Title: Primary evaluation of pre- and post emergence herbicides in vegetable and field crops.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076888/00002
 Material Information
Title: Primary evaluation of pre- and post emergence herbicides in vegetable and field crops.
Physical Description: Serial
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station.
Publication Date: 1958
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076888
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140809

Full Text







Everglades Station Mimeo Report 59-6


PRirMAi AUATIOI POST EMERGENCE APPLIED ERBICIDES

SITN V TABLE AbD FIELD CROPS, SPRING, 1958



J. R. Orsenigo






This report of the comparative performance of
commercial and experimental herbicides under the condi-
tions of the Florida Everglades, Spring, 1958, was pre-
pared for herbicide researchers and industry. The data
contained do not constitute nor imply a recommendation
of any herbicide for any usage.












Everglades Station Mimeo Report 59-6

Belle Glade, Florida


November 10, 1958


10 November 1958





Everglades Station Mimeo Report 59-6


PRIMARY EVALUATION OF POST EMERGENCE APPLIED HERBICIDES
IN VEGETABLE AND FIELD CROPS, SPRING, 1958

J. R. Orsenigo
Assistant Horticulturist


Summary: Twenty-one chemical treatments were applied post emergence to 22 vege-
table and 8 field crops and annual weeds at three weeks after planting on organic
soil. BIO 4562 and FW-450 herbicides controlled grass weeds most effectively.
BIO 4562 attained complete control of broadleaf weeds but only several crops were
tolerant of the herbicide. Celery was highly tolerant. FW-450 was ineffective
in controlling broadleaf weeds but most vegetable crops were tolerant or partially
tolerant to it. The potential of these two experimental herbicides for post
emergence weed control in vegetables should be investigated further.

Number of Experiment: 16-58
Location: Field 1 E 4, EES
Cultural operations:
Field fitting: 25 February 1958
Fertilization: 7 March 1958 (400 Ib/A, 0-10-20, broadcast)
Final fitting: 7 March 1958
Crops planted: 11 March 1958
Celery transplanted: 13 March 1958

Routine fungicide-insecticide applications were made weekly and more fre-
quently when required.

Design: Randomized block design with four replications. Twenty-two vegetable
and 8 field crops were planted in east-west rows. Herbicide spray strips were
applied in a north-south direction traversing all crop rows. An herbicide strip
6 ft. wide x 70 ft. long constituted a treatment plot. There were 23 herbicidal
treatments including both hand-weeded and unweeded controls.

Description of test crops: (at time of herbicide application, three weeks after
planting).

Celery: Pascal, 6-8 in. tall, up to 6 petioles.
Carrot: Chantenay, 1-2 in. tall, slt true leaf.
Tomato: Homestead 1, 2-3 in. tall, 1st pair of true leaves expanding.
Pepper: Florida Giant, 1-2 in. tall, slt pair of true leaves not fully
expanded.
Spinach: Virginia Savoy, 2 in. tall, 3rd true leaf expanded.
Endive: Full Heart Batavian... (escarole), 2-3 in. tall, 3rd true leaf.
Romaine: Parris Island Cos, 1-2 in. tall, 3rd true leaf.
Lettuce: Boston, 2-3 in. tall, 3rd true leaf.
Onion: 2-3 in. tall, 2 leaves.
Radish: Scarlet Globe, 6-9 in. tall, 5th leaf, root 3/4 in diam.
Chinese cabbage: Michihli; Reps. I and II, 1-2 in. tall, 2nd true leaf.
Reps. III and IV, 6-8 in. tall, 3rd true leaf.
Cabbage: Badger Market, 2-3 in. tall, 2nd true leaf.
Cucumber: Marketer, 1-2 in. tall, 2nd true leaf opened to expanded.
Beet: Early Wonder, 2 in. tall, 2nd true leaf.
Kenaf: BG 52-41, 2-3 in. tall, up to slt true leaf expanded.
Cotton: D&PL 15, 3/4 in. tall, cotyledonary leaf stage, 1st true leaf
opening.


10 November 1958







English peas: Little Marvel, Reps. I and II, 4-10 in. tall, Reps. III and IV
10-12 in. tall.
Southernpeas: Black Eye California 5, 8-10 in. tall, 1st trifoliate leaves
expanding.
Alabama Crowder, 8-10 in. tall, slt trifoliate leaves expanding.
Snapbean: Tendergreen, 10 in. tall, slt trifoliate leaves expanded.
Soybean: Lincoln, 6-8 in. tall, let trifoliate leaves expanded.
Spring Wheat: Baart, 6-7 in. tall, 4 leaves,commenced tillering.
Rice: CP9016, 3/4 in. tall, 2 leaves.
Oat: Victorgrain, 6-8 in. tall. 3 leaves.
Hegari: 3/4 in. tall, 4 leaves.
Field corn: Corneli 54, 6-8 in. tall, 5 leaves.

