Group Title: Market news service on fruits and vegetables
Title: Marketing Florida citrus
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077079/00003
 Material Information
Title: Marketing Florida citrus
Series Title: Market news service on fruits and vegetables
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Consumer and Marketing Service
Florida -- Marketing Bureau Section
Florida -- Marketing Bureau
Federal-State Market News Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- War Food Administration
Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Division of Marketing
Publisher: The Service
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Publication Date: 1927-1928
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Farm produce -- Marketing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus fruit industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus fruits -- Marketing -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Market News Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Fruits and Vegetables and the Florida State Marketing Bureau.
Issuing Body: Issued by: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, War Food Administration, 1942-1944; by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing Administration, 1944-1953; by U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service, 1938-1942/1953-1964; by Federal-State Market News, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Consumer and Marketing Service, Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Marketing, Marketing Bureau, 1964-
General Note: Place of publication varies : Lakeland, Fla. 1937-
General Note: Description based on: 1925/26; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077079
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01406873
alephbibnum - 002686320
lccn - 2001229396
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Marketing Florida citrus

Full Text



S. UNITED STAT$ .I ^1$RI CULTURE
Bureau 6 Agricultural Economics
FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU COOPERATING





MARKET NES SERVICE ON FRUITS. AND VEGETABLES


'MARKETING -FLORI-DA GI.TRUS ..


SSUMMARY -OF -1927-28 .SEASON


9 ..-


By.W. H. Hall


Washington, D. C.
November, 1929.


* S
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TABLE OF CON 'T 'I''


Page

Introduction ... .. ... ; ..... -,* .. .. ....
Production Gaining ................. ... ......... .......... 2
Foreign Markets............. ....** *. :-. .** . ... .-...... ** .2---3
Federal-State Inspection......................... .........**-.. --4
Quality and Condition..................... ...................' ..***
Conclusion................................................... 4-5
Bulletins on Citrus Fruits........................... ....... 5--6
Productihi ............ ....... ...................... 6
Number of Citrus Trees........'. .. ..-........ .;. .-; .... ..........** ***...
Shipments -(Comparative) ......... ........................ ************
Shipments (by Weeks).... .. .. ...... .. .. ... .... .9-12
Auction Averages, California........................ .............. 13
Auction Averages, Florida .............. ..........................*13
F. 0. B. Prices, Florida.........................................13--1
Destinations of Florida Oranges................................. 16--19
Destinations of Florida Grapefruit..................*. -........ 20--22
Destinations of Florida Mixed Citrus..............".............23-26
Destisatlona of Florida Tagaecinee.............. .. ...............
Recapitulation of Destinations ......................................... 28
Unloads Florida Oranges in Principal Cities..........................29
Unloads Florida Grapefruit in Principal Cities.................. -* 30
Car-lot Shipments of Florida Mixed Citrus by Loading Stations....31--32
Car-lot Shipments of Florida Grapefruit by Loading Stations......32--33
Car-lot Shiptrents of Florida Oranges by Loading Stations......... 33-34
U. S. Standeads for Citrus Fruits (Florida)......................35--37


















... .*
.. ..* .. ..

I'. S:. : :






UNITED STA~iS ~ETARIMT-T OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of AgricultuifI economics
Florida State 1arketin g Bureau Coopnrating



I!AREMT IIEWS SERVICE ON FUITS AND VEGETABLES



MATING FLORIDA CITRUS

S~J lIliY OF 1,927-28 EASON

The Bureau of Agricultural :Economics in cooperation with the Florida
State Marketing Bureau. issued daily market reports at Orlando from Novern-
ber 1927 to March 1920. The office w .s closed .earlier than usual due to
the smaller crop and shorter season.

Citrus people generally will long remember the 1927-28 season due
principally to high prices. .Seldom have growers received such good
prices for fruit.and seldom have dealers exerionced a season where price
fluctuations have been so ,even. To those who endeavor to interpret the
S future of.the citrus industry there are several things that should be
-taken.into careful consideration. A complete analysis of what has just
transpired should be weighed against what has transpired in recent years
in-so far as possible against conditions which appear likely to be en-
countered within the next few years. It is not only manifestly unfairr
but wholly inexcusable to endeavor to predict the future by -.-hat happened
for a single year. Everybody recrnbers only too well the disastrous
seasons encountered since production became heavy and realize that a
repetition of these years may again be etxprienced. lWhen contrasted
w. ith profitable seasons, it is often difficult to arrive at a satisfac-
tory conclusion, and yet, it might be well to state here that even dur-
ing seasons of low prices the grover who has exercised care in selecting
his groves and in the growing and marketing of his fruit has as a general
rule made a fair return from his investment. Furthermore, it is just as
unfair to form an opinion from what happened during a bad year as it is
from what happened during a good year. An average over a period of years
is the only fair conoarison.

A combination of circumstances contributed to the high prices of
the 1927-28 season. In the first placo the crop was short--the October
4o first Governrirnt estimate placing total production of Florida oranges
Sand grapefruit at 14,500,000 boxes.; California ,ias at least tvo weeks
late with. shipments of NJavels; quality of the oarly bloom Florida fruit
was unusually good, and decay throughout the season w,.is rather negli-
gible as there ?,'is -very little rain. Somaonhat contrary to expectations
S the usual reaction following a freeze failed to uaterializo although
during a period of a week or so -w hen the 1uitionable fruit was being
moved there were some declines.. ith to-rporaturos of from 23 to 28
degrees through the greater portion of the citrus '.)lt the actual damage
proved to be ligE'ter than might be supposed, which was due no doubt Mrin-
ly to the dormant condition of the troeo and prevailing dry v eather.

1i0 6.'..







PRODUCTION GAINING

There is, perhaps, nothing that concerns the grower quite so much
as increased production.. True, the consumption of grapefruit has in-
creased by leaps and bounds during the last 'ten years, and it is also
likely that an analysis of the orange consumption would also show some
increase. On the other hand, there is a point of saturation for all
farm commodities. Increase in the United States orange and grapefruit
supply in the last fifteen years'has'been over five times as rapid as the
gain in population, which means that it is absolutely necessary to increase
consumption to a point that it will ke p pace with'the increase in pro-
duction. Although the citrus- crop has its ups and downs, especially in
Florida the potential production in'that state is fully twenty million
boxes, as demonstrated in the -lq3-24 season.

In this connection, it.eould.be well to consider the non-bearing..
trees as shown by the 1924 release by the'.Bureau of Census. 'This showed
1,542,111 grapefruit trees and 8,599,517 orange trees, or a little more
than one-third as much as. the total bearing acreage. California is in-
creasing its grapefruit acreage, especially in the Imperial Valley, but
this is not of sufficient importance to cause immediate concern. Ari-
zona is forging ahead with new acreage, but is not yet an important fac-
tor in;'the grapefruit industry. Both Texas and Florida have planted con-
siderable new grapefruit acreage since 1924, and many authorities are
of the opinion that grapefruit has reached the point of over-production.
This statement will undoubtedly be questioned in some quarters, but to
question a thing without backing it up with sound argument is not very
convincing.

The statement that orange production has also reached the saturation
point is also heard quite frequently, and if we look no farther than the
disastrous years encountered within the last ten years and the increase in new
acreage, it would seem that there is plenty of room for this statement.
Production of oranges in California increased from eighteen million
boxes in 1924 -- 1925 to at least 28,500,000 in 1926-27 season. In ad-
dition, the lemon crop increased to 7,200,000 boxes and grapefruit to
600,00.0 boxes, and the potential production of this state is figured
at, conservatively, 38,000,000 boxes of citrus fruit.

FOREIGN MARKETS

Grapefruit consumption in the British Isles and Continental Europe
has shown a rapid increase since 1922. It appears regularly on the menu
of the better-class hotels and in the better grade fruit stores. While
the'total annual export of grapefruit is not considered large, from the
viewpoint of total production, still rith proper advertising, it is not
unreasonable to suppose that within the next five years it might easily
be doubled or even trebled.

A special representative of the United States Department of Agri-
culture, who has spent several years in Europe making a study of the fruit
and vegetable markets, recently issued a very interesting survey on the
grapefruit consumption abroad. One of the outstanding features of this






-3-

article.was a recommendation. tat shipped .have prnhted on the grape-
fruit wrappers complete instructions for serving. Heretofore, exporters
have relied mainly upon printed inistructions"plaed in the hands of European
dealers, but it v.as found that comparatively few of these printed forms
found their way into the hands of those who'prepared the grapefruit for
eating. Medium sizes .are generally preferred in the foreign markets and
best grade fruit also is, aid to meet'iith much better demand than medium
or inferior stock..:

Exports of citrus fruit from theUnited States are mostly to Canada.
Of 2,700,000 boxes of oranges shipped.outside the country during 1926,
more than 2,200,000 boxes went to Canada and about 235,000 to the.United
Kingdom. About fourfifths of the 296,000 boxes of lemons exported last
year found a market in Canada. Exports of grapefruit to the United Kingdom
have shown a more consistent gain than any other citrus fruit. That ter-
ritory received during.1926 about 160,000 boxes of United States grape-
fruit, compared with only 10,000 five years ago. Canada took approxi-
mately half-of the total 1926 grapefruit exports of 411,000 boxes. The
United States Department of.Agriculture, BurQauof Agricultural Economics,
has available a series.of.special mimeographed reports dealing v:ith foreign
markets for citrus fruit, as well.as the prediction and marketing of these
fruits in other countries.

Imports of fresh grapefruit from Cuba and the Isle of Pines occur
chiefly between August and November, though light shipments arrive during
other months. Arrivals from Porto Rico are very heavy during the last
four months of the year and reach a second but smaller peak in the spring.
Between 500 and s00 carloads usually come from the Cuban territory dur-
ing the course of a year, and 'as. any as .1,900 carloads from Porto Rico.
In addition, shipments of prepared grapefruit--mostly the canned product--
from Porto Rico have been rapidly gaining; continental United States re-
ceived more than 9,000,000 pounds of the prepared grapefruit during 12
months ended June, 1927.: Limited quantities of oranges also are received
from Porto Rico.

Lemon imports are almost ,holly from Italy or Sicily. Perk of
1,600,000 boxes was reached in the fiscal year nd.d1O00923. The
next three years, imports ranged bet~ 1,00,000 boxes, ut the fiscal
year closed last June svw a sharp reduction to 660,000 boxes. Competition
and distribution of the California lemon crop has been greater each season.
The bearing acreage of lemon trees in-Sicily also has bcen decreasing, and
currency and wage problems recently, .ave been restricting exportations.
These conditions, together with..the TU. S. tariff of 2 per pound, should
be somewhat favorable for the .California lkmon industry at least during
the next year or two. Lemonrproduction in California, plus the imported
product, is-already greater than the consumptive requirements, according
to statements issued by a leading organization interested in lemons.

FEDERAL-STATE INSPECTION AVAILA LE

For a number of -years fruit ?nd vegetable inspection has been avail-
able to the shippers of Florida through a joint arrangement between the






4. S. Departmentof Agriculture and the florida State Marketing Bureau. It
is not deemed necessary to go into details regarding the service, nor to
dwell at length upon its merits, as most shippers are doubtless at least fam-
iliar with the general workings of the inspection service. However, it
might be well to state that the service, generally speaking, has shown an
increase from year to year, and shippers who have made it a part of their
marketing program from year to year, become more enthusiastic each season.
The supervising inspector in charge of this work maintains'an office in
Orlando from about October first to June first. Communications regarding
the service during the period when the Orlando office is closed should be
addressed to the Bureau.of Agricultural Economics, Fruit & Vegetable
Division, Viashington, D. C., br to the Florida State Marketing Bureau,
S204 St. James Building, Jacksonville; Florida. Government grades on citrus
fruits may be obtained from 'ashington.

QUALITY AND CONDITION

While the early varieties of oranges were late in coloring, the
quality of early bloom Florida citrus was unusually good. The late bloom
fruit, however, was about the same as in other years, ranging from fair
to poor, which was reflected in the wide price differential between the
early and the late bloom. There was very little rain during the main har-
vesting season, which reduced decay to a minimum and which is also be-
lieved to have contributed materially to the fine quality. The fact that
the Florida green fruit law was extended to November 30 last season un-
doubtedly accounted for the improvement in quality of early shipments.

