<%BANNER%>
Sugarcane variety trials.
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076923/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sugarcane variety trials.
Physical Description: Serial
Creation Date: 1969
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00076923:00001

Full Text





Everglades Station Mimeo Report EES69-11 MAY 1969 ril, 1969


SUGARCANE VARIETY JJI -T Univ. of Florida

F. le Grand /


Several variety trials were harvested either as plant, first stubble or
second stubble crops during the 1968 and 1969 grinding seasons. Harvesting
results are reported here together with the recommendations for newly tested
varieties.

Trials were conducted on the property of the Florida Sugar Corporation
with locations and harvesting dates explained in Table one. Cane from each
plot was harvested by hand after burning; prior to harvesting a sample con-
sisting of 20 stalks was collected from each plot for juice analysis.

The cane samples were processed by a sample mill. Juice extraction from
cane, percent brix and percent polarization in juice, and cane weight were
used to calculate by means of the Winter-Carp formula the amount of sugar
produced per plot. Sugar production per plot is expressed on a relative basis
to the sugar production obtained from plots with the standard variety Cl. 41-223.
Duncan's multiple range test was employed to determine significant differences
in sugar production between varieties, which are given in Table two.

Table three gives cane production from plots expressed as tons cane per
acre and their average obtained from the different trials. The same information,
but now expressed in relation to cane production of check variety C1. 41-223
is presented in Table four. Finally, Table five gives a recapitulation of averages
obtained from Tables two and four and the calculated yield of cane for each
variety.

The calculated yield of cane in Table five needs some additional explana-
tion. Varieties yielding the same or superior sugar production may be recom-
mended for release as a commercial variety. The increased sugar production can
result either from a cane production higher than the check variety or from a
higher juice extraction and/or higher percent sucrose in juice than is present
in Cl. 41-223. The former possibility will result in increased sugar production
while cost for production remains the same; the latter situation will cause an
increased sugar production as well as cost reduction.

Discovery of a variety with values significantly in excess of 100.0 in the
first and third columns of Table five, meaning that increase in sugar produc-
tion has been due to improved cane quality is most desirable. Less desirable
but still acceptable are values in excess of 100.0 in the first column and
near to 100.0 in the third column. In this case increased sugar production is
only due to higher cane production.


1/ Assistant Sugarcane Agronomist, Everglades Experiment Station, University
of Florida, Belle Glade, Florida.






- 2 -


The calculated yield of cane as mentioned in Table five may be compared
with actual sugar yield in cane. The latter is based on grinding of cane by
the factory and sugar produced from the processed cane. In contrast, the
calculated yield of cane was calculated for each variety from the cane pro-
duction, juice extraction, purity and percent sucrose in juice from a 20-stalk
sample from each plot.

When examining Table five only two varieties may be found acceptable for
commercial sugar production; both varieties obtain their increased sugar pro-
duction from a cane tonnage higher than Cl. 41-223 while the calculated yield
of cane is about similar to the check.


C. P. 62-374. This variety was harvested eight times from four trials. In the
test at field B-3-35, variety C. P. 62-374 produced significantly more sugar
than Cl. 41-223 in the first as well as second ratoon while the same fact was
observed in field B-17-26, South for the first ratoon. In all cases, except
during plant crop in field B-17-26, North, C. P. 62-374 yielded a higher sugar
production than Cl. 41-223, although values obtained were not necessarily
significantly different.

C. P. 62-374 may be commercially useful but plantings should only be made
on a very limited scale. The variety flowers heavily and has its peak of sugar
content during the beginning of January. Preliminary readings have indicated
that the variety may lose its sugar rapidly after this peak has been reached.
The superior cane tonnage obtained is likely due to the large diameter of the
stalk and its long internodes.


C. P. 63-485. This variety was tried only in one experiment. In plant and
first ratoon crops the yield obtained was superior to that from Cl. 41-223
although this fact was only significantly different in the first ratoon. The
variety does not flower as profusely as C. P. 62-374 and indications are, that
its stubbling ability is favorable. In the future, C. P. 63-485 will be tested
again as to obtain additional information in order to determine its value for
commercial production.
















EES69-11
750 copies








Table 1. Locations, varieties and harvesting dates according to crops.


B-17-26, North


Plant


Location

Variety

C.P. 63-1

L. 63-:

C.P. 63-

C.P. 62-

Cl. 41-:

C.P. 62-;

U.S. 59-

C.P. 50-

C.P. 62-

C.P. 63-!

