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Title: Carrot fertilizer experiments.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076890/00001
 Material Information
Title: Carrot fertilizer experiments.
Series Title: Carrot fertilizer experiments.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Burdine, Howard
Publisher: Agricultural Research and Education Center.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, Fla.
Publication Date: 1969-72
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076890
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140822

Table of Contents
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        Page 3
        Page 4
    Tables
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 11
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        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text


SBelle Glade AREC Research Report EV-1973-7


y : 3 LiD RA\RCAkROT FERTILIZER EXPERIMENTS, 1969-72
S Howard 1. Burdine-'
i .APR 3 175 .|

I Zs aPOTP s the results of three experiments conducted to determine
rr9onss'6grOh on Everglades organic soils to nitrogen, phosphorus,
and'pitassiuii applications and to correlate these responses with soil test results.

Experimental Conditions

Experiments 1 and 2 were grown on new soil. These areas had been cleared of
brush and grass a year or two previously, and applications of some micronutrients
and P and K had been make. These areas had been sown to ryegrass which was used
for temporary pasture. Experiment 3 was conducted on land cleared of native
vegetation about 1965 and established to St. Augustine grass pasture. In the fall
of 1971, the grass was plowed under and the land prepared for row cropping. It is
highly probably that micronutrient applications on this area, particularly that
of copper and zinc, were much heavier than on areas 1 and 2 to enhance the nutri-
tive value of the grass. This seems evident from the copper and zinc content of
the carrot roots presented in Table 12 for Experiments 2 and 3.

In all of these experiments, six rows of the cultivar tWaltham Hicolor 9, were
seeded on beds with a base width of 45'inches. Each fertilizer plot consisted of
an area five beds wide and 30 feet in length. Fifteen feet of the center bed in
each fertilizer plot were harvested for yield and'grade data. The design of all
experiments was randomized complete blocks and nutritional treatments were
applied factorially in all combinations. Experiment 1 had four replications.
Experiments 2 and 3 had three replications.

Before fertilization, soil samples were taken from level soil. After ferti-
lizer materials were applied by hand and disked in, beds were thrown up and carrots
were seeded in one operation by the grower-cooperator. Six weeks after seeding,
soil samples were taken from the center bed area to be harvested.

In all of these experiments, copper, zinc, manganese, and boron were applied
uniformly at rates recommended for virgin soil in the N, P, and K mixtures.

Temperature and moisture conditions:

Exp. No. Temperature Rainfall Soil Moisture Conditions
1 Near normal Above normal Good
March, April
2 Near normal Much below normal, Very dry
Entire period
3 Jan. above normal Below normal early Dry to April 1
later near normal April 1, 3.5 in.


1/ Professor (Plant Physiologist), University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural
Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, Florida.


May 1973










Planting, harvesting dates, and plant population:
Avg. No. roots
harvested per
linear foot of
Exp. No. Seeded Harvested Days from Seeding bed

1 12/24/68 4/21-22/69 120-121 27.3
2 1/7/71 5/10-12/71 123-125 25.8
3 12/20/71 4/16-18/72 120-122 26.5

Results and Discussion

Soil test results: Soil test data are presented in Tables 1, 4, and 8 for
Experiments 1,.2, and 3, respectively. Soil pH was high for Experiment 1 with
only a slight drop after fertilization. In Experiment 2, soil pH averaged 5.8
at the start and dropped slightly after fertilization. In Experiment 3, soil pH
at the start was slightly above 6.0 but dropped to about 5.5 after fertilization.
Phosphorus applied to new soil is much more soluble than on older soil. Also,
the extremely dry soil conditions of Experiment 2 and the early period of
Experiment 3 may have delayed reactions between the soil and fertilizer materials.
The large amounts of potassium found after fertilization inExperiment 3 exceeded
the amounts of potassium applied. This is probably due to residual potassium
applied previously to the pasture grass which moved upward during the dry period,
and possibly to incomplete reaction between the soil and the fertilizer. Soil
test data from beds planted to lettuce indicate that after broadcast fertiliza-
tion, levels of both P and K are considerably higher in beds than that which would
be found with level cultivation. Bed culture on these soils may result in
different formulas for soil P and K levels than the customary level culture.

Yield data: Yield data for these experiments are presented in Tables 2, 5,
and 9. Highest yields were obtained in Experiment 1, possibly at least in part,
because of better moisture conditions and slightly lower average temperatures
during the latter part of the growing period. A good response was found to the
intermediate phosphorus level (Tables 2 and 3), but significant responses to
potassium levels were not found.

