Title: Field corn research.
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 Material Information
Title: Field corn research.
Series Title: Field corn research.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Green, Victor E., Jr.
Harris, Emmett D., Jr.
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, Fla.
Publication Date: 1963
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076898
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140939

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10 (r
Everglades Staion Mimeo Report 64-21 June,.1964, -

1963 Field Corn Research
Victor E. Green, Jr. and Emett D. Harris, Jr. i/

Three variety tests and one spacing test were conducted during the 1963
crop season. All tests were located in Field 2 N.W. on "old" muck that has been
under cultivation for about 35 years and which has grown a crop of corn almost
every year. Test 1 consisted of established varieties previously grown at this
station. Test 2 was largely a comparison of Poey-T varieties along with Corneli
54 and two DeKalb hybrids previously tested. Test 3 consisted of 13 white corns
and Corneli 54. New varieties in this test were Poey T-23A and T-46A and Cade
Experimental I, II, and III, all having closed pedigrees at this time. Some of
the varieties occurred in more than one test.

The three variety tests were contiguous and oriented east and west. There
were six replications in each test. Plots consisted of one row of corn 20 feet
long. All rows were bordered. Ten-foot alleys separated experiments. The
survival stand goal was 1 plant every foot, or 14,520 per acre. This was
attained by dropping seeds on February 14, 1963 every foot in the rows three
feet apart and thinning the stand to one plant every foot.

Soil tests from samples taken on January 28 revealed, according to methods
of analysis in use at this station, that the reaction of the soil was 5.80, and
the P and K levels were 7 and 103, respectively. On February 11, fertilizer was
broadcast on the soil and disked in at the rate of 540 pounds of 3-12-16 con-
taining 1 unit each of CuO, MnO, B 0 and ZnO per acre. Three pounds of techni-
cal aldrin per acre were disked ino3the soil for wireworm control. On February 18
Randox and Vegedex at 2 1/2 pounds per acre in 40 gallons of water were applied
to the soil for pre-emergence weed control. On March 25, budworms were controlled
with an application of two pounds of technical toxaphene per acre in 100 gallons
of water. The crop was laid-by April 1, by deepening the furrows.

The midpoint of tasselling was recorded for each variety. For most varieties
this was between May 8-10. Early varieties were DeKalb 633 and 805 that tasselled
on April 24. Later varieties were the Rocamex 500-series that tasselled on May 13.
Stalk and ear heights were recorded for each variety. At maturity, the existing
stand was recorded for each plot and converted to percent perfect stand. Each
plot was harvested with husks remaining on the ears. The snapped corn was bagged,
dried at 110 F. for three days, and weighed. The ears were husked, and the yields
re-weighed as ear corn. Six ears of corn were weighed in each plot, shelled,
and the grain was weighed. Shellout was calculated as percent by weight of the
ear corn. Yields per acre were extrapolated from plot yields corrected to perfect
stands in pounds and bushels of U. S. No. 2 grain.

Conversion factors were calculated for the relationships: Snapped/Ear;
Snapped/Grain; and Ear/Grain.





i/ Associate Agronomist and Associate Entomologist, working under state Project .
1058.









Page 2


The spacing test was planted on February 16 just north of the variety tests.
A 6 x 6 latin square design was used. Rows were three feet apart. Plots con-
sisted of three rows. The center row was harvested for yield. Poey T-23 white
hybrid was used to test six spacing arrangements. Two populations were tested:
14,520 and 19,333. Drill spacings of multiples of 9 and 12 inches were used.
To attain identical populations, with each increase in drill distance, one more
plant per hill was used: 1/9, 2118 and 3/27 for the 19,3353 population and 1/12,
2/24 and 3/36 inches for the 14,520 population.

Results. During the 1963 crop season, growing conditions were excellent, but
stands attained were less than desirable. Table 1 and Figure 1 show that Rocamex
H-503 continues to be a good yielding corn. In 1963, it produced 101 bushels per
acre, and an average of 104 for seven years of trial. The most serious drawback
to this variety is its height: 9 1/2 feet with ears 6 1/2 feet from the soil.