Golden Security sweet corn and Contender snapbean were planted and golden-
type celery plants were set for the experiment, however plant stand and survival
were not sufficient for adequate evaluation of the treatments.

Description of weed growth: The two principal weeds in the area of the experiment
at time of treatment application were:
Stickerweed, Amaranthus spinosa, 1-2 in. tall, 2nd pair of true leaves
expanded.
Crab-grass, Digitaria sp., 1-2 in. tall, 3rd leaf expanded.

The following weeds were of lesser importance and occurred in some plots in
light infestations which precluded effective treatment evaluation:
Ragweed, Ambrosia sp., 2-3 in. tall, 2nd pair of true leaves expanded.
Nut-grass, Cyperus sp., 4-6 in. tall, 5 leaves.

Description of herbicidal treatments: The herbicides and rates employed are
listed in Table I along with the specific formulations used and the formulator.

The herbicidal treatments were applied post emergence broadcast overall to
crops and weeds at the stages described above with experimental tractor spray
equipment using 42 gpa of herbicide solution at 20 psi and a tractor speed of
3 mph.

Date of herbicide application: 1 April 1958. 3 weeks after planting.

Soil moisture at time of herbicide application: (0-1/2 in. depth)
110 percent (Note: field capacity approximately 160 percent)


Rainfall data:
Weeks after application
1
2
3
4


Total accumulated
0.21
2.32
2.78
3.74


Method of evaluation: At ten days after treatment application visual evaluations
were made. Crop stand and tolerance (growth) were rated using the unweeded and
hand weeded controls as standards. A 1-9 rating scale was employed after which
the average values were converted to percentages for this report. The tabular
data for crop stand and tolerance to the herbicides represent percentage evalua-
tions as based on untreated controls. Evaluations of grass and broadleaf weed
stand were taken similarly and are reported in the tabular data as percentages of
the unneeded control plots. Percentage grass and broadleaf weed control values
are related proportionately to the hand-weeded control.









Table 1. Description of herbicidal treatments: (All rates are in terms of acilequivalent or active
per acre, whichever applies)


ingredient


Designation


Herbicide


Formulation


Supplier


Rates Applied, Ib/A


Unweeded control
Hand Weeded Control


4- (2,4-DB)

4- (2,4-DB) *

4-(2,4-DB) *

4-(MCPB)

PBA
HRS-203
BIO 4562
2,4-D
fRBP

amitrol
monuron
FW-450


(plots at random in each replicate)
(plots at random in each replicate) Weeded as required.

dimethylamine salt, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)
butyric acid Butyrac 118
butyl ester, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)
butyric acid M-1090
propylene glycol butyl ether esters,
4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid M-1091
dimethylamine salt, 4- (2-methyl-4-
chlorophcnoxy) butyric acid Butyrac 119
dimethylammonium polychlo 1obenoate X33 A
classified HRS-203
classified BIO 4562
2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid Acid Paste
alkanolamine salts, 4,6-dinitro o
secondary butylphenol Premerge
3-amino 1,2,4-triazole Weedazol
3-(p-chlorophenyl)-l,l-dimethylurea Karmex W
sodium 2,3-dichloroisobutyrate FW-450


Am. Chem. Paint

Dow Chem. Co.

Dow Chem. Co.

Am. Chem. Paint
Hooker
Hooker
Niagara Chem.
Stauffer Chem.

Dow. Chem. Co.
Aw. Chem. Paint
E. I. "i.ut
Rohm and Haas


1,2

1, 2

1, 2

1, 2
1.5
1.5
1.5
1


1.5, 3
0.75, 1.5
0.75, 1.5
5, 10


Hebiid








At 30 days after treatment application visual evaluations were made
of crop tolerance (growth) only for those treatments which afforded some
degree of weed control and crop tolerance. Ratings of grass and broad-
leaf weed control were taken for all treatments. These ratings were
based upon the control plots as standards

At both 10 and 30 days after treatment application the dominant
weeds were crab-grass and st ckerweed In plots where grass weeds were
controlled poorly or not at all the exclusion of broadleaf weeds was al-
most complete, probably a concomittant of the competition of the grass
weed population.

