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Popcorn research.
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Title: Popcorn research.
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Creation Date: 1963
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Everglades Station Mimeo Report 64-22 /

1963 Popcorn Research OCT 964

Victor E. Green, Jr. and Emmett D. Harris, Jr.-/

Two variety tests were planted in 1963. The first had 20 ent -7,f,..;
was identical to that in 1962. The second had 22 entries, with the 'f!ra-
12 entries identical to those in 1962. Substituted for the inbreds in the
last 10 entries of Test 2 were new experimental 3-way and. 4-way hybrids
from the ames Seed Farms (ASF). Both tests were located in Field 2 N.W.
on "old" muck that had been under cultivation about 35 years and which has
grown a crop of corn almost every year. These tests were just west of the
field corn tests and were treated similarly. There were three replications
in randomized complete blocks in each test. Plots consisted of one row of
plants 20 feet long. All rows were bordered. Ten-foot alleys separated
experiments. The final population goal was 43,560. This was obtained by
dropping seeds on February 15, 1963 every four inches in the row and thinning
the stand to one plant every four inches.

Soil tests from samples taken on January 28, revealed, according to
methods of analysis used at this station, that the soil reaction was 5.80,
and the P and K levels were 9 and 45, respectively. On February 11,
fertilizer was broadcast on the soil and disked in at the rate of 540 pounds
of 2-12-16 containing one unit each of CuO, MnO, B 0 and ZnO per acre.
Three pounds of technical aldrin per acre were disEea into the soil for
wireworm control. On February 18, Randox and Vegadex at 24 pounds per acre
in 40 gallons of water were applied to the soil for pre-emergence weed
control. On March 25, budworms were controlled with an application of two
pounds of technical toxaphene per acre in 100 gallons of water. The crop
was layed-by April 1, by deepening the furrows.

The tasselling midpoint, the stalk and ear heights in inches were
recorded for each variety. On June 12, or 118 days after planting, the
plots were harvested with the husks on the ear, each plot bei'g bagged
separately. The corn was placed in a forced air oven at 105 F. for 3
days. The plot yields were then weighed as snapped corn. After husking,
they were weighed as ear corn. Six-ear samples from each variety (two
from each replication) were weighed, shelled, and the grain weighed.
Shelling percentages were calculated for each variety. Moisture in the
samples was determined electronically and yields of ear corn and grain
per acre were calculated. These data appear in Table 1 (Test 1) and Table
3 (Test 2).

A 12-ear sample from each variety (four from each replication) was
sent to the Ames Seed Farms laboratories for determination of ear quality,
kernel size, test weight, and popping quality. These data appear in Table
2 (Test 1) and Table 4 (Test 2).

Table 5 shows the average yields of popcorn grain at 13.0 percent
moisture for varieties grown from 2 to 7 years between 1952 and 1963,
while Table 6 shows the OVT for that period.
Associate Agronomist and Associate Entomologist, working under State
Project 1058. The Ames Seed Farms, Ames, Iowa, through its agent,
J. R. Murray, furnished seed and industrial measurements for these tests.








Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relation of
kernel size to two other factors: test weight and popping quality. Table
7 shows these relationships. The average weight per bushel was calculated
for the 42 entries, and also for the 35 varieties represented in the two
tests.

Results. Tables 1 and 3 show that most of the varieties had a mid-point of
tasselling on, or one day before or after April 23, showing very similar
maturity for this group of hybrids. Two single crosses, Sgl8xSgl533 and
Ia28xIa61 along with two ASF hybrids including one 3-way and one 4-way,
both containing three identical inbreds had a tasselling mid-point on
April 26. Except for lopop 6 and the single cross Sgl8xSgl533 that grew
only 66 inches tall, the remaining entries grew between 70 and 88 inches
tall. Four ASF hybrids exceeded 83 percent sellout. The following varieties
had yields above 3000 pounds per acre: Purdue 213, lopop 8, Nebraska 104,
Purdue 410, and the following ASF hybrids: A-354-4, A-364 and A-357.

