Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
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 Material Information
Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
Series Title: Horticultural trials with celery varieties.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Guzman, V. L.
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, Fla.
Publication Date: 1960-1961
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076892
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140845

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Everglades Station Mimeo Report 62-16 January 1962
HORTICULTURAL TRIALS WITH CELERY VARIETIES
V. L. Guzman-'


Weather Conditions.- The seedbeds were grown in the fall and the transplanted
celery during the winter. October and November were warm and relatively dry,
conducive to good growth. December was dry and cold, with temperatures near
the danger point on December 13, 14, 17, 18 and 22; however, no severe damage
occurred to the celery seedlings. There was more rain in January, and temper-
atures were near the danger point on the night and morning of the 21st and 22nd.
February was dry and'warm, except for near freezing temperatures on February 13
and 14. During March low temperatures prevailed on the llth, after several
weeks of dry, warm weather, but did not injure the crop. Temperatures during
April continued on the rise and rainfall was moderate.


Table 1. Climatological Summary for 1960-61 Growing Season.

Month Temperature averages ( Fo ) Rainfall
1960 Max. Min. Mean Inches

September 87.0 71.0 79.0 19.50
October 86.2 66.6 76.4 2.65
November 81.0 60.1 70.6 1.58
December 72.8 48.3 60.5 0.43

1961
January 71.2 49.5 60.4 2.57
February 76.1 53.5 64.8 1.15
March 81.3 56.3 68.8 0.88
April 81.9 56.6 69.25 2.08
May 86.7 63.0 74.8 8.68
June 88.0 68.3 78.2 6.03

In general, climatic conditions were conducive for good growth due to the
absence of the damaging effect of heavy rains. Soil moisture was apparently
insufficient after transplanting; as a consequence, some plants were lost.
Some unevenness of growth resulted due to replanting.

Location, planting and harvest dates.

Horticulture experiment No. 452 was grown on Billy Rogers Farm, field 4E,
block -B, South Bay. Seedbeds were sown October 6, 1960 and plants set in the
field January 19, 1961. The experiment was harvested April 24, 1961.


l/ Associate Horticulturist, Everglades Experiment Station, Belle Glade,
Florida.
*<: .?* ,-


SP M/s) **







-2-

How the trials were conducted.- There were two types of trials: the "observa-
tional", where a single row 40 feet long was used for preliminary studies and
the "replicated", where the varieties which exhibited the best possibilities
in past observational trials were compared in replicated experiments.

In the replicated trials, randomized block design with six replications
was employed. Plots 40 feet long with plants spaced 7.0 inches and 2 feet
between rows were used. A thirty.foot row was harvested containing 51, plus
or minus 2 plants, for both the observational and replicated trials. The
stand was nearly perfect, but the plants were slightly uneven.

Cultural.- Amount, type and time of application of fertilizer was managed by
the grower cooperator and appeared to be adequate in amount and formula for the
celery crop. -For the control of diseases, Naban plus zinc sulphate or Dyrene
were the standard fungicides with copper alternating every two to three weeks.
Insects were controlled with toxaphene and parathion. Weeds were reduced by
applying 4 pounds of Vegadex per acre as a post-transplanting treatment. The
control of diseases, insects and weeds was- good.

Varieties and seed sources.-


Replicated Trials


Acc. No.

1-
2-
3-
4-
5-
6-
7-
8-
9-
10-


Variety


52-70
52-70-58-2-13
52-70-2-8-short
52-70-2-8
52-70
Green Light
Compak No. 1
16-11
Compak No. 2
128-B


Seedsman


Ferry Morse
F.F.V.A.
F.F.V.A.
F.F.V.A.
Abbott and Cobb
J. H. Harris
Ferry Morse
ASG
Ferry Morse
E.E.S.


Observational Trials
Utah 10B
Utah 10B
Utah 10B
XP 3C6
XP 311
XP 304
XP 22
Utah Pascal 4-5


Ferry Morse
Dessert
Dessert
ASG
ASG
ASG
ASG
F.F.V.A.


11-
12-
13-
14-
15-
16-
17-
18-









Data Obtained

Yield Data

I Untrimmed total fresh weight.
II Trimmed fresh weight.
III Estimated crates per acre based on size.

Growth Characteristics.

IV Length of petioles from base to first node.
V Width of petioles midway between base and first node.
VI Number of outer petioles.
VII Number of inner petioles.