Nitrogen rates were included as factors in Experiments 2 and 3 to determine
whether or not the lack of response to potassium in Experiment 1 could be due to
a nitrogen deficiency. However, yield and grade data for the last two experiments
(Tables 5, 6, 8, and 9) show only one significant main effect response to nitrogen.
This was the linear increase with nitrogen rates of weights in the .75 x 6" size
in Table 9. There are other reasons for not using nitrogen fertilizers on carrots,
at least for the present, on Florida organic soils.

Responses to phosphorus in Experiments 2 and 3 were not large, probably
because of the higher soluability of residual phosphorus with the decrease in
pH level-after fertilizer application.










There were several yield responses up to the intermediate potassium levels
which are seen in Tables 5, 6, 8, and 9. These generally showed up as increases
in larger marketable roots and decrease in number of culls due to size.

Tissue analysis: Recently there has been much interest in the area in
tissue analysis as a tool to determine whether sufficient nutrients are available
to complete crop growth, to determine why a crop is not growing properly, or why
certain physiological disorders are present. The improvement in analytical
instruments at the AREC at Belle Glade has been of invaluable help in the
accumulation of this kind of data from crops growing under variable experimental
conditions.

One leaf from each of 30 plants was taken from each plot in Experiments 2
and 3. Sound oldest leaves (including the petiole clipped at the top of the root)
were collected at 60, 90, and 120 days after seeding. Data from the analysis of
this tissue are presented in Tables 7 and 11. Rates of N did not significantly
affect the N content of the leaf tissue in either experiment. Potassium rates
did not significantly affect K content of leaf tissue 60 days after seeding.
However, there were significant differences between K rates at 90 and 120 days
after seeding. Phosphorus differences were significant for all rates at all
sampling dates in both experiments. However yield responses to P in these
experiments were mostly not significant in Experiment 2 (Tables 5 and 6). In this
experiment leaf tissue was much higher in P (Table 7) than found in Experiment
3 (Table 11) where some significant yield responses were found to P (Tables 9
and 10)

Data from analysis of root tissue at harvest are given in Table 12 for
Experiments 2 and 3. The value of these data to growers is not apparent at
present, except possibly as a comparison with similar carrot root tissue data
from other production areas.

Conclusions

1. Bed cultivation under the extremely dry conditions under which carrots
are grown in the Everglades make prediction of soil test levels difficult. It
may be necessary under experimental conditions to apply P and K treatments 6-7
weeks in advance of bed formation and seeding for accurate predictable data.
Comparisons of the changes in available P and K found in the beds with that found
under the level conditions (before beds are formed) should lead to predictable
data.

2. Potassium requirements for carrots may not be as high as was presumed
at the start of this series of experiments. For the present, it is believed that
sufficient potassium to build up levels to 150 pounds 0.5 acetic acid soluble
K (under conditions of level cultivation) should be adequate.

3. Leaf analysis data indicate that differences in potassium content of the
leaf at 60 days may not be apparent, at least under conditions where potassium is
not limiting. However, differences in P content were very apparent between rates
at this period in both experiments.







-4-



4. Nitrogen fertilization of carrots on these soils is not to be recommended
at present.

5. One or two more experiments on older, low fertility soil need to be
conducted.






EV-1973-7
500 Copies











Table 1. Experiment 1. Average effects of phosphorus and potassium treatments
on soil pH, water soluble phosphorus, and 0.5 N acetic acid soluble
potassium.

Before,fertilization After fertilization
Material and Soil P, Ibs. K, lbs. Soil P, Ibs. K, Ibs.
rates per acre pH per A. per A. pH per A. per A.

K20, pounds per acre

160 7.07 3 23 7.01 23 124
320 7.10 3 23 7.04 21 156
480 7.06 3 24 6.98 24 198

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. ..N.S. N.S./**


P205, pounds per acre

100 7.05 3 23 7.04 10 162
200 7.14 3 21 7.00 16 158
300 7.05 3 24 6.99 21 158

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. 1/** N.S.


1/ ** Highly significant linear increase.











Table 2. Experiment 1. Total weights of all roots harvested, marketable
weight, and culls in tons per acre as influenced by rates of
phosphorus and potassium.


Materials used Total Marketable Cull
and rate weight, weight, weight,
applied tons/A. tons/A, tons/A.