Tables 2 and 4 show that the kernel size as reflected by the number of
kernels per 10 grams varies widely, from 56 to 105. In Test 1, the number
varied from 58 to 88 and in Test 2 from 56 to 86, with one instance of 105.
The vareties Purdue 410and Ames Seed Fame A-345' ,di Test 1 had the largest
kernels and Purdue 410, Nebraska 104, and ASF A-329 in Test 2 had the largest
kernels. The smallest kernels were possessed by the single cross Sgl8xSg30A
in both tests along with Ia28xIa61. The lowest test weights in 1963 tests
were 65.0 and 65.9, exhibited by the two single crosses with the smallest
kernels. The heaviest test was 68.0 pounds per bushel, that of ASF A-104-S.
Average of all entries was 66.7, of all varieties near 66.8.

Popping quality was excellent for the group of hybrids under test in
1963. ASF A-323 led the field with an WVT of 1296 (OVT 46.0). Next in line
were ASF A-354 with 1272 (45.1); ASF A-314 with 1260 (44.6); ASF A-336 and
A-354-L with 1247 (44.1); and A-363 with 1242 (44.0).

Table 5 shows that good average yields have been obtained from the
released varieties Nebraska 104, lopop 8, and Purdue 213. Many of the ASF
experimental hybrids have average yields above 4000 pounds per acre. These
varieties have excellent popping quality as shown in Table 6.

Relation of kernel size to test weight and popping quality.
The data in Tables 2 and 4 showed that the size of kernels among varieties
differed almost two-fold, from 56 to 105 kernels per 10 grams weight. Cor-
relation coefficients were calculated for the entries in Test 1, Test 2, and
the two tests combined to determine the effect of kernel size on the test
weight and on the popping quality. It will be noted from Table 7 that there
was a highly significant negative correlation in Test 1 and the combined tests
and a significant negative correlation in Test 2 between kernel size and test
weight, signifying that the larger the kernel (smaller number of kernels per
10 grams) the higher the test weight. In other words, varieties possessing
small kernels tend to have low test weights. This might be explained in
various ways, including the one that follows. The more seed per unit volume,
the more air spaces, and hence the lighter the weight. Less space is occupied
by starch. Interestingly, the test weight of popcorn and that of water-are
almost equal. A bushel (8 gallons, or 32 quarts, or 62 pints) of water weighs
8.3 x 8 = 66.4 pounds. The average of all entries in 1963 was 66.8 pounds,
but the average of all entries from 1954 to date is only 65.9, less than that
of a bushel of water.









Table 1. The Agronomic characteristics of 20 popcorn varieties


Seed Parent Pollen Height, inches Yields, Shellout Yields of
Entry Variety Pollen Midpoint: -Ear Corn, % Grain at
Male Female Parent April Stalk Ear lbs. 13%, lbs.

1* Iopop 8 sg18 Sg30A Ia28xIa61 24 77 42 2920 82.7 2450

2 lopop 10 sgl8 Ia69 Ia28xla61 24 82 41 1895 80.0 1550

3 Purdue 32 (K4) Sgl8 Sg30A S.A. 24 24 81 46 2555 79.9 2075
4 Purdue 213 g18 SA1533 Ia28 24 80 40 2625 82.4 2200

5 Purdue 410 Sgl8 Sg1533 4722-2AA 24 79 39 2625 81.0 2135
6 ASF A-104-S 54 38 88 22 82 44 3285 82.2 2735

7 ASF A-313 38L 66 88 24 82 44 3140 82.8- 2645
8 ASF A-314 38 66 88 22 88 44 2625 81.3 2180

9 ASF A-323 54 66 88 22 81 46 3575 81.8 2965

10 ASF A-332 43 88 66 24 80 42 3430 78.6 2740


Occurs also in Test .2


in Test 1. Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.









Table 1. (Cont.) The AGronomic characteristics of 20


Seed Parent
Male Female


36 88


Pollen
Parent


66


Pollen Height, inches
Midpoint: Stalk Ear
April

22 80 40


Yields,
Ear Corn,
lbs.

2625


Shell cut



83.1


Yields of
Grain at
13%, lbs.