CONCLUSION

The basic principles of citrus growing and marketing are essentially
the same as those in other lines of business, and while this may not seem
to be true in the face of certain results obtained, yet in the final
analysis it will be found to be correct.' In making this statement, the
fact is not lost sight of that there are few, if any industries fraught
with so much uncertain% as exists in the fruit and vegetable industry,
and yet it is undoubted'possible to materially reduce what might ordinarily
be termed the normal element of risk by proper application of recognized
methods of growing and marketing, and making the best use of valuable
government information on the various phases of the fruit and vegetable
industry.

Last season was an unusually profitable one, and fortunately it came
at a time when it w-as most needed. The shipper who made the remark that
the crop marketed itself perhaps spoke better than he knew, but in broad-
casting this remark, he could have performed a real service by adding
that while this is true, still greater progress could have been obtained
by closer cooperation and greater care in all of the phases of growing
and marketing.

Undoubtedly years of heavy production are ahead. It may not be the
next year, or the next year, but they are sure to come, and during these
years of heavy production, it is going to take something more than opti-
mism and individual effort to keep on the right side of the ledger.









Many plans and suggestions for bettering the industry have been dis-
cussed during the past ye-r. Some have been discarded and-some are still
being considered. Growvers and shippers dach have their ovn ideas as to
what should be done to correct the faults of citrus growing and marketing,
and it is quite likely th:.t in time--out of .ll these opinions and sug-
gestions--something definite '.ill crystallize. It may be that not any one
of the present plans would cure even majority of the ills of the in-
dustry, but on the other hand, there seems to be some good in all of them,
and perhaps the best padt of the whole thing is it shows that the growers
and shippers .~re thinking, and thinking quite seriously.

BULLETINS ON CITRUS FRUITS, AVAILABLE FROM U. S. DEPART.ENT OF
ACRI CULTURE

FB-794, Citrus Fruit Improvement.
DB-924, Tear-Stain of Citrus Fruit.
DB-l11, Citrus Scab.
FB-933, Citras-Fruit Insect Control in Florida.
FB-1309, Common MIealy Bug on Citrus in California,
FB-1321, Fumigation of Citrus Trees for Insect Pests.
FB-1343, Culture of Citrus Fruits in the Gulf States.
DB-965, Argentine Ant in California Citrus Orchards.
Db-993, Composition of California Lemons.
DB-1159, Coloring Satsuma Oranges in Alabema.
DB-1237, Organization and Development of a Cooperative Citrus-Fruit Mar-
keting Agency.
DE-1255, Inheritance of Composition in-Fruit through Vegetative Propa-
gation,--Bud Varieties of Eureka and Lisbon Lemons.
DB-1261, -Operating Methods and Expense of Cooperative Citrus-Fruit Mar-
keting Agencies.
DB-1362, American Fruit and Produce Auctions.
DB-1367, Coloring Citrus Fruit in Florida.
DB-1368, Cold Storage of Florida Grapefruit.
DB-1435, Economic Aspects of Citrus-Fruit Growing in Polk County, Florida.
DB-1414, Management Problems of Cooperative Associations Marketing
Fruits & Vegetables.
DB-1474, Citrus Melanose and Its Control.
DB-1483, Bud Selection in the Valencii Orange,--Progeny Tests of Limb
Variations.
DC-206, Net Feature of Bud Vari:ation in Citrus.
DC-215, Commercial Control of Citrus Scab.
DC-232, By-Products from Citrus Fruits.
DC-259, Commercial Control of Citrus Melanose.
DC-293, Commercial Control of Citrus Stem-End Rot.
FB-1096, Frost & Prevention of Damage by It.
FB-1333, Pruning Citrus Trees in the Southwest.
FB-1447, Citrus-Fruit Growing in the Southwest.

THE FOLLOWING CAT BE FPURCHASED-FROM SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS,
GOVERNMENT POINTING OFFICE
FB-674, Control of Citrus Thrips in California and-Arizona, 5
FB-1011, Woolly '1hite Fly in Florida.*Citrus Groves, 5c
DB-494, Humidifier for Lemon-Curing Rooms, 5'






BULLETINS ON CITRUS FRUITS (CON.)

DB-623, Bud Variation ih Washinaton Navel Orange, i5
DB-6241 Bud Variation in Valencia Orange, 25.
DB-813, Bud Variation in the Eureka Lemon, 254
DB-815,::Bud V.ariation in the Lisbon Lemon, 25~
-DB-821, Frost Protection in Lemon. Orchards,, 10
DB-8S5, Black Fly of Citrus.and.Other Subtropical Plants, 20 ..
DB-1040, Control of Citrophilus Mealybug., 5t
DB-1117, Natural Control of Citrus Mealybug in Florida, 5 4

PRODUCTION

The figures in this ta:bli :of production include fruit consumed on
farns, sold locally, and used for manufacturing purposes, as well as that
shipped. The figures do not include'fruit which ripened on the trees
but v.hich wvas destroyed by frbtzing or storms prior to picking. TPe
figures include tFanerines and s-ttsuTas, the .former having reached moder-
ate proportions in Florid.d and the crceage in that St'te is increasing
rapidly. For California the figures relate to the crop produced from
the bloom of the year shown, fruiting through the -,-inter and through
the spring and summer of the follovrin year being picked from November 1
of the yeA.r sho-n to October 31 .of the following ye:.r. Fruit not picked
until after thie letter d-aieis -included v.ith the crop of the following
year. For all States except C.ali-fornia the estimates include-all' fruit
picked after about September 1 'of the year shown.

Production of Citrus Fruits, by States, 1922-1927

Oranges

STATE .g122 -1923 a194 1925 1926 1927

Boxes Boxes Boxes Boxes Boxes Boxes

Calif. 20,106,000 24,137,000 18,100,O00 24,200,000 2,167,000 .22,500,000
Florida 10,200,000 12,900,000 11,600,000 9,100,000 10,700,000 10,000,000
Alabama 350,000 450,000 1,OCO 200,000 150,000
Arizona 81,000 s6,000 60,000 36,000 75,000 -
Louisiana 60,000 75,000 75,000 100,000 150,000 200,000
Miss. 45,000 55,000 27.000 42,000
Texas 4,000 6,000 12,000 10y,U00 20,000 30,000
Gra-efrui t


Calif. 394,000 363,00oo0 37,000 00,000 650,000 720,000
Florida r,600,000 5,400,000. 3,600,000 7,300,000 7,gOO,000 O.500,000
Arizona 44,000 65,000 67,00,000 7,000 75,000
Miaa. 1,000 1,000 -
Texas 35,0o0 65,000 211,000 200,000 340,000 490,000

Lemons


5,125,000 ,176,000 JOJbigL


Calif. 3,400,000


6,732,000


_ .


6,400,000


- r I









S.Number of Orange-and GCrapefruit Trees of Bearing Age

The figures shown are approximates only. They ?ire intended to repre-
sent the numbers of citrus trees on farms and old enough to produce fruit
in the year shown. The figures no doubt include some small trees produc-:
ing a negligible quantity of fruit.. The enumerators of the 1910 and 1920
census asked for orange trees and also for other subtropical fruits. In
this table tangerine trees have been included with other orange trees..
The 6numeretors of the 1925 census asked only for the number of orange ...
trees and the figures may include only part of the tangerines. "' addition
to the numbers shown there are in. some sections a considerable number of
trees on properties that z-ere not listed 's farms by the Census Bureau.

Orange (.g)



State .1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 198 ...


Fla. 4525000 5125000 6025000 7306000 7601000 S546000
Calif 15473000 15787000 15868o00 15973000 16230000 16475000 16698870 160ooooo
Ariz; 53000 60000 680000 77000 -
Ala. 660000 1500000 11700000 275000 300000 -
La. 119000 128000 138000 151000 153000 163000 -
Tex. #116392 #1995744

Gra:pefruit


tatM. 1Q21


2344ooo
325000
25000


1Q32


2544000
3540ooo


1 Q2


2644000
366000


1ap2L


2970000
378500
39000


1lQ2


2a41000
S394000
-9oo


IQP26


1927


304oo000 -
447500 560070 700000

#33 50A147331


(2) Including T.ngerines.
(4) From records of Division of Crop .nd Livestock Eftimates.
(*) Planted 90 trees to the acre.
(#) Trees four ye:rs old -nd older in lo-v.r Rio Grande Valley; survey of
Plant Iuara1ntinae nd Control Administr tion, July 1, 1926.


Following are tht 1927 Californi* figures. (0r.,ngs)
Bearing
Navels..........--. --3,573.50
V.slncis.a.......... 7,857,630
Miscellaneous....... 267,390


Non-bearing
197,550
1,444,860
9,900


qi.,af.A I OPI I PLL 1 q 2 r-,


1932____






Compar. tive Shi-pents-cf lorids Citrus

..... ... Ornes. : .; Grapefruit. Mixed Citrus
Season (Including T ngerins')"

1920-21 .20,g59 -cars ..: 11,115. cars. (Not sho'.n)
1921-22 15, 718a : .. 12,943 ". "
1922-23 23,006 *. .., 16,99 2,631. cars
1923-24 33,431 .19,614 3,60o
1924-25 25,091 20,b.7 4,226 "
1925-26 19,625 14,269. .' 3,565 "
1926-27 22,536 .7 "" 5.313 .
1927-28 16,437 1 . .i$4 . 6,218i "


Comparative Shipmen'ts. of .California Citrus

Or:nges Gr-pefruit Mixed Citrus
Season --- - ---

1920-21 46,g44 cars 45)l cars ":
1921-22 2 ,376 ...... ...... "- 503 ". -U ............ ...-.", ....
1922-23 48,346: 507 .'. l 103.ccrs
1923-24' 44,905.: 46.. :.'1424 I -
1924-25 34,439.. 4.'49'" 1148 "
1925-26 47,017 546 ." 1 105 "'
1926-27 53,511 597 1639 "'
1927-28 # 41.556. 741i 4,1571 "
(#) To October 1. ................-..... ......


-8-


~ ~ ' ' '







.:.CBiLOT SHI ^ENTS OF ORANGES -BY WEEKS
.KdAIROT SHI YENTS 07 OANGE B3Y-WEEKS


.(Including Tangerines)
S.lorida alifornia . All Others Totals
V-eks 1927-251 12&-2. 1927-2 192i 27 [192 7-2 i 192o-27 .1927-2g 1926-27


Sept. 4-10
11-17
18-24
Sept. 25-Oct.l
Oct. 2-3
9-15
16-22
23-29
Oct. 30-Nov.5
Nov. 6-12
13-19
20-26
Nov. 27-Dec.3
Dec. 4-10
11-17
13-24
25-31
Jan 1-7
s-14
15-21
22-25
Jan. 29-Feb.4
Feb. 5-11
12-1'
19-25
Feb. 26-,ar.3
Mar. 4-10
11-17
1'-24
25-31
Apr. 1-7
o-14
15-21
22-2S
Apr. 29-May 5
. May 6-12
13-19
20-2b
* May 27-June 2
June 3-9
10-15
17-23
24-30


0
-I
9
60
120
206
369
314
491
771
935
1030
1162
1396
575
477
1029
1054
373
510
624
4s9
372
433
485
499
376
361
373
306
265
230
221
150
12o
92
50
29
7
4
5
2


1


10
95
214
197"
225
375
926
1135
1383
1753
1421 .
577
646
1222
993
60s
599
1007
1013
IO34
1034
769
712
559
439
553
613
595
455
322
272
207
172
141
79
53
29
21
12


211
101"
32
449
1319
ldis
13 89''

4179
955
661
792
934
941
1037
934
.1126
1046
1297
1341
11o4
1210
1240
1366
1207
1134
1132
11l
1246
937
672
632
626
595


3o6

355
1001
-833
1596
1039.
764
'675
964
S35
999
1145
1169
3183
430
1167
1234


1416
1060
1466
1623
1902
1834
1791
1i44
1399
1369
1112
1207
1231
1095
* ;60


1
4
27
71
1
36 --
36
51
55
26z
27
26
20
11
14
17
8
5
g
5
-


9
61
1 124
3 233
-- .440
- 606
.7 678
'5 939
q9 1435
,6 2454
;7 3071
.1 2d12
1 15S5
1 1222-
1 1519
1 2023
1056
1310
1563
1445
1464
2 1367
1611
1545
1673
1702
1477
1516
1505
1598
1425
1284
1258
1210
1296
966
679
636
1 o31
597


1
10
96
217
197
531
999
1836
2205
2332
3359
2471
1342
1322
2187
1834
1637
1744
2256
1836
1264
2203
2053
2017
2255
1905
1613
2079
2221
2357
2156
20o3
1751
1571
1510
1191
12o0
1200
1120
372







dARLOT SHIPI5NTS.. E..O.ANES' Y yiKS(CON.)