The six Poey-T varieties in Test 2 yielded between 92 and 106 bushels per
acre, while Corneli 54 averaged only 70 bushels. The DeKalb varieties were low
yielding in this test. Poey T-62A holds much promise if it performs well through-
out Latin America and goes into commercial production, making seed generally
available. Plants were only 7 2/3 feet high with ears only 4 1/2 feet off the
ground. The DeKalb hybrids tasselled between 14 and 19 days earlier than the
Poey-T and Rocamex varieties. These DeKalb varieties grow only about 7 feet
tall, and have the capacity of producing very large ears of dent corn.

Three varieties were outstanding in Test 3. They are Poey T-23A, and Cade
Experimental I and III, which had acre bushel yields of 100, 120, and 109,
respectively. They grow between 11 and 11 1/2 feet tall when planted at Belle
Glade in February. These were tested for the first time in 1963.

Certain varieties occurred in more than one test. Data obtained from these
varieties are summarized in Table 4.

Conversion of one form of yield to another.

Some growers use a snapper to.harvest the ears with the "slip-shucks"
remaining on the ear. Others use a "picker" that removes the husks. Still
others use a "picker-sheller', that removes only the shelled grain from the
field. In formulating ratios and in selling the harvest, it is frequently
desirable to be able to easily convert from one form to another. Various
rules-of-thumb are in common use in the corn belt and other areas.

One of the most common rules-of-thumb states that a bushel of the harvested
material weighs as follows:

Type Harvest Weight per Bushel, lbs.
Snapped Corn 72

Ear Corn 65


Shelled Corn







Page 3


This scheme presupposes the following weights:


Type Harvest Grain Cob Husk Total

Shelled 56 56

Ear' 56 9 65

Snapped 56 9 7 72


A bushel of ear corn, thus, would have 56 pounds of grain and 9 pounds of
cobs, totaling 65 pounds. A bushel of snapped corn would have 56 pounds of
grain, 9 pounds of cobs and 7 pounds of husks, totaling 72 pounds.

On a percentage basis:

56
Sx 100 = 86 percent of ear corn is grain

x 100 = 78 percent of snapped corn is grain

65
x 100 = 90 percent of snapped corn is ear corn

The average of 35 entries of neo-tropical corns at Belle Glade in 1963
including 29 varieties showed that ear corn contained about 82 percent grain,
that snapped corn contained about 65 percent grain, and that snapped corn contained
about 80 percent ear corn. This would indicate that the neo-tropical varieties
have more cob and more husk than do corn belt varieties. This is certainly the
case, especially for the husks. Husk coverage is an important part of the
breeding programs south of the corn belt.

Using 56 pounds of grain per bushel (which is standard for U.S. No. 1):

56 = 68 pounds of tropical earcorn make 1 bushel of grain

56
.= = 86 pounds of tropical snapped corn make 1 bushel of grain

It follows, then, that the 56-65-72 type rule-of-thumb is not valid for the
tropical varieties with good husk coverage and the larger cobs. A 56-68-86
rule-of-thumb is suggested.

Table 5 shows actual conversion factors for groups of corn with similar
parentage. The extremely high conversion factor from snapped corn to ear corn
for DeKalb 633 and 805 of 95.6 is explainable because those varieties are almost
self-husking at harvest. Also for this reason, these varieties had highest
snapped corn to grain factor of 71.8. This advantage does not carry over to the
shelling percentage, which was the lowest for the 29 varieties tested, 75 percent.
The lowest snapped corn to ear corn factor was reflected by the Rocanex varieties,
signifying the best husk coverage, a very important trait.




Page 4


In the 1963 field corn spacing test, where the plants were spaced in
multiples of 9 inches, heights of plants average 120 inches, while those
on 12-inch multiple spacings averaged 10 inches shorter. Ear heights
differed on the average only 3 inches, 67 for the closer spacing and 64 for the
wider spacing. The midpoint of tasselling for the experiment was May 13, or
86 days after the February 16 planting. Since four ears were weighed, shelled,
and the grain therefrom weighed, it was possible to establish a fairly reliable
shelling percentage for the-test variety, Poey T-23. The average sellout from
35 samples was 82.3. The average ear weighed 0.50 pound and the average grain
from each ear weighed 0.41 pound. Yield data showed that the 9-inch spacing
was superior to the 12-inch spacing. These average yields were 117 and 91 bushels
per acre, respectively.