2230


12 ASF A-345 81 38 54 22 82 41 3065 81.0 2515


13 ASF A-354 ..88. 38 54 23 77 39 2410 83.1 2035


14 ASF A-354-L 38L 54 88 22 88 45 4450 81.3 3685


ASF A-357


ASF-A440


ASF A-441


A-88-KP-28


Nebraska 104


Sgl8xSg30A


S7 66


88 38


31 38N


KP 28


Sgl8 sg301


Sgl8 Sg301


88


66


66


88


N42


22 76 41


23 83 45


22 80 39


24 74 39


23 86 44


24 73 39


Occurs also in Test 2.


Entry


11


Variety


ASF A-336


15


16


17


18


19


20


3650


2990


3285


2845


3795


1240


83.2


80.1


81.9


83.8


81.7


82.2


3085


2440


2720


2415


3130


1035


popcorn varieties in Test 1.


Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.


A

&


--


-- --






Table 2. The Industrial Characteristics of 20 Popcorn Varieties
in Test 1. Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.

Entry Variety Quality Kernel Test Wgt. Popping Quality Kernels/
Score I/ Score 2/ Lbs. Out / WVT Pound

i* lopop 8 8.5 80 66.3 39.1 1111 3629
2* lopop 10 8.5 76 66.3 38.8 1104 3447
3* Purdue 32 (K4) 8.5 62 67.3 39.2 1114 2812
4* Purdue 213 8.0 74 67.0 38.0 1082 3357
5* Purdue 410 8.5 58 66.5 38.8 1103 2631
6 AS? A-104-S 8.5 63 68.0 42.4 1201 2858
7 ASF A-313 8.0 80 66.1 43.7 1234 3629
8 ASF A-314 8.5 85 66.3 44.6 1260 3856
9 ASF A-323 7.5 68 66.4 46.0 1296 3084
10 ASF A-332 8.0 62 67.7 43.2 1221 2812
11 ASF A-336 7.0 65 66.6 44.1 1247 2948
12 ASF A-345 7.5 58 67.0 ko.8 1157 2631
13 ASF A-354 7.5 80 66.4 45.1 1272 3629
14 ASF A-354-L 8.0 77 66.8 44.1 1247 3493
15 ASF A-357 8.0 67 66.8 43.1 1220 3039
16 ASF A-440 8.5 62 67.7 43.6 1232 2812
17 ASF A-441 8.0 60 63.7 38.7 1101 2722
18 A-88-KP-28 7.0 84 67.6 41.2 1169 3810
19* Nebraska 104 8.0 62 67.6 38.7 1101 2812
20* Sg.l8cSg.30A 7.0 88 66.1 41.3 1172 3992

* Occurs also in Test 2.
1/ Higher scores indicate higher quality. 10.0 is perfect.
2/ Number of kernels in 0 grams of popcorn.
3/ Calculated from regression formula. Figure 8. Proc. Soil and Crop
Science Soc. Fla. 20:36. 1960.
It is the opinion of a number of persons in the popcorn industry that
the smaller kernels tend to produce better expansion in the popped product.
The data in this present test show that there is no significant correlation.
All correlation coefficients were found to be not significant as shown in
Table 7.


EES Mimeo 64-22
350 Copies
June 1964







Table 3. The Agrononic Characteristics of 22 Popcorn Varieties in Test 2. Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.


Entry Variety Seed Parent Pollen parent Pollen Height, inches Yields Shell- Yields
Female Male Female Male Mid- Stalk Ear Ear out % Grain,
Point: Corn Ibs. at 13%
April lbs.

