; and prevent the shipment in interstate com-
merce of foods not in accordance with such standards;
when approved by the Association of American Dairy Food
and Drug Officials, the Association of Official Agricultural'
Chemists, the National Joint Committee on Definitions and
Standards of Foods and Drugs, and the Secretary of Agri-
culture of the United States.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.









1 33


SOME RESULTS OF CITRUS FRUIT INSPECTION.

BY A. M. HENRY, B. S.

Along with the inspection of citrus fruit under the regu-
latory provisions of the food laws during the past ten years
some investigations into the ripening of oranges and grape-
fruit have been made. Some 2500 samples of oranges and
grapefruit have been examined to determine the ratio of
solids to acid and further investigations have been made
on 500 of these samples. Consequently considerable data
has been collected in regard to the maturing of citrus fruit.
These investigations have shown that the chief causes of
variations in the maturing and coloring of grapefruit and
oranges are location, climate, variety, and culture.
The variations from location are caused by differences in
the composition, drainage, and topography of the soil in
different places. The composition of the soil seems to have
different effects on the maturing and coloring of fruit.
Some soils seem to hasten the maturing and retard the
coloring of fruit; while other soils have the opposite effect.
These variations resulting from location and soil seem to
affect grapefruit more than oranges as there are certain
sections that lead in the production of early grapefruit
year after year. Location also affects the climate as the
amount and time of rain and heat are different in the vari-
ous sections of the state.
Variations from year to year in the maturing and color-
ing of citrus fruit from climatic causes are principally af-
fected by differences in the time and amount of rain, heat,
and cold. This effect of the seasons, the earliness or late-
ness of the maturing and coloring of citrus fruit is the
most pronounced and noticeable of all the variations, par-
ticularly with oranges. The orange crop in the fall of.
1921 has been the earliest crop since the inspection of citrus
fruit has been carried on, although even then there were
some sections later than usual.
These investigations have not been extensive enough with
the different varieties and strains of oranges and grape-
,fruit to draw any conclusions as to their effects on the ma-
turing and coloring of oranges and grapefruit.
Cultural conditions, differences in cultivating, fertilizing,
pruning, and spraying of the grove, appear to have more
influence on the quality of the.fruit and the time of color-


2-Bul.











ing than other conditions. Fruit that is grown in groves
given good cultivation, proper fertilization, efficient prun-
ing and spraying will produce fruit that is mature and
edible -earlier in the season than fruit from neglected
groves, although the fruit from the well cared for grove
will not color as early as the fruit from the neglected grove.
These observations have been so universal in the State that
the fact that thrifty groves produce early maturing and
late coloring fruit should-be emphasized. If one wishes to
produce early colored fruit with fine, large seeds and a poor
quality of flesh, sour and bitter; observation has shown that
the best way to do so is not to take any care of the trees,
neglect them, and allow insects and diesases to injure them.
In conclusion observation and experience during ten
years of citrus fruit inspection have shown that the color-
ing and maturing of citrus fruit are affected differently by
such factors as location, climate, variety, and culture. The
factors that are most likely to cause thrifty, healthy groves
and early maturing fruit are also.the factors that will tend
to keep the fruit green in color. The factors that tend to
stunt the trees and retard the development of the fruit are
the factors that cause early coloring of the fruit. For lack
of time and money the Chemical Department of the State
has not been able to devote the attention to this very vital
subject which it deserves. The work we have accomplished
in conjunction with the regulatory work in the enforce-
ment of the law has shown the necessity for further and
more intensive work.
RELATION OF COLOR TO MATURITY DURING
SEASON OF 1918.
"During the inspection season, Sept. 1, to Nov. 5.
68 samples of grapefruit, less than half colored showed
20 samples, or 29%, mature;
48 samples, or 71%, immature;
238 samples of grapefruit, one-half colored or more,showed
126 samples, or 53% mature;
112 samples, or 47%, immature;
65 samples or oranges, less than half colored, showed
49 samples, or 75%, mature;
16 samples, or 25%, immature;
72 samples of oranges, one-half colored or more, showed
52 samples, or 74%, mature;
19 samples, or26%, immature.










These samples were taken from the various packing
houses where the fruit was being shipped or being pre-
pared for shipment.
"The record further shows that of nine samples of fully
colored grapefruit, only three were mature, while the
other six-two-thirds of the fully colored grapefruit-
were immature; that grapefruit showing even less than
one-quarter color were fully mature; and that mature
and immature oranges both showed color from a trace to
three-quarters color.
This study emphasizes the fact that coolr bears no re-
lation to maturity.

SELF-RISING FLOUR.

BY A. M. HENRY, B. S.

During the past year an investigation of prepared flour
with the leavening ingredients and salt added, commonly
called self-rising flour, as compared with plain flour pre-
pared with ordinary baking powder, has been made. Self-
rising flour as sold, in Florida is usually prepared with salt,
soda, and phosphate. There is little, if any, self-rising flour
prepared with cream of tartar or alum baking powders.
The analysis of self-rising and plain flours has shown
that the quality of the self-rising and plain flours of the
same grade and similar price is about the same. Analysis
of bread made from self-rising flour and plain flour with
a phosphate baking powder and salt added shows the same
amount of ash in both breads and of similar composition.
It has been reported that acid phosphate, as prepared and
used for fertilizer, was being used as the acid ingredient of
the leavening agents in self-rising flour. This would be
shown by a higher conetnt of sulphates in the ash, but
analysis has failed to show any higher content of sulphates
in self-rising flour than in plain flour prepared with a
phosphate baking powder.
Reports from wholesalers, jobbers, and retailers, show
that at least 90 per cent, probably 95 per cent, of the flour
sold to the domestic trade in Florida is self-rising flour.
Probably most of the plain flour sold is used for making
cakes and other fancy foods as practically all of this is
sold in towns large enough to be supplied with bakers'
bread and is the highest grade of flour sold. These reports








36

show that coincident with the iiicrease in the sale of self-
rising flour has been the decrease in the sale of baking
powder, particularly the cheap and low grade baking
powders. Likewise, the sale of cooking soda has decreased,
but not to the same extent as baking powder as it has
various other uses around the home than as a leavening
agent. The majority of self-rising flour sold in Florida is
low grade, but this is not different from conditions before
the introduction of self-rising flour as the majority of flour
sold in Florida then, as now, was low grade.
Laboratory experiments and the reports of merchants
both show that the loss from deteriation is less with self-
rising flour than with baking powder. This is probably
due to two reasons. First, flour is not kept on hand as
long before final consumption as baking powder, either by
the dealer or consumer. Second, the leavening ingredients
in self-rising flour are diluted much more than in baking
powder, and consequently do not react as readily from at-
mospheric moisture.
Experience in traveling through the rural sections and
eating at turpentine camps, sawmills, farms, and -small
town boarding houses, has shown that with the use of self-
rising flour the old soggy' baking powder biscuit and the
yellow soda biscuit, have largely disappeared, and that it
is possible to get good biscuit almost anywhere at the pres-
ent time.
Self-rising flour as well as plain flour and other foods
is not all good, and needs regulation. Self-rising flour is
just as liable to be short weight, mouldy, or full of weevils
as plain flour. However, laboratory experiments, reports
from merchants, and observation of the sale and use of self-
rising flour in the making of biscuit, which is the chief use
of flour in the home in Florida, has shown that self-rising
flour is a wholesome product which has filled a need with
a great many people of Florida, and when properly made
and handled deserves the same consideration as any other
wholesome food product.











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FERTILIZER
FOR 1922.

For the season 1922 the -following State values are fixed
as a guide to purchasers, quotations January 1st.
Values of the ingredients of fertilizers per pound are as
follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid............... 6c per pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... le per pound
Ammonia ....... ........... .. .....23c per pound
Potash ................................ 8c per pound

If calculated by units (a unit being 20 pounds, or 1%
of a ton) the State values for fertilizers are as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid .............. $1.20 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................ $0.20 per unit
Ammonia ............................ $4.60 per unit
Potash ................................. $1.60 per unit

An allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing and bagging
is usually charged.
To find the commercial State value, multiply, the per-
centages of valuable ingredients by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE No. 1.

Available Phosphoric Acid............8.05x1.20-$ 9.66
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid........... 2.00x0.20- 0.40
Ammonia ...........................5.35x4.60- 24.61
Potash ............................. 5.80x1.60- 9.28
Mixing and bagging ................... 3.50

State value per ton..........'........ -$47.45

EXAMPLE lO. 2.

Available Phosphoric Acid............ 8.00x1.20-$ 9.60
Ammonia .......................... 3.00x4.60- 13.80.
Potash ............................. 3.00x.60- 4.80
Mixing and bagging................... --- 3.50

State value per ton..................... ---$31.70








38

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JAN. 1, 1922.

COMPOSInION.

MATERIAL.



Dissolved bone back........ 16 .... .... .... $ 30.00

High grade acid phosphate. 16 ..... .... 16.00

Hardwood ashes .......... ...... 2 .... 30.00

Hardwood ashes .......... ........ 3 .... 32.00

Nebraska potash .......... .... .... 25 .... 40.00

Muriate of potash .... . ...... 50 .... 54.00

Sulphate of potash ...... ... .... 50 . . 70.00

K ainit .......................... 15 1 .... 19.00

Kainit .............. ..... .... 14 .... 17.00

K ainit ....................... .. 12 .... 15.00

Nitrate of potash.............. .... 15 18 80.00

Shrimp scrap ............. 4 2 1 7 52.00

Cotton seed meal ... 2.5 .... 1.5 7 50.00

Sheep manure ............ 1 .... 4 2 33.00

Goat manure ............. 1 .... 2.5 1.5 25.00

Ground tobacco stems...... .... .... 8 3 34.00

Ground tobacco stems.............. 6 .2 30.00









39

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS' AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JAN. 1, 1922-(Continued).

CoMPOSI ION.

MATERIAL. | '



Cut tobacco stems......... .... .... 7 1.5 25.00

Baled tobacco stems........ .... .... 7 2 39.00

Tobacco dust ..................... 2 2 24.00

Steamed bone meal........ 8 14 .... 3 45.00

Raw bone meal............ 5 16 .... 4.5 50.00

Low grade tankage........ 4 8 .... 6.5 45.00

Medium grade tankage..... 4 4 .... 8 50.00

High grade tankage....... 3 3 .... 10 55.00

Dried blood ............... .... .... ... 16 80.00

Nitrate of soda........... ......... .... 18 55.00

Sulphate of ammonia....... .... .... .... 25 65.00

Castor meal .............. .... .... .... 6 44.00

Castor meal .............. .... .... .... 7 45.00

Fish scrap ................... ..... .... 9 62.00

Fish scrap ............... 3 ........ 13 79.00
Terms: 30 days net, or 5% discount for cash in 10 days.
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.











NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT JAN-
UARY 1, 1922, FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES.

Ammonia sulphate, bulk, f. o. b. works
................... per 100 lbs. 2.30 @ -
double bags, f. a. s., New York..per lbs. 2.60 @ -
Blood, dried, 15@17 per cent ammonia,
f. o. b. New York..............unit. 3.50 @ 3.75
Cottonseed meal, 7 per cent. ammonia,
f. o. b. mills ..................ton. 33.00 @ -
Fish scrap, dried, 11 per cent. ammonia
and 15 per cent. bone phosphate, f.
o. b. factories.................. unit 3.25 & 10
ground, 11@12 per cent. ammonia, 15
per cent. bone phosphate, f. o. b.
Baltimore .................... unit. 3.75 & 10
'wet, acidulated, 6 per cent. ammonia, 3
per cent. phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish
factories ....................unit. 2.50 & 50
Hoof meal, f. o. b. Chicago........ unit. 2.00 (@ -
Lime, nitrate ................ per ton. 40.00 @ 50.00
Soda, nitrate, spot............. 100 lbs.. 2.35 (() -
futures ....................100 lbs. 2.37, @ 2.40
Tankage, ground or screened, 10 and 15
per cent., New York..........unit. 3.00 & 10
11 and 15 per cent., Chicago..unit. 3.00 & 10
9 and 20 per cent., Chicago.... unit. 3.00 & 10
concentrated, 14 to 15 per cent., Chica-
go ......................... unit. 2.75 t -
blood, 16 to 17 per cent., Chicago.unit. 3.50 @
garbage, Chicago ...............ton. 4.00 (!@ 4.25
unground, New York...........unit. 2.75 & 10











PHOSPHATES .