K20, pounds per acre.
160 20.8 19.8 1.0

320 20.6 19.5 1.1

480 20.6 19.6 1.0

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S.



P205, pounds per acre.
100 18.9 17.7 1.2

200 21.6 20.7 0.9

300 21.5 20.5 1.0


sig.


N.S.


1/**. Highly significant quadratic effect of phosphorus.











Table 3. Experiment 1.
ages of roots


Effect of phosphorus and potassium levels on percent-
in various marketable and cull grades.


Material
and rate
applied


1.5" x 6"


K20, pounds per acre.

160 10.2

320 7.9

480 9.4


Sig.


P20 pounds

100

200

300

Sig.


N.S.2/


per acre.

5.5

11.0

10.0

**1/


% Marketable roots


% Marketable roots
Grades

1.5" x 4" .75" x 6"


1.2

0.9

1.2


N.S.


0.6

1.2

1.5

N.S.


48.1

47.7

51.6


N.S.


46.4

51.4

49.5

N.S.


.75" x 4"


22.2

23.7

20.2


N.S.


23.3

20.8

22.0

N.S.


% Cull roots
Grades
Size
culls cracks


17.7

19.5

17.5


N.S.


23.6

15.1

15.9

**1/


0.6

0.5

0.8


.NS.


0.5

0.6

0.8

N.S.


* or **. Significant quadratic effects

N.S. Not significantly different.


at the .05


or .01 level, respectively.











Table 4. Experiment 2. Average effects of treatments on soil pH, pounds of
water soluble P and pounds per acre 0.5 N acetic acid soluble potassium.


Material and Before 'After End of the
.rate applied fertilization fertilization Experiment
per acre pH P K pH P K pH P K

P_20, pounds per acre.

100 5.79 8 37 5.69 30 249 5.70 17 85

200 5.84 7 37 5.62 46 238 5.71 25 79

300 5.83 8 35 5.71 61 256 5.69 37 80

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. **_- N.S. N.S. **_/ N.S.



K 20, pounds per acre.

160 5.82 8 37 5.66 50 164 5.69 25 47

320 5.85 8 37 5.66 43 242 5.70 29 82

480 5.79 8 35 5.70 44 336 5.69 24 115

Sig. N.S.N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. **N N.S.N.S.. **1


N, pounds per acre.

0

40

80


5.83

5.80

5.84

N.S.


8

8

8

N.S.


36

37

36

N.S.


5.69

5.69

5.63

N.S.


45 z2,44 5.73 28 85

45 247 5.69 25 79

48 252 5.67 26 81

N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


1/ **, highly significant linear increase with rate of application.








Table 5. Experiment 26 Yields in tons per acre marketable roots and culls by
grades as affected by varying rates of potassium, phosphorus and nitrogen.


Marketable roots/ Culls'
Materials Small
and rates Total 1.5" x 6" 0.75" x 6" 0.75" x 4" Total size Cracks Forks


K20, pounds per acre.

160 16.25 0.35 9.29 6.61 5.07 3.58 0.45 1.04

320 17.03 0.47 11.91 4.64 4.27 2.75 0.56 0.96

480 16.68 0.33 11.02 5.33 4.27 2.86 0.52 0.89

Sig. N.S. N.S. 3/** 3/** 2/** 3/** N.S. N.S.



P205, pounds per acre.

100 16.62 0.29 10.72 5.61 4.78 3.35 0.47 0.96

200 16.50 0.33 10.46 5.71 4.78 3.28 0.55 0.95

300 16.72 0.43 11.02 5.27 4.07 2.58 0.51 0.98


Sig.


N.S.


N.S.


N.S.


N.S.


NN.S .S. N.S.


N, pounds per acre.

0 16.96

40 16.35

80 16.54

Sig. N.S.


0.37

0.34

0.33

N.S.


11.40

10.13

10.70

N.S.


5.19

5.88

5.51

N.S.


4.33 2.97 0.50 0.86

4.72 3.19 0.48 1.05

4.54 3.03 0.54 0.97

N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


There were no 1.5" x 4" roots found in this experiment.

**. Significant linear decrease at the .01 level.

* or **. Significant quadratic effect at the .05 or .01 level, respectively.








Table 6. Experiment 2. Average percent of total number of roots harvested in
various marketable grades and culls as influenced by potassium,
phosphorus and nitrogen treatments.