1 Purfe' 3(K4) SR18 Sg30A SA24 I 24 80 42 3355 79.5 2715
2* Purfce 213 Sgl Sg1533 Ia28 24 72 41 2990 80.5 2450
3- Purdue 406A flgi Sg1533 KP58-K 22 82 44 4670 80.7 3820
4 Purdue 410 Sgll Sg1533 4722-2AA 23 79 49 3720 bl.4 3075
5 lopop 6 Sgl8 Sg30A Ia28 P 24 66 41 2335 82.7 1965
6 Ioop8 Sg18 Sg30A Ia28 Ia61 22 86 45 4600 0o.0 3745
7* Iopop 10 Sgl8 Ia69 Ia28 Ia61 22 80 42 2335 81.8 1945
* Nebraska 104 Sg18 Sg30A N42 23 82 47 4015 80.5 3290
9* SgldxSg30A Sglb Sg3OA : 24 76 39 2260 82.3 1900
10 SglSxSgl5353gl 533 26 66 36 510 510
11 Ia28xIa61 Ia28 Ia61 26 70 40 2410 81.0 1995
12 SglSxIa69 Sgl8 Ia69 2 24 77 41 1895 79.2 1530
13 A-329 47 88 6 22 76 36 1750 79.1 1410
14 A-MS 332 CMS43 88 66 26 76 38 3575 o0.0 2905
15 A-360 38 66 43 88 22 77 44 2920 80.3 2390
16 A-360-2 CMS38 66 PR43 55 23 76 39 2990 79.1 2415
17 A-MS 362 CMS43 88 54 66 26 72 37 2410 81.3 195
18 A-363 43 88 51 66 22 73 41 2625 82.8 2205
19 A-364 47 66 43 88 22 70 39 4015 80.6 3290
20 A-365 58 66 43 88 22 75 41 3210 79.9 2605
21 A-367 43 b6 40 66 2 77 41 2b l. 235
22 A-439 P38 8 66 23 82 41 3575 .77 2b75
Occurs also in Test 1.









Table 4. The Industrial Characteristics of 22 Popcorn Varieties in
Test 2. Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.

Entry Variety fQ lity Kernel Test Wgt. Popping Quality. Kernels/
SCore s/ Score 2/ Lbs. Out 3 WVT Pound


SPurdue 32(K4)
- Purdue 213
Purdue 406A
-Purdue 410
-lopop 6
Iopop 8
lopop 10
- Nebraska 104
- S 18x Sg 30A
- Sg 18xSg 1533
- ia28 x Ia61
Sg i8xIa 69
^-A-329
-A-MS 332
-A-360
-A-360-2
-A-MS 362
-A-363
-A-364
-A-3cor-- -s
A-367
A-439


8.0
8.5
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.5
7.5
8.5
7.0
6.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
8.5
8.0
7.5
8.0
8.5
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0


60
78
66.
56
85
84
80
58
86
67
105
70
58
63
68
68
72
64
65
63
67
60


66.5
66.8
: 67.2
65.9
66.1
66.6
66.3
66.8
65.5
66.5
65.0
66.8
66.1
66.8
67.0
66.4
66.8
66.8
65.9
67.0
67.5
66.3


35.1
39.0
39.0
38.3
37.4
38.3
37.9
39.4
41.9
34.8
32.1
42.7
38.3
43.0
41.9
40.7
43.0
44.0
39.4
42.8
42.4
41.9


1005
1110
1111
logo
1067
1090
1079
1120
1186
998
925
1208
1090
1217
1186
1158.
1216
1242
1119
1211
1200
1187


2722
3538
2994
2540
3856
3810
3629
2631
3901
3039
4763
3175
2631
2858
3084
3084
3266
2903
2948
2858
3039
2722


* Occurs also in Test 1.
I/, 2/, 3/ See footnotes, Table 2.






Table 5. The Average Yields of Popcorn Varieties Grown at Belle Glade, Florida,
More than once between 1952-1963.
Tines Grown
Variety 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Average