Acid, phosphate, basis 16%, bulk.......
.........................per ton. 10:00 @ 10.50
Southern ports ................... 9.50 @ 10.00
'Bones, rough, hard, f. o. b. Chicago..... 25.00 @ 27.00
soft steamed, unground, f. o. b. Chicago 13.00 @ 15.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. ammonia and
60 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. Chi-
cago ............................ 21.00 @ -
do., 3&50 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago........ 23.50 @
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50
p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. Chicago 31.00 @
bone meal, f. o. b. New York......... 32.00 @ -
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. mines............... 3.25 @
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75
p. c., f. o. b. mines............... 7.50 @ -
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 77
p. c., f. o. b. mines .............. 9.25 @ -
Florida high-grade phosphate hard rock,
77 per cent., f. o. b. mines.per ton. 10.50 @
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c.'....
.... ................... .per ton. Nominal
75 p. c. .......................... 7.00 @ -
70 p. c. ground...................... 7.50 @ -
unground ........................ 6.00 @ -

POTASHES.

First sorts .................. ....per lb. 10 @ 11
Kainit, actual weight............ per unit. 60 @ -
Southern ports ............. ....... 50 @
Manure salts ................per unit. 55 @ -
Southern ports ................... 45 @ 50
Muriate, 80@85 per cent., K. C. L., bags
............. ........... per unit. 70 @ 75
95@98 per cent., basis 80 per cent,,
bags .................... per unit. 85 @ -
Nebraska fertilizer, in paper-lined cars,
f. o. b. works........... .per unit. Nominal
Sulphate, 90@95 per cent., basis 90 per
cent, bags :................per ton. 47.50 @









42

FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.
To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitgrogen, multiply by....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply b .............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.45t
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K,0) by.. 2.33
For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva-
lent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.99 per cent, the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.
Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the re-
spective laws, including rules and regulations and stand-
ards, by appalling to the Commissioner of Agriculture,
or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly Bulletin
of the State Department of Agriculture should also be
made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or State Chem-
ist. The bulletins of the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station can be had by application to the Director,
at Gainesville.
The form of letter for transmitting special samples of
fertilizers or feeding stuffs as. shown in the rules and reg-
ulations is adopted and must be explicitly complied with
in order to obtain a legal certificate of analysis.










43

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEEDING
STUFFS FOR 1922.

For the season 1922 the following State values are fixed
as a guide to purchasers, quotations January 1st.
These prices are based on the current prices of cereals,
which have been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of cereals to a large extent gov-
erning the price of other feed, pork, beef, etc.

Values of the ingredients of feeding stuffs per pound
are as follows:

Protein ........................... 4.50c per pound
Fat ........ :....................... 4.50e per pound
Starch and Sugar.................... 1.75e per pound

If calculated by units (a unit being 20 pounds, or 1% of
a ton), the State values for feeding stuffs are as follows:

Protein .............................. $0.90 per unit
Fat ................................... 0.90 per unit
Starch and Sugar....................... 0.35 per unit

To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages of valuable ingredients by the price per unit.

EXAMPLE No. 1.

Oats:
Protein .......................... 12.40x0.90-$11.16
Fat ............................... 4.40x0.90- 3.96
Starch and Sugar ................. 59.60x0.35- 20.86

State value per ton................ $35.98

EXAMPLE No. 2.

Corn:
Protein ........................... 10.50x0.90-$ 9.45
Fat .............................. 5.00x0.90- 4.50
Starch and Sugar.................. 70.00x0.35- 24.50


State value per ton.................


$38.45











MARKET PRICES OF FEEDING STUFFS :AT
FLORIDA SEAPORTS, JANUARY 1, 1922.

Western No. 2 Corn, 100 lbs. (new sacks).......... $ 1.40
White Oats, per sack, 100 lbs. (new sacks)........ 1.75
Fancy No. 1 Oats (new bags, heavy weight)....... 1.85
Strictly No. 1 Timothy Hay, per ton............. 31.00
No. 1 Green Alfalfa Hay, per ton....... ......... 35.00
Best Kentucky Shorts, 100 lbs. (white sacks)...... 1.95
Kentucky Wheat Bran, 100 lbs. (cotton sacks) .... 1.90
Wheat Shorts, 100 lbs........................... 1.75
Pure Wheat Bran, per sack..................... 1.65
No. 1 Alfalfa Meal, 100 lbs ...................... 1.65
C. S. Hulls, per ton (strictly old style)........... 17.00
C. S. Meal, 7% bright, per ton .................. 42.00
C. S. Meal, 8% bright, per ton.................. 44.00
0. P. Linseed Meal, 100 lbs. per sack.............. 2.90
Peanut Meal, 30%, 100 lbs. per sack............... 1.70
Corn Feed Meal (hominy hearts) 100 lbs. per sack.. 1.70
Corn Gluten Feed, per sack..................... 2.45
BPeet Pulp (bright grey stock), 100 lbs. per sack.. 1.85
Dried Brewers Grains, 100 lbs ................... 2.00
Good Poultry Wheat ........................... 2.40
Broken Rice for Chicken Feed .................... 2.25
Cracked Corn, 100 lbs. per sack.................. 1.75.
Ground Oats, 100 lbs. per sack.................... 2.00
Meat Scraps (55% protein) 100 lbs per sack ...... 4.75
Meat Scraps (45% protein) 100 lbs. per sack...... 4.25
Digester Tankage (50% protein), 100 lbs. per sack. 4.25









45

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS.


NAME.-.. da 4b a 0'



Blood Meal ............. 82.3 0.9 3.8 ..... 3.3

Digester Tankage ........ 50.0 14.0 4.5 3.0 20.0

Meat and Bone Meal..... 40.0 11.0 4.0 2.0 37.0

Barley (grain) .......... 11.5 2.1 69.8 4.6 2.7

Barley Feed ............ 12.7 3.4 61.7 7.8 4.2

Brewers 'Dried Grains... 26.5 6.9 41.0 14.6 3.5
Distillers' Dried Corn
Grains .............. 37.0 12.2 36.3 11.6 2.6
Distillers' Dried Rye
Grains ............... 23.1 7.8 47.1 10.9 3.9

Buckwheat (grain) ..:... 10.8 2.5 62.2 10.3 2.1

Buckwheat Middlings.... 28.3 7.4 42.7 4.8 4.8

Corn (grain) ........... 10.5 5.0 70.0 2.0 1.5

Corn Gluten Feed........ 25.4 3.8 52.9 7.1 2.1

Hominy Feed ........... 10.6 8.0 64.3 4.4 2.6

Cotton Seed Meal........ 41.1 9.0 26.0 9.0 6.3

Cotton Seed Meal........ 38.6 8.4 27.5 10.5 6.5

Cotton Seed Meal........ 36.0 8.0 29.0 12.5 6.2

Cotton Seed Feed........ 24.01 6.3 35.0 22.0 5.0










46

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS.
(Continued)



NAME^

4 & 0 rk- 8-d

0. P. Linseed Meal....... 33.9 7.5 35.7 8.4 5.4

N. P. Linseed Meal....... 36.9 2.9 36.3 8.7 5.6

Oats (grain) ............ 12.4 4.4 59.6 10.9 3.5

Oat Groats ............. 14.3 8.1 67.1 1.4 2.2

Oat Hulls .............. 4.0 1.7 52.3 29.2 6.0

Oat Middlings .......... 16.3 6.8 61.8 4.6 3.2

Peanuts with Hulls...... 20.4 36.2 16.4 16.4 4.1
Peanut Kernel without
Hulls ................ 26.8 .44.9 17.5 2.6 2.2

Peanut Oil Meal......... 47.6 8.0 27.3 5.1 4.9

Peanut Feed ............ 28.4 11.1 27.0 23.4 4.5

Rice, Rough .......... 7.6 1.9 '66.7 9.3 4.9

Rice Bran .............. 12.1 11.4 44.3 12.4 9.7

Rice Hulls .............. 3.3 1.1 34.0 35.4 16.9

Rice Polish ............. 11.9 9.1 62.3 1.9 4.8

Rye (grain) ............ 11.8 1.8 73.2 1.8 2.0

Rye Middlings .......... 15.7 3.4 61.2 4.6 3.7

Velvet Bean Seed........ 21.0 6.0 52.0 7.5 3.0









47

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS.
(Continued)



NAME
V0 w



Velvet Beans (seed and
- pod) ................. 18.0 4.5 50.0 15.0 4.0

Wheat (grain) .......... 12.4 2.1 71.2 2.2 1.9

Wheat Bran ............ 15.0 4.4 54.0 9.5 6.3

Standard Middlings...... 17.4 4.9 56.8 6.0 4.4

Red Dog Flour ......... 16.8 4.1 63.3 2.2 2.5

Wheat Miexd Feed....... 16.8 4.6 55.7 7.6 5.2

Wheat Screenings ....... 13.3 4.1 61.1 7.4 3.9

Dried Beet Pulp......... 8.9 0.9 59.6 18.9 3.5a

Cocoanut Oil Meal....... 20.5 12.5 43.0 9.5 5.3

Fish Meal .............. 50.0 7.0 ..... ..... 30.0

Corn and Cob Meal....... 7.5 3.1 70.8 5.8 1.2

Ground Corn Shucks..... 2.8 0.6 54.6 30.2 1.9

Ground Corn Cobs....... 3.0 0.7 56.6 30.0 1.6

Corn Meal .............. 9.7 3.8 68.7 1.9 1.4

Cotton Seed ............ 18.4 19.9 24.7 23.2 3.5

Cotton Seed Hulls. ..... 4.0 2.0 36.6 44.4 2.6

Velvet Bean Hulls....... 7.5 1.6 44.6 27.0 4.3









48

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS.
('Continued)



NAME "



Cow Peas ............... 20.81 1.4 55.7 4.1 3.2

Soy Bean Meal.......... 48.4 6.4 27.5 4.5 4.4

Dry Jap Sugar Cane..... 2.3 1.5 62.6 26.2 2.8

Peanut Vine Hay........ 9.9 6.3 38.4 29.6 6.6

Cow Pea Hay........... 13.0 4.2 45.9 20.5 7.5

Velvet Bean Hay........ 14.7 1.7 41.0 29.7 5.7

Kudzu Vine Hay......... 15.91 1.6 33.0 32.3 6.8

Beggar Weed Hay....... 21.6 4.1 35.1 24.3 4.0

Alfalfa Hay. ............ 14.9 2.3 37.3 28.3 8.6

Alfalfa Meal ............ 14.3 2.0 35.8 30.1 9.0

Timothy Hay ........... 6.2 2.5 45.0 29.9 4.9

Rhodes Grass Hay....... 7.7 1.3 36.8 41.1 6.6

Para Grass Hay......... 8.0 1.6 45.7 31.2 6.2

Napier Grass Hay........ 11.3 2.2 41.1 26.2 9.9

Natal Grass Hay......... 7.41 1.8 39.2 36.7 5.0

Maiden Cane Hay........ 11.6 2.6 42.4 28.6 4.2

Crab Grass Hay.........l 8.01 2.4 42.9 28.7 8.5









DEFINITIONS OF FEEDING STUFFS

ADOPTED BY THE ASSOCIATION OF FEED CON-
TROL OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND
APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRI-
CULTURE OF FLORIDA UNDER THE PROVI-
SIONS OF THE FEEDING STUFFS LAWS.