Material Total % % marketable roots--/ % cull roots
and rate marketable 1.5" x 6" 1 75" x 6" .75" x 4" small size cracks forks

K20 applied, pounds per acre

160 53.9 0.4 24.6 28.9 40.7 1.5 4.0

320 62.5 0.6 37.9 24.0 32.3 1.9 3.3

480 62.9 0.4 35.2 27.3 31.9 1.6 3.5

Sig. *2/ N.S. **2/ *2/ **2/ N.S. N.S.



P20- applied, pounds per acre
100 57.9 0.4 31.4 26.1 36.9 1.5 3.7

200 58.8 0.4 31.7 26.7 35.8 1.9 3.4

300 62.5 0.6 34.5 27.4 32.2 1.6 3.6

Sig. N.N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. *2/ N.S. N.S.



N applied, pounds per acre

0 60.9 0.5 35.1 25.2 34.3 1.7 3.2

40 59.1 0.5 30.6 28.0 35.6 1.6 3.7

80 59.4 0.4 32.0 27.0 35.0 1.7 3.9

Sig. N.S. N.S. *2/ N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


1/ There were no 1.5" x 4" roots in this experiment.

2/ ** or *, significant quadratic response at the .01 or .05 level, respectively.









Table 7. Experiment 2. Carrot leaf tissue content of some macro and micronutrients
(dry weight basis) as.affected by varying levels of nitrogen, phosphorus
and potassium applied to the soil.l/

Nutrient and K20 applied P205 applied Nitrogen applied
days from pounds per acre pounds per acre .pounds per acre
seeding 160 320 480 100 200 300 0 40 80


1. % N, 60 5.25
90 4.19
120 3.41


5.36
4.20
3.30


5.13
4.16
3.22**2/


5.27
4.11
3.40


5.29
4.22
3.22


5.18
4.22
3.31*3/


5.27
4.11
3.35


5.28
4.21
3.26


5.19
4.23
3.30


2. % P, 60 .74 .75 .74
90 .37 .36 .37
120 .34 .33 .32


.70 .75 .78**2/
.33 .37 .40**2/
.31 .32 .37**2/


.74 .75 .73
.36 .37 .38
.33 .33 .33


3. % K, 60 5.45
90 3.52
120 2.21

4. % Ca, 60 1.98
90 2.29
120 2.28


5. % Mg, 60 .44 .44 .44
90 .49 .41 .41*3/
120 .42 .39 .39


6. Boron,
ppm


7. Zinc,
ppm


8. Iron,
ppm


60 50
90 32
120 33

60 28
90 16
120 20

60 46
90 39
120 25


49
30*2/
33*3/

29
19**2/
22

71**2/
35
30


.45 .43
.44 ..43
.40 .40


47
30
32

28
.18
23

57
37
30


.42 .43 .46*2/
.44 .43 .44
.40 .40 .42


32
33*2/
31

28
16**2/
19**2/

60
36
25


49
31
32

28
17
21

52
35
26


Differences between fertilizer rates are significant only where designated by or
**

1/ Copper and manganese were freely applied to the foliage in this experiment and
these determinations are not included.
2/ or **. Significant linear increase or decrease at the .05 or .01 level,
respectively.
3/ or "*. Significant quadratic response at the .05 or .01 level, respectively.


5.47
5.08
3.17

1.99
2.27
2.16


5.59
4.53**3/
3.71**2/

1.90
2.41
2.16


5.52
4.10
2.98

1.98
2.38
2.15


5.45
4.00
2.99

1.92
2.26
2.23


5.54
4.02
3.13

1.95
2.35
2.22


5.46
4.06
2.96

1.95
2.37
2.27


5.55
4.05
3.25

1.96
2.27
2.16


5.49
4.01
2.89*3/

1.95
2.34
2.17









Table 8. Experiment 3. Average effects of potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen
applied to the soil on soil pH, water soluble phosphorus and 0.5 N
acetic acid soluble potassium.

Materials Before fertilization After fertilization End of the experiment
and rates Soil P K Soil P K Soil P K
applied pH Ibs/A. Ibs/A. pH Ibs/A. lbs/A. pH lbs/A. Ibs/A.