... (Including Tangerines)
Flofida. California All Others Totals
Weeks 11927-28 1926127 j192{-28(1926-2J .198-2811926-27 19 7


i


July 1-7 7 482 662 462 669
8-.14 729 1044 729 1044
15-21 1 334 1066 834 1069
22-26 2 778 1016 778 1018
July 29-Aug. 4 632 909 632 909
Aug. 5-11 1 609 *957 609 95G.
12-18 1 579 70 57.9 371

Total 16437 22536 365i, 46Q48" 6 1 266 54726 69750


CAKLOT S-:IR.LNTS 07 RAAFEFPUTIT Tr' WEEKS


S Florida Tyexs j All Others To.tals
Veeks 11927-6 19261-27 11927-2811926-27 192 7-26192-2-7 .1927-2- 1926-27
c t 1L- 1 1 1 1


eup* .
4-10
11-17
1i-24
Sept. 25-Oct.l
'Oct. 2-6
9-15
10-22
23-29
Oct. 30--Nov.5
Nov. 6-12
13-19
20-26
Nov. 27-Dec.3
Dec. 4-10
11-17
1g8-24
25-31
Jan. 1-7
g8-14
15-21
22-28
Jan. 29-Feb.4
Feb. 5-11
12-18
19-25
Feb.. 26-,tar. 3
: ir. 4-10
11-117
18-24
25-31


2 "

74
120
261
431
422
2 50
325
563
-399
399
575
372
349
212
275
602
446
249
456
527
394
391
541
497
4;6
4 7
568
375


14
20
o4

196
693
762
421
650
a14
440
291
213
397
572
431
592
772
635
547
605
671
695
713
690
499
610


4
4
7
17
16
1
13
21
32
33
37
26
33
21
17
19
s
13
22
31
17
19
15
26
11
34
21
31
22
25


" 1
4
2
10
19
17
16
"21
26
21
22
15
16
11
17
17
11
19
18
14
14
10
lo
17
30
11
30
36
2S
16
14


6 .1
27 4
8-1 16
137 30
279 S
463 174
465 134
345 252
40o 751
655 836
5077 501
499 706
690 870
482 495
459 345
269 258
307 444
461 635
535 494 -
347 651
520 625
593 692
448 598
433 653
5 71 696
537 733
514 751
518 719
610 515
400 624


.




-11-


CAPQLOQ .SHII EN'TS OF GRAPEFRUIT BY WEEKS


.Fl- ..ida ... Texas i All Others Totals
Weeks 4. 1921-2611926-2 7 1927-2 11926-27 11927-2311926-27 11927-2811926-27

Apr. 1-7. 393 6-'5 1 11- 11 404 637
3-14 "372 --627 .-. ...-.- ... 30 15 402 642
15-21 415 518 1 23 19 438 538
22-25 379 492 1 26 15 405 508
Apr. 29-May 5 404 455 1 18 26 422 482
May 6-12 256 475 11 19 267 494
13-19 195 365 13 7 213 372
20-26 190 205 16 13 206 218
May 27-June 2 169 154 12 11 161 165
June 3-9 102 70 5 9 107 79
10-16 60 34 15 22 75 56
17-23 33 23 5 13 38 36
24-30 13 6 10 21 28 27
July 1-7 19 2 16 7 35 9
S-14 14 17 18 31 18
15-21 13 1 19 15 32 16
22-28 13 1 30 6 43 7
July 29-Aug.4 7 1 16 16 23 17
Aug. 5-11 6 13 13 19 1
12-18 4 10 13 14 13
19-25 1 11 7 12 7
26-31 8 2 8 2

Total 14134 17304 1034 747 952 07 16170 1358


CARLOT SHIBr'ENTS OF I;IXED CITRUS FRUIT


Florida i California All Others I Totals
WeeksI 1927-2,31926-27 11927-29 TIb-27 1192-2811926-27 1927-2811926-27


Sept. 4-10
11-17
18-24
Sept. 25-0ct,l
Oct. 2-8
9-15
16-22
.23-29
Oct. 30-Nov.5
Nov. 6-12
13-19
20-26


13
6.3
131
161
176
S.225
314
247


10
26
41.
64
131
225
219


1
4
13
6s
135
169
190
236
328
265


10
26
41
.68
133
237
230








CARLOT SHIPMENTS OF .MIXED CITRUS FRUIT BY WEEKS


.... Florida I California All Others Totals
Weeks' I .1927-211926-27 .1927-281926-27 1i927-2811926-27 .1927-2g1926-27


Nov. 27-Dec.3
Dec. 4-10
11-17
18-24
25-31
Jan. 1-7
8-14
15-21
22-28
Jan. 29-Feb.4
Feb. 5-11
12-18
19-25
Feb. 26-Mar.3
Mar. 4-10
11-17
is-24
25-31
Apr. 1-7
S.. -14- ..
15-21
22-28 .
Apr. 29-May 5
May 6-12
13-19
20-26
May 27-June 2
June 3-9
10-16
17-23
24-30
July 1-7
S-14
15-21
22-28
July 29-Aug.4
Aue. 5-ll


Total


338
393
544
220
164
272
297
152
192
215
213
205
198
198.
207
157
146
118
111
387
105
81.
67
59
54
44
18
10
6
7


269
323
336
145
194
227
194
145
118
207
229
221
223
212
181
145
125
146
174
1.75
153
90.
101
88
55
35
...32
17
14
11
4

1
4.


6218 5313


7
13
3
4
83
13
34
22
23
30
40
49
59
32
56
62
58
68
45
* "65
42
..24
43
55
.. 65
69
52
38
25
22
43
27
51
42
40
36
41


13
12
16
11
29
31
35
27
21
41
34
24
31
47
42
63
44
38
59
. -.. 53
37
42.
34
34
- .44
56
-..45
62
51'
50
50
41
52
37
40
39
27


7
12



3.


2 352
418
3 550
226
3 174
r 28o
230
1 331
3 174
215
1 245
255
255
259
1 231
263
219
204
186
1 156
152
147
105
110
114
119
113
-70
4s
31
29
43
27
51
42
40
36.
41


142S ll2?Q


AUCTION AVERAGES

Price per box of certain brands .Lt New York. Figures compiled by the Division
of Statistical and Historic-:1 Research. Compiled from New York D;ily Fruit Re-
portei. Monthly averages obtained by taking simple averages of reported averages
of all sales of certain brands.


284
335
"355
156
226
262
230
175
139
249
263
245
254
260
223
208
169
184
234
228
190
132
135
122
99
91
77
79
65
61
54
41
53
41
40
..39.
29


772i ~ 7


41 2q--


--~-` 1







SI.. ..A ES (CON).. .
. .. A)G13-
A dIO AVFACE (oN) ~.


. California (Navels)


Feb. ,ar. Apr"
3'39. 5:'13 71..10
3 56" 4.20 4.41
4l. 1 6,51 6.97
4.17' 3-91 4.60 '
3.50 3-23 4.05
4.9s 5.76 5.72
4.69 4'.- 77 5-74
4.86 4.94 5.36


Jan.
4.22
-4.5 7
3.95
4.53
2, 84
3.68
'4.23
3.S7


Feb'.
6.43
3--94
4.85
4.34.
. 3-02:
3-43'
4.41
4.04


Mar.
6.63
'4.20
6.63
, .4.72
S3.16
5.87
4.95
4.39.


Grapefru.it


5-.11
*5.0I
6.78
4.61
3.49
7-.05
54.9o
s.o6


Florida
Apr.
9.40
4.82
7-15
5.67
3.51
6.43
5.82
5.21


Florida


J n.n
3.1b
4.s6
3.47
3.73
3.00
2.94
4.05.
3.174


i'U,
3.28
'4.30
3.7(3
3.96
2.86
3.00
4.07
4.01


.ar.
3 ,bO
3.60
4.71
3.91
3.63
3-15
2.90.
4.78
4.01


4.05
4.55
4.46
3-910
3.02
4.04
5.37
4.01


- F. 0. B. PRICES-


This bureau started shipping-point-in-formation on February 1, 1927,
and v.s made possible largely because of the fact that many shippers be-
gan using the Governnent grades on citrus fruits, thus affording a definite
basis for quotations, .Prior to that time sales had been made principally
on the basis of brands. or- indi ~d--grades -rather than -n Government
grades, which precluded tht prDticability of quoting the f. o. b. market.


Orang '


1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927,


Dec.
$5- .0
5. 79
6.46'
5.0oo
4.44
4.71
4:67
5.50
6.16


Nov.
2.80
4-. ....
4.13
3.S8
3.55
3.63
6.ao
4.78
6.10


Ja. -
5:98.
4:.96
4.64
4.34
3-50
5-3?
5.0.o
5.36


Dec.
3.95

4.29
4.os
2.68.
3-57
.4.oo
3.49
5.81


1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927


June
4.76
5* 71
5.w
4.67
'435
6.74


May
8.32
5.56
3.06
5.47

7.76
: 591
4. 9


Oct.
$3.16
5.47
3.06
3.69
3.11

7. 80
3.51
3.31


Average
5.70
4.63
6.07
.4.45
3.67
5.94
5.23
5.15


Average
5.91
4.17
5.44
4.65
3.27
4.89
5,07
4.47


1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927


$3. 72
5.31
3-37
3.75
2.89
4.19
4.93
5.21
4.72


jov.
3.67



2.99
3.95
4.20
4.93


,3-29
3.92
3-926
3.86
4.00
2.91
2.39
4.03
3.57
4.qq....


May
5,02
4.54
5.20
3.4S
3.45
4.50
5.07
3.99


Average
3.70
-4-55
4.03
3.70
2.9S.
3.38
4.50
3.94


-


I I I i T I


(







Prices ruled generally firm throughout the season, violent fluc-
tuations, such as have been experienced during many previous seasons,
being entirely missing. The January freeze, uncertainty as to quality of
late bloom fruit and the irregularity at times of California shipments,
were all contribUting .factors in unsettling the market for short periods,
but for the most part factors affecting the market throughout the season
were such .that operators were.abl.e to foretell trends with a reasonable
degree of accuracy. Som hat.contrary to general expectations, cash
buying was.perhaps: no heavier proportionately than..in.previous years, and.
this seems to have been due at least in part to the:even market tone
throughout mostlthe season andi'to a lesser degree to.the excellent carrying
quality of stock,.