On a plant per hill basis, averaging the yields from the two spacings gave,
for the single plant per hill 105; for 2 plants per hill 114; and for 3 plants
per hill 93 bushels per acre.

On the basis of this test, Poey T-23 performs best on three-foot rows where
bills are spaced 18 inches apart, and 2 pants occupy each hill.
Seed Sources

Poey Hybrids and Corneli 54

Yellow Cornbli 54, Poey T-62, Poey T-66

'White Poey T-23, Poey T-46

Experimental Poey T-23A, Poey T-46A, Poey T-62A, Poey T-63, Poey T-65

Sources: Hector Supply Company, Belle Glade, Florida; Alexandria Seed Company

P. 0. Box 1870, Alexandria, Louisiana; Cade Export Company,

Alexandria, Louisiana; Semillas Mejoradas de Mexico, S. A. Liverpool

143, Mexico 6, D. F., Mexico.

Rocamex Hybrids

White-Rocamex H-501, 503, 504, 505, 507, 502.

Source: Oficina de Estudios Especiales, Secretaria de Agricultura y Ganaderia

Calle Londres 40, Mexico. (Cooperative with the Fundacion Rockefelle:

Same address.

Funk G-Hybrids

Yellow Funk G-745

Sources: Kilgore Seed Company, Belle Glade, Florida; Louisiana Seed Company,

Alexandria, Louisiana or Box 2586, Montgomery, Alabama.

DeKalb Hybrids
Yellow DeKalb 633, DeKalb 805
Source: DeKalb Agricultural Association, Maitland, Florida





Page 5


Entomological Investigations

Observations to determine average length, ear diameter, and degrees of
earworm (IHeliothis zea (Boddie) and/or Laphygma frugiperda (J. E. Smith))
damage and weevil damage among the varieties were made front January 20 to
January 23, 1964, following open storage after harvest. Most weevil damage
was caused by the rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus)). Five repre-
sentative ears from each plot were measured to the nearest 0.5 centimeter for
ear diameter and ear length. All available ears from each plot up to a maximum
of 25 ears per plot were each assigned an index number (0-5) to indicate the
degree of injury by earworms. An average plot index was computed and multiplied
by 100. The highest possible index, 500, would indicate the greatest assignable
degree of earworm damage. The following indexing system was used:

Index Fraction of Length of Ear Damaged

0 No damage

1 One-eighth or less

2 One-eighth to one-fourth

3 One-fourth to three-eighths

4 Three-eighths to one-half

5 One-half or greater

To evaluate the damage by weevils, 100 kernels were taken randomly from each
plot after the corn was shelled to count the number damaged.

The results of Test 1 are shown in Tables 7 and 8, those of Test 2 in Tables
9 and 10 and those of the white tropical field corn variety test are in Tables
11 and 12.

There were no significant differences among the varieties in Test 1 in
respect to either earworm or weevil damage.

In test 2, both earworm damage and weevil damage were highly significantly
greater among the DeKalb varieties than among the other varieties. Poey T-65
had highly significantly more weevil damage than Poey T-66. If one could assume
no effect from reciprocity of crossing, inbred "0" is a better contributor of
weevil damage resistance than inbred "R" when combined with inbreds "A", "S",
and "P". Poey T-62 suffered significantly less earworm damage than that
occurring anong Poey T-65 and T-66. This might imply that inbred "T" is relatively
an effective contributor of earworm resistance among these varieties.