Meal is the clean, sound, ground product of the entire
grain, cereal or seed which it purports to represent.
Chop is a ground-or chopped feed composed of one or
more different cereals or by-products. If it bears a name
descriptive of the kind of cereals, it must be exclusively of
the entire grains of those cereals.
Ear Corn Chops is corn and cob, chopped, without the
husk, with not a greater proportion of cob than occurs in
the ear corn in its natural state.
SHead Chops consists of the entire' head of the grain
sorghums, chopped, and should bear the name of the
sorghum from which it is made. This includes, among
others, kafir head chops, milo head chops, feterita head
chops, and sorghum head chops.
Head Stems consists of the head of the grain sorghums,
from which the grain has been removed, and should bear
the name of the sorghum from which it is made.
Chopped Alfalfa is the entire alfalfa hay, chopped and
not ground finely enough to become a meal. It must not
contain an admixture of alfalfa straw or other foreign ma-
terial.
Alfalfd meal is the entire alfalfa hay ground and does
not contain an admixture of ground alfalfa straw or other
foreign materials.

ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

Blood meal is ground dried blood.
Cracklings are the residue after partially extracting the
fats and oils from the animal tissues. If they bear a name
descriptive of their kind, composition or origin, they must
correspond thereto.










Digester Tankage is the residue from animal tissues, ex-
clusive of hoof and horn, specially prepared for feeding
purposes by tanking under live steam, drying under high
heat, and suitable grinding, and contains less than 10 per
cent. phosphoric acid (P205).
Digester Meat and Bone Tankage is the residue from
animal tissues, exclusive of hoof and horn, specially pre-
pared for feeding purposes by tanking under live steam,
drying under high heat, and suitable grinding, and con-
tains more than 10 per cent. phosphoric acid (P205).
Meat Scrap and Meat Meal are the ground residues from
animal tissues, exclusive of hoof and horn, and contains
less than 10 per cent. phosphoric acid (P205). If they
bear a name descriptive of their kind, composition or ori-
gin, they must correspond thereto.
Meat and Bone Scrap and Meat and Bone Meal are the
ground residues from animal tissues, exclusive of hoof and
horn, and contains more than 10 per cent. phosphoric acid
(P205). If they bear a name descriptive of their kind,
composition or origin, they must correspond thereto.

BARLEY PRODUCTS.

Barley Hulls are the outer coverings of the barley.
Barley Feed is the entire by-product resulting from the
manufacture of pearl barley from clean barley.
Barley Mixed Feed is the entire offal from the milling
of barley flour from clean barley and is composed of bar-
ley hulls and barley middlings.
Ground Barley is the entire product obtained by grind-
ing clean sound barley, containing not less than 90 per
cent. pure barley and not more than 10 per cent. of other
grains, weed seeds and other foreign material and not
more than 6 per cent. fiber. Provided that no portion of
this stated 10 per cent. of other grains, weed seeds or for-
eign material shall be deliberately added.
Mixed. Feed Barley is the entire product obtained by
grinding country run barley containing not less than 75
per cent. pure barley and not more than 25 per cent. of
other grains, weed seeds and other foreign material. Pro-
*










vided that no portion of this stated 25 per cent. of other
grains, weed seeds or foreign material shall be deliberately
added. The ingredients must be stated as barley, other
grains, weed seeds and other foreign material..

BREWERS' AND DISTILLERS' PRODUCqS.

Brewers' Dried Grains are the properly dried residue
from cereals obtained in the manufacture of beer.
Distillers' Dried Grains are the dried residue from ce-
reals obtained in the manufacture of alcohol and distilled
liquors. The product shall bear the designation indicat-
ing the cereal predominating.
Distillers' Corn Solubles, a by-product from the manu-
facture of alcohol from corn, is a mash liquor concentrated
after the removal of the alcohol and wet grains.
Distillers' Corn and Rye Solubles, a by-product from
the manufacture of alcohol from corn and rye, is a mash
liquor concentrated after the removal of tl alcohol and
wet grains.
Distillers' Rye Solubles, a by-product from the manu-
facture of alcohol from rye, is a mash liquor concentrated
after the removal of the alcohol and wet grains.
Malt Sprouts are the sprouts of the barley grain ob-
tained in the malting process. Sprouts derived from any
other malted cereal must be designated by the name of that
cereal.
BUCKWHEAT PRODUCTS.

Buckwheat Shorts or Buckwheat Middlings are that por-
tion of the buckwheat grain immediately inside of the hull
after separation from the flour.

CORN PRODUCTS.

Corn Bran is the outer coating of the corn kernel.
Corn Feed Meal is the by-product obtained in the manu-
facture of cracked corn, with or without aspiration' prod-
ucts added to the siftings. This name is also correctly ap-
plied to the by-product obtained in the manufacture of









52

table meal from, the whole grain by the non-degerninating
process.
Corn Germ Cake is the product obtained in 'the manmi
facture of starch, glucose and other corn products and 'on'
sists of the germ from which part of the corn oil has been
extracted.
Corn Germ Meal is ground corn germ cake .
Grits are the hard, flinty portions of Indian corn con-
taining no bran or germ.
Corn Gluten Meal is that part of commercial shelled
corn that remains after the separation of the larger part
of the starch, the germ and the bran, by the processes em-
ployed in the manufacture of cornstarch and glucose. It
may or may not contain corn solubles.
Corn Ghiten Feed is that portion of commercial shelled
corn that remains after the separation of the larger part
of the starch and the germs by the processes employed.in
the manufacture of cornstarch and glucose. It may or
may not contain corn solubles.
Maltose Process Corn Gluten Feed is the dried residue
from degermed corn, after removal of starch in the manu-
facture of malt syrup.
Hominy Feed, Hominy Meal or Hominy Chop is the
-kiln-dried mixture of the mill run bran coating, the mill
run germ, with or without a partial extraction of the oil
and a part of the starchy portion of the white corn kernel
obtained in the manufacture of hominy, hominy grits and
corn meal by the degerminating process.
Yellow Hominy Feed, Yellow Hominy Meal. or Yellow
Hominy Chop is a kiln-dried mixture of the mill-run bran
coating, the mill run germ, with or without. a partial ex-
traction of the oil and a part of the starchy portion of the
yellow corn kernel obtained in the manufacture of yellow
hominy grits and yellow corn meal by the degerminating
process.
OI CAKE.

Oil Cake is the cake obtained after extraction of part of
the oil by crushing cooking and hydraulic, .pressure from











seeds screened and cleaned of weed seeds and other for-
eign materials by the most improved commercial processes.
When used alone the term "oil cake" shall be understood
to designate the product obtained from partially extract-
ed, screened and cleaned flaxseed. When used to cover any
other product the name of the seed from which it is ob-
tained shall be prefixed to "oil cake."
Ground Oil Cake is the product obtained by grinding
oil cake. When used alone, the term "ground oil cake"
shall be understood to designate the product obtained from
partially extracted, screened and cleaned flaxseed. When
used to cover any other product the name of the seed from
which it is obtained shall be prefixed to "ground oil cake."

COTTONSEED PRODUCTS.

Cottonseed Meal is a product of the cottonseed only,
composed principally of the kernel with such portion of
the hull as is necessary in the manufacture of oil; provided
that nothing shall be recognized as cottonseed meal that
does not conform to the foregoing definition and that does
not contain at least 36 per cent. of protein.
41.12 Per cent. Protein Cottonseed Meal, Choice Quality,
must be finely ground, not necessarily bolted, perfectly
sound and sweet in odor, yellow, free from excess of lint,
and must contain at least 41.12 per cent. crude protein,
equivalent to 8 -per cent. of ammonia.
Cottonseed Meal not fulfilling the above requirements
as to color, odor or texture, shall be branded Off Quality.
38.56 Per cent. Protein Cottonseed Meal, Prime Quality,
must be finely ground, not necessarily bolted, of sweet
odor, reasonably bright in col6r, yellow not brown or red-
dish, free from excess of lint, and must contain at least
38.56 per cent. crude protein equivalent to 71/2 per bent.
of ammonia.
Cottonseed Meal not fulfilling the above requirements
as to color, odor or texture, shall be branded Off Quality.
36 Per cent. Protein Cottonseed Meal, Good Quality,
must be finely ground, not:'necessarily bolted, of sweet
odor, reasonably bright in color, and must contain at least











36 per cent. crude protein, equivalent to 7 per cent. of am-
monia.
Cottonseed Meal not fulfilling the above requirements
as to color, odor or texture, shall be branded Off Quality.
Cottonseed Feed is a mixture of cottonseed meal and cot-
tonseed hulls, containing less than 36 per cent. of protein.
Cold Pressed Cottonseed is the product obtained from
the subjection of the whole undecorticated cottonseed to
the cold pressure process for the extraction of oil and in-
cludes the entire cottonseed less the oil extracted.
Ground Cold Pressed Cottonseed is the product obtained
by grinding cold pressed cottonseed.

LINSEED AND FLAX PRODUCTS.

Linseed Meal is the ground product obtained after ex-
traction of part of the oil from ground flaxseed screened
and cleaned of weed seeds and other foreign materials by
the most improved commercial processes, provided that the
final product shall contain less than six per cent. of weed
seeds and other foreign materials and provided- further
that no portion of the stated six per cent. of weed seeds
and other foreign materials shall be deliberately added.
Oil Meal ji the ground product obtained after the extrac-
tion of part of the oil by crushing, cooking and hydraulic
pressure, or by crushing, heating and the use of solvents
from seeds which have been screened and cleaned of weed
seeds and other foreign materials by the most improved
commercial processes. When used alone the term "Oil
Meal" shall be understood to designate linseed meal as de-
fined. When used to cover any other product the name of
the seed from which it is obtained shall be prefixed to the
words "oil meal."
Old Process Oil Meal is the ground product obtained
after extraction of part of the oil by crushing, cooking and
hydraulic pressure from seeds screened and cleaned of
weed seeds and other foreign materials by the most im-
proved commercial processes. When used alone the term
"Old Process Oil Meal" shall be understood to designate
linseed meal as defined, made by the old process. When











used to cover any other product the name of the seed from
which it is obtained shall be prefixed to "old process oil
meal."
New Process Oil Meal is the ground obtained after ex-
traction of part of the oil by crushing, heating and the
use of solvents from seeds screened and cleaned of weed
seeds and other foreign materials by the most improved
commercial processes. When used alone the term "New
Process Oil Meal" shall be understood to designate linseed
meal as defined, made by the new process. When used to
cover any other product the name of the seed from which
it is obtained shall be prefixed to "new process oil meal."
Flax Plant By-Product is that portion of the flax plant
remaining after the separation of the seed, the bast fiber
and a portion of the shives, and consists of flax shives, flax
pods, broken and immature flax seeds, and the cortical tis-
sues of the stem.
Ground Flaxseed or Flaxseed Meal is the product ob-
tained by grinding flaxseed which has been screened and
cleaned of weed seeds and other foreign materials by the
most improved commercial processes, provided that the
final product shall contain less than four per cent. of weed
seeds and other foreign materials, and provided further
that no portion of the stated four per cent. of weed seeds
and other foreign materials shall be deliberately added.
Unscreened Flaxseed Oil Feed Cake is the product ob-
tained by extraction of part of the oil from unscreened
flaxseed by crushing, cooking and hydraulic pressure, or
by crushing, heating and the use of solvents. The ingred-
ients shall be stated as partially extracted flaxseed and for-
oeign seeds (wheat, wild buckwheat, pigeon grass, wild mus-
tard, etc.)
Ground Unscreened Flaxseed Oil Feed is the ground un-
screened flaxseed oil feed cake.
Screenings Oil Feed is the ground product obtained after
extraction of part of the oil by crushing, cooking and hy-
draulic pressure, or by crushing, heating and the use of
solvents from the smaller imperfect grains, weed seeds and
other foreign materials, having feeding value, separated in








56

cleaning the grain. The name of the grain from which the
screenings are separated shall be prefixed. to "screenings
oil feed."
OAT PRODUCTS.