Purdue 32 (K-4)* 2200 2515 1540 435 2015 4945 2395 16045 2290
Nebraska 104* 905 1930 5040 4085 5750 3210 ..-- 20920 3485
Cmntril 4 1860 2270 2990 2255 1615 520 11510 1920
lopop 8 3110 4720 4470 5365 3100 20765 4155
Purdue 213 2880 4755 4755 4860 2325 19575 3915
Central 1 1930 2990 4610 3085 1950 14565 2915
ASF A-54-3888(A-104S) 4930 4290 5955 2735 17910 4480
ASF A-88-KP28 5435 4185 4955 2415 16990 4250
ASF A-88-3854(4-354) 5170 4180 4830 2035 16215 4055
lopop 6 2650 4675 4790 1965 14080 3520
lopop 10 1415 2925 4185 1750 10275 2570
Oeatrae 2 1745 2080 2750 2500 9075 2270
Central 115 3330 1980 2370 1200 8880 2220
Purdue 31 1600 2560 1950 570 6680 1670
Purdue 202 2335 985 550 1540 5410 1355
ASF A-441(31x3811)66 4375 5005 2720 12100 4030
ASF A-345(81x38)54 4010 4885 2515 11410 3800
ASF A-440(88x38)66 4160 4655 2440 11255 3750
ASF A-225(56x96)88 3050 4795 3485 11330 3775
Cuba YS(RS)FU 3670 2125 1395 7190 2395
ASF-54-3425(C-7-303) 3120 1690 1460 6270 2090
ASF-3437(C-7-310) 2555 1420 2050 6025 2005
CentrEl 105 1985 1670 1365 5020 1670
C etral 5 585 1480 2345 4410 1470
Purdue 4c6-A 6365 3820 10185 5095
ASF A-54-3884 5150 4795 9945 4975
ASF A-KP-3888 5655 3760 9415 4710
ASF A-354-L 5165 3685 8850 4425
ASF 88-3896 5195 3360 8555 4280
Purdue 410 5845 2605 8450 4225
ASF A-357 4835 3085 ,7920 3960
ASF A-323 4875 2965 7840 3920
ASF A-332 4935 2740 7675 3840
ASF A-313 4865 2645 7510 3755
ASF A-314 5005 2180 7185 3595
ASF-88-4496 2775 4160 6935 3470
ASF-A-336 3960 2230 6190 3095
Sgl8xSg30A (P-20) 3175 1470 4645 2325
ASF-92-3454(c-7-336) 2735 1350 4085 2045
CEatrol 3 2065 2020 4085 2045
Central 110 2600 1380 3980 1990
Central 112 2780 950 3730 1865
ASF 2894-3856 1215 1760 2975 1490
ASF A-81 1120 1375 2495 1250

Purdue 32 and Nebraska 104 are no longer being used commercially.






Table 6. The Average Expansion Ratio (OVT) of Popcorn Varieties Grown at
Belle Glade, Florida more.than once Between 1953-1963.
Times Grown

Variety 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Average


Purdue 32 (K-4)

Nebraska 104


31.5 34.0 24.0 31.8 35.7 34.7


33.4 35.2 39.2 37.0


36.0 39.1


37.2 228.9


32.7


219.9 36.7


topop 8
Purdue 213
C etral 4


ASF A-354
ASF A-104-S
ASF A88-;KP28 '
lopop 10
Iopop 6
Central 1
Purdue 202
Central 115
Purdue 31


ASF A-440
ASF A-225
ASF A-345
ASF A-441
ASF 54-3435(C-7-303)
Central 2
ASF 54-3437(C-7-310)
Central 105
Cuba YS(RS) FU1

ASF A-223
ASF A-314
ASF A-313
ASF A-3546
ASF A-357
ASF A-336
ASF A-332
ASF 88-3896
Sgl8xSg30A(P-20)
ASF A-KP-3888
ASF 88-4496
Purdue 410
Purdue 406A
ASF A-54-3884
ASF A-81
ASF 2894-3856
C'etral 5
Central 112
Central 110
ASF 92-3454(C-7-336)


36.8
35.1
33.5


43.3
42.2
41.7
37.0
33 .9
32.5
38.0
35.0
30.0


40.1
40.1
41.4
38.7
30.0
31.0
29.0
32.0
23.0

46.1
45.6
45.2
44.3
44.6
43.1
43.7
42.5
42.8
41.2
38.6
41.3,
38.1
38.9
37.0
37.5
30.0
35.0
33.0
35.0


37.7
37.3
39.0

41.0
38.7
40.6
37.8
37.1
37.5
27.0
29.0
34.0

44.4
43.1
41.3
41.8
34.0
36.0
31.8
26.0
33.0

46.0
44.6
43.7
44.1
43.1
44.1
43.2
42.4
41.6
41.6
41.8
38.6
39.0
35.6
35.1
33.1
40.0
30.5
30.0
27.0