In the test on white tropical field corn varieties, Rocamex H-505 received
significantly more earworm damage than Rocamex H-507. The genetical implication
here seems to be that "T1- x T is a better parent than "T for transmitting
earwom resistance. The larwom damage among Rocamex H-501 rd H-502 was
significantly less than that among Rocanex H-503, H-504, H-505, and H-507.
There are no obvious genetical implications. Earworm damage was significantly
less among Rocamex H-503 and H-504 than anong Rocanex H-505 and H-507. Inbred
lines "6", "7", "8", and "9" occurred among H-503 and H-504 whereas "10", "ll"
and "12" occurred among H-505 and H-507. When grouped, the Rocamex varieties
received highly significantly more earworm damage than the Poey varieties and








iage '6


Table 7. Average ear diameter, ear length, earworm diaage, and percent
weevil damage anong 10 varieties of tropical corn at Belle Glade, Florida
1963. Test 1.


Ear Ear Earworn % Weevil
Diai. Lgth. 'Damage Damaged
Variety (cm) (ec) Index Kernels
V ai i i iiii ,, ii ia


1. Rocanex H-501

2. Rocanex H-503

3. Funk G-740

4. Funk G-745

5. Keystone 257

6. Big Joe

7. E-bro 256 CP

8. EDbro 257CT2

9. Embro Flint 1

10. Corneli 54


5.2

5.0

4.9

5.0


5.0

4.8

5.4

5.0

5.1


17.9.

17.9

17.3

16.6

16.6

16.8

15.7

18.7

17.0

18.4


235

255

250

249

235

240

253

256

242

244


Corneli 54. The Cade Experimental varieties suffered significantly less earworm
damage than the other hybrids in the test when grouped. Poey T-23A and Poey
T-46A suffered significantly less weevil damage than Poey T-23 and Poey T-46.
As the percentages of T-23A and T-24A are unknown, genetical Implications are
vague. However, the designations themselves imply that the varieties are
improved T-23 and T-46, probably with some common parentage.




EES Mimeo 64-21
450 Copies
June 1964


---








Table 1. The characteristics of 10 varieties of tropical corn at Belle Glade, Florida.


Coded Crossing Scheme Heightinches Conversion Factors 1



-X-
Female Parent Male Parent ion F





i. Rocamex H-501 T 2 T3 T4 I0 77 5-0 9"2 87 75-9 61.9 81.6 4855
to*.


2. Rocamex H-503 T2 T3 T6 T 114 77 5-i0 68 i01 77-1 62.5 81.0 5650
3. Funk G-740 1 2 3a 6 113 71 5-8 97 70 79.8 65.4 81.8 3915
4. Funk G-745 1 2 7 8 105 67 5-10 103 73 84.5 70.8 83.9 4060
5. Keystone 257 c 62 ys M. m 107 60 5-10 lo6 56 80.3 68.9 85.7 3115
6. Big Joe M W+CF+YT 94 47 5-8 74 71 82.5 69.9 84.6 3985
7. EDbro 256 cP Improved Embro K-25i 97 59 5-8 124 57 83.9 68.8 81.8 3190
aI II)







1. ERoamex H-501 T T TD B 110 77 5-10 00 87 82.6 70.4 81.6 4855
2. Rocamex H-503 T T3 T6 T7 114 77 5-10 68 101 77.1 62.5 81.0 5650
3. Funk G-740 1 2 3a 6 113 71 5-8 97 70 79.8 65.4 81.8 3915
4. Funk G-745 1 2 7 8 105 67 5-10 103 73 84.5 70.8 83.9 4o6o
5. Keystone 257 C2 6 Oys MI IL 107 60 5-10 106 56 80.3 68.9 85.7 3115
6. Big Joe MI Wr+CF+YT 94 17 5-8 74 71 82.5 69.9 84.6 3985
7. Embro 256 CP Improved Embro K-25-j 97 59 5-8 124 57 83.9 68.8 81.8 3190
8. Embro 257CT2 M4 M1 D B 113 66 5-8 100 87 82.6 70.4 85.3 4855
9. Embro Flint 1 M4 C1 F76-lx F76-3 102 62 5-8 117 84 82.0 68.4 83.3 4710
10. Cornell 54 A C D B 107 66 5-10 74 82 81.1 64.2 79.3 4565


Occurs also in the white corn test.
I/ Snapped corn weight = 100%.