Oat. Groats are the kernels of the oat.
Oat Hulls are the outer coverings of the oat.
Oat Middlings are the floury portions of the oat groat
obtained in the milling of rolled oats.
Oat Shorts are the covering of the oat grain lying imme-
diately inside the hull, being a fuzzy material carrying
with it considerable portions of the fine floury part of the
groat obtained in the milling of rolled oats.
Clipped Oat By-Product is the by-product obtained in
the manufacture of clipped oats. It may contain the light
chaffy material broken from the end of the hulls, empty
hulls, light, immature oats and dust. It must not con-
tain an excessive amount of oat hulls.

PEANUT PRODUCTS.

Peanut Oil Cake is the residue after the extraction of
part of the oil by pressure or solvents from peanut ker-
nels.
Peanut Oil Meal is ground peanut oil cake.
Unhulled Peanut Oil Feed is the ground residue ob-
tained after extraction of part of the oil from whole pea-
nuts, and the ingredients shall be designated as Peanut
Meal and Hulls.

RICE PRODUCTS.

Rice Bran is the pericarp or bran layer of the rice, with
only such quantity of hull fragments as is unavoidable in
the regular milling of rice.
Rice Hulls are the outer coverings of the rice.
Rice Polish is the finely powdered material obtained in
polishing the kernel.











RYE PRODUCES.

Rye Middlings or Rye Feed is the by-product obtained
from the manufacture of ordinary "100 per cent." rye
flour from cleaned and scoured rye grain.
Rye Red Dog is a mixture of low-grade flour, fine par-
ticles of bran and the fibrous offal from the "tail of the
mill. "
VELVET BEAN PRODUCTS.

Velvet Bean Meal is ground velvet beans containing
only an unavoidable trace of hulls or pods.
Ground Velvet Bean and Pod is the product derived by
grinding velvet beans "in the pod." It contains no addi-
tional pods or other materials.

WHEAT PRODUCTS.

Wheat Bran is the coarse outer coating of the wheat
kernel as separated from cleaned and scoured wheat in the
usual process of commercial milling.
Standard Middlings consists mostly of fine particles of
bran, germ and very little of the fibrous offal obtained
from the "tail of the mill." This product must be ob-
tained in the usual commercial process of milling.
'Flour Middlings shall consist of standard middlings and
red dog flour combined in the proportion obtained in the
usual process of milling.
Red Dog Flour consists. of a mixture of low-grade flour,
fine particles of bran and the fibrous offal from the "tail
of the mill."
Brown Shorts (Red Shorts) consists mostly of the fine
particles of bran, germ and very little of the fibrous of-
fal obtained from the "tail of the mill." This product
must be obtained in the usual commercial process of mill-
ing.
Gray Shorts (Gray Middlings or Total Shorts) consists
of the fine particles of the outer bran, the inner bran or
bee-wing bran, the germ and the offal or fibrous material











obtained from the "tail of the mill." This product must be
obtained in the usual process of commercial milling.
'White Shorts or White Middlings consists of a small
portion of the fine bran particles and the germ and a large
portion of the fibrous offal obtained from. the "tail of the
mill." This product must be obtained in the usual process
of flour milling.
Wheat Mixed Feed (Mill Run Wheat Feed) consists of
pure wheat bran and the gray or total shorts or flour mid-
dlings combined in the proportions obtained in the usual
process of commercial millings.
Wheat Bran and Standard Middlings consists of the
two commodities as defined above, mixed in the propor-
tions obtained in the usual process of commercial milling.
Screenings consists of the smaller imperfect grains, weed
seeds and other foreign materials, having feeding value,
separated in cleaning the grain.
Scourings consists of such portions of the cuticle, brush,
white caps, dust, smut and other materials as are sep-
arated from the grain in the usual commercial process of
scouring.
(Note) If to any of the wheat or rye by-product feeds
there should be added screenings or scourings-as above
defined, .either ground or unground, bolted or unbolted,
such brand shall be so registered, labeled and sold as clear-
*ly to indicate this fact. The word Screenings" or Scour-
ings," as the case may be, shall appear as a part of the
name or brand and shall be printed in the same size and
face of type as the remainder of the brand name. When
the word "Screenings" appears it is not necessary to
show also on the labeling the word "Scourings."

* MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS.

Dried Beet Pulp is the dried residue from sugar beets
which have been cleaned and freed from crowns, leaves
and sand, and which have been extracted in the process
of manufacturing sugar. /











Cocoanut Oil Meal or "Copra Oil Meal" is the ground
residue from the extraction of part of- the oil from the
dried meat of the cocoanut.
Fish Meal is the clean, dried ground tissues of unde-
composed fish, with or without the extraction of part of the
oil.
Fish Residue Meal is the clean undecomposed residue
from the manufacture of glue or other fishery products
from non-oily fish.
Ivory Nut Meal is ground ivory nuts.
Palm Kernel Oil Meal is the ground residue from the
extraction of part of the oil by pressure or solvents from
the kernel of the fruit of Elaeis guineensis or Elaeis mal-
anococca.
Yeast or Vinegar Dried Grains are the properly dried
residue from the mixture of cereals, malt and malt sprouts
(sometimes cottonseed meal) obtained in the manufacture
of yeast or vinegar, and consists of corn or corn and rye
from which most of the starch has been extracted, to-
gether with malt added during the manufacturing process
to change the starch to sugars, and malt sprouts (some-
times cottonseed meal) added during the manufacturing
process to aid in filtering the residue from the wort and
serve as a source of food supply for the yeast.










STANDARDS ADOPTED :,FOR THE WHEAT BY-
PRODUCTS, BEGINNING JANUARY 1; 1922.

By the States of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Caro-
lina, North Carolina, Mississippi arid Louisiana.

(With or without screenings or scourings)

Maximum Minimum :'T'
Fiber Protein Fat
(per cent) (per cent) (per cent)
Wheat Bran ......... 11.00 14.50 3.5
Wheat Mixed Feed.... 9.00 15.50. 3.5
Standard Middlings... 9.00 16.00 3.5
Brown Shorts ......... 6.50 16.00 3.5
Gray Shorts ......... 6.00 16.00 3.5
Red Dog Flour....... 4.00 16.00 4.0
Flour Middlings ...... 6.00 15.00 3.0
White Shorts ........ 3.50 14.50 3.0
^ i .:
Products offered under the name of "shorts" will not
be accepted at a guarantee of more than 6% crude fiber,
except when they are branded "brown shorts," a guaran-
tee of not over 6.50% crude fiber will be accepted.

Products offered as middlingss" will not be accepted at
a guarantee of more than 6% crude fiber, except when
they are branded "standard middlings," a guarantee of
not over 9% crude fiber will be accepted.

Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla.,
Dec. 23d, 1921.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
FERTILIZER SECTION.
SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 2405, Revised General Statutes of Florida.


NAME, OR BRAND. 2, FOR WHOM SENT.
1 1 s 1
8


Ground Bone No. 1.............

Complete Fertilizer No. 3.......

Fertilizer ....................
Fertilizer .....................

Pepper Special ............
Fertilizer .....................

Sulphate of Potash No. 2.......


8.47 10.30 14..90 4.81 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

11.82 11.30 0.50 4.93 3.00 H. B. Hull, Orlando.

6.35 8.25 0.85 3.84 5.161R. O. Swindal, Palmetto.
9.82 7.00 1.50 5.10 4.84 K. S. Parrish, Parrish.

12.07 6.93 2.87 5.45 3.161S. C. Kelly, Fort Myers.
12.50 14.50 0..621 2.88 4.92 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

2.00 ..... ......... 49.641H. Levine, Orlando.










Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Cottonseed Meal No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Cottonseed Meal No. 1.........


5.77

4.75

6.72

11.64

8.07


5.751 1.50

4.751 0.20


Mixed Fertilizer No. 3.......... 5491 11.62 5.93

Fish Tankage ................. 5492 15.95 3.88

Mixed Fertilizer ...,........... 5493 10.60 6.48

Fertilizer No. 1................ 5494 9.45 8..40

Fertilizer No. 2................ 5495 9.07 6.65

Fertilizer ..................... 5496 8.87 7.05

Fertilizer ................... 5497 10.62 8.12

Fish Tankage ................. 5498 18.97 4.40

Fertilizer ..................... 5499 11.45 8._65

Fertilizer .................... 5500 7.77 7.70

Fertilizer ..................... 15501112.50111.80


2..07



2.371

2.32

1.77

1.35

1.42

0.50

1.25

2.60

0.90|

0.90

0.30


5.30 4.66jW. P. Carter, Sanford.

3.89 5.721W. J. Lawton, Oviedo.

7.28 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

4.80 4.80 T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

7.70 ..... IL. A. Brumley, Sanford.

6.50 3.281W. J. Lawton, Oviedo.

10.30 ..... H. H. Chappell, Sanford.

5.00 6.141I. M. Stowe, Sanford.

4.75 3.84 Jonah Parrish, Parrish.

4.00 2.98 Jonah Parrish, Parrish.

4.25 3.46 M. K. Parrish, Parrish.

5.00 3.381M. K. Parrish, Parrish.

9.15 ..... R. S. Simmons, Sanford.

4.50 3.441A. C. Albrecht, Miami.

3.35 8.86 C. W. Bush, Miami.

5.371 4.461H. S. Miller, Homestead.


---------










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921--(Continued.)

V V


NAME, OR BRAND. .6 a FOR WHOM SENT.
55 0 .
II- *l
0* 0
Cb 41,


Nitrate of Soda ................ 5502 2.87 .....

Fertilizer ................... .. 5503 11.52 6.50

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5504 9..12 5.52

Cottonseed Meal ................ 5505 8.37 ....

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 550 11.22 6.72

Cottonseed Meal ............... 5507 8.85 .....

Fertilizer ..................... 508 8.80 8.73

Fertilizer .................... 5509 11.72 12.07

Fertilizer ................... 5510 9.25 7.95

Fertilizer ................. .... 5511 8.621 7.95


1.75

0.70


2.40


0.02

0..55

2.45

2.85


3.80

5.50

3.10o


..... IAlderman & Burnett, Bradentown.

3.30 D. H. Long, Mandarin.

3.42 J. H. Perritt, Sanford.

..... J. W. Coxwell & Son, Fort Myers.

5.42 E. L. Brown, Sanford.

..... E. Grothen, Dania.

0.521H. A. Naberhuis, Miami.

5.16 B. I. McKenney, Odessa.

6.441B. I. McKenny, Odessa.

6.06M. K. Parrish, Bradentown.








Fertilizer ..................... 5512 10.65 8.05
Complete Fertilizer ....... .... 5513 12.2211.05
Complete Fertilizer ............15514 11.11 5..451
1 1 1
Mixed Fertilizer ............. 5515 13.78 7.37
Fish Tankage ................. 5516 15.93 4.18
Fish Tankage ................. 5517 18.02 3.53
Fish Tankage ................. 5518 17.51 4.22
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5519 7.47 5.75
Tankage ...................... 5520 9.47 4..48
Fertilizer ..................... 5521 10.001 9.10
Fertilizer ..................... 5522 8.55 8.431
Fertilizer ..................... 5523 8.17 8.70
Cottonseed Meal ............. 5524 .........
Fertilizer .................... 15225 7.52 7.05
Fish Tankage .................. 5526 18.151 3.80
Kainit No. 2................... 5527 4.00 .....