C.P. 57-(

C.P. 63-

C.P. 63-


B-3-35


E-27-25, South Bay


rI 4- -


First Stubble First Stubble


12-5-68

12-5-68

12-5-68

12-5-68

12-5-68


12-28-67

12-28-67

12-28-67

12-28-67

12-28-67

12-28-67


Second Stubble


12-8-68

12-8-68

12-8-68

12-8-68

12-8-68

12-8-68


Plant First Stubble


11-17-67

11-17-67

11-17-67

11-17-67

11-17-67


476

112

433

374

223

299

16-1

28

242

580

503

506

485


B-17-26, South


Plant


12-19-67

12-19-67












12-19-67

12-19-67

12-19-67


First Stubble


12-30-68

12-30-68












12-30-68

12-30-68

12-30-68


i _____________ ___________________ I ____________________ .1. ____________ 1 ____________________ t ______________ I


12-8-67

12-8-67





12-8-67



12-8-67

12-8-67


I I I I I 1


12-11-68

12-11-68





12-11-68



12-11-68

12-11-68


__ I __










Table 2. Average sugar production per plot on the basis of Cl. 41-223 = 100.


Location B-17-26, North B- 3-35 E-27-25, South Bay B-17-26, South

Variety Plant IFirst Stubble First Stubble Second Stubble Plant First Stubble Plant First Stubble Average
I


103.4 b

100.0 b





105.7 b


C.P.

L.

C.P.

C.P.

C1.

C.P.

U.S.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.


61.0 a

66.5 a

87.5 1

91.8 1

100.0 1


118.5

100.0


63-476

63-112

63-433

62-374

41-223

62-299

59-16-1

50-28

62-242

63-580

57-603

63-506

63-485


68.9

72.4

94.7

c 116.9

100.0

86.7

98.2

114.4

114.6

88.4

c 107.4

76.8

c 114.5


by the same letter are significantly different from each other in sugar production at the 5% level.


76.9 a

78.3 a

102.0 1

105.6 1

100.0 1


119.9 b

100.0 b












118.7 b

72.6 a

108.2 b


87.4

96.8


118.1

81.0 a

120.8


116.4

100.0

83.4

94.9

97.1

102.5


173.5

100.0

90.1

101.5

168.9

126.7


c

a,b

a

a,b

c

b,c


106.5 c

100.0 b,c





86.1 a



89.5 a,b

95.9 b,c


- ---


Varieties not followed








Table 3. Average cane production from plots expressed as tons cane per acre.


Location B-17-26, North B-3-35 E-27-25, South Bay 8-17-26, South

Variety Plant First Stubble First Stubble Second Stubble Plant First Stubble Plant First Stubble Average


C.P.

L.

C.P.

C.P.

Cl.

C.P.

U.S.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.


63-476

63-112

63-433

62-374

41-223

62-299

59-16-1

50-28

62-242

63-580

57-603

63-506

63-485


42.4

40.3

54.8

59.4

51.9


36.1

43.1

50.2

52.1

44.2


62.6

53.2

50.4

50.7

61.9

61.7


35.1

24.2

27.7

26.1

42.1

32.2


70.2

64.0





70.2



68.4

70.8


49.2

45.6





55.4



45.2

51.7


56.9

44.8












61.3

38.7

51.6


50.4

42.3












51.0

50.5

50.4


39.2

41.7

52.5

54.5

46.3

39.0

38.4

57.4

46.9

56.8

58.7

44.6

51.0


__________________ __________________ ________________








Table 4. Average cane production per plot expressed on basis of Cl. 41-223 100.


Location B-17-26, North B-3-35 E-27-25, South Bay B-17-26, South

Variety Plant First Stubble First Stubble Second Stubble Plant First Stubble Plant First Stubble Average


C.P.

L.

C.P.

C.P.

C1.

C.P.

U.S.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.


81.7

77.6

105.6

114.4

100.0


81.7

97.5

113.6

117.9

100.0


117.7

100.0

94.7

95.3

116.3

116.0


145.0

100.0

114.5

107.8

174.0

133.0


63-476

63-112

63-433

62-374

41-223

62-299

59-16-1

50-28

62-242

63-580

57-603

63-506

63-485


107.9

100.0





121.5



99.1

113.4


127.0

100.0












136.8

86.4

115.2


119.1

100.0












120.6

119.4

119.1


81.7

87.5

109.6

119.8

100.0

104.6

101.5

130.4

124.5

103.0

120.3

102.9

117.1


- ______ ___________ 1 ______ 1 __________


109.7

100.0





109.7



106.9

110.6







Table 5. Calculated yield of cane for varieties on basis Cl. 41-223 = 160


Sugar production Cane production Calculated yield of cane
on basis Cl. 41-223 on basis Cl. 41-223 on basis C1. 41-223
Variety = 100 = 100 = 100
(Table 2) (Table 4)


C.P.

L.

C.P.

C.P.

C1.

C.P.

U.S.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.

C.P.


63-476

63-112

63-433

62-374

41-223

62-299

59-16-1

50-28

62-242

63-580

57-603

63-506

63-485


68.9

72.4

94.7

116.9

100.0

86.7

98.2

114.4

114.6

88.4

107.4

76.8

114.5


81.7

87.5

109.6

119.8

100.0

104.6

101.5

130.4

124.5

103.0

120.3

102.9

117.1


84.3

82.7

86.4

97.6

100.0

82.9

96.7

87.7

92.0

85.8

89.3

74.6

97.8


.1.