**


Occurs also in Test 2 and in the white corn test.


1963. Test 1l










Table 2. The characteristics of 10 varieties of Poey, DeKalb and Corneli corn at Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.
Test 2.

Coded Crossi Scheme Height, inches .* Conversion Factors
Female Parent Male Parent P. cl. .c'
Ndame

I7 00 ri t3 X1 G
Variety to to S tr
Name______ ___
1. Corneli 54** A C D B 110 67 5-8 52 70 78.5 59.5 75.9 3915
2. Poey T-62 A R P T 106 64 5-8 81 97 83.6 65.8 78.8 5435
3. Poey T-63 0 V S U 99 59 5-8 48 100 79.0 61.2 77.4 5580
4. Poey T-65 A R S P 105 59 5-8 37 94 77.9 65.9 84.4 5290
.5. Poey T-66 A S P 0 110 73 5-10 104 92 81.4 65.9 81.1 5145
6. DeKalb 633 Closed pedigree 88 44 4-24 60 66 96.0 73.0 76.0 3695
7. Poey T-62A Closed pedigree 92 54 5-8 74 106 76.8 63.6 82.8 5940
8.* Poey T-23 I J G F 102 56 5-8 65 101 76.0 64.5 84.8 5650
9.* Poey T-46 G F J K 98 56 5-10 90 102 79.5 64.9 81.6 5725
11. DeKalb 805 Closed pedigree 82 38 4-24 74 50 95.2 70.6 74.1 2825


Occurs also in the white corn test.


Snapped corn weight = 100%.


occurs also invest an the ite corn test
Occurs also in Test 1 and the white corn test.









Table 3. The characteristics of 13 white tropical
Florida. 1963.


field corn varieties and Corneli 54 at Belle Glade,


Coded Crossing Scheme Height,inches + Conversion Factors
Female Parent Male Parent a-
0 0) 15) Pr n
rS -P O P
0 a +* P HO
D) Id rd
Variety H HH (. DJ H (a
Name M g to5 >
1. Rocamex H-501 T1 T2 T T 111 72 5-13 84 92 76.7 63.8 83.3 5145
2. Rocamex H-503 T2 T3 T6 T 121 70 5-13 79 79 76.2 63.8 83.8 4420
3. Rocamex H-502 T T3 T2 T 112 71 5-13 86 94 77.1 65.3 84.6 5290
4. Rocamex H-504 (H-503) T8 T9 111 67 5-13 70 74 77.7 63.8 82.1 4130
5. Rocamex H-505 T2 T3 To 107 68 5-13 60 87 73.7 62.1 84.2 4855
6. Rocamex H-507 T2 T T11 T12 109 71 5-13 60 85 74.2 59.7 80.6 4780
7. Poey T-23A Closed edigree 110 67 5-10 75 100 78.8 65.3 82.8 5580
8. Poey T-23 I J G F 92 47 5-10 63 91 75.9 63.2 83.3 5070
9. Poey T-46 G F J K 105 61 5-10 69 92 78.8 65.3 82.9 5145
10. Corneli 54 A C D B 113 71 5-10 72 88 79.0 64.6 81.8 4925
11. Cade Exptl. I Closed pedigree 114 67 5-10 60 120 79.8 67.1 84.2 6740
12. Cade Exptl. II Closed pedigree 110 76 5-10 55 92 77.1 61.3 79.4 5145
13. Cade Exptl. III Closed pedigree I11 61 5-10 50 109 78.4 63.4 81.1 6085
14. Poey T-46A Closed pedigree 98 59 5-10 78 96 81.3 68.6 84.4 5360


Also occurs in Test 1.
Snapped corn eight = 100.
l/Snapped corn weight = 10046.


Also occurs in Test 2.


Also occurs in Tests 1 and 2.









Table 4. The characteristics of 5 corn varieties occurring in more than one test at Belle Glade, Florida in 1963.