2.101 5.46 2.481H. L. Stranahan, Ft. Myers.
0.15 3.15 5.52 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.
2.001 4.70 4.061E. H. Vance, Orlando.
0.55 5.50 4.921J. E. Klock, Sanford.
2.22 10.40 ..... H. H. Chappell, Sanford.
3.121 9.30 ..... IF. F. Dutton, Sanford.
1.90 10.30 ..... Frank Meisch, Sanford.
1.35 5,.07 5.201G. H. Brown, Sanford.
2.12 9.80 ..... F. F. Dutton, Sanford.
1.90 5.35 4.84 A. H. Rummell, Homestead.
0.071 4.10 0.401R. E. Caves, Miami.
0.00 4.20 0.28 H. S. Miller, Homestead.
..... 7.001 ..... Flynn, Harris & Bullard, Jacksonville.'
0.20 4.15 7.60 A. C. Gabrielson, Dania.
3.20 9.001 ..... G. C. Spering, Sanford.
..... ..... 14.00 L. A. Brumley, Sanford.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-(Continued.)




NAME, OR BRAND. o c .9 FOR WHOM SENT.
S5 1 S


?r*,I m*bZ nin a Ic..'.. 0 IQ I Z 9O o] 0.aIi IT A i l -1 anr ,,anntr .


r sr an age ................. u
Nitrate of Soda ................ 5529

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5530

Fertilizer ..... ............... 5531

Vegetable Special Mixture...... 5532

Vegetable Special Mixture...... 5533

Blood,. Bone and Potash........ 5534

Original. No. 1' ................ 5535

SOrange Tree Manure........... 5536

Fertilizer No. 2................ 15537


1.87 .

6.72

10.09

5..18

6.28

5.32,

4.70

6.32

9.02


I .... ... . .. .e e., a or.r
-II
..... 19.12 ..... L A. Brumley, Sanford.

0.35 5.351 5.041F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

1.701 4.78 5.161 J. M. Fry, Palatka.

1.67 4.45 6.24 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

1.401 4.151 6.37 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

1.90 5.66 6.31 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

1.751 5.25j 6.52 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.
Il 1
1.70 4. 01 4.90 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

4.201 4.8G0 2.941Citrus Culture Association, Mt. Dora.








Special Mixture No. 1........... 5538 5.80 6.75 9.20
Fertilizer .................... 5539 7.90 9.27 1.15
Fertilizer ...................... 5540 7.52 8.321 5.251
Complete Fertilizer ............ 5541 11.921 8.05 1.101
Fertilizer .....................'. 5542 13.42 11.55 0.25
Fertilizer ..................... 5543 11.77 10.85 1.001
Fertilizer .................... 554410.45 11.40 1.00
Complete Fertilizer B......... 5545 8.52 8.05 4.75
Complete Fertilizer, Sample A.. 5546 11.05 7.70 2.051
Complete Fertilizer ............ 5547 8.6511.831 1.52
Fertilizer .......... ...... 5548 10.351 7.80 1.25
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5549111.62 7.65 1.701
Mixed Fertilizer ............... l5550112.02 6.75 1.401
Fish Scrap No. 2............... 555110.42 11.25 1.951
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5552 11.12 6.20 0.80i
Fertilizer (Sample No. 2-M).... 15553110.121 5.391 5.161


4.60 3.381Citrus Culture Association, Mt. Dora.
5.40 5.40 Mr. Stone, Palatka.
2..94 3.16 Standard Growers' Exchange, Ft. Myers.
4.26 5.40 N. M. Cogswell, Orlando.
5.55 3.40IRabama Fruit Co., Orlando.
3.81 3.12 J. J. Chapman, Mt. Dora.
4.10 6.241B. I. McKenney, Odessa.
4,15 4.14 Standard Growers' Exchange, Orlando.
4.80 1.78 Standard Growers' Exchange, Orlando.
3.00 5.161G. L. Huxtable, Orlando.
I 1
4.80 1.181Palmer Turst, Sarasota.
5.15 3.50 P. Robinson, White City.
4.80 6.241F. F. Dutton, Sanford.
9..821..,.. Henry Witte, Sanford.
I
4.821 5.64 Henry Witte, Sanford.
4.951 3.74 Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921--(Continued.)




NAME, OR BRAND. C D i FOR WHOM SENT.



. 1 I I


Fertilizer (Sample No. 1-A)..... 5554

Fertilizer .................... 5555

Fertilizer ..................... 5556

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5557

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5558

Commercial Fertilizer ......... 5559

Mixed Fertilizer ............. 5560

Complete Fertilizer .......... 5561

Fertilizer ..................... 5562

Fertilizer ..................... 5563


7.80 8.84

6.82 12.65

6.22 11.65

8.07 7.50

6.35 7.081

10..32 9.95

10.55 9.13

11.32 11.03

7.87 10.15

6.07 7.651


6.921

1.751

2.001

4.501

8.17

0.851

0.02

1.37

1.701

6.151


6.25

5.63

5.35

4.441

4.37

3.251

4.00

5.001

4..60

2.901


0.44 Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.

5.52 The Citra Fruit Co:, Ft. Myers.

6.16 The Orange River Fruit Co., Ft. Myers.

3.04 M. L. Floyd, Quincy.

2.76 M. L. Floyd, Quincy.

5.041E. S. Larkin, Dade City.

4.741W. T. Kemp, Quay.

5.36 Andy Johnson, Orlando.

5.56 P. B. Armstrong, Terra Ceia.

4.28 The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto








Goat Manure ................. 5564

Fertilizer ................. 5565

Nitrate of Soda................ 5566

Fertilizer .................. 5567

Fertilizer ............ .......... 5568

Acid Phosphate ............... 5569

Fish Scraps .................. 5570

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2........ 5571

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1 ......... 5572

Mixed Fertilizer No. 3.......... 5573

Fertilizer ..................... 5574

Fertilizer ........... ........ 5575

Fertilizer ..................... 5576

Crab Scrap .................. 5577

Fertilizer ................... 5578

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5579


10.27

9.60

2.07

110.27

2.95

6.55

9.15

9..87

6.55

15.87

8.35

11.10

11.57


14.05

0.75


18.751


0.10 1.76 3.801H. T. Lane, Lily.

1.02 3.80 4.701J. E. Fugate, Alachua.

..... 18.90 ..... W. R. Haygood, Oxford.

0.35 ..... ..... G. M. Sims, Madison;

..... ..... 19.86 G. M. Sims, Madison.

0.07 ..... ..... B. L. McKeithen, Vernon.

2.30 9.50 ..... Frank Meisch, Sanford.

1.65 4.80 4.94 F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

1.17 5.80 5.00 F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

1.20 5.05 5.701F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

0.50 5.12 11.02 Astca Investment Co., Tavares.

0.90 3.00 2.541H. A. Wilkerson, DeFuniak Springs.

1.05 3.00 2.721F. E. Wilkerson, DeFuniak Springs.
.I
0.10 5.90 0.501W. S. Smith, Palmetto.

0.60 1.70 2.001J. C. Smith, DeFuniak Springs.

0.75 0.561 1.2810. 0. Helseth, Vero.


I '










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921- (Continued.)

,d ,'
'o 'o
0 <<
NAME, OR BRAND. S. ai g. FOR WHOM SENT.
o Ao
.~1 03 P4 0SS *~a ^
si~~L I & &
= o w | e
Sd
P, 0


Special Mixture No. 383.........

Fruit and Vine ................

Fertilizer No. 583..............

Fertilizer No. 483..............

Orange Tree Manure..........

Fertilizer .....................

Complete Fertilizer ..........

Fertilizer ...................


Fertilizer

Fertilizer


6.72

4.45

13.95

9.00

7.12

9.40

11.57

11.05


................... 5588 9.07 10.65

.....................5589 15.95 11.75


0.35

0.87

0.80

I 0.77
1.70

0-60

1.10j

5.651

0.251

0.80o


2.77 3.24 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

2.77 8.60 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

5.12 3.40 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

4.20 3.32 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

3.81 4.70 Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville.

4.33 4.76 Miss Hammond, Ft. Pierce.
I I
4.35 5.20 G. L. Huxtable, Orlando.

3.20 6.20 Monroe & Stephens, DeLand.

3.40 10.20 Ponce DeLeon Groves, Indrio.

1.55 1.761W. E. Whiddon, Graceville.








Fertilizer ..................... 5590 6..80j 7.90


Fertilizer ..................... 5591

Fertilizer, -Sample No. 2........ 5592

Fertilizer, Sample No. 1....... 5593

Fertilizer, Sample No. 3....... 5594

Fertilizer, Sample No. 4....... 5595

Fertilizer ... ............... 5596

Fertilizer No. 1............... 5597

Fertilizer No. 2 ............... 5598

Dried Blood No. 3............ 5599


Acid Phosphate No. 4........... 5600

Fertilizer, no Potash, No. 5..... 5601

Complete Fertilizer ........... 5602

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5603

Fertilizer ..................... 5604

Fertilizer No. 5............... 5605


7.62112.08


1


8.57

8.42

8.60

8.00

2..00

0.67

1.17

7.80

5.15

6.00

8.95

8.60

8.27

7.77


5.75

11.12

3.551

3.30

3.50

8.601

2.851


0.151

13.75

0.401

1.151

2.071

4.051


3.30 10.40 Standard Growers' Exchange, Ft. Myers.

4.96 0.16 J. A. Scarlett, DeLand.

4.95 4.78 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5.15 5.60 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5..20 4.98 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5.00 5.24 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

2.88 10.161G. M. Locke, Terra Ceia.

..... 50.52 H. Levine, Orlando.

24.60 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

15.20 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

.... ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

5.00 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

3.20 5.02 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.

3.12 3.721W. T. Higman, Orlando..

5.40 0.601G. S. Hollingsworth, Arcadia.

5..30 4.84 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.


18.05

10.34

9.30

6.20

10.95

9.65










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921--(Continued.)




NAME, OR BRAND. 0 W, < a FOR WHOM SENT.


S I I


Fertilizer No. 6......... ......

Fertilizer No. 7.................

Fertilizer ..................... 5

Fertilizer No. IV............. I

Fertilizer No. III..............

Fertilizer No. II............... 5

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer .................. 5

Fertilizer No. 2................ 5

Fertilizer ..................... 5


5606 7.97 9.50 4.20

5607 7.40 9.20 4.20

5608 17.57 7.62 2.05

i609 9.77 8.40 0.25

5610 9.47 6.80 0.50

5611 8.60 9.10 2.50

5612 8.75 9.00 2..17

5613 7.7710.80 5.00

i614 7.75 8.85 1.35

5615 13.35 7.25 4.35


5.48 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.
I
5.58 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

3.10 E. L. Wartman, Citra.

3.00 M. Klein, Orlando.

5.00 L. Wichtendahl, Orlando.

3.94 S. J. T. Seegar, Orlando.

5.54 S. J. T. Seegar, Orlando.

6.35 Messrs. Fugazzi Bros., Valrico.

0.38 The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.
6.5I FgziBrsVlio


4.451 3.001Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.


|








Fertilizer No. 1................ 5616 8.30

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5617 8.02

Fertilizer ...................... 5618 5.60

Fertilizer ..................... 5619 10.87

Fertilizer ..................... 5620 8.65

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5621 5.55

Fertilizer ................... 5622 12.18

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 44151).......5623 9.89

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 31155)...... 5624 12.00

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 43516)...... 5625 8.50

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 40347) ...... 5626 8.14

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 43216)..... 5627 9.20

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 22186) ...... 5628 11.02

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 9000)....... 5629 10.60

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5630 9.17

Complete Fertilizer ............ 56311 7.16


9.45

8.63

8.23

7.65

11.60

7.65

4.78

10.28

9.40

8.20

9.10

9.18

8.40

8.57

9.05

7.98


0.35
1.271

0.121

5.601

0.751

0.05

2.75

2.751

2.90

3.60

4.50

4.20

3.25

3.20

3.65

1.07


2..80[ 4.90 The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.