Physiological Disorders

VIII Cracked stem.
IX Intensity of cracked stem.
X Pithiness at the base.
XI Intensity of pithiness.
XII Number of feather leaf.
XIII Pencil stripe.

Results

Data for the replicated experiments are presented in Table 2, for the
observational trials in Table 3.

Explanation of Headings in the Tables.- Sources. Institution supplying the
seeds.- A & C Abbott & Cobb Seed Co.; Asg.- Asgrow Seed Company; E.E.S.-
Everglades Exp. Station; F.M. Ferry Morse Seed Company; J.H. Joseph E.
Harris Seed Co.; F.F.V.A. Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association; Des.-
Dessert Seed Co.

Total untrimmed fresh weight.- Total weight in pounds of all the celery stalks
before cleaning, stripping and topping.

Trimmed fresh weight.- Weight in pounds of all celery stalks after cleaning,
stripping and topping.

Crates per acre, estimated yield.- Plants were graded into plant size, from
1- or 2 to 6-8 dozen per crate as commercially done. From the number obtained
of each grade, total crates per acre were calculated.

Length of petiole from base to first node.- Petiole length was obtained by
measuring in inches the distance from the base to the first node of the petiole
of 10 plants selected at random per replication and variety.

Width of petiole midway between base and first node.- These data were taken
in centimeters. The same number and petioles used for measurement of length
of petiole were employed for width studies.







-4-


Number of outer petioles- All petioles that were long enough to be trimmed to
16 inches. The value is the mean of 10 plants per variety and replication.

Number of inner petioles.- All inside petioles that were short enough to re-
main uncut, when trimming the stalk to 16 inches. The values are the mean
of 10 plants taken at random per variety and replication.

Cracked stem.- The number of cracked stems of 10 plants per variety and repli-
cation was recorded. The main symptom of this disorder is transverse outward
peeling of the epidermis and adjoining tissue, which becomes brown. It appears
mostly at the node of the petiole. Varietal differences to cracking are very
striking.

Intensity of cracking.- The values are the mean rating of severity of cracking
using a scale from 1, very light cracking, to 5, severe cracking,on the same
10 plants employed for counting cracked stem.

Pithiness at the base of the petiole.- Obtained by counting in each replication
and variety the number of pithy petioles in 10 selected plants at random.
Pithiness is the breakdown of thin walled cells in the parenchyma which leaves
hollow places in the petiole.

Intensity of pithiness.- The figures are the mean of degree of pithiness using
a scale from 1 to 5 (one, very light to 5, severe pithiness).

Number of feather leaf.- Obtained by counting the number of leaves showing
discoloration of the leaf blade of 10 plants selected at random per variety
and replication.

Pencil stripe or celery "rust".- Obtained by examining 10 selected plants at
random per plot and variety and recording the number of affected petioles.
Pencil stripe appears as longitudinal brown striping of the petioles. Gener-
ally it affects the heart petioles first. The lesions are usually small and
sometimes rusty looking, therefore the name given by some growers of "rust".
In most cases the very small stripings are transversal to the stalk and the
union of many of them gives the longitudinal appearance. It is a very serious
disorder, ruining the marketability of the produce when severe.

Incidence of early blight.- Each variety was rated for early blight lesions
from 0 to 5 under sprayed conditions (zero, no disease; five, very severe
incidence of the disease or a dead plant).

Since the main objective of this experiment was to compare the performance of
the new selections of 52-70 made by the FFVA, most of the discussion will be
centered on lines 52-70-2-13, 52-70-2-8-short and 52-70-2-8. Other types of
Utah celery included in this experiment were for comparison also, since their
performance has already been investigated during the past several years. There
is a new breeding line from the Everglades Experiment Station, 128-B, that
showed promise although it is not as resistant to blight as Emerald, but less
susceptible than some of the Utah types.

It was pointed out that replanting was necessary in order to obtain a
nearly perfect stand, when some of the plants died after transplanting. This
of course introduced more variability, which could be reflected in the various
measurements obtained.








Table 2. Exp. 452. Replicated celery variety trials transplanted January 19, 1961
and harvested April 24, 1961. Billy Rogers Farm, South Bay.