K20, pounds per acre

40 6.02 8 99 5.56 42 157 5.73 13 25
120 6.00 8 103 5.54 42 186 5.70 14 32
200 6.04 9 112 5.52 45 226 5.67 17 36

Sig. N.S. *1/ N.S. N.S. ** **


P205, pounds per acre

30 6.03 8 99 5.56 27 190 5.72 8 28
120 6.03 8 104 5.55 43 188 5.71 15 31
210 6.00 9 114 5.51 58 192 5.67 21 34

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. ** N.S. ** *


N, pounds per acre

0 6.01 8 105 5.59 41 190 5.74 14 33
40 6.02 9 104 5.53 42 190 5.71 14 29
80 6.04 8 105 5.49 44 190 5.65 15 31

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


1/ or **. Significant linear increase or
respectively.


decrease at the


.01 level,


.05 or










Experiment 3. Yield in
by nitrogen, phosphorus


tons per acre of carrots by grade as affected
and potassium applied to the soil.


Material Marketable Yields by grades, tons per acre
and, rate carrots Marketable Culls,
applied tons/A. 1.5"x6" 1.5"x4" .75"x6" .75"x4" Size Forks Roots

K20 applied, pounds per acre

40 16.84 3.54 .194 8.14 4.97 .964 1.58 .477
120 16.68 4.61 .341 7.63 4.10 .721 1.52 .471
210 17.19 4.61 .373 8.02 4.19 .808 1.18 .674

Sig. N.S. *2/ **2/ N.S. *3/ N.S. *2/ *2/


P205 applied, pounds per acre


17.11
17.16
16.34


3.97
4.84
3 q5;


.254
.252
1ni


8.36
7.77
7 A5:


4.53
4.30
A AA


.819
.825
QAn


Sig. N.S. *3/ N.S. N.S. N.S. S. N.S. N.S.


N applied, pounds per acre

0 16.54 4.50 .299 7.43 4.31 .840 1.58 .600
40 16.72 3.87 .295 8.03. 4.52 .867 1.26 .467
80 17.47 4.40 .314 8.32 4,44: .786 1.44 .554

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. *2/ VN.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


1.40
1.38
I 0t '


.614
.483
c525


1/ There were no cracked roots in this experiment.
2/ or **. Significant linear increase or decrease at the
respectively.
3/ *. Significant quadratic response at the .05 level.


..05 or .01 level,


Table 9.










Table 10.


Experiment 3. Average percent of carrot roots by total number of roots
harvested in various marketable and unmarketable grades as influenced
by nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium rates applied to the soil.


Material Average Unmarketable grades
and rates percent Marketable grades, % of total % of total 1/
applied marketable 1.5"x6" 1.5"x4" .75"x6" .75"x4" Culls Forks Rots

K20 applied, pounds per acre

40 74.2 7.3 .45 33.9 32.4 18.7 5.6 1.5
120 78.2 10.0 .83 36.2 31.1 15.2 5.3 1.6
200 77.4 9.8 .92 35.1 31.6 16.5 4.0 2.1

Sig. *3/ *3/ *2/ N.S. N.S. N.S. *2/ N.S.


P205 applied, pounds per acre
30 76.2 7.8
120 77.5 10.9
210 76.0 8.4


36.0
34.9
34.4


31.9
30.8
32.5


17.1
16.1
17.1


4.9
4.8
5.1


1.9
1.6
1.7


Sig. N.S. *3/ N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


N applied, pounds per acre
0 75.6 9.6 .75 34.4 30.8 17.0 5.6 2.0
40 77.1 8.6 .71 34.3 33.5 16.9 4.4 1.6
80 77.0 9.0 .75 36.5 30.8 16.5 4.8 1.7

Sig. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.

1/ There were no cracked carrots in this experiment.
2/ *. Significant linear response at the .05 level.
3/ *. Significant quadratic response at the .05 level.










Table 11. Experiment 3. Carrot leaf tissue content (dry wt. basis) of
several macro and micro-nutrients at three sampling dates as
affected by rates of N, P and K applied to the soil.