4.40 4.84 J. H. Dillard, Orlando.

3.90 4.401M. E. Lafollette, DeLand.

5.08 5.14 John W. Kerr, Ft. Pierce.

4.95 4.94 Kirkhuff & Crouter, Bradentown.

3.78 4.88 Mr. Lafollette, DeLand.

4.45 5.34 S. J. McRae, Alachua.

3.92 3.90 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

3.75 4.34 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

5.30 4.76 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

4.21 4.40 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

4,20 4.16 Lakeland Highlands Co.-op. Assn., Lakeland.

3.97 4.56 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

4.05 4.56 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

4.10 5.121S. B. Hull, Orlando.

4.301 3.441E. S. Lawrence, Orlando.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-(Continued.)



.. .. , 0
NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.
7g -4 n 0 .
off S L *aS J 'S S
_a 0
~~~~~~~0 0 71_ __ _ __ _ _


Complete \Fertilizer ........... 5632

Fertilizer .................. 5633

Fertilizer ................... 5634

Fertilizer No. 2................ 5635

Fertilizer No. 1................ 5636

Phosphate .................... 5637

Tobacco Stems ............... 5638

Potash Salts .................. 5639

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 25224)...... 5640

Cottonseed Meal ............... 5641


10.80

14.06

4.90

9.07

10.00

3.65

6.10

0.85I

12.20


S8.30

5.20

10.90

9..27

9.80

3.30




8..20


8.95 .....


1.50 4.75 4.80IRand & Maxim, Orlando.

2.40 3.87 5.78 J. E. Fugate, Alachua.

1.201 6.05 8.00 H. R. Day, Grand Island.

0.85 5.00 3.60 Silver Lake Estates, Leesburg.

1.301 5.10 2.04 Silver Lake Estates, Leesburg.

20.201..... .... E. P. Parker, Wauchula.

..... 2..451 9.021E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

..... ..... 120.06 Cholrine 7.52%, Indian River Prod. Co., Vero.

2.30 4.12 4.82 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

..... 7.10 ..... A. W. 'Kelly, Ft. Myers.


i I i I









Castor Pomice ................ 5642

Sheep, Manure ................ 5643

Cottonseed Meal .. ........... 5644

Fertilizer .. ................ 5645

Fertilizer No. 1............... 5646

Mixed Fertilizer No. 4 ......... 5647

Kainit ........................ 5648

Nitrate of Soda No. 2.......... 649

Acid Phosphate ............... 5650

Mixed Fertilizer No. 5......... 5651

Acid Phosphate No. 3.......... 5652

Castor Pomace No 2.......... 5653

Cottonseed Meal No 1.......... 5654

Sulphate of Potash No. 5....... 5655

Tankage No. 4 ................ 5656

Fertilizer ............. ..... ..5657


i' ,,


9.50

3.80

8,62

3.82

0.32

4.25

-2.22

1.47

5.52

5.12

11.45

9.07

8.47

0.85

5.00

10.35


..... 5.95

0.00 4.02

..... 8.07

3.25 6.47

35.30 .....

0.70 .4.34


0.20

0.75

0.10


. . ...

5..18 4,72

5.32 0.25


19.41



5.45



6.72

,6.80



9.90

4.33


.... IL. Santini, Ft. Myers.

0.22 C. Boyce Bell, Sanford.

..... Roy F. Symes, Sanford.

2.14 S. H. Wilder, Plant City.

..... Am. Oil Chemists' Society, Savannah, Ga.

5.28 L. I. Frazier, Sanford.

14.18 L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

5.14 L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

..... A. Van Ness, Sanford.

.... JA. Van Ness, Sanford.

.....IA. Van Ness, Sanford.

50.92IA. Van Ness, Sanford.

5.....A. Van Ness, Sanford.
.06M Fleischer, Sanford
5.061M. Fleischer, Sanford.











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1922-(Continued.)


'3 "
*< d
1 41
NAME, OR BRAND. o. 6 S. | FOR WHOM SENT.
NAME+, 'R .RIN


____________________ I l ______________
ir p a A

11Z n


Fertilizer No. 2................ 5658

Careless Weed Ash from Stock 5659
Feed No. 533.

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1......... 5660

Blood No. 2................ 5661

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.......... 5662

Fertilizer No. 3................ 5663

Fertilizer No. 4............... 5664

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1........ 5665

Trintage No. 2.............. 5666


2.42 .....

..... .....


8.12 5.85

10.02 .....

10.35 5.30

9.37 18.15

5.42.

7.40 5.23

6.771 2.70


3.20



0.20




0.27

1.30)


Tot.

5.00i

15.69

5.30



3.93

4.59

12.23


14.50 Am. Oil Chemists' Society, Savannah, Ga.

7.88ILime (CaO) 22.60%, Insoluble Matter 1.75%,
l P20, 6.12%. Pennsylvania Sugar Co., Miami.

5.62 O. J. Pope, Sanford.

..... J. Sinclair White, Sanford.

5.76 J. Sinclair White, Sanford.

..... Am. Oil Chemists' Society, Savannah, Ga.

4.34 Am. Oil Chemists' Society, Savannah, Ga.

5.24 C. D. Couch, Sanford.

..... Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.








Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Goat Manure No. 1..........

Pure Animal Bone Tankage No. 2

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.........

Pure Animal Bone Tankage No. 3

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Goat Manure .................

Peanut Meal ................

Tankage No. 2.................

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 6.........

Kainit No. 7 ..................


5667 6.32

5668 14.37

5669 7.00

5670 7.95

5671 9.90

5672 7.90

5673 9.25

5674 6.02

5675 15.20

5676 7.62

5677 5.37

5678 10.17

5679 9.77

5680 8.12

5681 6.32

5682 2.97


3.85

0.09

0.85

0.23

0.20

0.15

5.50

3.52

0..17


3.65

2.00

2.32

1.42

0.32


I 4.95 5..74Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.

1.80 3.821C. Boyce Bell, Sanford.

8.09 ..... J. Pope, Sanford.

5.20 5.0610. J. Pope, Sanford.

4.65 5.721T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

4.70 5.04 T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

8.47..... T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

5.27 5.54 0. M. Stowe, Sanford.

1.751 3.021C. Boyce Bell, Sanford.

8.95 ..... T. I. Hawkins, Sanford.

10.201..... Fish & Fish, Sanford.

4.88 5.12 Fish & Fish, Sanford.

4.90 5.341H. R. Stevens, Sanford.

5.26 5.18 H. R. Stevens, Sanford.

4.92 5.84 L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

.....113.861L. A. Brumley, Sanford.


i ,


i









SPECIAL FERTILIZER AN ALYSES, 1921-(Continued.)



MOB I o
NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.



'4.ll- I __


watermelo
Special Su

Tankage IN

Adid Phos

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


n Special Guano..... 5683 10.50
gar Cane Guano..... 5684 8.95

ro. 1 .............. 5685 9.50

phate No. 2.......... 5686 10..95

. . . . . . . . . 5687 8.75

..................... 5688 8.60o

................... 5689 11.12

(A. C. L. 43206)..... 5690 10.22

(A. C. L. 37682-B).... 15691 11.07

(A. C. L. 37682-A)... 5692112.55


7.40

7.45

1.70

L5.75

7.05

8.22

7.58

8.45

8.32

8.051


0.501

0.50

1.051

2.15

3.75

5.35

2.42

1.50

1.40

0.371


4.85 0.38JArchie Morrison, Sopchoppy.

5.25 0.32JArchie Morrison, Sopchoppy.

10.20 ..... L. W. Tilden, Winter Garden.

.. ..... ...L. W. Tilden, Winter Garden.
IL.
3.40 8..94 Alfred Caristrom, Winter Haven.

3.60 5.34 Alfred Carlstrom, Winter Haven.

3.17 5.941M. M. Bass, Standard Grow. Ex., Ft: Myers.

3.71 5.381Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

3.36 7.02 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

3.801 5.72 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.










Fertilizer (A. C. L. 27843).......

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 40333)......

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 46450)......

Fertilizer (A. C. L. 43461)......

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Soft Phosphate ..............

Early Bird Vegetable Manure...

Fertilizer No. 1..............

Pure Animal Bone Tankage No. 1

Complete Fertilizer No. 1........

Complete Fertilizer No. 2.......

Complete Fertilizer No. 1....

Complete Fertilizer No. 4.......

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Sulphate of Potash No. 1.......


5693 10.50

5694 10.15

5695 9..72

5696 10.67

15697 6.92

5698 9.15

5699 3.75

5700 10.55

5701 9.65

5702 8.95

5703 14.37

5704 14.52

5705 7.92

5706 9.00

5707 11.77

5708 0.95


8.30

8.48

8.28

8.60

4.15

6.40

2.50

6.70

5.31

1.32

10.93

8.73

6.51

7.00

10.04


0.35 3.10 8.60jLakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

1.52 3.60 5.256Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

1.62 3.69 5.40 Lakelad Highland Co-op. Ansn., Lakeland.

0.65 3.22 7.44 Lakeland Highlands Co-op. Assn., Lakeland.

2.401 5.76 8..151A. D. Smith, Sanford.

0..75 5.55 6.601A. D. Smith, Sanford.

20.501 ......... R. H. King, Wauchula.

0.351 4.21 3.36 A. H. King, Wauchula.

0.32 4.35 4.58 B. R. Beck, Sanford.

0.43 8.18..... J. H. Estridge, Sanford.

0.57 3.83 6.90 B. A. Minor, Orlando.

0.22 3.75 7.18 B. A. Minor, Orlando.

7.30 3.10 5.90 J. H. Sadler, Orlando.

3.00 3.201 8..88|Mrs. L. D. Minx, Orlando.

1.80 3.071 9.48 Kirkhuff & Crouter, Bradentown.

..... ..... 149.921Tom Waldron, East Palatka.


L










SPeiJAL PRETILIZER ANALYSES, 1921- (Continued.)




NAME, OR BRAND. i i FOR WHOM SENT.


.. 0 o 0 .
Z___i 4 I I


11% iBlooa & Bone F'ertilizer No. 2 5709
10% Blood & Bone Fertilizer No. 3 5710

Cottonseed Meal No. 4.......... 5711

Fertilizer No. 1 ............... 57121
Fertilizer No. 2................ 5713
Fertilizer No. 3............... 15714

Fertilizer No. 2................ 5715

Fertilizer No. 1................ 5716

Fertilizer .................... 5717

Fertilizer No. 2 ............... 5718


8.55 4.30
9.77 2.10
6.92 ....

7.251 4.75
8.401 6.53

9.40 7.58
9.65 6.30

8.02 4.90
5.82 8.00

7.32110.65


2.401
1.-00


0.801

0:571
7.42

0.701
0.801
0.151

0.50


11.05 ..... Tom Waldron, East Palatka.

9.89 ..... Tom Waldron, East Palatka.
7.20 ..... Tom Waldron, East Palatka.

3.78 3.421F. W. C. Kramer, Leesburg.
3.921 3.14 F. W. C. Kramer, Leesburg.

5.16 6.42 Rabama Fruit Co., Orlando.
4.15 3.20 F. W. C. Kramer, Jr., Leesburg.

4.12 3.60 F. W. C. Kramer, Jr., Leesburg.
5.08 3.22 F. B. Turner, Bradentown.

4.80 9.381The Manatee Fruit Co.; Palmetto.









Fertilizer No. 1................ 57191 6.55 9.98

Complete Fertilizer No. 1....... 5720 10.60 10.50

Complete Fertilizer No. 2...... 5721 3.47 8.75

Cottonseed Meal .............. 5722 7.50 .....

Complete Fertilizer No. 1...... 572311.15 6.85

Fertilizer No. 3............... 5724 7.40 9.90


0.42

0.90

0.50


0.401

0.65


5.65 9.82 The Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

4.78 9.22 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.

3.87 8.261W. L. Story, Winter Garden.

8.70 ..... jJ. O. Clarke, Savannah, Ga.

3.02 6.001W. T. Hickman, Oakland.

5.25 9.78 The Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.
I










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
FERTILIZER SECTION.
OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Ifispectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies Greater Than 0.20% in Available Phosphorio Acid, Ammonia, and Potash are Distinguished by