36.5
37.3
38.0

43.5
43.1
40.0
40.3
38.3
36.0
35.8
33.0
24.0

43.6
42.8
40.8
38.7
35.9
32.0
36.2
34.5
33.0


39- g
38.6
31.5

45.1
42.4
41.2
38.4
-37.4
34.0
33.5
29.0
28.0


38.7
38.5
37.0


188.9
187.0
179.0

172.9
166.4
163.5
153.5
146.7
140.0
134.3
126.0
116.0

128.1
126.0
123.5
119.2
99.9
99.0
97.0
92.5
89.0


92.1
90.2
88.9
88.4
87.7
87.2
86.9
84.9
84.4
82.8
80.4
79.9
77.1
74.5
72.1
70.6
70.0
65.5
63.0
62.0


SPurdue 32 and Nebraska 104 are no longer being used cormnercially.


37.8
37.4
35.8

43.2
41.6
40.9
38.4
36.7
35.0
33.6
31.5
29.0

42.7
42.0
41.1
39.7
33.3
33.0
32.3
30.8
29.6

46.1
45.1
44.5
44.2
43.9
43.6
43.5
42.5
42.2
41.4
40.2
40.0
38.6
37.3
36.1
35.3
35.0
32.8
31.5
31.0







Table 7. The Relation of Kernel Size to Density and Expansibility in
Popcorn From 1963 Data at Belle Glade, Florida.

20-Variety Test 1 22-Variety Test 2 Y 42 Total Entries
Variables -) Test Test Test
I Weight OVT Weight OVT Weight OVT
CORRELATION COEFFICIENT

Kernel Size: -0.572** 0.216 N.S. -0.500* -0.387 N.S. -0.498** -0.145 N.
S.
Number of seed
in 10 grams of
popcorn




I/ Significance for 18 DF = 0.441 @ 5%, 0.561 @ 1%; for 20 DF = 0.423 @ 5%,

0.537 @ 1%; for 40 DF = 0.304 @ 5%, 0.393 @ 1%.

Entomological Investigations

Observations to determine average ear length,' ear diameter and degrees of
earworm (Hi6this zea (Boddie) and/or Laphygma fruigiperda (J. E. Smith) damage
and weevil damage among the varieties were nade on January 24, 1964, on Test 2
and January 27,1964, on Test 1, following open storage after harvest. Most
weevil damage was caused by the rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus)). -
Five representative ears from each plot were measured to the nearest 0.5 centi-
meter for ear diameter and ear length. All available ears from each plot up to
a maximum of 25 ears per plot were each assigned an index number (0-5) to indi-
cate the degree of injury by earworns. An average plot index was computed and
multiplied by 100. The highest possible index, 500, would indicate the greatest
assignable degree of earworm damage. The following indexing system was used.

Index Fraction of Length of Ear Damaged

0 No damage

1 One-eighth or less

2 One-eighth to one-fourth

3 One-fourth to three-eighths

4 Three-eighths to one-half

5 One-half or greater

To evaluate the damage by weevils, 100 kernels were taken randomly from
each plot after the corn was shelled to count the number damaged.









Table 8. Average Ear Diameter, Ear Length, Earworm Damage, and Percent
Weevil Damage among 20 Popcorn Varieties in Test 1. Belle Glade,
Florida. 1963.

Ear Ear Earworm % Weevil
Varieties diameter Length Damage Damaged
(cm) (cm) Index Kernels

1. Iopop 8 3.6 13.3 283 100
*
2. Iopop 10 3.5 13.1 299 94

3. Purdue 32(K4) 3.7 14.5 326 81
4. Purdue 213 3.6 13.6 289 98

5. Purdue 410 3.8 15.2 269 100

6. ASF A-104 3.4 16.4 284 96

7. ASF A-313 3.4 15.1 277 98

8. ASF A-314 3.2 14.9 269 97

9. ASF A-323 3.3 17.7 251 100

10. ASF A-332 3.3 16.1 299 97

11. ASF A-336 3.5 17.1 272 92

12. ASF A-345 3.4 16.2 247 99

13. ASF A-354 3.0 16.1 271 98
14. ASF A-354-L 3.4 16.4 243 96

15. ASF A-357 3.3 16.2 253 89
16. ASF A-440 3.4 16.1 272 81

17. ASF A-441 3.7 16.3 294 99
18. A-88-KP-28 3.1 16.0 265 99

19. Nebraska 104 3.7 15.2 289 100
20. 30A 33 11.6 06 99
20. Sgl8xSg30A 3.3 11.6 406 99


Occurs also in Test 2.