The rating values summarized in Tables 2 10, inclusive, are
averages of four replications.

Experimental results:-:The following data apgy to observations at 10
dcys after application. In general, the gramineaous crops (Table 2)
were more highly tolerant of the phenoxy-type herbicides, especially
the butyric acid analogues of 2,4-D.

Response to herbicides was variable among the leguminous crops
(Table 3). Most of these were tolerant of at least the low rate of
FW-450. The English pea was the only member of the family tolerant
of the butyric acid analogues of 2,4-D. The snapbean was tolerant of a
variety of herbicides, and the southernpeas were affected but slightly
by the low rate of DIO 4562.

Cotton and kenaf were tolerant of the low rate of FW-450, but did
not respond similarly to the other herbicides (Table 4). The beet and
cucumber manifested about the same order of tolerance to this herbicide.

The cruciferous crops and the onion were most tolerant of FW-450
(Table 5). Onion tolerance to monuron and URS-203 was notable.

Leafy crops; lettuce, endive and romaine, and spinach were most
tolerant to the low rate of FW-450 (Table 6).

Pepper, tomato, carrot and celery were tolerant of FW-450, es-
pecially the low rate (Table 7). Celery was exceptionally tolerant of
the butyric acid analogues of 2,4-D and DIO 4562.

At 10 days after application grass weeds were most effectively
controlled by DIO 4562 and FW-450 (Table 8). The latter material attain-
ed practically no broadleaf weed control. Both rates of 1IO 4562 con-
trolled broadleaf weeds completely. Monuron at both rates and the high
rate of DIDP afforded excellent to complete broadleaf weed control.

At 30 days after application the most effective weed control was
provided by amitrol, DINDP, monuron, DIO 4562, and FW-450; the crops most
tolerant to these herbicides are enumerated in Table 9. More crops were
tolerant of FW-450 than of any other herbicide. The tolerance of celery
and carrot to DIO 4562 was outstanding. A high degree of tolerance to
monuron was exhibited by hegari, oat, carrot and celery.

Ratings for additional vegetable crops tolerant of FW-450 are
given in Table 10.







Effective grass control was maintained for 30 days after the post
emergence application of the high rate of DIO 4562 and FW-450 (Table 8).
Both rates of application of DIO 4562 effectively controlled broadleaf
weeds. The other herbicides tested were comparatively ineffective in the
control of grass weeds. The high degree of broadleaf weed control indi-
cated for the other herbicides probably resulted from actual control plus
competitive elimination of broadleaf weeds by the dense grass weed popu-
lation.

Conclusions: DIO 4562 herbicide provided the most striking and most
rapid post emergence grass and broadleaf weed control; weeds plants died
within 24 to 43 hours. Umbelliferous crops were especially tolerant of
this chemical, but directional post emergence applications to some of the
seemingly less tolerant crops should be investigated.

More crops (especially non-graminaceous) were highly tolerant of
FW-450 than of the other herbicides. This material attained control of
grass weeds slowly while it was ineffective in the control of broadleaf
weeds. At 30 days after herbicide application, FW-450 plots were prac-
tically grass-free but were dominated by broadleaf weeds. FW-450 should
be evaluated at lower rates and earlier stages of post emergence appli-
cation for the control of grass weeds in vegetable crops.

In this experiment kenaf and Alabama Crowder southernpeas appeared
more sensitive and more desirable test plants for phenoxy-type herbicides
than cotton.


Acknowledgements: Vegetable and crop seed were furnished by F. II.
Woodruff and Sons, The Kilgore Seed Company, American Chemical Paint
Company, and the Agronomy Section, Everglades Experiment Station. The
herbicides were furnished by the suppliers indicated in the text. Mr.
William R. Alston assisted in experiment installation and maintenance.


EES/JRO 59-6
400 copies
November 10, 1953.










Table 2. The stand and tolerance of field corn, begari, oat, rice,
and spring wheat to post emergence herbicides. Values
for 10 days after application as percentages of the un-
treated controls.


F.