Black Face Type.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND .



Alabama Chemical Co., Montgomery, Ala.


Gold Medal Acid Phosphate....................

Rex .High. Grade Guano..........................

American Agricultural Chemical Co., Jacksonville,
S.. Florida.
Bradley's Orange Special........................


2701




2693


Guaranteed ........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............



Guaranteed ........
Found ..............


.7.10
10,00
10.97


16.00
.18,08

10.00
10.53



1 8.00


8.831


2.00
S0.17

..2.00
S1.32


2.00
2.10


4.00P 4.00
4971 4.40


2.00
2.30



3.00
3.54









Bradley's High Grade Cuke and Lettuce Special..


Bradley's High Grade Cdke and Lettuce Fertilizer


*Bradley's Florida Vegetable.......................


'Bradley's Florida Vegetable- Manure.............


Bradley's sea Fowl Guano, Special Mixture.......


Lazaretto Early Trucker.....................


Special Mixture (Truck)........................


American Agricultural Chemical Co., Pensacola,
Florida.

Bradley's B. D. Sea Fowl Guano.................


Goulding's 16% Acid Phosphate.................


Guaranteed .........
2629 Found ..............j

Guaranteed .........
2749 Found ..............
2759 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2625 Found .............

Guaranteed ........
2760 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2702 Found .............

Guaranteed ........
2632 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2692 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2710 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2644 Found ............


10.001
11.871

12.00
7.92
7.85

10.00
11.45

12.00
9.,02

10.00
11.37

10.00
11.30

10.00
5.87



12.00
10.27|

12.00
10.50


5.00
5.40

5.00
5.37
6.08

6.00
6.95

6.00
6.87

8.00
9.80

7.00
7.85

6.00
8.52



9.00
9.32

16.00
18.651


2.00 6.00 3.00
2.00 5.90 3.,48

1.00 6.00 3.00
3.95 6.30 3.20
3.52 6.10 2.98

2.00 4.00 3.00
2.30 4.071 3.58

1.00 4.00 3.00
3.90 4.45 3.48

3.00 4.00 3.00
4.50 3.95 3.42

2.00 5.00 5.00
2.15 5.20 5.76

2.00 4.00 ......
3.65 4.00 ......



0.50 2.25 3.00
1.30 2.75 2.98

0.50 ... ......
0.151 .........


i I













MANUFACTURER AND BRAND.


American Agricultural Chemical Co., Pensacola,
Florida.-Continued. I
Goulding's 2% Ammoniated Bone .............. Guaranteed......... 12.00 8.00 0.50 20
2642 Found .............. 9.25 9.80 0.70 2.20 .....
Goulding's 4% Potash Compound................ Guaranteed ......... 12.00 8.00 0.50 ...... 4.00
2698 Found .............. 4.52 7.9 0.1 ...... 4.74
Goulding's Fish Guano........................... Guaranteed ........1 12.00 11.00 0.50 2.00 1.00
2708 Found .............. 10.60 10.80 1.07 2.65 1.56
Goulding's Fish and Bone ........................ Guaranteed ........ 12.00 8.0 0.5 2.00 4.00
2711Found .............. 10.42 9.0 1.2 2.2 4.32
Goilding's Gray Land Formula ................... Guaranteed ........ 12.00 8.00 0.50 0 5.00
2643 Found ............ 9.62 8.87 1.50 3.3 4.76
Goulding's Standard Meal Fertilizer ............. Guaranteed ........ 12.00 8.001 0.50 2.00 2.00
2709Found .............. 9.5 9.481 0.27 1.99 2.74
Goulding's Vegetable Compound................. Guaranteed .......... 12.00 8.00 0.50 4.00 4.00
2699 Found .............. 6.77 12.57 1.2 3.40 2.00









Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville, Florida.

Cotton Seed Meal.............................


Tobacco Dust ...............................


Ground Tobacco Stems .......................


Animal Ammoniated No. 49.....................


Animal Ammoniated No. 58.....................


Fertilizer No. 293..............................


Fertilizer No. 483............. .............


Blood, Bone, and Potash No. 3.................


Citrus Grower No. 3..........................


Guaranteed ......... 10.00
Found .............. 9.37

Guaranteed ......... 10.00
Found ............. 8.90

Guaranteed ........ 10.00
Found .............. 9.35

Guaranteed ......... 10.00
Found .............. 4.20


Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found.............

Guaranteed ........
Found ..............
Found .............
Found ..............


10.00
9.40

10.00
8.52

10.00
8.85

10.00
14.20

10.00
8.071
6.82
7.17
1


...... ......
...... ......

...... ......
...... ......

...... ......


7.00
6.85

3.00
3.17

2.50
2.83

4.00
3.20

5.00
4.10

"2.00
2.16

4.00
4.20

5.00
4'80

5.00
4.70
5.10
4.12


) 1.00
3 0.60

) 1.00
3 1.12

) 1.00
5 0.70

S1.00
) 0.10

) 1.00
5 0.55

) 1.00
1 1.62
S1.85
5 1.45
1 ,


8.00
7.30

7.00
6.86






3.00
3.08

3.00
3.54

3.00
.3.00

3.00
2.66
2.90
2.48


......


I










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.



J-O ~ ~ o O *
MANUFACTURER AND BRAND. g g 3
S ao a ^^ ^^ S .r
GE r -,,,
.0 0 0 .83

0 C P -P1 a,~
rn 3&C) 5 ~ d & 82*
O 'J 83MBT mB f
*~ ~~~ ^ J A^
____________c^ < i


Armour Fertilizer Works, Jacksonville, Fla.-Con.

Fertilizer No. 485...............................


General Crop No. 5............. ..............


General Crop No. 3.............................


Guaranteed ........
2736 Found ..............

Guaranteed ........
2635 Found .............
2654 Found .............

Guaranteed .. .....
2653 Found .............


General 'Tree No. 5.............................. Guaranteed ........
2715 Found ..............
2733 Found ..............
General Tree No. 3............................... Guaranteed ........
2637 Found ..............
Original No. 1................................... Guaranteed .........
.. .12626 Found ..............


10.00
6.40

10.00
9.77
9.05

10.00
9.00

10.00
8.10
6.37
10.00
6.00
10.00
7.87


8.00
8.00

8.00
8.43
8.43

8.00
8.05

8.00
9.00
8.60
8.00
9.98
5.00
6.10


4.00
4.50

4.00
4.17
4.36

4.00
4.25

4.00
3.70
3.80
4.00
5.02
5.00
4.51


5.00
4.46

5.00
5.46
5.06

3.00
3.30

5.00
4.58
5.22
3.00
3.04
5.00
5.18










Special Crop Manure No. Z83....


Special Potash Compound......................


Vegetable ..................................


Vegetable No. 3................................


Ashburn Oil Mill, Ashburn, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal..............................


Blackahear Manufacturing Co., Blackshear, Ga.

German Kainit ............................


Standard Acid and Potash.....................


Brantley's Gem Guano ........................


..............


3.00
2.86
3.30

3.00
3.56

6.00
5.68
5.98

3.00
4.14


Guaranteed .........
2618 Found ..............
2652 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2617 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2613 Found ..............
2704 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2630 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2610 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2667 Found ..............
2671 Found.............

Guaranteed ........
2665 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2666 Found ..............


10.00
9.55
9.65

10.00
7.97

10.00
8.97
8.42

10.00
9.20


...... ......
6.92 .....




1.42 ....
2.32 .....

10.001 8.00
9.25J 9.65

10.00 9.00
9.551 10.60


12.00
18.44
13.26

4.00
3.88

3.00
2.88


....;.. .....


1.00 ......
0.50 .....

1.00 1.60
0.851 1.64


7.00 ......
7.50 ......


I










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND e ,,2 '0
B o
ca 3fa 0 0 s
5FI O 0


Blackshear Mfg. Co., Blackshear, Ga. Continued
Prolific Cotton Grower..........................


Sea Island Standard.............................


Chase & Co., Sanford, Fla.

Ground Castor Pomace.........................


26641


Guaranteed ........
Found .............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............



Guaranteed ........
Found .............I


The Coe-Mortimer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

No. Potash Special No. 4....................... Guaranteed ........
2707 Found ............
Green Band Very Early Trucker................ IGuaranteed .........
12705 Found ..............


10.00
10.60

10.00
8.67




9.35



10.00
11.52
12.00
10.8Q


9.00l 1.00
10.85 1.00

8.00 1.00
8.63 0.92








10.00 2.00
12.50 1.75
9.00 1.00
9.65 1.70


3.00
3.20
Co
2.00
2.06











3.00
3.42









Co-Operative Fertilizer Co., Miami Fla.

Magic Avocado Fruiter........................



Magic Citrus Fruiter..........................


Magic Citrus Vitalizer...........................


Magic Muck Manure...........................


Magic General Trucker.......................


Magic Organic Trucker..........................



Empire Cotton Oil Co., Macon, Ga.

Gilt Edge Brand Cotton Seed Meal.............



Exchange Supply Co., Tampa, Fla.

Exchange Inorganic No. 5.......................


Guaranteed .........
2713 Found .............
2719 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2714 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2754 Found .............

Guaranteed ........
2718 Found ..............

Guaranteed ........
2753 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2720 Found .............




Guaranteed .........
2621 Found ..............
2622 Found ..............


Guaranteed .........
Found .............


12.00
10.40
7.45

12.00
11.00

10.00
7.00

10.00
9.20

10.00
8.21

12.00
8.25




8.29
7.71



10.00
11.80


0.50
0.95
0.50

0.50
1.051

0.25
0.15

0.50
0.15

0.25
1.35

0.50
0.75


3.00
3.42
3.10

3.00
2.98

2.00
1.90



4.00
4.20

4.00
3.78



7.00
7.33
7.60



3.00
3.60


5.00
4.88
6.06

5.00
5.24

3.00
2.92

5.00
4.50

3.00
3.18

3.00
3.22


5.00
4.30


""'""










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND d




Exchange Supply Co, Tampa, Fla.-Continued.

Exchange Perfection Citrus Grower .............. Guaranteed ......... 10.(
2657 Found .............. 10.(
.Florida-Carolina Phosphate and Fertilizer Co.,
Croom, Fla.
Eggplant and Pepper Special................... Guaranteed .......... 10.(
2738 Found .... ......... 4.'
F. C. General Truck Manure ..................... Guaranteed ......... 10.(
742 Found .............. 3.
F. C. Special Vegetable Mitxure................. Guaranteed ........ 10.(
2739 Found ........ ..... 4.(
F. C. Strawberry Fruit and Vine...............2. Guaranteed ......... 10.(
2741 Found .teed.......... 4.1
F. C. Strawberry Grower....................... | Guaranteed ........*. 10.(


0 0
,SS ,25 ...






6.00 1.00 4,00 3.00
7.151 2.15 4.20 3.32



8.00 2.00 5.00 2.00
5.00 8.25 4.22 1.80
8.00 2.00 3.00 3.00
6.38 5.87 3.51 2.94
8.00 2.00 5.00 -300
7.10 3.90 5,14 3.14
8.00 2.001 3.00 5,00
7.38 3.021 3.90 4.42
8.001 2.00 5.00 2.00
[5.15 5.15 5.61 2.98








F. C. Tomato Special................ ...........



The Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.

Gulf Celery Special...........................

Gulf Special Grower............................


Gulf Spring Special............................


Special Fruit and Vine.........................



Independent Fisheries,. Jacksonville, Fla.

S. S. Co.'s Corn, Cane and Sweet Potato Special
Mixture ....................................


