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Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076892/00006
 Material Information
Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
Series Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Guzman, V. L.
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, Fla.
Publication Date: 1961-1962
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076892
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140845

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Everglades Station Mimeo Report 63-13


HORTICULTURAL TRIALS WITH CELERY VARIETIES
V. L. Guzman


Two types of tests were conducted: 1- observational and 2- replicated. The
observational trial serves to eliminate those lines or varieties which offer no
possibility for the fresh market. In this trial varieties are planted in single
rows with no replications. The most promising are elevated to the next season
replicated trials for further evaluation. In the replicated trials, varieties
which exhibited the best possibilities in the past observational trials are com-
pared in replicated experiments.

Character of the weather during the trials.

The general character of the weather during the season was moderate with a
long dry spell and unpredictable cold waves. Most damage resulted from flash
rains during March and cold weather following a relatively long period of warm
weather. October was warm and the amount of rainfall was not excessive. November
continued warm and precipitation was low. December was warm until the 25th, when
the first frost of the season occurred. Cold weather prevailed also during the
26th, 29th and 30th. This month was characterized by practically no rainfall.
January continued cold with dangerously low temperatures and wind during the 3rd,
6th, 13th and 31st. Rainfall was below normal. February was warm and with prac-
tically no rainfall. During March temperatures were high but slightly below
normal. Low temperatures and high wind occurred during the 7th, 8th and 9th.
Another cold spell arrived the 17th, but it was not as severe as the previous
ones. Most of the rain fell during the last 10 days of the month, particularly
on the 26th when 3.0 inches relieved the long dry spell. This rain fell in a
short period, and most of the fields were badly flooded. Despite the fact that
the season was extremely dry, the water supply for the celery crop was adequate.
The plants were slightly damaged by the cold waves and heavy rain during March.

Climatological summary for 1961-62 growing season.


Temperature averages (F) Rainfall
Month Max. Min. Mean (inches)
1961

October 85 63 74 2.14 i N
November 81. 58 69 1.46
December 77 52 64. 0.19

1962 |
January 76 51 64 1.80
February 81 53 67 0.6
March 79 53 66 3.8


January 1963







Location, planting and harvest dates.


Horticulture Experiment No. 462 was grown on A. Duda and Sons Farm, field
NR15. Seedbeds were sown October 3, 1961 and plants set in the field January 3,
1962. The experiment was harvested April 3, 1962.

Field plot technique.


Randomized block design with six replications was
long with plants spaced 7 inches in rows 2 feet apart.
and observational celery trials, single row plots were
was 30 feet long with a plot area of 60 square feet.


used. Plots were 40 feet
In both the replicated
used. The harvest row


Fertility conditions.

The experimental field had been cropped to cabbage and corn during the past
season. The soil analysis indicated a mean pH value of 6.2 with 14 pounds of
phosphorus and 273 pounds of potassium per acre. The grower cooperator applied
sufficient fertilizer for the nutrient needs of the crop.

Weed, disease and insect control.

Weeds were controlled by post-transplanting application of Vegadex at the
rate of 5 pounds per acre. In addition, 3 mechanical cultivations were re-
quired for good weed control. For th e control of diseases, Nabam plus zinc
sulphate or Dyrene were the standard fungicides with copper alternating every
two to three weeks. Insect control was effective with toxaphene, diazinone and
thiodan.

Varieties and seed sources.

Replicated Trials

Ace. No. Variety Seed Company

1 52-70 Ferry Morse
2 52-70-58-2-13 F.F.V.A.
3 52-70-2-8-short F.F.V.A.
4 52-70-2-8 F.F.V.A.
5 52-70 .Abbott and Cobb
6 Green Light J. H. Harris
7 Compak No. 1 Ferry Morse
8 16-11 Asg
9 Compak No. 2 Ferry Morse
10 128 EES

Observational Trials

11 Utah 10B Ferry Morse
12 Utah 10B Dessert
13 Utah 10B Dessert
14 XP 306 Asg
15 XP 311 Asg
16 XP 304 Asg
17 XP 22 Asg
18 Utah Pascal 4-5 F.F.V.A.