Grapefruit, also early, and midSaasonvarieties.of oranges ran heavy
to small sizes, which resulted in heavy discounts for small..nd very small
sizes. .Valencia oranges, however ran much larger than the other varieties..
and sizes of 126's and larger were discounted anywhere from .25 to $1.00
per box. Quotations in the following tables are confined to early bloom
fruit, U, S. grade l, .and to.sizes specified.:

Prevailing .Prices.at Orlando and Nearby Points
Carloads'f.o.b. usual terms(per box) U. S. #1

Oranges
(Early and midseason varieties, except where specified as Vaiencias);

Week Ending (150's.and smaller.for Vaencias. 216.p and larger for others)

1927-28 1926-27' Week "ndinaiig.1927-28 1926-27


Nov. 5 $3.25-3.75
Nov. 12 3.50-4.25
Nov. 19 4.25-5.00
Nov. 26 4.25-4.75.
Dec. 3 3-75-4.-o'
Dec. 10 3.75--.00
Dec. 17 3.75-4.50
Dec. 24 4.00-4.50
Dec. 31 4.00-4.50
Jan. 7 4.00-4.50
Jan. 14 3:.50-4-50
Jan. 21 3.25-4.50
Jan..28 ....4..0Q-.4.50
Note: Valencias mal


(not quoting)
II

n



It
II
It
II


Feb. 4
Feb. 11
Feb. 18
Feb.. .25
"Val. '.
Mar. .3
Val,
Miar. .10
Val.
Mar. 17
Val.
Mar. 24
Val.


tured very early in 1928


$3.75-.4-50 $2.75-3-50
3.75-4-50 2.50-3.25
4.00-4.50 2.60-3.50
4.25-500o .2,7,5-3-50
5.o00 5-50" ..
4.50-5.00 2.75-3.25
5.00-5-50
4.50-4.75 2.75-3:25
5.00-5-50
4.50-5.00 ?2.75-325
4.75-5.25
(no quot.) 2.75-3.25
5.00-5.50r
and other varieties were


through much earlier than in'most seasons.

.. Grapefruit-U. S. #1
(70's and larger, "D" means' Duneah-Variety, "M" Marsh Seedless)

Week: Endi:ng : : .. .:
1927-28 1926-27 eek Ending 1927-28 .1926-27
Nov. 5 $2.90-3.25 '(not quoting) ::eb, 11 $3,75-4.00 $1.90-?.50
Nov. 12 3,00-3.25 Feb. 18 4.00-4.25 2.00-2.50




-15.

Gr ap, e +r i *t: 4 t t-

l eek. nding. . .. ... .. ek. kndini
192 -26 192o-27 1927-2_ 1926-27
Nov. 19 $3.00-3.25 (notot uoting)- F-eb 25 $3.75-4.25 $2.00-2.75
Nov. 26 3.25-3.50 ar. 3 3.50-3.75D 2.50-3.-0D
Dec. 3 3.00-.335 3.75-4.o00
Dec. 10 3.-00-3.25 ar. 10 3 7ar.7-.00 2 r
De,. 7lT"'' 3 .'0-3.50 4- o4. 25
Dec. 2.4'' 3.25-3.50 Mar. 17 3.75-4.o00 2.75-3.oo0
Dec. 31" .'3'-50-3.75 4.0oo0.4);5M
Jan.. ;7 3.35-3,75 Mar. 24 3.75-4.25D 2.50-2. 5D
Jan. 14 '3.00-3.50 4.00-4.50iK'
Jan."2 ':'" 3.0-3.75 '*ar. 31 3.75-'4.25D 2.50-2.S5D
Jan. 28' 3.50-4.25 4. o0-4-. 50m
Feb. ......3'-4. 25 2. 00-2'. 50
Note:"' B'the 'middle of March" ,most dealers had abolished discounts on 0's
ani. 'boy the und of March, quotations were usually on the basis of
," O' 'id larger, with discounts of 25 to 7?5 per box on cars run-
S ning. 'heavy to small end very small'sizes. In raking' an analysis of
thiie season's prices the reader should keep in mi.td that th .above prices
S' "cover U. S. #1 grade only. There were frequently a few cars sold
above the range, and during the latter part of the season consider-
ab'le late bloom stock was sold at considerably less then the above
q potat ions.

DESTITATIONS OF FLORIDA CITRUS

The following tabulations o' the destinations of Florida citrJus
have be:in compiled principally from information contained in the daily
market reports issued at Orlando. It- pill be noted that there is quite
a difference between the totil carlot shipments and the total destinations
shown.. This i-s because the office at Orlando is maintained only during
the main "shipping season, and there is no ray of obtasinirn destinations
on what moves before the office is opened and after it is closed. The
passing' through the Florida gateways, Potomac Yards ahd Cincinnati, cor-
rected by diversions at Savannah, Atlanta and Cincinnati form the basis
of the. .'d&s'tination" figures. There wore a few minor diversion points
from which figures wdre not obtained and these are designated in the
tabult4iohs to distinguish them from consuming markets.

Th'e .tbbl'es undoubtedly give a fairly good picture' of the distri-
bution dArin'g the period the office 'as in operation, but it should be
borne in-mind' that diversions accomplished beyond Potomac Yards, and
Cincinnati,' also beyond the Florid gateways of cars unloaded this side
of Potbmac Yards and Cincinnati, are.not shown. The exports to Europe are
cont*i~id in the destinations shown to the large cities on the Atl-atic
S-aboard., but export 'figures will be found elsewhere .'in this summary.





-16-


DESTINATIONSS OF FjEIjIDA CITRUS,

OBRANGES


ALABAM'A
Birminghem..... 253
Andalusia.........2
Albertvillo.......2
Anniston. ......... 6
Brewton..........1
Dothan ...........14
Demopolis........ 1
Eufaula...........1
Enterprise.........1
Fayette......:...'. .1;
Gadsden......... 6
Huntsville.. ....5
Montgomery ...... 82
Mobile...........32
Opelika ..........2
Ozark...........,.
Selman.......... 23
Sheffield.........2
Tuscaloosa........3
Talladega..........1
Total ...... 39 -.

ARKANSAS
Blythesvilie......2
Arkansas Cityi....1
Fort Smith,.......3
Little Rock.....27
Pine Bluff ........2
Total... ... 35

CANADA
Brantford .......12
Calgary.......... .3
Benefield......... 1
Hamilton......... 4
Montjoli..........1
Montreal......... 57
Ottawa......... ...7
Quebec.......... 15
St. Johns.........4
Toronto.'.........74
',innipeg.........6
Regina............1
Eingston........ .1
London.......... .
Total,,.....lg


COLORADO
Denvur...........2
Pueblo...........1
Total.......3

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport......39
Hartford........84
"anchesturr.......1
Yilton.......... .2
New .,Bef-dfrd. ---... 7
NoBv ritain..... b
New Hav n......94
Nev London;..,...4
Norwalk..........2
'waterbury........
Salisbury.,.....15
South Norwalk..., .
ST tal .....66

DELAVARE
Silmington...... 91
Total ......19

DISTRICT OF COLUL'BIA
Hashington.. ..209

FLORIDA
Jacksonville....29
Pensacola.......24
Tallahassea.....,3
River Junction,.. 1
Chipley.......... 1
Total......5S

GEORGIA
Albanty...........15
Augusta......... 47
Athens............5
Americus......... 2
Adairsville.....1
Cuthbert........1
Columbus........14
Covington.........1
Cordele.......... 3
Cedartown ........2
Clarksville...... 1


Chipl.y.., ........1
Cornelia.... ..2
Dublin.... . -..4
Everett.... .. 35*
Atlanta.........276
Griffin...........7
Inman Yds.........9
Je.sup .......,.....4
Lagrange......... 2
Macon.....,.....
Milleh..i.......X
Monticello........1
Monroe..,t........ 4
Marietta..........2
Rome............17
Statesboro........4
Thalmann.........3S*
Vidalia...........1
Y.aynusborc....,... 2
Yaycross......... 1
Cartersville,..,...1
Savannah......... 25
Total...... 25

ILLINOIS
Catro ............ 4
Champaign.........
Centralia....,....5
Chicago .........462
Bloomington....... 4
Danville ........10
Daecatur... ..... .,.4
Gal.sburg....... 5
Jacksonville......1
Monmouth,.........1
Kewanee.......... 2
Mattoon...........2
Peoria............9
Quincy............1
Rockford...........
Springfield.......4
Streator.........1
Spring Valley .....2
'ounds........... 1
STotal. .....525





-17A


OS~NG~S~~(CON.)


INDIANA
Evansville.......44
Fort Liayne........5
Indianapolis.....114
kokomo'..... .... ...2
La Fayette..".....9
Mari on. ........ .
Muincie: .. ......... 3
Sbuth Bend:.'.....-3
Trrre' autc.....,.1
VIicennes.........3
Total...... 15

IOIA
Burlington. ...-:9
Cedar R,:pids......4
Dubuque ...........4
Davenport......... 5
Mason City........2
.Ottuy ... .'....1
Total.......25

KENTUCKY
Ashland... ...,..2
Bowling Green.....1
Corbin............. i
Burneide.......... 1
Frankfort..........2
Glasgow ..........1.
Danville .......... 1
Harlan............2
Hopkinsville.......2
Junction City.....2
Leighton..........1
Lexington........ 57
Louisville......151
Middlesboro.......5
Owensboro..........7
Pikeville... .....3,.
Paducah... ...,... 10
Somerset......... ..3
Morehead...........1
Richmond........... 1
Total......255

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge..... 14
Lake Charles...... 3
Lafayette........ 4


roi'c'. .......... 12
Ne Orleans.....129
Ruston........... 1
Shreveport.......19
Natchitoches. ...1.
Total.. ....1.. 33

MAINE '
Auburn.... .......1
Portland........29
.ockl&nd..........1
Total.......31

MARYLAuD
Baltiioorc...... .547
Cumberland........2
Hagerstown.......-7
Total......556

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston...........23
Fall iRiver........ 4
Fitchburg.........1
Pittsfield.......11
Sprin'gfield...... 54
W.attOrtown..........2
; atupp........ ...
T.orcester....... 4
Total....-900

MICHiIGA
Alr a......... ... .. 1
Battl, Creek. ....4
Detroit ........ l6
Escanaba. ... ..'.. 1
Flint.............6
Grand Rapids.....22
Holland...........
Jackson........... 1
Salma:, zoo.........2
Lansing... .........5
Ann ,d bor.........1
Decatur....... ..
Total......231

MINNESOTA
inne apolis...... 11
St. Paul........... 6


Winona............2
Lcch,- ster.........
.Total......20

MISSISSIPPI
Brookhaven........2
3olumbus.......... b
Corinth...........2
Clarksdale........2
Greenw:ood.........7
Grc Haz.lhurst........3
Hattiesburg......10
Jackson..........21
Laurel............5
keridian......... 1
.Tupc lo...........16
V.icksburg...........
S Yazoo City.........6
vC Co -nb........... .2
Xosciusko........ 1
Total......109

MISSOURI
Hannibal......... 4
Xapses City......1
S.t.. Louis.......1 3
Ozark.............
Springfield.......
Total......2G5


Kearny,........... 2
Omaha............. 3
Lincoln........... 2
Total... ....7

NEW JERSEY
Morristown........2
Newark...........35
..Paterson.......... 2
Pittstown.........1
Hill ipsburg..... 3
Trenton...........3
Jersey City......14
Total.......60


L.T
'~'"""""'"'~",~`~I;. F~~j~,~~ ,..I.;.
--CI --








DESTINATIONS OF. FLORIDA 'CTRUS

ORANGES .(COw.)


NEW, HAMPSHIRE
Keene .............1
Lakeport........... 1
Peterboro..........1
Total. .......