International Vegetable Oil Co., Savannah, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal..... .........................


Guaranteed .........
2740 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2706 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2658 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2659 Found .............

Guaranteed ........
2697 Found .............



Guaranteed .........
2675 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2623 Found .............
I


10.00
3.95



10.00
10.92

8.00
8.72

8.00
9.75

10.00
8.70



10.00
8.77


7.03 ..... ......


5.00
3 18



5.00
5.80

1.00
1.44

3.00
4.00

5.00
5.36 -


3.00 ......
3.02 ......










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND $ | Z 5 .
0 f as 4 0

zN__I___4__I I1
~O QLI lf F


alF' a


The Mapes Formula & Peruvian Guano Co., New
York, N. Y.

Florida Potato Manure........................


Fruit Special ......... ........................


Fruit and Vine Manure........................



5 Per Cent Fruit.......... ................


Orange Tree Manure..........................


Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed ........
Found .............

Guaranteed ........
Found ..............
Found .............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............

Guaranteed ........
Found ............
Found............


12.00
14.62

10.00
14.42

10.00
10.85
6.87

10.00
13.45

12.00
15.77
8.50


5.00
5.98

3.00
3.34

10.00
10.26
10.98

5.00
5.42

3.00
3.54
3.20









Orange Tree Manure (War Potash)............690
2690

Vegetable Manure, Special......................
2685


Mizell Fertilizer Co., Tallahassee, Fla.

Mizell's Perfect Fertilizer......................
2624


Nitrate Agencies Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Nitrapo ................................
2680

Shrimp Scrap .... ............................
2676

Cotton and Corn Special No. 1.................
2677

N. A. C. Story Mitxure........................
2673

I.
E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jaoksonville, Fla.

.Simon Pure No. 2.............................
2747


Guaranteed .........
Found .............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............




Guaranteed ........
Found ..............




Guaranteed .........
Found ..............


Guaranteed .........
Found ............ .

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............




Guaranteed .........
'Found ..............


2.00
5.90

2.00
4.38





1.25


.


lz.00
11.25

12.00
5.97




12.00
10.20





1.72 .

10.00
15.87

10.00
9.50

10.00
9.85




10.00
5.52|


6.00
4.50

6.00
4.78




8.00
9.75






0 n


4.00
3.65

5.00
5.23




2.00
2.60




18.00
18.04

7.00
8.75

3.50
3.60

5.00
5.80




4.00
4.95


3.40 0.50

9.40 1.00
9.15 0.85

0.00 1.00
10.80 1.85




6.00 1.50
6.301 0.95


1.00
1.06

3.00
3.04




2.00
4.00




15.00
16.24

1.00
1.10

3.50
.3.62

:5.00
5.36




6.00
6.64


1
1










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES. 1921-Continued.


MANUFACTURER AND BRAND





E O Painter Fer Co Jacksonville Fla
-Con


Young Tree or Nursery 3% Special............. Guaranteed ......... 10.00
2684 found .............. 12.65

Corn 1% Special............................. Guaranteed .... 10.00
2686 Found .............. 10.521

Fruit and Vine 5% Special..................... Guaranteed ......... 10.001
2688 Found .............. 12.901
2748 Found .............. 9.171

Potato Special ............................. Guaranteed ......... 10.00
Pot S l 2674 Found .............. 9.821

Sugar Cane 2% Special ............. .......... Guaranteed ......... 10.00
2689 Found .............. 11.05

Tomato 3% Special............................. Guaranteed ......... 10.001
|2681 Found .............. 11.571


0
-S

0d 0
c8 A r
-4^ 4


a
o .,
*7t i '


5.001 3.00
5.781 0.87

6.001 1.00
6.00 2.25

6.00 0.50
6.60 1.55
6.25 1.25

5.00 1.00
4.65 2.401

8.001 1.00
8.221 3.65

6.00 .. ...
5.801 2.85


3.00
3.76

1.90
1.80

5.00
5.66
4.90

2.00
2.74

2.00
2.02

3.00
3.48


_ __I I


- -









Vegetable 3% Special............................ G Iuaranteed .........
2691|Pound ......... .... I


Watermelon 3% Special.....................


The Southern Fertilizer Co., Orlando, Fla.

365 For Bearing Orange Trees.................


473, General Vegetable Fertilizer...............



Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Complete Fertilizer .... .................. ..


Dixie Top Dresser...... ......................


No. 2 Orange Tree Mixture....................


Southern States Special......................



Truckers' Choice ...........................


I I


I i


Guaranteed .........
Found ........ ...



Guaranteed ........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............
Found ............. .



Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............

Guaranteed .........
Found .............
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............


10.00
11.45

10.00
u.82



10.00
7.00

10.00
6.00
7.22



10.00
8.35

10.00
6.52

10.00
11.65

10.00
10.22
11.50

10.00
10.87


3.00
3.70


4.15




5.37


5.60
3.60



1.00
1.50

1.00
0.67

1.00
1.64

1.00
0.75
1.00

1.00
1.00


4.00
4.30

3.50
3.5.



3.00
3.25

4.00
3.97
,4.50



4.00
4.15

6.00
6.30

3-.00
3.30

4.00
4.00
4.92

4.00
4.30


2.00
2.60




-5.00
6.00

5.00
5.40
5.06

3.00
3.44










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND S . I.S .

-1 O o
5d ca 0s 0 a
o a h P4 1
Z 5g !l<^FiC! < 4


Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co., Dothan, Ala.

V.C. High Grade Dissolved Bone..............


V.C. Florida Potash Compound..................


West Coast Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.

Cane and Corn Special.........................


Citrus Fruiter ...............................


IGuaranteed .........
2670 Found .............

Guaranteed .........
2669 Found ..............



Guaranteed .........
2722 Found .............

Guaranteed ........
2712 Found .............
2723 Found ..............


Special Tree Mixture ......................... I Guaranteed ........
12724 Found .............


12.00
12.52

12.00
'13.25


16.00
17.42

8.00
10.02


12.00 6.00 .....
11.97 6.32 5.30

12.00 6.00 2.00
9.90) 7.05 4.70
11.77 7.13 3.37

12.001 6.00 ......
10.471 7.28) 4.62


......,







3.00
3.40

3.00
2.60
2.98


4.00
2.26



1.00
1.32

5.00
4.48
4.80


4.00 1.00
4.03 1.70









Special Vegetable Mixture ......................
2721

Tomato Fruiter ...................... .....
2660


Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Cherokee Grower ...............................


Guaranteed........
Found ........... ..

Guaranteed ........
Found .............



Guaranteed .........
Found ..............
Found ..............
Found ..............


Cherokee Special Mitxure ........................ Guaranteed .........
2648 Found ..............
2727 Found ..............

Florideal Grower ............................... Guaranteed .........
2646 Found ............I
2695 Found ..............
2730 Found ....

Ideal Citrus ManureS.......... .............. Guaranteed .........
2649 Found ..............
2729 Found ..............

Ideal Celery Special ............................ Guaranteed .........
2631 Found ..............

Ideal Field Crop Guano.............. .......... Guaranteed .........
12640 Found ..............


6.00 .
4.43 4.87

6.001 .....
7.901 5.70


12.001
11.751

12.00
9.451



12.00
6.251
8.72
7.751

12.00
7.701
7.901

12.00;
7.611
8.751
6.27
I
12.00
10.12
5.771

12.001
6.321

12.001
13.101


0.50 4.00 ...
2.00 4.00...
3.40 5.05 ...
3.65 4.951 .....

0.50 5.00 ......
0.82 4.95 .....
4.62 4.95 ....

1.00 4.00 2.00
1.621 4.44 2.86
4.001 4.43 2.36
1.62 4.36 2.96

1.00 3.00 5.00
1.321 3.20 5.04
2.051 3.33 6.36

4.001 6.001 4.00
3.151 6.301 4.36

0.501 2.50 3.00
2.371 3.20 3.60


9.00
8.87
9.00
8.90

8.00
7.55
8.43]

8.00o
7.751
10.80
9.25

6.001
6.481
5.821

2.001
5.151

8.001
9.851


(










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.




MANUFACTURER AND BRAND. 0t & 2


z 0 1 = S I
z______ ^ g~ 5 .gifi ^ *


Wilson & Toomer Fer. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.-Con.

Ideal Grower ...................................



Manatee Trucker ..............................



Seminole Corn and Cane Grower ...............


Seminole Fruit Manure.......................


Seminole Fruit aid Vine........................


Guaranteed .........
Found ..............
Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
Found ..............
Found ..............


Guaranteed .........
2694 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2696 Found ..............

Guaranteed .........
2750 Found ..............


12.00
10.00
9.37

12.00
10.32
12.30

12.00
12.60

12.00
12.77

12.00
5.50


7.00
7.18
7.77

6.00
5.88
7.42

8.00
8.18

8.00
8.35

6.00
6.201


1.00
0.82
5.40

1.00
1.42
2.75

0.50
1.82

1.00
3.75

1.00
4.751


1.00
1.66
1.46

3.00
3.54
4.16

3.00
3.36

5.00
5.80

8.00
8.60









Winter Haven Special.........................




W. & T.'s Fruit Grower........................


W. & T.'s Golden Fruiter.......................




W. & T.'s Special Mituxre No. 1...............






No Label. Seized at Jacksonville...............


Guaranteed ......... 12.00 6.00 1.00
263 Found ............. 10.65 6.70 0.85
2645 Found .............. 8.07 6.55 0.35
2723 Found .............. 7.72 8.60 4.00

Guaranteed ......... 12.001 9.00 0.50
26381Found ..............J 1 10.7 10.80 4.95

Guaranteed ......... 12.00 6.00 1.00
2639 Found .............. 11.92 9.05 '2.50
2731 Found .............. 7.82 9.08 2.82
2756 Found .............. 7.92 6.85 2.07

Guaranteed ......... 12.00 6.00 1.00
2620 Found .............. 9.50 5.55 1.50
2627 Found .............. 9.201 6.42 2.00
2641 Found .............. 12.401 7.10 3.05
2650 Found .............. 7.17 6.10 1.35
2728 Found .............. 8.701 8.80 2.80


IGuaranteed ......... ...... . .....
2661jFound .............. 10.05 5.55 4.35


3.00 3.00
3.50 3.80
4.20 3.32
3.30 3.48

3.00 3.00
3.75 5.72

4.00 3.00
5.15 2.90
4.24 3.62
4.32 5.72

5.00 5.00
4.95 5.12
6.20 6.50
5.75 6.52
4.82 5.44
4.801 6.00



2.50 3.32










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1921. B. JAY OWEN, Asst. Chemist
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 24, 1905.




SENDER AND SUBSTANCE --
o V U
zm F


J. O. Clarke, Savannah, Georgia.

Cotton Seed Meal................ ..........


Max Wedeles Tobacco Co., Quincy.

Cotton Seed Meal...........................


Merryday Grocery Co., Palatka.

Cotton Seed Meal ..........................
Cotton Seed Meal...........................


518 ........



519 ......



520 ........
52 1 ........


37.85 ...... ....... ........




38.34 ........ ........ ........



37.63 ........ ........ .......
37.90 ........ ........ ........




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