Corn


Heaari


Oat


Rice


LS. Wheat


Herbicide, Rate/Acre Std. Tri. Std. Col. 3td. !Tcl. Std. Tol .d. Tol.
Unweeded Control 100% 100" 100 00 100 100 100 % 100 100% 1007
iand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
2,4-D 1 lb. 91 87 75 75 69- 84 S 4 84 81 w
(2,4DB) 1 lb. S7 9 81 681 75 S4 7W 84 72 75
S 2 lbs. 94 9 876 91 d4 84 SV 86 97 94L
4(2,4-DB)* 1 Ib. 71 69 69 78 9 81
2 lb. 87 8 81 62 62 84 91 81
4-(2,4-DB)**l Ib. 91 '94 75 75 78 81 75 81 75 8
2 Ibs. 91 97 66 72 6 75 53 66 53 69
4-(MCPB) 1 lb. 7 91 75 .75 66 81 84 _8 87
2 lb. 91 b4 69 j 69 81 81 97 71 81 1
PBA 1.5 lb. 7 7 75 72 72 69 66 72 72 75
HRS 203 1.5 lbs. 94 7 75 3 4 1 75 7
Amitrol 0.75 Ib. 7 69 66 '5 53 75 72 62 0 22
1.5 lb. 5 72 47 75 7 59 22 12
DNBP 1.5 lb. 8 81 41 47 19 22 72 59 69
3 Ib. 72 62 25 19 12 12 53 53 -4 7
Monuron 0.75 lb. 62 62 8 75 69 62 50 59 59
1.5 lb. 56 50 62 56 66 69 7R 72 75 69
B10 562 1 Ib. 75 53 31 53 4 72 53 3
5 b. 47 50 0 Cj 0 0 25 9 3 3
FW-450 5 Ib. 81 62 37 19 .. 69 62, 59 72 47
10 lb. 62 34 3 3 69 69 72 53 50 50















Table 3. The stand and tolerance of soybean, snapbean, Ala-


bama Crowder and Black
peas to post emergence
days after application
treated controls.


Sonvhpean


5 SnanheFnn


Eye southernpeas, and English
herbicides. Values for 10
as percentages of the un-


A~Fa.Crwderi RThck E~ve


Eng. Peas


Herbicide, Rate/Acre Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol
Unweeded Control 100 0 7 100 100 O 100v 100% 100 100 100 100% 100,
Hand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1IC.
2,4-D 1 lb. 81 34 66 4W 50 22 53 22 72 59
4-(2,4-DB) 1 lb. 41 19 62 34 41 16 T4 16 84 8
2 lbs. 22 9 44 34 25 12 31 16 91
4-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 28- 12 34 16 19 3 22 87
2 lbs. 0 0 3 0 0 0 9 91 7
4-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 31 16 12 9 3 3 16 6 9 '
2 lbs. 16 12 12 9 9 6 9 66 591
4-(MCPB) 1 lb. 50 31 78 69 56 41 66 47 91 84 1
2 lb. 25 12 84 53 50 28 81 31 87 78
PBA 1.5 lb. 37 25 59 31 53 20 53 28 47 31
-RS 203 1.5 lb. 7 25 81 6 47 25 56 2 62 47
Amitrol 0.75 lbs. 22 12 75 72 53 50 41 31 84 69
1.5 lb. 19 16 78 62 W 28 37 22 81 62
DNBP 1.5 lb. 53 56 87 72 59 78 69 87 81
3 lbs. 31 31 69 62 31 2 59 41 91 72
Monuron 0.75 lb. 16 19 75 72 56 56 72 59 72 66
1.5 lb. 3 3 47 56 28 19 37 22 72 56
B10 4562 1 lb. -W 25 47 37 81 78 84 81 75 69
5 lb. 0 0 12 9 31 28 44 34 37 37
FW-450 5 lb. 94 78 91 78 91 81 87 66 97 75
10 lb. 72 31 72 56 41 69 25 69 56










-8-


Table 4. The stand and tolerance of cotton, kenaf,
beet, and cucumber to post emergence applied
herbicides. Values for 10 days after appli-
cation as percentages of the untreated controls.