NEW YORK.
* Albany..........30
-Auburn............ 5
'-Batavia...........3
'Binghampton...... 25
SBuffalo.........100
Elmira............16
Glens Falls.......5
Ithaea. .........4
Johnson City,.....2
Liberty..........2
Jamestown.........
New York City..2518
Niagara Falls.....5
Ogdensburg........ 2
Oneonta........... 3
Poughkeepsie..... 2
Rochester........50
SSyracuse......... 49
Schenectady......20
Troy.............6.
.Lockport..........1
Freshpond..........9
New Hampton....... 3
Lawrence.......... 1
Watertown,........ 2
Yonkers........... 2
To-t-al.....266

NORTH CAROLINA
Asheville........30
Aberdeen., .. .....2
Albemarle......... 1
Burlington........ 9
Charlotte.......102
S* Dunn....... .......1
SDurham............21
Elizabeth City....6
SFayetteville......
Fairmont...........2
Conway......... ....1
Greensboro.......45
Goldsboro.........31


Gastonia.. .... 16
Greenvillc........3
Henderson........3
Hickory..........14
High Point........
Hamlet............5
Hendersonville....
Lexington..........1
Xinston'...........9
Kelford:...... ......1
*Lumberton........ .4
Laurinburg........
Littleton........ 1
La Grange......... 1
Monroe............5
Mount Airy........2
North "ilkesboro..1
New Btrn...........1
Raleigh..........32
Rocky Mount...... 19
SRockingham .........1
Sanford........... 6
Shelby.............4
Salisbury.........5
I ashington........4
tW ldon............
Wilminrgton....... 10
; ilson............7
V inston-Salem....34
VWadesboro.........2
S-Asheboro......:....2
Newton....... :.....2
*Rutherfordtoi......1
Total......45M

OHIO
Akron............. I
Canton.............3
'Cleveland.......341
Cincinnati..... 387
Columbus.........301
Dayton...........37
Hamilton..........2
Lakeview..........4
Marietta...........1
Portsmouth.........
Shelby............3
Springfield.......4


Toledo ...........1
Youngsrtown......,. 11
Evergreen..........
Gre.ensburg ........ 1
.assillon..........3
Marion...........7
ansfild.........
.. .Total.....11 6

OKLAHQOA
Enid..... ...... 1
Oklahoma City..... 1
Tulsa.-.............
2otal........4

pE SYLVANIIA
,.itoona..........21
Allentown........ 12
Bethlehem .........6
Carlisle..........1
Chambersburg......
Huntington.... *..4
Harrisburg...... 31
Hazleton........ 22
Kane..............*
Lansford......... 3
Lebanon..........1
.Lancaster.. ......7
Leighton.......*.*
Mt. Carmel......* 2
N>wburgh. ..***.. 1
Pottsville ....... 5
Pittsburgh;.....291
Philadepipha.. .1237
Reading.......... 19
Scranton .......-54
.ShamOki ...... ...2
SheAandcah ........1
Tyrone. ..........1
yilIkes-aarre.....36
Villiacsport......8
Uniont n ......... 2
York .............S*
Tayneiboro........1
?otal.....1781

RHODE SlND
Provfdence...... 16
Newyprt.......... .2
:Total......118







-19-


DO.NGES (CON ,
OKANGES (CON.)


SOUTH CAROLINA
Anderson.......... 8
Belton...... .;.. .
Columbia.........71
Charleston.......61
Chester.. ..... ..1.
Conway ......... .. .
Florence........197*
Greer........ ....1
Greenville.......44
Lake City......... 3
Orangeburg....... 14
Rockhill........,.3
Spartanburg..,. .26
* Sumter. ............ .
Greenwood.........14
Union.............2
Yemasseee.......... 1
Total......456

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls...... .2

TENNESSEE
Bristol..... ....21
Clarksvil-le.......7
Cookeville....... 1
Chattanooga.. ..107
Fayetteville......9.
Humboldt...... ....1.
Johnson City.....11
Jackson..........16
Xingsport.........1
Knoxville.........55
Martin............ 1
Lexington.........3
Milan............ 2
Memphis.........162
Nashville....... 112
Tullahoma......... 1
Union City........1
Lebanon...........1
Morristown........2.
Shelbyville .......
Total.....,.515.


TEXAS
EXAS..lrillo..........2.
Beaumont..........5
Dallas.... ........ 17
Fort Worth.......7
Houston.......... 14
-San Antonio.. ...... 2
Corsicana........
vaco... ..... .. 5..
Tyler,.... -.....
Total.,.....54

VERMONT
SBurlington........5
'h4it, River Junct.2
Newbury............
Total..i.......

VIRGINIA
Alexandria%>. ....3
Batesviller t.....1
Cartersville ...... l
Charlottesville...7..
Danville ....... .14
Harrisonburg,..-. 5
Lynchburg........27
Martinsville......2
Norfolk .... ..... .81
Orange...... .: ....1
Petersburg....... 14
Richmond.,.. ....106
Staunton..........5
Portsmouth .........3
South Boston...... 2
Jackson........... 1
Total.......273

WASHINGTON
Seattle...........
Spokane........... 2
Total........5

WET VIRGINIA
Bluefield........s
Charleston.......10


Hinton............ 1
'Iuntington.......11
Parkersburg ......4
Welch............1.
Hazelton.......... 1
Logan.......... --3
.-iheeling,,......"..15
Total.......54
TISCONSIN
Ashland.......*....
Grcn Bay........2
Oshkosh..., *....... 2
Racine............ 2
Milwaukee........31
Janesville........1
Eau Claire..,.....1
Total.......40






-20-


DESTINATIONS OF FLORIDA CITRUS


ALABAMA
Birmingham.......53
Montgomery.......31
M.o.bilec.... ........ 11
Sylacaugg .........
Wintfi.eld..-:. . ..1.'
Selma. .........
S To.t.al...:. ...104

ARIUN SAS
Fort. Sith.........3
Little Rock...-...23
Pine Bluff..,... ..1-
Arkansas City.....L
Tot.al.'...... 23

-.4 D .-
Brantford......... 9
Calgary..........7. 7
Edmonton. ........ 6
Lethredge..........
Hamilton...........2
Kitchener.........1
Montreal.........55
North Bay.........1
Ottawa........... 11
Quebec ...........4
Saskatoon.........6
St. Johns......... 3
Toronto.......... 35
Vancouver........ 10
Regina............9
St. Catherine..... 1
Total......210

COLORALO
Denver...........71
Grand Junctionl...3
Pueblo............4
Colorado Springs..5
Trinidad........... 1
Total....... J4

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport.......21
Hartford.........52
New Haven........ 57
New London ........2
Norwalk...........1
South Norwalk....1
Total......134


. GPEFRUIT .

DISTRICT OF COLUmBIA
Mashinigtonr; ,,'' .'.'.1"48

DELA..ARE .." .....
Iiilmington.... ....";.I" ".

FLORiIDA
Jacksonville.. .. .106
Pensacola.........2
River Junction.... 1
Total.'.... 109

G E O r G I A ' .
Albany............ S
~augusta ..........6
At.hens ............
Columbus.......... 2
Decatur...........1
EVerettl........ 39*
I nman Yards ...... 14*
Jesup .............7*.
Lagrange........... 1
Macon ............14
Rome ............ 2
Thalmann.........2*
t otal......122

IDiO '
Boise...........6
Pocatollo.........1
Twin .f.ll .......1
Tot l..........g
ILLINOIS
Cha~mpaign:.......)
Chicago '...... .63
Cairo.............. 2
Bloopiington......16
Dinville .........6
Decatur......... 7
Dixon.............2
E. St. Louis... ..21' .
Galesbur".........5
J,.cksonville. ...10
Joliet ............ 1
Monmouth ..........
Kewarne.. .. ......2
M-attoon. ............ i
Peoria..'.........41
Quincy...........12
Rockford ......... 4
Streator...........1


Springfield......10
Spring Valley.....2
Total....... 6

INDIAIN
Evans ville.......15
Ft. ..ayne... .....23
Indianapolis... .117
.Logansport........5
Mitchall..........1
.uncie............1
South 'ond.......22
Spencer...........1
Terre Haute..... .9
Total.....194

IOTA
Burlineton....... 16
Council Rluffs... .4
Ceda1r .-.oids......5
Dos Moin s....... 24
Dubuque.......... 10
D-venuort........1
,'ason City........
.arshalltown..... .
Ottumwa ......... .1 :
Sponcer............3
Sioux City.......24
waterloo.........5
Ft. Dodg .. .......3

Tot.. ..-.121

ILNS. S
Coffoyville.......2
Hutchinson.........9
Salina............3
Topeks..........20
X iQlita...........17
Ft. Scott.........1
Kane.' s City.......3
Independence ....1
Ft.. Dodge..........1
Dodge City........
Total.......5S

KENTUCXY
Lexincton......... 2
Louisville .......74
Edmonton .......... 1





-21-..


DESTINATIONS -OF; FLORIa DC CITRUS


-~ C -- ~ --(


Paducah ...........1
Total...... 10

LOUISIANA
Monroe- .......... 1
New Orleans......48
Rust'on............ 2
Shreveport.......14
Total .......65

MAINE
Portland..........2S
Rockland.......... 1
Total.......29

MARYLAND
Baltimore.......217
Hagerstown........1
Cumberland........ 2
Total......220

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston .........517
Fitchburg.........2
Pittsfield.......2
Springfield......41
V.atertown.........2
Torcester........ 11
Total......575

MICHIGANI
Aln~P..............1
Bay City..........7
Battle Creek..... 9
Detroit.......-.312
Jackson............7
Kalamazoo......... S
Lansing ..........16
Muskegon.-........4
Port Huron........1
Petosky............1
Menominee........ .
Total...... 67

MINNESOTA
Duluth............
Minneapolis......98
St. Paul-........47
St. Cloud......... 1


Winona........ .
Marshall......... 1
Total......5

MISSISSIPPI
Jackson...........4
Laurel............
Meridianl.........3
Gulfport.........1
Tupelo............
Total.......10

MISSOURI
Hannibal ..........
Joplin...........10
Kansas City.....142
Springfield.......5
St. Louis.. .... 207
St. Joseph.......11
Total.....-353

MONT.W-
Billinzs...........4
Boz.rr-an. .........2
Butte............ 16
Helena...........1
Viles City ........3
C-reat Talls........
Total.......34

NEBRASKA F
Hastings..... .. .5
Lincoln..........18
Omaha............ 4
Kearney..;........ 1
Grand Island......2
Fairbury... .....1
Total.......75

NEVADA
Reno..... ..... ..2

NE&. JERSEY
Newark............ 16
Paterson......... 1
Total.......17
NEL YORZ(
Avoca ............1.
Albany ........... 39


SAmsterdam..........1
Auburn........... .
Buffalo......... 117
Einghamton...... 15
EilTira...........15
Glens Falls.......5
Jairmstovn..... ....3
Kingston..........1
Liberty........... -.10
Nev: York City..1.347
Niagara FaIIN;... .3
*Lakoviews.......-. 5
Ogdonsburg........2
Oneonta...........3
Olean............. 2
Plattsburg........1
Rochester........90
Sodus.......... .. 4
Syracuse.........39
Schenectady...... 30
Troy... .......... 9
Ncw ianrrton. ..o..... 4
Froshpond......... 1
Utica ........... 20
'.atortown......... 5
Total.....1730

NORTH C.AOhLIFA
ibt rde en .......... 2
.Asheville..........5
Burlington........2
Charlotte.........24
Durham............4
Greensboro...... ,12
Gastonia-......... 5
Raleigh.......... 3
Rocky Mount.......3
Sanford...........1
ilmington........ 1
.inston Salem.....6
Total.......68

NORTH DAKOTA
Bismarck.........2
Fargo............. 3
Grand Forks....... 3
Devils Lake.......1
Jamestown .........1
Total.......10








DESTINATIONS OP FLORIDA CtTPUS


OHIO
Akron............27
Canton ...........10
Cleveland........219
D-ayton........... 21
SDe-fiance.......... 1
Easat Liberty...... 5
Lima....... ......5
Hamilton...........1
Mansfield......... I
Cincinnati......209
Springfield.......4
Sunbury .........5.
Toledo...........35
-Youngstown .......31
SEvergreen......... 6
Columbus.... .....10
Total.... ,.300

OKLAHODMA
Chickasha .........2
Enid............ .1
.Oklahoma City....20
Tulsa.... ........ 17
Ponca City........4
Shawnee .. ..........2
Lawton-. ..... ... .3
Muskog.ee.: ...... 1..1
SPawhuska........... 1
.. Guthrie......... .1
.Total..-,....52

OREGON
S.Portland........ 32
Klamath Falls.....1
Total ....... 3

PENNSYLVANIA
Altoona...........10
Allentown.........1
Bradford..........1
Harrisburg......16
Hazelton. ......... 1
Pittsburgh,..... 242
Phi.ladelphia .. .516
eading........... 2
Scranton.........32
Wilkes Barre-..... l4
Erie..............2
Ivilliamsport...-. -
Total......840


GIPEFRrJI T (CON.)