Nutrient
and days
from seeding

1. % N, 60
90
120

2. % P, 60
90
120

3. % K, 60
90
120

4. % Ca, 60
90
120

5. % Mg, 60:
90
120


6. Boron,
ppm


7. Zinc,
ppm


8. Iron,
ppm


K20 applied
pounds per acre
40 120 200


5.23
4.04
3.44


5.16
4.08
3.47


5.16
4.12
3.50


P205 applied N applied
pounds per acre pounds per acre
30 120 210 0 40 '80


5.12
4.03
3.29


.58 .58 .58
.42 .44 .45
.31 .30 .30


5.06
4.51
3.01


1.57
1.28
1.10


5.25
4.80
3.11

1.49
1.28
1.06


5.30
4.98**-
3.60**2/


1.44
1.29
1.10


.46 .43 .43
.35 .34 ..34
.32 .32 .34

1 32 30*3/
0 29 29
6 37 35,

8 98 85
1 66 69
1 40 41


125 127
83 87
66 70


5.14
4.11
3.59


5.29
4.11
3.53


5.16
4.04
3.48


.55 .58 .61**"257
.37 .45 .48**-.42
.21 .31 .38**2/.29:


5.29
4.81
3.40

1.48
1.30
1.07


5.21
4.62
3.10

1.46
1.26
1.09


5.10
4.85
3.22

1.56
1.30
1.10


5.23
4.74
3.15


1.47
1.28
1.09.


.44 .43 .45
.34 .34 .35*/
.30 .34 .33


5.09
4.11
3.45


5.30
4.10
3.48


.58 .59
.44 .45
.31 .30


5.22
4.80
3.27

1.57
1.26
1.07


5.16
4.74
3.30

1.46
1.32
1.09


.45 .43
.34 .35
.32 .33


30 31
29 29
35**/ 35

96*3/ 81
66 66
39 37


126 116 131
85 84 85
68 70 '69


30
29
37*2/

97
76
44*-


119 127 126
85 83 87
67 66 74


Differences between fertilizer rates are'significant only where starred.

SCopper and manganese were freely applied to the foliage of these plants
in the disease control program and these values are not given.

: or **. Significant linear increase or decrease at the .05 or .01 level,
respectively.

3/ or *. Significant quadratic response at the .05 or .01 level, respective-
ly.


-- ~I-I ------~'- ~-`-----~-II-






Table 12.


Experiment 2 and 3. Average carrot root.content at harvest (dry weight
basis) of several plant nutrients as influenced by nitrogen, phosphorus,
and potassium treatments.


Material Nutrientl/
and % % % % % ppm ppm ppm ppm ppm
rate N P K Ca Mg B Mh Cu Zn Fe

2. Experiment 2.
a. K20, pounds per acre

160 2.31 .49 3.11 .43 .17 31 6.6 2.7 15 41
320 2.24 .46 3.73 .40 .19 30 6.6 2.5 14 39
480 2.24 .48 3.96 .42 .16 29 6.7 2.4 14 40

Sig. 3/* 3/** 3/*

b. P205, pounds per acre

100 2.21 .42 3.64 .42 .16 29 6.8 3.0 16 44
200 2.25 .48 3.55 .41 .17 30 6.3 2.7 14 38
300 2.33 .53 3.61 .42 .19 31 6.9 2.4 13 38

Sig. 2/** 2/** 2/* 3/** 2/** 2/** 2/*

c. N, pounds per acre
0 2.28 .48 3.64 .44 .18 30 6.6 2.9 14 39
40 2.23 .47 3.65 .42 .17 30 6.7 2.6 14 40
80 2.27 .48 3.52 .39 .17 30 6.6 2.5 15 41

Sig. 2/* 2/* 2/*
2. Experiment 3.
a. K20, pounds per acre
40 2.29 .55 3.80 .36 .18 30 6.2 6.0 41 35
120. 2.23 .56 4.15 .34 .19 30 7.0 5.9 46 '38
200 2.28 .53 4.44 .34 .19 31 7.1 6.9 37 36
Sig. 2/** 2/* 2/* 3/*

b. P205, pounds per acre.

30 2.19 .45 4.04 .34 .17 31 6.6 6.6 41 ,36
120 2.27,.. .57 4.04 .35- .19 ., 31 6.8 6.1 41 37
210 2.34 .62 4.:30 .34 .19 30 6.9 6.0 43 36
Sig. 2/** 2/** 2/*
c. N, pounds per acre
0 2.25 .53 3.97 .34 .19 30 6.4 6.4 42 37
40 2.26 .56 4.24 .33 .18 31 6.9 6.2 39 36
80 2.29 .54 4.18 .33 .19 31 7.0 6.2 44 35

Sig._
I/ Copper and manganese were applied to the foliage in the pest control programs
cf both experiments.
2/ or **. Significant linear increase or decrease at the .05 or .01 level,
respectively.
3/ or **. Significant quadratic response at the .05 or .01 level, respectively.




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