Cotton


Kenaf


Beet


Cucumber


Herbicide, Rate/Acre Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol.
Unweeded control 1003 1007 100 00 00 1007 100% 100%
Hand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
2,4-D 1 lb. 3 3 84 47 9 9 81 72
-(2 4-DB) 1 lb. 25 12 72 31 3 3 61 59
T 2 lb. 9 9 47 25 16 9 64 56
-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 19 3 56 19 19 9 1 47
2 lb. 0 0 9 6 6 3 50 22
4-(24-DB)** 1 lb. 9 9 31 19 0 0 75 53
2 lb. 0 0 19 6 3 3 50 37
-(MCPB) 1 lb. 19 12 64 75 28 9 81 72
2 lb. 19 6 72 56 19 12 61 59
PBA 1.5 lb. 0 O 69 44 41 22 87 50
HRS 203 1.5 lb. 0 0 0 0 59 50 66 4
Amitrol 0.75 lb. 25 19 81 62 37 25 69 4
1.5 lb. 12 9 76 44 26 25 78 37
DNBP 1.5 lb. 5 4 0 0 0 0 16T 16
i ;3 lb. 34 3d 0 0 0 0 0
Monuron 0.75 lb. 100 67 0 0 34 3 0 0
t" 1.5 Ibs. 94 9 0 0 0 0 0
B104562 1 lb. 34 O 0 0 0
5 lb. 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
FW-450 5 lb. 97 6l 97 87 64 87 84 84
10 lb 56 37 446 2 69 6 72 4










-9-


Table 5. The stand and tolerance of cabbage, chinese cab-
bage, radish and onion to post emergence applied
herbicides. Values for 10 days after application
as percentages of the untreated controls.


Cabbage Ch. Ca bbage Radish Onign
Herbicide, Rate/Acre Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol.
Unweeded control i1007 100 100" 100 100% 100 100% 100
Hand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
2.4-D 1 lb. 75 2 75 28 62 28 75 81
4-(2 -DB) 1 lb. 9 34 62 31 66 50 84 64
2 lb. 53 34 W4 25 56 44 72 72
4-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 76 37 56 25 66 47 4 684
2 lbs. 53 22 56 22 69 34 75 78
-(2,4-DB)** 1 lb. 72 26 59 31 59 44 7 4
2 lb. 50 22 59 22 50 34 87 76
-(MCPB) 1 lb. 69 31 72 34 d4 62 67 57
2 lb. 62 25 62 22 75 41 84 7b
PDA 1.5 lb. 59 37 66 47 69 41 64 72
HRS 203 1.5 lb. 69 47 78 59 1i 56 94 91
Amitrol 0.75 lb. 62 28 56 25 75 50 4 7
1.5 lb. 62 37 34 19 72 37 75 66
DNBP 1.5 lb. 0 0 0 3 3 0 0
3 lb. C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Monuron 0.75 lb. 3 3 3 19 16 9 97
S1.5 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 76
B10 452 1 b. O O 0 0 0 0 59 44
5 lb. 0 0 0 0 o 31 25
FW-450 5 lb. 87 69 94 7 91 67 97 94
10 lb. 6' _47 97 91 81 75 87 87










-10-


Table 6. The stand and tolerance of lettuce, endive, ro-
maine and spinach to post emergence applied
herbicides. Values for 10 days after applica-
tion as percentages of untreated controls.


Lettuce


Endive


Romaine


Spinach


Herbicide. Rate/Acre Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol.
Unweeded control 100 100% 1007 100 100% 100% 100% 100%
Hand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
2,4D 1 lb. 25 9 69 31 25 25 16
4-(2,4-DB) 1 lb. 9 3 84 62 34 44 31
S2 lb. 22 9 75 56 22 34 31
4-(24-DB)* 1 lb. 25 9 84 72 31 69 34 22
2 lb. 19 6 69 34 19 37 6 3
4-(2,4-DB)** 1 lb. 25 9 72 69 22 1 16 9
S 2 lb. 41 19 66 53 22 41 6 6
4-(MCPB) 1 ib. 47 22 78 66 37 50 53 31
S 2 lb. 22 9 78 56 37 4 25 19
FDA 1.5 lb. 78 44 75 50 53 47 31
HRS 203 1.5 lb. 87 4 84 62 50 8 62 53
Amitrol 0.75 lb. 34 12 56 31 9 47 25
1.5 lb. 47 19 41 28 19 41 28 22
DNBP 1.5 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
S3 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Monuron 0.75 1b. 19 19 25 19 31 25 22 12
1.5 lb. C 0 3 3 9 12 0 0
B10 4562 1 lb. 0 0 56 50 0 0 0 0
5 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
FW-450 87 81 94 7 87 91 87 7
10 lb. 87 66 87 72 72 4 31










-11-


Table 7. The stand and tolerance of pepper, tomato, carrot
and celery to post emergence applied herbicides.
Values for 10 days after application as percentages
of the untreated controls.