-3-


7 Data Obtained

Yield Data

I Untrimmed total fresh weight
II Trimmed fresh weight
III Estimated crates per acre based on size

Growth Characteristics

IV Length of petioles from base to first node
V Width of petioles midway between base and first node
VI Number of outer petioles
VII Number of inner petioles

Physiological Disorders

VIII Cracked stem
IX Intensity of cracked stem
X Pithiness at the base
XI Intensity of pithiness
XII Number of feather leaf
XIII Pencil stripe

Results

Table 1 and 2 present summarized data of performance of celery varieties in
the observational and replicated trials, respectively. This is the second season
in which the same varieties were compared. The main objective of the trials was
to find if the new selections are superior to the original 52-70. In contrast to
last year's trials, there were no major difficulties during the growing of the
crop. Although some replanting was necessary to obtain a nearly perfect stand,
growth and yields were outstanding.

Yields as untrimmed weight, trimmed weight or estimated crates per acre did
not differ significantly among the new selections from the 52-70 check (variety
1). Petiole length and width of 52-70-2-13, although shorter and wider than the
check, were not significantly different. Lines 52-70-2-8 and 52-70-2-short had
a significantly shorter and wider petiole than the check. Line 52-70-2-13 had
fewer number of outer and inner petioles than the check, but only the latter
observation was significantly different. Cracking of the stem appears to be
worse in the new lines than in the original variety, although these differences
were not always statistically significant. There is some indication that line
52-70-2-13 had more pithy petioles and feather leaf than the check. It is pos-
sible that this could be only a manifestation of slightly more maturity at har-
vest time than the original 52-70.

The performance of line 128AA(No.10) of the Everglades Experiment Station
seemed to be similar to the check in most respects, but its appearance was inferior
to the new 52-70 lines.








The new selections from 52-70 in general have the same characteristics as
the original variety. The most outstanding contribution, particularly for line
52-70-2-13, is its earliness and the good width and length of petiole, which
contributed to make a remarkably attractive pack., The main weakness of the line
is its susceptibility to show a larger number of badly cracked stems when condi-
tions for manifestation of this disorder are present.

Lines in the observational trials produced high yields but their appearance
was only as good or inferior to the check. Lines of Utah 10B seemed slightly
better in general appearance than others in the observational trials.

Key to Tables 1 & 2

Explanation of Headings in the Tables. Sources. Institution supplying the
seeds. A & C Abbott & Cobb Seed Co.; Asg. Asgrow Seed Company; E.E.S. -
Everglades Exp. Station; F.M. Ferry Morse Seed Company; J.H. Joseph E.
Harris Seed Co.; F.F.V.A. Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association; Des. -
Dessert Seed Co.

Total untrimmed fresh weight. Total weight in pounds of all the celery stalks
before cleaning, stripping and topping.

Trimmed fresh weight. Weight in pounds of all celery stalks after cleaning,
stripping and topping.

Crates per acre, estimated yield.- Plants were graded into plant size, from
1-- to 6-6 dozen per crate as commercially done. From the number obtained of
each grade, total crates per acre were calculated.

Length of petiole from base to first node.- Petiole length was obtained by
measuring in inches the distance from the base to the first node of the petiole
of 10 plants selected at random per replication and variety.

Width of petiole midway between base and first node.- These data were taken in
centimeters. The same number and petioles used for measurement of length of
petiole were employed for width studies.

Number of outer petioles All petioles that were long enough to be trimmed to
16 inches. The value is the mean of 10 plants per variety and replication.

Number of inner petioles. All inside petioles that were short enough to re-
main uncut, when trimming the stalk to 16 inches. The values are the mean of
10 plants taken at random per variety and replication.

Cracked stem. The number of cracked stems of 10 plants per variety and repli-
cation was recorded. The main symptom of this disorder is transverse outward
peeling of the epidermis and adjoining tissue, which becomes brown. It appears
mostly at the node of the petiole. Varietal differences to cracking are very
striking.

Intensity of cracking. The values are the mean rating of severity of cracking
using a scale from 1, very light cracking, to 5, severe cracking, on the same
10 plants employed for counting cracked stem.







Pithiness at the base of the petiole. Obtained by counting in each replication
and variety the number of pithy petioles in 10 selected plants at random. Pithi-
ness is the breakdown of thin walled cells in the parenchyma which leaves hollow
places in the petiole.

Intensity of pithiness. The figures are the mean of degree of pithiness using
a scale from 1 to 5 (one, very light to 5, severe pithiness).

Number of feather leaf. Obtained by counting the number of leaves showing dis-
coloration of the leaf blade of 10 plants selected at random per variety and
replication.

Pencil stripe or celery "rust". Obtained by examining 10 selected plants at
random per plot and variety and recording the number of affected petioles.
Pencil stripe appears as longitudinal brown striping of the petioles. Gener-
ally it affects the heart petioles first. The lesions are usually small and
sometimes rusty looking, therefore the name given by some growers of "rust".
In most cases the very small stripings are transversal to the stalk and the
union of many of them gives the longitudinal appearance. It is a very serious
disorder, ruining the marketability of the produce when severe.

































EES Mimeo 63-13
300 copies













Table 1. Exp. 462. Celery Observational Variety Trials transplanted January
April 3, 1962. A. Duda and Sons Farms, Belle Glade.


3, 1962 and harvested


Varieties


1* I ,


43

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11. Utah 10B FM 9.0 2.05 7.2 9.9 166.8 107.2 1251 1251 7.8 1.2 0.8 2.2
12. Utah 10B Des 7.4 2.80 6.3 9.4 160.0 115.5 1009 1084 8.3 0.0 0.0 4.0
13. Utah lOB Des 10.2 2.55 6.4 8.3 161.3 110.8 1184 1234 4.9 0.5 0.8 3.6
14. XP 3C6 Asg 7.9 2.00 4.7 10.5 142.8 99.7 1042 1057 4.3 0.0 0.0 4.4
15. XP 311 Asg 8.4 2.25 5.2 9.0 154.8 106.0 1158 1198 9.2 0.0 0.0 2.6
16. XF 304 Asg 9.2 2.15 4.4 9.3 182.5 118.0 1270 1310 1.0.0 0.0 0 3.3
17. XP 22 Asg 7.3 2.50 6.7 8.8 149.5 103.6 1098 1153 6.0 0.0 0.0 1.7
18. Utan rascal 4-5 FFVA 9.1 2.15 4.4 8.7 155.2 141.5 1068 1168 2.1 1.4 1.0 1.3











Table 2. Exp. 462. Replicated celery variety
April 3, 1962. Duda and Sons Farm.


trials transplanted January 3, 1962 and harvested
Belle Glade.


Variety


Utah 52-70 (check)
Utah 52-70 2-13
Utah 52-70 2-8-short
Utah 52-70 2-8
Utah 52-70
Green Light
Ccmpak 1
Utah 16-11
Compak 2
128-AA
.05


(O

-g
ct
al


147.7
154.1
152.0
155.4
154.3
156.2
160.6
157.7
158.4
162.0
NS


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
LSD


FM
FFVA
FFVA
FFVA
A&C
J.H.
Fmi
Asg
FM
EES


4-
o




(D
0 P
Sp


8.9
8.2
8.9
8.6
9.3
9.9
8.9
9.8
7.7
9.6
1.0


'-4

0

00
o
ILI
a)C
11

0
4-)0
0)


4.5
3.9
5.0
5.1
4.7
5.1
4.5
5.0
4.7
4.5
0.6


96.4
104.7
101.7
105.0
103.4
103.0
105.1
103.6
98.1
105.0
NS


803
903
938
933
822
983
916
948
816
815
110


973
1038
1042
1046
964
1057
1033
1022
968
975
NS


9.78
9.73
8.33
8.43
10.20
9.85
9.53
8.65
9.92
10.35
0.49


2.26
2.35
2.42
2.42
2.31
2.15
2.42
2.09
2.11
2.34
0.13


0.8
1.4
1.8
1.5
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.4
1.1
1.3
0.6


1.6
2.3
2.4
2.8
2.3
1.1
1.8
0.9
1.7
2.6
1.0


2.70
13.27
1.92
2.32
3.05
4.15
8.25
4.87
5.88
6.13
1.46


0.86
1.13
0.58
0.78
0.83
1.18
2.95
1.13
1.48
1.73
0.38


0.5
1.2
1.1
0.9
0.6
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.2
0.7
0.4


- --


- ..........


__




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