I I I


Vari etP


Utah 52-70 (check),
Utah 52-70 2-13
Utah 52-70 2-8-short
Utah 52-70 2-8
Utah 52-70
Green Light
Compak 1
Utah 16-11
Compak 2
128-B


LSD. .05


r,
0
k




JC


$4


-Iv
4
H 0



0


0
0
.-4
0

o


o

31


.,1
0
'-I
0
o
4,
0
0
i O
a
4,
H
Mi-


Va tI I 4 I I l t -


FM
FFVA
FFVA
FFVA
A&C
J.H.
FM
ASG
FM
EES


122.9
112.7
114.4
117.4
125.1
117.9
109.8
128.2
132.4
128.2

NS


75.6
74.7
82.3
72.8
75.2
74.2
71.2
76.6
79.3
75.1

NS


634

571
554
618
614
599
439
752
663
511

NS


911
895
866
838
882
915
828
985
946
866


8.8
8.7
7.4
7.5
9.1
8.8
8.6
8.6
8.5
9.1

0.36


1.79
1.95
1.94
1.98
1.89
1.65
1.96
1.62
1.83
1.88

0.11


I ___________ *


11.9
9.9
12.6
11.4
12.1
13.6
10.4
13.8
10.0
12.3

1.26


5.0
5.4
5.4
5.2
5.1
5.1
5.0
4.4
4.2
4.2

0.72


0.45
D.41
0.88

0.51
0.50
3.01

3.36
3.03.
3.08
3.23


0.291


0.28
0.35
0.68

0.50
0.38
0.02

0.33
0.03
0.08
0.23


4,
0

PI


0.28
0.55
0.75
0.98
0.65

1.53
4.63
2.53
2.23
1.26

i.26


m I
1-H

1-I-
4.
0
0


o
I-i


0.28
0.50
0.37
0.40
0.35
0.48
2.17
1.13
1.65
0.75


ra
0


CS
0


0
a,


0



I


0.70
0.45
1.18

0.93
0.76
0.26
0.68
0.38
0.86
0.36

0.56


3.0
2.5
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.5
2.5
3.0
3.0
2.5









Table 3. Celery Observational Variety Trials in Experiment 452 Conducted at Billy Rogers
Farm, South Bay.




0 Va o









12. Utah 10B Des 7.5 1.72 5 15 14 '91 84 855 6.3 o o.o
3 Uh 1 D 8.8 .
o 4 0





5. x 31 AG 8.3 .85 4 13 13 88 049 1175 .6 0 o.o
-u 43 8 ,- a; 43 o) *H : g 0t + P S .










16. XP 304 ASG 8.8 1.75 15 162 106 1081. 1242 3.4 0 0.1
15 XP 3 ASG 8 41.85 4.
















17. XP 22 ASG '7.2 1.95 60 15 141 99 938 164 3.8 P 0.0

18. Utah Pascal 4-5 FFVA 8.0 2.05 45 11 117 79 750 1022 0.8 0 0.3










Yields as untrimmed weight, trimmed weight or estimated crates per acre
did not differ significantly among the varieties. Length of petiole of the
52-70 check (variety No. 1) is significantly better than the selections 5270-
2-8 short and 52-70-2-8 and almost significantly better than 52-70-2-13, but
these lines have a significantly better petiole width than the check. This
characteristic of the new lines make them more attractive This is especially
true with line 52-70-2-13, which combines a highly desirable length of petiole
with a good rib width. In addition, the new selections from 52-70 are more
uniform. Line 52-70-2-13 has fewer outer petioles but the rib is fleshier.

No significant differences were found in number of petioles showing pith-
iness at the base among the 52-70 lines. Line 52-70-2-8 short showed a signi-
ficantly larger number of cracked stems. Although the number of cracked stems
in 52-70-2-13 and 52-70-2-8 seem to be about the same as that of the check,
nevertheless the intensity or degree of cracking appeared to be worse in these
lines. It should be noted that the figures on number of cracked stem gave an
average of less than one stem per plant showing this disorder; this value is
low, indicating that conditions were not conducive for the manifestation of
cracking.

The heavy incidence of leaf miner made observations on blight susceptibility
somewhat difficult; however, line 52-70-2-13 appeared slightly less damaged by
early blight.

In the observational trials (Table 3) Utah 10B from Dessert and XP 304
from Asgrow deserve further observation.




























EES 62-16
PrC; evmnip-a




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