.ntry in Test: Height,inches Pollen Stand Yields, Conversion Factors Yields,
Variety mid- attained, bu./A. Ear/ Gran Grain Ibs./A.
Name 1 2 lhite Stalk Ear point % U.S. No. 2 Snapped Snapped Ear U.S. No. 2
Rocamex H-501 1 1.10 77 5-10 92 87 75.9 61.9 81.6 4855
Rocamex H-501 1 111 72 5-13 84 92 76.7 63.8 83.3 5145
Average 110 75 5-11 88 .89 76.3 62.9 82.5 5000
Iocamex H-503: 2 114 : 77 5-10 68 101 77.1 62.5 81.0 5650
Rocamex H-503 2 121 70 5-13 .79 79 76.2 63.8 83.8 4420
Average 117 73 5-11 74 90 76.7 63.2 82.4 5035
Poey T-23 8 102 56 5-8 65 101 76.0 64.5 84.8 5650
Poey T-23 8 92 2 47 5-10 63 91 75.9 .63.2 83.3 5070
Average 97 51 5-9 64 96 75.9 63.9 84.1 5370
Poey T-46 9 98 56 5-10 90 102 79.5 64.9 81.6 5725
Poey T-46 9 105 61 5-10 69 92 78.8 65.3 82.9 5145
Average 101 58 5-10 79 97 79.2 65.1 82.1 5435
Corneli 54 10 i07 66 5-10 74 82 81.1 64.2 79.3 4565
Corneli 54 1 110 67 5-8 52 70 78.5 59,5 75.9 3915
Cornel 54 "10 113 71 5-10 72 88 79.0 64.6 81.8 4925
Average .110 68 5-9 66 80 79.5 62.8 79.0 4468








Table 5. The relationships among snapped corn, ear corn and shelled grain of
tropical field corn varieties grown at Belle Glade, Florida in 1963.
Conversion Factors, Percent by Weight
Variety or Groups
of Varieties Snapped corn Snapped corn Ear Corn
to to to
ear corn grain grain
Average of 35 entries in 3 tests
including 29 varieties 79.8 65.3 81.9

Corneli 54, Ave. of 3 tests 79.5 62.8 79.0
DeKalb 633 and 805, Ave. 95.6 71.8 75.0
Cade Exptl. I, II, III, Ave. 78.4 63.9 81.6

Funk G-740 and 745, Ave. 82.2 68.1 82.8
Embro 256CP,257CT2,Flint 1, Ave. 82.8 69.2 83.5
Big Joe Synthetic 82.5 69.9 84.6
Rocamex H-501,503, Ave. 2 tests 76.5 63.0 82.4

Rocamex H-501,2,3,4,5,7, Ave. 76.1 62.9 82.6
Poey T-18,23,23A,46,46A,62,62A,
63,65,66, Ave. 79.9 64.9 82.2



Table 6. Data from a spacing test with Poey T-23 field corn at Belle Glade,
Florida. 1963.

Plants Drill Square Plants Tassel: Yields,.
per spacing, feet/ per mid- Height in. bu./A.
hill inches plant acre point Stalk Ear U.S. No.2
1 9 2.25 19,333 t 118 69 119
2 18 2.25 19,333 121 67 128

3 27 2.25 19,333 121 66 105
1 12 3 14,520 120 67 92
2 24 3 14,520 107 62 100

3 36 3 14,520 102 64 82







75 85 95 105 115 125
x x x x x x

N 12 BIG JOE---------- ---o
0o.
F FUNK G-740-----------------------o .
E 10 CORNELI 54-----------------------e
B
R ROCAMEX H-503---------------------------.---..
U 7
A 6 ROCAMEX H-501 ----.. -----ea.----- --.----. -o
R
Y POEY T-23------.....------- ...-.-__ --o-
KEYSTONE 257--------- ----------o
T
R 4 ROCAMEX H-502-----------------...----9
I
A EMERO 257C'T2------------- ---..--------o
L- 3 FUNK. G-745------------.-------- ..--o
S EMBRO 256CP------------- --------o

x x x x x x
75 85 95 105 115 125
AVERAGE YIELDS, BUSHELS PER ACRE SHELLED CORN


Figure 1. Average yields of corn varieties grown the indicated number of times
at Belle Glade, Florida between 1952 and 1963, inclusive.


75 85 95 105 115 125
x x, x x x x

N POEY T-66----------------- ---------------------------,
U 3 POEY T-6----- -------------------------------o
M POEY T-62------.--------------------------
B
E POEY T-63 -----------------------------....-e
R ROCAMEX H-507--------- -- ------------------ --------o
ROCAMEX H-S07O?--------------o
S2 POEY T-65---------- ...--..-------------....o
F EMBRO FLINT 1----------------------- --o
ROCAMEX H-50O----------------------- --------
F DEKALB 633---------o
E
B CADE EXPL 1- .--- .....-.--------___....---..-.o
R CADE EXPL 3--.-----------------------------e
U POEY T-62A----------------------------------o
A POEY T-23A------------------.-------o
R POEY T-46A----------- -- ---------
Y CADE EXPL 2------ ----------- o

Trials
X x x x x x
75 85 95 105 115 125

AVERAGE YIELDS, BUSHELS PER ACRE SHELLED CORN
Figure 2. Average yields of new and experimental corn varieties grown one
to three times at Belle Glade, Florida between 1961 and 1963, inc.






Table 8. Detailed analysis of variance for earworn score and percent weevil damaged kernels anong 10 varieties
of tropical corn at Belle Glade, Florida. 1963. Test 1.


EARWORM DAMAGE WEEVIL DAMAGE
Respec- Respec-
Source of Variation d.f. tive Mean tive % Mean
Scores Squares Kernels Squares

Blocks 5 1274.35 1911.50*

Varieties 9 369.31 402.19

Big Joe (Synthetic) vs. Hybrids 1 240-247 212.82 64-75 574.54

Corneli 54 vs. Other Hybrids 1 244-247 65.33 82-74 348.48

Keystone 257 vs. Rocanexes, Funks, Embros 1 235-249 -960,19 77-73 65.19

Rocanexes & Funks vs. Enbros 1 247-250 109.57 71-77 496.03

Rocanexes vs. Funks 1 245-250 135.38 71-70 4.17

Rocamex H-501 vs. Rocanex H-503 1 235-255 1180.08 62-80 990.08

Funk G-740 vs. Funk G-745 1 250-249 3.00 73,67 90.75

Embros: 256 CP & 257CT2 vs. Flint 1 1 255-242 633.36 76-81 113.78

Embros 256CP vs. 257CT2 1 253-256 24.01 84-67 936.33

Error 45 1217.42 679.10








Table 9. Average ear dinaeter,
among 10 varieties of
1963. Test 2.


ear length, earworn damage, and percent weevil damage
Poey, DeKalb and Corneli corn at Belle Glade, Floride


Ear Ear Earworm ( Weevil Damaged
Diam. Lgth. Damage Kernels
Variety (cn) (cn) Index

1. Corneli 54 F-2 5.0 19.0 219 94
2. Poey T-62 4.9 18.6 209 93

3. Poey T-63 5.4 19.3 206 86
4. Poey T-65 5.0 18.3 260 97

5. Poey T-66 5.4 18.4 231 79
6. DeKalb 633 4.7 18.0 299 100
7. Poey T-62A 5.0 17.6 209 96
8. Poey T-23 5.3 19.3 240 97
9. Poey T-46 5.2 .19.2 235 87
10. Corneli 541 5.4 18.9 242 90
11. DeKalb 805 4.9 19.5 267 100






Table 10. Detailed analysis of variance for earworm score and percent weevil damaged kernels anong 10 varieties
of Poey, DeKalb and Corneli corn at Belle Glade, Florida* 1963. Test 2.