RHCKE ISL F'D .
Providence......57

SOUTH C.lROLIN "
Bloomville. .... .9
Columbia........ .9
Charleston........
Florence..... 123
Greenville. ...'4
Rockhill......... 1
Spartanburg.....,,2
Sumter..... ; ..
-Manning........ 4
Total.....181

SOUTH DAKCOTA
Sioux FIll......6
Rapid City ......2
Aberdeen,.......1.
Total.......9

TENNESSEE
)ristbl.......4
Clarkesville..... 1
Chattanooga..... 70
Jackson..........1
Knoxville.......11
Lexington........1
Iartin.......... 4
Memphi s........ .7 T
Nashville...... .72
Total.....242

TEXAS
Amarillo........10
Beaumont.........1
Dallas..........15
El Paso.........14
Ft. V.orth.......14
Houston ..........7
San Antonio......7
Sweetwater... ...1
Waco............. 3
Austin.......... 1
Jacksonville.....1
Tot-al......74

UTAH
Salt Lake City. ,31


VERIOONT
Burlington........3
St. Johnsbury... .,.2.
:Rutland......... 1
ITotal..... .6

VIRGINIA
Charlottesville,..1
Danville..........1
Uarrisonburg...... '
Harrisburg........4
.Tjynchburg.........9
iTorfolk...... .... .3
Petersburg.......10*
.. Richmond ..... -.._69
Total......230

WASHINGTONI
Spokane..........16
Seattle--.... 51
Bellihiarm ........ 1
.enatch e .......... 1
Tacoma- ..... ..... -.
Total.......72

SEST VIRGINIA
Bluefield.........1
Charleston.......11
Huntington .......1
\,heeling.........*9
,illiamson........
Total.......23

WISCONSIN
liadison........... 5
Milwaukee........94
La Crosse........10
Oshkosh.......... 3
Rucine............2
Stevens Point.....4
Green Bay........12
,au Claire..... .
Total......133

YO/ ING
Casper............6
Cheyenne..........
Total........ 9







-23.'

DF'STII~tTIO!VS -tF-PL0:.,D.ID-*ITRUS


.Athens...........3
.Anniston........6
Bir.mingham ......1
-Cullmnan..........1
-Dothan........... -5
:1ufaula........ 3
Evergreen.. ......1
Gadsden..... :....10
.Huntsville..':... :,' 5
Hardeysvile ..A...1
iMontgomery....... 29
Mobile: ....... .17
Opeiika. ......... 7
Selma....... .... 10
*Sylacauga .......... I.
Sheffield .......1
Scottaboro,........1
Tuscaloosa........2
Talladega.........1
Troy....... -
Total..... 218

ARK -SaSS
Ho t.Springs. .....2
Little Rock....... 6
Pine Bluff........
Texarkana.........2 2
Stuttgart.........1
Total........ l

CANAD .. .
7 London............ 2
Brantford..........9
Montjoli ..........2,
Montreal........ .IS
Ottawa ..... ..... .2
Quebec ............ 3
St. Johns....... 5
: Toronto ........12
Halifax..........2
Kentmere..........
Reddeer--.........1
Edmonton..........1
Total.... 5S

COLORAlO
Denver............4


MIXED `CITRUS

CONNECTICUT
. Bradgeport...... 12.
H&rtford ........ 36
New Bedford ....2..2
.New Hiven...... .,25
*New Lnondo.... 6.
Sor;'1k..... ...'.1
*Norwich. .....
St-a.nford.. 1 .
lbaterbury ........10
viiimniaac.....*2
South Nor alk,.. q9
*.. Total. ....108

DIST:IICT OF COLUMBIA.
i Ic shington.. ;".'.; 3 '

DELA1A E
ilin ton. ......4

FLL.DA.
Jacksonville... .24
Penpacola.......27
.Jeppnings,. .. ...1
'Lall:.hassee ..... .
Total......55

GEORGIA
Alb ny........... 5
.A~u~usta..... ... 26
Athens.... ........ 7
Americus .........1
Columbus ........ 21
Qornelia ......:. :.:-
Dublin... .......1
Everett.... .......15*
Griffin........"..2
ft. Gaines.......1
.Imaa Yd ........1
Jackson.........1
Lar:n' ........ ..- *..8
acon..:........40
SMartin..........-2
t onroe...........3
1arietta... ......
om . .:. . .. .9.1
Stat sboro.......4
Th,' luan= ........19*


Tifton..........'..1
Vidalia............2
Ivaynesboro........4
Total...... 1 ,7

ILLINOIS
Carbondale.......--
Champaign......... 1
Chicago..........174
Bloomington...... 5
Danville..........3
Decatur...........1
Eldorado... ......3
E. St. Louis...... 3
Galesburg........2
Jacksonville......3
Monmouth..........1
La-Salle..........
Metropolis........1
Peoria ...........5
Rockford..........2
Robin-son ..........
St'roator... ... ... 1
Shelbyville.......
Total...... 209

INDIANA
Evansville........9
Indianapolis.....29
Kokono............ 1
Logansport........2
La Fayette........3
Mitchell..........
Marion............1
Muncle............ 1
New Albany........1
Seymour.,........ l
Terre-Haute......1
iUo bs ....... )v


Sur.lington........3
Cedar apids...... 1.
Rivur Junction....3
.at'erloo ...'. .- .1
Hinton...........
Total........ 9





..S .i..T.0 . .S i....... . ...S


KENTUCKY
Ashland...........2
Bowling Green.....2
Danville..........1
Glasgow........... 1
Harlan.... ...... '..1
Hopkinsville......1
Lexington......'.20
Louisville.......35
Lebanon ...........2
Mayfield..........1
Middlesbb'ro. '..'....4
Murray .......... 1
Owensboro..'......1
Pikeville.,.....3
Paducah.........5
Somerset..........1
Winchester....... 1
Mansfield........ 1
Total. ......83

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge.......5
Donaldsonville... .1 Sa
Lake Charles....... '
Lafayette.... ....1
Monroe..... ... .4
New Orlean........ 16
Ruston...........1
Shreveport....... .3
Rayville..........1
Total.......5

MAINE
Bangor............1
PortlanC........10
Rockland...........4
Waterville.... ..1I
Total.......16

MAAYLAND
Baltimore....;..183 ''
Cumberland.;......2
Frederick..........
Hagerstown.......11
Total.......197


YASSACHUSETTS
Boston..........254
Concord...........
Fall River........
Fitchburg....... '..1
Pittsfieldl......-'. :4.2: "
Sprinjfield..... 1: -
v' atuppa, i 4.. ...* '
tLinchester;........2
Y orcester...... 2 :
.North- Adams.... ..1'
New Bedford....... ':
Bradford... ..i.. 1
Total.....319


Meridian.........14
Natchez...........12
Starksvills.......2
Tupelo...........13
Later Valley......1
Vicksbure........
Mc Cobi.*........
-total.......

MISSOURI
Jefferson City....1
Kansas City......10
St. Louis.........54
Total........5


MI CIGG:AN... : ONT-'JA
Alma. ........ .1 Shelby. ..........1
Detroit ..........54 Havre.............1
Escanaba.;,* .,,:,..,.-2 :... Total.........2
Flint.",........ .3
Grand Rapids .......6 NEBRASK
Jackson............1 ..... Lincoln...........2
St. Johns. :,.....;. Omaha............2
ult Saint Marie.......1 Total.........
Manistee........ ..:, NEVADA
Total ...... 70 eno.............. I


MINNESOTA ......
Duluth. ...........2
Minneapolis......14
liinona......... 1
Total......17. '

MISSISSIPPI .
Biloxi... .. ... 1 ;.
Brookhaven...... ..2'
Columbus...... ... *
Corinth..,,...... .. 3,
Cla rksdale....... .2
Greenwhood.......'.-.
Gre envilce. -. l ... .
Grenada.....' : .....
Gulfport,..-. ,.,-..'..3 : '
Hat t i'esburg..'. .... -7' '
..Jackson........9
Laurel...........5


NE. JEiSEY
Glassboro.........2
Newark..........1.
Paterson...........1
Trenton.........2
Jersey City.......4
Total........

NET YOiK
Albany.........12
Amsterdam. .......
Buffalo,,........54
Binghamton....... 18
Catskill.........3
Cortland..........2
Elmira........9
GenevaO..........3
Glens Falls.......2
Eudson.... .......1
*


.










DESTINATIONS OF'FS F ,f-CfD-T.4.US

.:IYD CITRUS


NEI YOCK (CON)
Janestown .........5
Malone............ 1
New York City..lO06
Niagara Falls.....1
Ogdensburg........2
Olean.............6
Plattsburg.........2
Rochester........ 35
Sodus............. 2
Syracuse.......... 2
Saratoga Springs..2
Schenectady .......3
Troy..............7
Utica.............
Vatertown.........4
North Bay.........1
Total.....1298

NORTH C.JTOLIN.A
Aberdeen ......... .2
Asheville ........21
Albemarle......... 1
Charlotte........30
Dunn............. 1
Durham...........12
Elizabeth City....4
Fayetteville.....-9
Greensboro.......12
Goldsboro.........15
Gastonia...........6
Greenville........3
Hickory...........7
Hamlet............ 4
Hendersonville....2
Kinston............5
Lumberton......... 1
Laurinburg........1
La Grange..........2
Morganton.........1
Yonroe............ 6
Mocksville........1
Newbern........... 6
Murphy............ 1
Raleigh...........19
Rocky Mount.......10
Sanford...........
Statesville......-'l
Shelby........ : 4
Salisbury.. ,;'.~ '14
1Vashington.'*-.'... .4


'Weldon......... '.. 5
.*miLiinton .';. ....9
'.il son.'.'.'.'.' .. '.. 4
binstodri-'Srif : '...16
Warren 'Pl"ine'.... .
Tadesb 'ro .'.'.'.'.'... .


OHIO
Akron....... ..... ..3
Bel l. foh'? 3 ine'.'.'.'. I'
Canton'.'...........1 .
Clevlan'd'........ 45
Columbh's'.'. .. '. 92
Dayton.'. .;'. ... '4
Delarvare'. '.'.', '. . 3
Cincinnati'. ',.' ..127
Mariotta.........2
,ansfiejd.,., .... .. 1 .
Portsmouth.'.......
Shelby.......... .6
Springfield.......6
Toledo...........15
Troy..............2
Youngstown.........7
Zanesville........6
Evergreen.........1
Ironton..........1
Frecmont.......... 1
Total.......328

OKLAHOiMA
Oklahoma City.....3

OREGON
Portland..........2

PENNSYLVANIA
Altoona.......... 11
Allentown..........3
Chambersburg.-.... 4
Conncllsville.....1
DuBois...........,
Harrisburg.......19
SHaszl'ton. ,...... .2
' ':: 's. ... ; .
'*- Lancaster.....'. i .
Mount Carnnel....'...''.,.
: PIttburg h... 141.'.'
.**. P ad 'pi aia: .. .492 :'.*


R eading...,.....4
Scranton.i.....14
Sh!mokin.........3
Sunbury.........1
ilkesbarre.... 14
.illinimsport.....
;taynesboro.......
York.......... .
Total......2

RHODE ISLAND.
Providence.....

SOUTH CGAOLINa ,
Anderson....... e
Bloonvillu.......
Columbia........2
Charleston...... 3
Flo.rcncc....... .7*
Gr.enville......10
Lake City....2---
Laurens...........
Mullins..........1
Orangeburg.......8
Eockhill........ 3
Spartanburg.....15
Sumter.......... 5
Greenwood.......12
Union..... ......3
Manning..........2
Darlington......1
Richland.........
Total., ...213

TENNESSEE
Bristol.... .... .6
Clarksville... 3.
Chattanooga. .L-
Dyersburg... ....1
Fayetteville ...9
Johnsyn City .....
JacksOni *......
Knoxvi1e ... ...5
Lexingtn ........2
Me Keazie..-....-2
Martin. ,.. .....2
Me,2phis s..;...... 47
Nashville ...... 50
Union City. .,...3
; Rogersville.-.-.1











TENNESSEE (CON)
Burnsville........1
Morristown .......
*Total... -...11

TEXAS
Amarillo... .'.' '. 1"
Beatmont'. .'- .'... '' .
Dallas..... .: ....' '
Ft. i;orth.',: .. ..;2.
Houston'.. . .*., 3
Sweotw..t'er..'.... .1
Paris.............1
Tyler........... ..,,L
Total.......ii'

UTAH ... .. .
Salt Lake City.... -

VEIV:ONT
Burlington........
White -River Junct.4
St. Johnsbkdry.'.. ..3
Ruttanal.... .. J.,... 2"
Newbury. .. .,. .....1
** Total.'-...-.'

VIRGINIA ..
Abingdon....... .3
Alexan::ri.a. .... '.4
Charlottesville...4.
Culpepper-.........1
Danville...........4
Harrisonburg..... 2
Harrisburg........3
Lynchburg,....... .9
Norfolk..........63
Petersburg........54*
Pulaski. .............1
Richmond .........54
Roanoke.-.. ...'.26
Staunton...... ..,
inchester.......
Portsmouth.. .... .2
"Total. . .23 9


DESTINATIONS OF07"L CXTiS

.... ....*.;.. i C.cz.GITRsU .- .

V. SHINGTON..
Seattle......... .2

WEST VIRGINIA
Bluefield...'. .'. ',
Clarksburg.. .'.... 6.
Charleston......' ,..
Hunting on.... .5
h4eppling ........,2
Haxaelton,.. ..,,...
Total.......22

wISONSIN '
Madi son'. : .'.....- .
1ilwaukee. .. "/ ..- 27
La Crosse.. ..';:...1
Othkosh........... 1
Itacine. ... -. ,* ,.. 2
Green Bay. ..... ..2
Total'...... ,35


(*):Diversion points.


.,.I .


''

~ ...
~!,. 5
;r ' ..~ '
~: ~ ; ~ ' ';"
'.~' . . '~

: I. f-L~
. '
..... i~..
.. rz .: ..; 1' .
-: ..


I: ._









T iNjLATIONS O. F.LORIDA CITRUS

TANGERIINES


CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport. ......
Hartford........... 2
Total......... 3


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington.........10

ILLINOIS
Chicago............30

INDIANA
Indianapolis......2

KENTUCKY
Lexington...........1
Louisville........-3
Total....-..-.4

MARYLAND
Baltimore...-. .-.52

MASSACEUSETTS
Boston............32
Springfield........ 1
Total.........3

MICHIGAN
Detroit.. ........... 9
Grand Rapids....;...-.1
Totl..........10

MINNESOTA
Minneapclis........1

MISSOURI
St. Louis..........6

NEBRASKA
Omaha.............. 1

NEW YORK
Buffalo ............5
New York City....267
Utica...............1
Total.......273


NO:. R TH CAROLINA
Charlott'e........ 1
Greenstboro.....', .. .
Gastonia.......... 1
Total..... .. 6

OHIO
Cleveland .........23
Cincinnati........34
Columbus.......... 6
S Toledo...'.........2
Total........5
PENNSYLVANIA
Allentcw ........... I
Pittsburefp ........JO
Philadelphia..... 132
Scranton...........
York.............
Total...... 165

RHODE ISLAND
rrovidence....... 4

SOUTH' CARLINA
Columbia.........1
Charleston........- 2
Florence...........21*
Total........24

TENNESSEE
Chattanooga,.......1
Nashville........2.
Tital.........3

TEXAS
Houston...........1

VIRGINiA
Nort~ik .......... ..2
FeteTsturg.........4
RiChqopd............
Total.........9

bI SCdNSIN
Milwaukee..........3




-28-.

DESTIVtATIONS O 'FtORIDA CITRUS


Nov. 2 to Mar. ?9, 1927-28

Oranges Grapefruit Mixed Ci
Alabama .... ..... -': 439 104
Arkansas.. ..... .. 35 28
Canada.'................ 189 210
Colorado........ 3 84
Connecticut: ......... 266 134
Delaware............. ... 19 6
District of Columbia. 289 148
Flrida. ......58 109
Georgia.. .. 825 122
Idaho.......... .. ..
Illinis.:: .. .. 525 786
Indian .. :..... 185 194
I owa..............- .. 25 122
Kansa '............... 5
Kentucky.i :. :......'..: 255 104
Louisniana.......... 183 65
Maine:... .. 31 29
Maryla4d............ 556 220
Massaeihusetts........ 900 575
Michigan............. 231 367
Minnesota............ ..'... 20 154
Mississippi ........ 109 10
Missouri............ 205 383
Montana... .... .. 34
Nebraska............. 7 75
New Jeriey......' .. 60 17
New Hampshire.'...... 3
New York' ........... 2,866 1,780
Nevada............... 2
North Carolina .....,- 46s 68
North Dkota........ : 10
Ohio. .... ......... .. ... 1,164 400
Oklahoma...;.. 4 52
Oregon............. 33
Pennsylvania......... -...1,71 840
Rhode rIslan' ......... 118 57
South Carolina........ 456 151
South. Dakota........- .--. 2 9
Tennessee........'... ... .515 242
Texkas .'.'.'.*..... -. .'. .. 54 74-;
Texas ........... 54 74
Tenas.................... .
Utah;.''' .- .* ;.. 31
Vermont. .'.'. ... .. 6
Virginia........5..,I 273 230
Washington........, :-- -.- 5 72
Hest Virginia... .... 54 23
Wisconsin............ 40 133
Wyoming..........*...*
TOTALS............ 13,226 8,798


trus Tangerines
218
14 '
58-
4


31 10
55
167


30
2. *: .


209
50
9

83
35
16 .
197 .
319
70
17
93
65
2-
. .. . . . .
7 -

,298

246-

233
3
.- 2.
728
61
.213

211

3
12
2.39 .

22
.22 35- -
--i


52
33
10
'1

6


273.1

273


165
4
24

3
1



3

3


5,163 705






-9-

UNLOADS OF FLORIDA CITRUS BY MONTHS IN 30 IMPORTANT MARKETS 1927

QRANGES Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Oct. Nov. Dec. Total
New York 7 69 '817 711 .598 390 157- 11 ..12 395 743 4603
Philadelphia 377 328 352 279 115 .22 46 274 46 2261
Boston 349 239 240 ..222 68 '.'7 2 .18 223 380 1768
*Chicago 211 200 161 63 48 10 1 22 192 172 1080
SBaltimore 122 138 140 :99 72 21 100 157 849
Pittsburgh 168 138 101 '66 23 4. 1 10 94 130 735
Cleveland .103 71 8 3 57 31 13 1 6 58 78 501
Cincinnati 64 90' 95 .62 34 6 26 49 64 490
Atlanta 66 74 64'. 35 14 5 23 34 97 413
Washington 65 6o0 63 47 25 2 14 48 59 383
St. Louis 62 58. 63 35 20 4 46 68 367
Memphis 36 48 40 o 31 14 2 28 37 67 303
Detroit 55 55 43. 23 9 1 21 62 269
Providence 69 19 39 32 1 5 32 45 249
Buffalo .. 50 28" 37 15 14 9 45 38 236
New.Orleans 17 "45 53 48 27 6 7 4 22 229
Norfolk 30 33 29 33 21 1 2 9 20 47 225
Louisville 27 35 34 21 8 10 20 46 201
Nashville 26 36" 26 21. 4 12 18 5 196
Indianapolis 25 30" 35 16 2 1 8 33 45 195
Columbus 25 33 25 18 2 1 7 35 "13 179
Richmond 30 29 28: 15 6 1 9 21 S 177
Hartford 25 32 35' 20 5 1 6 22 27 173
Jacksonville 23 47. 49 7 6 5 1 2 5 26 171
New Haven 24 15 4o 2, 5 2 32 29 167
Springfield 27 16 231. 15 1 5 26 15 118
Evansville 12 8 15 1 9 11 34 94
Rochester 12 17 15. 13 3 1 23 10 94
Dayton 10 17 16 13 1 8 1 82
Syracuse 11 17 11: 9 2 2 14 16 82









tTLOADS OF FLORIDA CITRUS BY MONTHS IN 30 IMPORTANT MARKETS 1927

GRAPEFRTUT 'Ja nJl' eb. .h' Apr. May'June 'July Au. Se t'.bot. Nov. Dec. Total


New York
Philadelphia
Boston
Chicago
Baltimore
Pit tsburgh
Cleveland
Atlanta
Washington
St. Louis
Memphis
Cincinnati
Detroit
Providence
Buffalo
New Orleans
Norf.olk
Louisville
Nashville
Indianapolis
Columbus
Richmond
Hartford
Jacksonville
New Eaven
Springfield
Evansville
Rochester.
Dayt on
Syracuse


381 .64 -4go 502 421 14.7 -.6 2 97
97 *129 '147 7 2 44 32 1 1 76
92 106 -186 204 :152 71 "1 54
199 175 "277 b9 .196 27 :6 41r 173
29 "38 .60 ,38 -37 11 :2 27
50 55 53 46 5 8 2 4
55 64 '77 :':76 68 '9 1 i 7 39
23 17 30 29 ,24 3 14
38 33' 44 32 25 5 1 27
31 o 56 34 -,214 '8 1 6 33
13 22 16 23 23 3 2 3 12
30 35 145 30 31 6 2 4 37
77 72 98 .87 78 23 3- 3 k9
17 10 17 '17 8 .1 6
26 38 35 2 : '5 2 13
14 24 15 18 24 6 4
5 8 9 8 10 5 7
11 13 20 17 13 2 10
7 7 14 18 13 2 .- -- 6
19 28 39 30 24 8 23
25 29 41 28 24 3 .- -18
9 16 14 12. 12 10
15 14 17 18 15. 6 8
60 72 87 93 4o 4 1 L 3
14 14 1' 4 14 12 2 2
11 12 12 13 12 2 .- 10
5 3 4 6 3.- -
16 22 2 20 13: 5 :- -10
3 411 lo 7 3 3
11 7 "14 15 6 3 '- 7


295. 311 3106
92 128 974
135 117 1120
218 185 1706
28- 38 311
33 36 385
50 42 488
29 30 213
29 38 272
29 29 291
14 11 142
29 23 272
68 -69 624
9 14 99
34 26 241
9 10 125
9 5 66
9 8 103
99 85
30 16. 217
24 21 213
11 9 94
12 11 116
13 20 394
11 11 94
17 8 97
5 5 31
20 19 153
6 5 57
7 10 80






1-g

~A 4Ae-j ~rM O I-=LORIDA MIXED OIT-US FRUIT BY COUNTIES.AND MONTHS
.......... FOR SEASON 1S7i 2g .

OO TY ........ : .nT:~V.y a t ... M R. .: MAY' .!TTT-T. -a ToTAT,


Alachua

Brevard

Dafe "
De Soto

Hafdee

Hernando

Hi hlani s

Hillsbor-
Indian River

Lake

Lee

Manatee

Marion

Okeechob e

Orange

Osceola

Palm Beach

Pasco.

Pinellas

Polk

Putnam

Seminole

St. Johns

St. Lucie .


1 1 3 1 -1

2:8 51 74 76 49: 32 17"



7- .. s-T7: 37 20 -25 -7 .4

- .25 .-- 1-- 34- .-.6- .32 --*--s .--*


- 4 2


S14 .13

- 43 113

2 .21

-61 100

4 6

i 23 .19

19 21

4

-21 120

1 14


- 6 7

4 56

3 154 386

- 3 6

- 9


'C


if


3:


L9 8 17

)7 78 30

L7 21 19

33 125 53

?S 20 25

9 9 12

0 :., 3 .5

1

)6 .14s 116

5 2 2

S 2

52 11 S

5s 60 50

13 213 216

25 15 ..2

1S 6 9


1..




1


1]







I3
1

.