The results of Test 1 are shown in Table 8 and those of Test 2 are
shown in Table 9. Single degrees of freedom analyses of variance were
conducted in an effort to determine the role of seed parents in trans-
mitting resistance to insects.

In Test 1, Purdue 32(K4) and Nebraska 104 received highly significantly
less earworm damage than Sgl8xSg30A. Purdue 32(K4) and Nebraska 104 are
the result of crossing the inbreds, S.A. 24 and N42, respectively, with
Sgl8xSg3OA. As a class, Purdue 213 and 410 received highly significantly
less earworm damage than Purdue 32(K4), Nebraska 104 and Sgl8xSg30A. The
ASF hybrids received highly significantly less earworm damage than the
lopops, Purdues, Nebraska 104 and Sgl8xSg30A in a group comparison. The
varieties in Test 1 did not differ significantly in resistance to weevils.

In Test 2, as a group the ASF varieties received highly significantly
less earworm damage than the remainder of the varieties in the test. A-MS
332 received highly significantly less earworm damage than A-329. As
other parents were common to both varieties, this seemed to indicate that
inbred CMS43 resulted in greater earworm resistance than inbred 47.
Sg18xla69 received highly significantly less earworm damage than Ia28xIa61.
Purdue 213, the result of crossing Sgl8xSgl533 with Ia28, received highly
significantly less earworm damage than Sgl8xSgl533. In a group comparison,
Purdue 213 and Sgl8xSgl533 received highly significantly more earworm
damage than lopops 6, 8 and 10, Sgl8xSg30A, Ia28xIa61 and Sgl8xIa69. In
another group comparison, Purdue 32, 406A, and 410 and Nebraska 104 re-
ceived significantly less earworm damage than all other varieties except
the ASF varieties, which were not included in the comparison.

In Test 2, lopop 8 received highly significantly less weevil damage
than the average of lopop 6 and Sgl8xSg3OA. This comparison seems to
indicate that the inbred Ia61 is important in increasing the resistance
to lopop 8 to weevil attack. In a group comparison, lopop 6, lopop 8
and Sgl8xSg30A received significantly less weevil damage than lopop 10,
Ia28xIa61, and Sgl8xIa69. This latter comparison indicates no direct
genetic implication.







Table 9. Average Ear Diameter, Ear Length, Earworn Damage, and Percent
Weevil Damage among 22 Popcorn Varieties in Test 2. Belle Glade,
Florida. 1963.

Ear Ear Earworm %o Weevil
Varieties diameter Length Damage Damaged
(cm) (cm) Index Kernels


*

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.*

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.


Purdue 32 (K4)

Purdue 213

Purdue 406A

Purdue 410

Iopop 6

lopop 8

Iopop 10

Nebraska 104

Sgl8xSg30A

Sg18xSg1533

Ia28xIa61

Sgl8xla69

A-329

A-MS 332

A-360

A-360-2

A-MS 362

A-363

A-364

A-365

A-367

A-439


3.7

3.6

3.5

3.7

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.6

3.5

3.3

3.1

3.5

3.5

3.5

3.4

3.4

3.3

3.4

3.4

3.4

3.4

3.9


15.4

12.8

14.1

15.0

11.9

12.9

14.4

15.7

12.9

10.3

8.7

15.5

14.8

17.3

15.9

15.8

16.8

17.3

16.3

17.6

15.2

16.7


294

297

236

289

298

262

297

288

298

458

347

249

329

235

276

273

252

255

259

292

261

282


Occurs also in Test 1.


100

99

100

98

94

81

100

97

97

100

100

94

100

99

98

100

99

99

90

97

99

92


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