EARWORM DAMAGE WEEVIL DAMAGE
Respec- Mean Respective an
Source of Variation d. f. tive Squares % Damaged quares
Scores Kernels


Blocks 5 1020.8 1008.3*

Varieties 10 4887.5 254.1

DeKalbs vs. Other Hybrids 1 283-228 29410.7* 100-91 761.3*

DeKalb 633 vs. DeKalb 805 1 299-267 3040.1 100-100 0.1

Corneli 54 vs. Other Cuban Hybrids 1 230-227 88.7 92-91 14.6
Corneli 54 F-2 vs. Corneli 54 F-l 1 219-243 1656.8 94-90 36.8

Poey T-65 (AxR)(SxP) vs. Poey T-66 (AxS)(PxO) 1 260-231 2552.1 97-79 1008.3*

Poey T-23 (IxJ)(GxF) vs. Poey T-46 (GxF)(JxK) 1 240-235 80.1 97-87 280.3

Poey T-62, T-65, T-66 vs. Poey T-63, T-23, T-46 1 233-227 336.1 90-90 0.7

Poey T-62 vs. Poey T-65 & T-66 1 209-246 5451.4* 93-88 113.8

Poey T-63 vs. Poey T-23 & T-46 1 206-238 3906.3 87-92 113.8

Poey T-62A vs. Other Poeys 1 209-230 2352.8 96-90 .231.8

Error 50 1224.7 99.4








Table 11. Average ear diameter, ear length, earworm damage, and percent weevil
damage among 13 white tropical field corn varieties and Corneli 54
at Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.


Ear Ear Earworm % Weevil
Variety Diam. Igth. Damage Damaged
(cm) (cm) Index Kernels

1. Rocamex H-501 5.0. 17.2 287 93
2. Rocamex H-503 4.9 18.1 284 93

3. Rocamex H-502 5.2 16.8 248 93
4. Rocamex H-504 4.9 18.1 273 94

5. Rocamex H-505 5.1 16.8 338 94
6. Rocamex H-507 5.3 16.8 292 96

7. Poey T-23A 5.0 18.9 230 89
8. Poey T-23 5.0 18.6 242 96
9. Poey T-46 5.1 18.5 222 100
10. Corneli 54: 5.1 17.9 247 86

11. Cade Exptl. I 5.2 18.3 247 84
12. Cade Exptl. II 5.2 18.1 246 90'

13. Cade Exptl. III 5.4 19.3 223 91
14. Poey T-46A 5.1 19.5 225 83









Table 12. Detailed analysis of variance for earworm score and percent weevil damaged kernels
field corn varieties and Corneli 54 at Belle Glade, Florida. 1963.


among 13 white tropical


BUDWORM DAMAGE WEEVIL DAMAGE

Source of Variation d.f. Respec- Respec-
tive Mean tive % Mean
Score Squares Damaged Squares
Kernels


Blocks

Varieties

Rocamex H-501 (T1xT ) (T3xT) vs. H-502 (T1xT3)(T2xT )

Rocamex H-503 (T2T3) (T6xT7) vs. H-504 (H-503)(T8xT9)

Rocamex H-505 (TT3) (T10) vs. 1-507 (T2aT3(T11xT2)

H-501 & H-502 vs. H-503, H-504, H-505 & H-507

H-503 (2x3)(6x7) & H-504 (2x3x6x7)(8x9) vs.
H-505 2x3)(10) & H-507 (2x3)(11x12)

Rocamexes vs. Poeys & Corneli 54

Corneli 54 vs. Poeys

Poey T-23A & Poey T-46A vs. Poey T-23 & Poey T-46

Poey T-23 & Poey T-23A vs. Poey T-46 & Poey T-46A

ITteraction of comparisons among Poey varieties

Cade Experimentals vs. Other Hybrids

Cade Experimental I vs. III


Cade
Error


287-248

284-273

338-292

268-297


3479.9
6672.5*

4563.0

310.1

6256.3*

6864.0*


279-315 8103.4"


287-233

247-230

228-232

236-224

226-234

239-263

247-223
246-235


Experimental II vs. I & III


47295.1

1449.1

135.4

925.0

376.0

8208.1*

1704.1
552.3,
1487.0


93-93

93-94
94-96

93-94


94?95

94-91

86-92

86-98

93-92

95-90

88-92

84-91
90-88


820.5**

133.7
0.1

4.1

18.8

18.0


10.7

169.3

143.0

852.0*

9.4

135.4

215.0

133.3
28.4
135.4


_ i




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