2


- 1

L6. 17 5

L6 7 1

L9 4

7 7 3

14 40 12

S.. 5 2

1 1


4

L9

3



6



63

6


6S 18

6 2


4



143


a

'.1


6

366-

1 :


213

S 392
12

109

o112
2 ---487

1 112

589

172

91

60o

9

1 7s7

35

2

4 81

2 308

6 1792

S 57

44

5

1 235


3

.6

.3


- 1


5

25


- 14


39 47


60


.34


-







CAR-(QO SE F*$NS MDA' tX': I CITRUS FRiUIT B O..UNWTIES AND MONTmS. .
1*o i'TEKSON 192. ... .. .[ ..
YfinTNO .SPT' n 'nv- nEC JANt- MAR-AP VAY JUNnE TOTAL


Sumter ,. 1

Volusia .... . -. .6,. 34 6...66:: 55.. 46,,. 15:- 5 ..3 232

GLAND TOTAL 4 395 105,1512 965 837 750. 397. 225 25. 6198

CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA.GRAFEFRUIT.BY COUNTIES AND MONTHS
FOR SEASON 1927-2 ........

COUNTY SErT.OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB, MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY TOTAL
COUNTY ST.OCT. NOV. IjE.. SAN. VEb, MAR. I'P. ,yy._JUNZ JULY TOTAL


Alachua

Brevard

Collier

Dade

De Soto

Hardee

Hernando

Highlands

Hillsborough

Indian River

Lake

Lee

Manatee

Marion

Okeechobee

Orange

Osceola

Palm Beach

Pasco


- 2

- 5


*- 1

76 79


- 51 15 '16

2 10 4 10

5 6 7

2 22 2

34 47 jS

7 36 1 ;

32 42 70

)41 90 65

3 20 7 25

il 232 165 71

- 26 23 15

8 6 2

32 112 150

- 11 3 2

2

7 13 11


1I


3 84 66 '6b



3 69 1Q7 533

l 13 44 2

4 15 9

3 2

6 93 126 142

4 44 75 15

3 135 110 60

5 46 33 9

6 25 23 23

6 114 154 74

5 31 20 15

- 11 -

8 1i4 1173 71

4 6 8 6


14 3


5


0


5 5 9


- 198 232 198 273 200 161 122 131


- -4

- 472

- 1

- 366

1 107

3 67

1 53

620

2 1 239

10 13 5s3

1 1 451

157

10 s 1043

3 171

27

4 978

48

2

1 68

60 4 1579


Pinellas






.. -33-

OCARLOT SHIMENTS OF FLORIDA GRAP FRUIT BY COUNTIES AND MONTHS
S .. OR SE-2- ( N).......


COUNTY SEiT.

-Po6lk. 28

Pitnam

Sarasota

Seminole -

St. Lucie 4

Sumter

Volusia

Boat Shipments -


OC

73


T. NOV. DEC. JAN.

4 934 558 678

6 17 22

2 5

4 2 7 3

. 44 57 83


28 19

9 7


35

9


FEB. MAR.



15 7

4 1

21 3

123 129

1 -


14

11


AIR.

8'26

3



1

100


MA

-6


24

4


Y JUN

6 -16


1.


GRAND TOTAL 18igg 1485 19241485 g1881 194 2181 l631 103 270 32 14108

CAri-LOT SHI. ENITS Ot FLORIDA ORANGES BY COUNTIES AND MONTHS FOR
SEASON 1927-28


COUNTY SEPT. OCT. NOV, DEC. JAN. FE3, MAR. Al


Alachua

Bradford

Brevard

Citrus

Dade

De Scto

Flaaler

Hardee

Hernando

Fighlands

Hillsbcrough

Zdiai .River

Lake


- 10 18 37 .58.- -


- 2


- 159 261 ,212

3 -3


15

- 11 55 113

4
- if

30 94 214

6 27 59

6 26 24

4 27 112 331

- 2 21

- 113 394 449


67

9

51

30

4

165

25

390


13


0; 135. 2


3..

69,

2

63'

6

25

42

12

170


I. MAY JU:: TOTAL

.- 123

- : 2
2

0o 6 -923



5 23

2 4 344

17

?J 1 518

S 131

54 25 192

L' 3 735

?9 2 1 125

2 2 1575


E JULY TOTAL

6 1 ~ 6132

70

- 12

2 54

625

1

131

4 ... 47.


-2






-34-

CAR.LOT: SHIPMENTS-OF FLORIDA ORANGES- B-Y COUNTIES AND-MONTHS- FOR
SEASON 1927-26- (OON.)


COUNTY

Lee

Manatee

Marion

Okeechobee

Orange

Osceola

Pasco

Pinellas

Polk

Putnam

Sarasota

Seminole

St. Johns

St. Lucie

Sumter

Volusia

Boat Shipments


SE


- 6

, 3

S 33 281

S 4


SE


PT. OCT. NOV..

8 13

28 64

153 229

5

- 117 489

- 2 41

- 14 4o

- 6 91-

2 258 629

- 3 79

- 5 10

4 82


F


DEC.

14

41

231



749

41

54

*146

582

133



156'

11

16

14

437

11


JAN.

8

6

137

1

587

12

54

-69

661

91

2

108

4

31

6

333

'24


Subject to revision.


GRAND TOTAL 6 834 2953.4174 3145 1987 1866 1049 410 26 16450


r


..... o


4'






55


EB. MAR.

17 19

L3 35

14 6

- 3

29 384

5 16

3 6

!5 101

6 779


3

4

89

7
42

11

149

28


" .4


APR. MAY JUNE TOTAL

8 1 88

36 o 1 234

790

9

196 31 a 2984

9 3 129

1 172

19 16 1 524

582 284 20 4353

309

.2 29 .

1 47.4

29

43 4 190

-- 34

15 12 1289

11 1 102


6

34

7
4s



29

23




1. C..


.354

1. S. STANDARDS FOR CITRUS FRUITS (FLORIDA) 1927.
,,q .'' ...: .... *..
GRADE

S.-' Fancy shall consist of citrus fruits of similar varietal
characteristics which are mature, firm, well formed, smooth, thin skinned,
fr6e from decay, bruises, .creasing, saale, scab, black or unsightly dis-
coloratioi, ammoniationn, from cuts wh:ch are not healed;, and from damage
caused by 'dirt or'other forei'gn-materials, sprouting, sprayburn, dryness,
limb rubs, thorn scratches, scars, disease, insects or mechanical or
mother m.Anal *

In this grade not more than 75% of the surface of each fruit may
show light discoloration. In addition to the statement of grade any lot
may be further classified as Bright.sr Golden as hereinafter defined.

U. S. No. 1 shall consist of citrus fruits of similar varietal
characteristics which are mature, fi.m, well formed, fairly smooth, fairly
thin skinned, free from decay, bruises, creasing, black or unsightly dis-
coloration, from cuts which are not healed and from damage caused by dirt
or other foreign materials, sprouting, sprayburn, dryness, limb rubs,
thorn scratches, scars, scale, scab, ammoniation, disease, insects or
mechanical or other means.

In this grade (except when designated U. S. No. 1 Russet) not more
than 75% of the surface of each fruit may show light discoloration. In
addition to the statement of grade any. lot may be further classified as
Bright, Golden or Russet, as hereinafter defined.

U. S. No. 2 (Choice) shall consist of citrus fruits of similar
varietal characteristics which are mature a.d fairly firm, which may be
slightly rough and. slightly misshapen but which are free from decay,
bruises, black or unsightly discoloration, from cuts which are not healed,
and from serious damage caused by dirt or other foreign materials, sprout-
ing, sprayburn, dryness, limb rubs, thorn scratches, scars, scale, scab,
ammoniation, creasing, disease, insects or mechanical or other means.

In addition to the statement of grade any lot may I-, further classi-
fied as Bright, Golden, or Russet, as hereinafter defined.

COLOR CLASSIFICATION

Any lot of fruit may be classified according to the amount of die-
coloration as follows: Bright, when the surface of the fruit shows not
more than 20% light discoloration. Gold-i,n When the surface of the fruit
shows not more than 75% light discoloration, Russet, when the surface of
the fruit shows no black or unsightly discoloration.

TOLERANCES

In order to allow for variations incident to proper grading and
handling in each of the foregoing grades the following tolerances will be
permitted in the grades as specified:







-36--
U. S. Fanc.. t nd 1 ; S... Np..; ..i.' a.. ,, *.. I :I

Not more than 10%, by count, of ay2t may be below the require-
ments of either of these grades other than for discoloration, but not
more than one-twentaieth# of ':this .amou.nt.. shall be .allowed'4for fd.c.ay.
1/.In addition, not mo-re thEa. 10%, by count, -Ef "'any "lot may not bee4-tl' t "
requirementS relating t6 discplor:ation' but not. to .exceed one-foirth of thi"g-
amount or.iNO, shall 'be allowed for. black' or .unsightly discoloration.

U. S. Fa .y Bright or golden, andU. S. No. 1. Bright or.Golden, grades.

Not more than 10%, by count, of any lot may be below the requirements
of any of these grades but not to exceed one-fourth of thi's amount, or 2,
shall.be allowed for black er-:usightly discoloration and not more than 1/20
of this tolerance or .%, shall be allowed'for'decay.: /

U. S. r'o. 1 Russet, U. S. No. 2 Bright, Golden or Russet grades

Not morg. than 1l0, by co nt, of any. lot may be-below the requirements
of any of these:grades,- ut~u.nt more than 1/20 of-this amount or i shall
be allowed :for decay. /; ,.. ,.

STANDARD PACK

Fruit shall be: arranged in the.boxes according to the approved and
recognized methods. 'he 'fruit shall be tightly packed and the wrap show
at least 'oetahalf twist. -Each fruit.shall be enclosed in its individual
wrapper, except that in packs..of oranges'and tangerines- of a size 250 and
smaller only fruit in the top and bottom iCL d P .f -- we-vpA d at the
sides of th-bo'x shall be required to be wrapped. .

f Decay,; p-' other deterioration developing in transit on citrus fruits
Otherwise up to grade shall be considered as affecting the condition
a:'aad. ot the grade. -

Each box of obanges shall show a minimum bulge of 1- inches. With
grapefruit the minimum bulge shall be 2 inches. Boxes of tangerines shall
show Vi minimiumn bu-ge- of 3/4 inch.

In order to allow for variations incident, to proper packing not more
than 5 % of the boxes in any lot may not -meet the- requirements for standard
pack.

: DEFINITIONS OF GRADE TERMS :. :

As used in-these grades: *' .. .

1. "Similar varietal characteristics" means that the fruits in any
container are similar in color and shape. :;::.
mtne-- *- ***. **







i4 'Fi n" a aappliei Ct r;ap&iruit and oranges of the Mandarin
Group (Tangerines, Satsumas, King, Mandarin) shall be interpreted to
mean that the fruit shall not be badly puffy or the skin very loose.
Such fruit if dry shall not be considered firm.

3. "Free from damage" means that any injury from the causes men--
tioned shall not materially affect the appearance or the edible or ship-
ping quality of the fruit.

4. "Light discoloration" means smooth light russeting or any other
smooth surface discoloration of a darker color provided it does not de-
tract from the appearance of the fruit to a greater extent than the maxi-
mum of light discoloration allowed in each grade.

5. "Fairly firm" as applied to oranges means that the fruit is
slightly soft but not bruised; as applied to grapefruit means that the
skin may be thick and slightly puffy; as applied to mandarin, Satsuma,
Tangerine, King and other varieties of the Mandarin Group means that the
skin of the fruit is not badly puffy but may be slightly loose.

6. "Slightly rough" means that the skin is not of smooth texture
but is not creased or badly wrinkled.

7. "Slightly misshapen" means that the fruit is not of characteris-
tic shape but is not decidedly pearshaped, elongated or sharply pointed..

8. "Serious damage" means that any injury from the causes men-
tioned shall not seriously affect the appearance or the edible or ship-
ping quality of the fruit.













Date Due


- I *


'' -


I.


. '


*1 *


.~' ,.. '


'CI


:
s


r I
-

-






~:"
''

:


I 1. ;; :

-:.~; ':. .~




::i .:....(. ..i~


:


.1.

:'


L

i''' '

i '


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