S Pepper Tomato Carrot Celry
Herbicide Rate/Acre Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol. Std. Tol.
Unweeded control 10O 100' 100 100" 100 1000 100 100 O
Hand weeded 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
2.4-D 1 lb. 37 0 0 37 19 91 87
-(24-DB 1 lb. 56 22 9 9 61 78 97 94
2 lb. 67 31 0 0 75 69 91 81
-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 64 O 70 U 100 97
2 Ib. 16 0 75 100 9
-(2,4-DB)** 1 lb. 78 3 0 0 61 78 100 7
2 lb. 75 1 0 0 7b 72 94 97
-(MCPB) 1 lb. 75 59 53 34 78 8 100 97
2 lb. 72 34 6 72 4 100 94
PBA 1.5 lb. 76 50 7W 53 _481 87 78
HRS 203 1.5 lb. 72 31 0 0 94 91 b7 7
Amitrol 0.75 lb. 62 26 0 0 75 72 9 69
1.5 lb. 69 53 0 0 75 9 100 78
DNBP 1.5 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 4
3 lb. 0 0 0 0 0 50
Monuron 0.75 lb. 34 16 0 0 7 8 10 7
S 1.5 lb. 9 6 0 0 66 59 7 72
B10 4562 1 lb. 0 0 0 0 4 100 97
lb. 0 0 0 0 62 53 94 94
FW-450 5 lb. 87 87 91 84 97 94 100 87
10 lb. 78 53 12 9 87 78 97 78


m .











-12-


Table 8. Values for grass and broadleaf weed response to
post emergence herbicides. Data for weed stand
and control taken 10 days after application.
Data for weed control only taken 30 days after
application. Stand values are percentages of
the unweeded control while control values re-
present percentages of the hand weeded control.


_10-days after application 30 days after application
Crab-grass Stickerweed Crab-grass Stickerweed
Herbicide, Rate/Acre Stand Control Stand Contro Ccntrol Control
Unweeded control 100% O 100 O 0O 0%
Hand weeded control 0 100 O 100 100 100
2,4-D 1 lb. 94 19 50 50 3 81
4-(2,4-DB) 1 lb. 91 19 44 53 3 94
2 lb. 9-~ 34 16 810 100
-(2,4-DB)* 1 lb. 81 22 9 87 3 100
2 lb. 7 747 6 94 9 100
4-(2,4-DB)** 1 lb. 91 34 19 75 3 100
S 2 lb. 76 53 6 67 0 100
-(MCPB) I lb. 94 9 31 69 0 91
i 2 lb. 94 12 37 59 0 91
PBA 1.5 lb. 94 16 70 37 3 41
HRS-203 1.5 lb. 67 44 84 62 6 100
Amitrol 0.75 lb. 50 56 31 69 22 87
1.5 lb. 31 69 22 72 50 22
DNBP 1.5 lb. 72 47 44 66 6 75
3 lb. 53 62 3 97 12 81
Monuron 0.75 lb. l1 59 3 97 9 100
1.5 lb. 62 59 0 100 16 100
Blo 4562 1 lb. 5u 75 0 00 34 67
S5 Ib. 0 100 0 L00 78 97
FW-450 5 lb. 26 69 97 0 67 0
"10 lb. 12 84 87 3 97 0











-13-


Table 9. The responses of the most tolerant crops to the most
effective poet emergence herbicides. Crop tolerance
values as percentages of the untreated controls at 30
days after application.


Herbicide Amitrol DNBP Monuron B10 4562 FW-450
Rate/Acre/lbs. o.75 1.5 1.5 3 0.75 1.5 1 5 5 10
Hegari 0 -% 1j94 72 ~ -I ~
Oat 91_ 87 94 91 67 87
Sp. Wheat 56 72 -
Kenaf 56 41 7. -
Soybean 56 50 -
Snapbean 69 72 4 62 97 69
Ala. Crowder 69 66 1 87 50
B. Eye Peas 87 78 66 7 53 87 59
Ch. Cabbage 66 91 97
Radish 7 37 91 8
Romaine 66 8 87
Carrot d1 87 100 b 100 78 97 97
Cucumber 69 75 1 56
Celery 94 7 100 87 91 7











-14-


Table 10.


The tolerance of several vegetable crops to post
emergence applied FW-450. Tolerance values as per-
centages of the untreated control at 30 days after
application.


FW-450
5 Ibs. 10 lbs.

Cabbage 945 72%
Tomato bl --
Pepper 7b --
Lettuce -75 78
Endive 87 100
Beet _4 b7
Spinach 72 --




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs