Title: Evaluation of disease control chemicals applied to vegetable crops during the ... growing seasons.
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 Material Information
Title: Evaluation of disease control chemicals applied to vegetable crops during the ... growing seasons.
Series Title: Evaluation of disease control chemicals applied to vegetable crops during the ... growing seasons.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Thayer, P. L.
Wehlburg, C.
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, Fla.
Publication Date: 1959-1960-1960-1961
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076885
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 166140805

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FI-b


Everglades Station Mimeo Report 62-3


August 30 1961
August 30, 1961


EVALUATION OF DISEASE CONTROL CHEMICALS APPLIED
TO VEGETABLE CROPS DURING THE 1959-60 and 1960-61 GROWING SEASONS


The data presented here
bactericide.


Agrimycin 100
Dupont Spreader-Sticker
Dyrene
LO 1763
Maneb
MV-221
Nabac 25
Nabam (liquid)
Nabam A40 (powdered)
Nambam
Niagara 5769
Oil
Pfizer 35-1 thru 35-7
Plyac
SD 4901
TC22, TC61
Thylate
TBCS
Triphenyltin Acetate
Triton B1956
Zimaneb
Zineb


P. L. Thayer and C. Wehlburg

do not constitute recon2pendation of any fungicide or


MATERIALS USED


15% Streptomycin, 1.5% terramycin

50% 2,4-Dichloro-6-(O-chloranilino) triazine
Experimental material; Rohm and Haas Co.
80% Manganese ethylene bisdithiocarbamate
Experimental material; Stauffer Chemical Co.
25% 2,2-Methlenebis (3,4,6-trichlorophenol)
22% Disodium ethylene bisdithiocarbamate
93% Disodium ethylene bisdithiocarbamate
Experimental material; L.H. Nash
Experimental material; Niagara Chem. Co.
97.5% White Mineral Oil; Sun Oil Co. Spray Oil #11
Experimental materials; Chas. Pfizer Inc.
Spreader-Sticker; General Chemical Co.
Experimental Material; Shell Development Co.
Experimental materials; Tennessee Corp.
65% Tetramethylthiuram disulfide
Tribasic copper sulfate, 53% metallic copper
Experimental material; Metal & Thermit Corp.
Spreader-Sticker-Emulsifier; Rohm & Haas Co.
Experimental material; L. H. Nash
75% zinc ethylene bisdithiocarbamate


CELERY
1959-1960
During the early fall and late spring celery growers in the Everglades
apply basic copper sprays to celery for control of bacterial blight. It is
usually necessary to apply another fungicide with the basic copper to obtain
early blight control. After development of the early blight resistant variety
Emerald (148) it was thought that copper alone might be used to obtain both
bacterial blight and early blight control, or at least that fewer fungi-
cide applications might be made for early blight control than is recommended
for the more susceptible varieties.

To test this possibility two experiments have been completed with the
following treatments in a factorial arrangement of the random block design:
two celery varieties, three fungicides, and three intervals of spray. appli-'.
cation. The celery varieties were the early blight resistant 148 and a :
susceptible variety, Utah 52-70. Fungicide treatments were varied somewhat
in the two tests. Tribasic copper sulfate and Dyrene were used' in both, along."-
with nabam + ZnSO4 in the first test and maneb in the second, ."Sprays were'j
applied at intervals of 2-3 days, 4-5 days, and 7 days. / I
..... "- "'






-2-

Plots were single row, 25 feet long, replicated five times. Plants were
spaced 7 inches in rows 36 inches wide. Fertilizer was applied each time before
transplanting according to Experiment Station recommendations. Weekly sprays
of Parathion were applied for insect control. In the second trial Vegedex plus
Karsel was applied immediately after transplanting for weed control. A later
application of Atrazine pellets was made for grass control.

The fall test occurred during a period of relatively mild disease develop-
ment while the spring test occurred during a period of severe early blight and
Rhizoctonia disease development.

Results

The effect of treatments on disease control can be picked out of Tables 1
through 4. All fungicide treatments at the three intervals of application were
sufficient for control of early blight in the variety 148. Dyrene afforded the
most effective control of early blight on 52-70 followed by the carbamates.
Tribasic copper sulfate was generally ineffective on 52-70 except at the shortest
interval of application under mild disease conditions (Table 1 treatment. No.16).

Both celery varieties were equally susceptible to Rhizoctonia stalk rot
(Table 4). Dyrene and Tribasic copper sulfate effectively controlled this
disease while maneb was ineffective.

There was little difference in the 2-3 or 4-5 day spray application inter-
vals on disease control, but the 7 day interval was not sufficiently frequent
for control of Rhizoctonia on either variety or for control of early blight
on 52-70.

STreatment number 10 is of interest in both tests because of the short
petioles (Tables 1 & 2). The carbamate fungicides are generally considered
less phytotaxic than either Dyrene or Tribasic copper sulfate yet both maneb
and nabam reduced petiole length at the 2-3 day application interval while
the other two did not. This effect becomes even more interesting since it
was evident on the variety 52-70 but not on 148.

Fungicides or interval of application had no effect on yield or petiole
length except in the instance just mentioned in the preceding paragraph. The
variety 52-70 yielded better in both tests (Table 5). Petiole length of l48
was shorter than 52-70 in the fall test and longer in the spring (Table 5).

Results of these tests would indicate that tribasic copper sulfate can be
used, without aid of additional fungicides, for disease control in the celery
variety Emerald 148. This should result in a significant reduction in cost of
production.








Table 1. Early blight and yield of 2 celery varieties in the fall of 1959,
sprayed with 3 fungicides at 3 application intervals.

Treatment Early/ Petiole/ Trimmed_/
Interval/ Fungicide?/ Variety Blight Length Weight

1. 2-3 Nabam + ZnSO4 148 1.0 7.6 37
2. .4-5 1.0 7.8 38
3. 7 1.0 7.6 41
4. 2-3 Dyrene 1.0 7.8 37
5. .-5 1.0 7.9 33
6. 7 1.0 7.8 37
7. 2-3 Tribasic duSO 1.0 7.5 35
8. 4-5 1.0 7.7 42
9. 7 1.0 7.5 29
10. 2-3 Nabam + ZnSO4 52-70 1.2 8.3 49
. -5 1.6 9.1 50
12. 7 2.4 9.1 51
13. 2-3 Dyrene 1.0 8.9 51
14. 4-5 1.4 9.4 58
15. 7 1.6 9.0 50
16. 2-3 Tribasic CuSO4 2.2 8.6 49
17. 4-5 3.6 9.1 55
18. 7 4.0 8.7 48
LSD at 5% 0.6 0.7 10
LSD at 1% 0.8 0.9 14


1/ Days between fungicide applications.
2/ Concentrations per 100 gal. were: Nabam
and Tribasic corner sulfate 4 lb.


2 qt. + ZnSO4 3/4


/ Horsfall and Barratt system of disease rating, 1
plants.
_/ Petiole length in inches. Two outer petioles on
measured from base to first node.
/ In lbs. per 20 feet of row.


lb., Dyrene 1- lb.,


= no disease and 12 = dead

10 plants from each plot









Early blight, Rhizoctonia stalk rot and yield of 2 celery varieties
in the Spring of 1960, sprayed with 3 fungicides at 3 application
intervals.


S:Treatment
Interval Fungicide2-


Early
Variety Blight


Rhizoc/
tonia


PetioleW
length


Trimnedg
Weight


Maneb 148

Dyrene "
"
11I
Tribasic CuSO4 "
It I,

Maneb 52-70


Dyrene "
It Ii

Tribasic CuSO "


LSD at 5%
LSD at 1%


Days between fungicide
Concentrations per 100
copper sulfate 4 Ib.


applications.
gal. were: Maneb 1 lb., Dyrene 1- lb., and Tribasic


Horsfall and Barratt system of disease rating, 1 = no disease and 12 = dead
plants.
No. of celery stalks with Rhizoctonia lesions after trimming.
Petiole length in inches. Two outer petioles on 10 plants from each plot
measured from base to first node.
In lbs. per 20 feet of row.


Table 2.


1.
2.
3*
4.
5.

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.


2-3
4-5
7
2-3
4-5
7
2-3
4-5
7
2-3
4-5
7
2-3
4-5
7
2-3
4-5
7


1.2
1.4
2.2
1.0
1.0
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.6
3.0
3.6
4.8
1.4
2.2
4.2
4.0
3.8
5.4
0.9
1.1


12.2
11.6
19.0
6.2
10.0
11.9
5.6
7.0
10.2
12.6
15.2

3.2
6.0
11.4
14.2
11.8
14.2
6.8
8.9


9.8
9.6
9.7
10.4
9.9
9.7
9.5
9.5
9.7
8.8
9.4
9.2
9.2
9.4
9.4
9.0
9.5
9.1
0.7
NS


44.4
40o.5
46.3
50.9
47.2
49.0
42.0
44.9
45.5
47.8
44.4
47.0
51.0
'47.2
52.1
48.1
55.0
46.2
NS
NS


_I~._ .Ir L --


-------------.-------_ ____









Table 3. Factors affecting early blight in fall and spring grown celery.

Treatment Early Blight Ratings
Fall 1959 Spring 1960
1. Fungicide
Nabam + ZnS04 1.4 ---
Mabeb --- 2.7
Dyrene 1.2 1.9
Tribasic CuSO4 2.7 3.2
LSD at 5% 0.2 0.3
LSD at 1% 0.3 0.5

2. Interval
2-3 Day 1.2 2.0
4-5 1.6 2.3
7 1.8 3.5
LSD at 5% 0.4 0.6
LSD at 1% 0.5 0.9

3. Variety
148 1.0 1.6
52-70 2.1 3.6
Significant at 1% level.


Table 4. Factors affecting Rhizoctonia stalk rot in Spring grown celery.

Treatment No. Stalks with Rhizoctonia
Lesions Spring 1960
1. Fungicide
Maneb 14.6
Dyrene 8.9
Tribasic CuSO4 10.5
LSD at 5% 2.8
LSD at 1% 3.7

2. Interval
2-3 Day 9.0
4-5 10.3
7 14.0
LSD at 5% 2.8
LSD at 1% 3.7

3. Variety
148 10.4
52-70 11.8
NS









Table 5. Yield and petiole
spring.


-Variety

148-7
52-70


length of 2 celery varieties grown in fall and


Trimmed Weight
Fall 1959 Spring 1960

36.7 45.6
51.1 48.9
Significant at 1% Significant at

l .19 Petiole Length
19 .IQ 5n.rqi "4 1 0


7.7
8.9
Significant at 1%


9.7
9.2
Significant at 1%


A second fungicide trial was completed during the Spring of 1960 comparing
new fungicideswith the standards for celery disease control. Celery variety
Utah 52-70 was used and spray applications were made at 4-5 day intervals.
Sprays were applied in 50-150 gal./acre of water. Cultural practices, experi-
mental design, plot- sizes,- replications, and insect control were the same as
those described for the 1960 spray interval experiment in the beginning of this
report.

Results of this trial are presented in.Table 6. A final early blight
rating of 3.0 or less'is considered satisfactory control. Bacterial blight
was not affected by arn of the treatments for which ratings were taken. Plots
with high early blight ratings were not rated because many of the bacterial
lesions were over-run by early blight. At the rates used TC 22 and TC 61
were somewhat phytotoxic. TriphenyltLn acetate was the most promising new
material tested. It gave excellent control of early blight and Rhizoctonia
stalk rot and was not detectably phytotoxic.


148
52-70


-///


r f.; 2"- ,^







riiht 6_ C~elery F~ungiCide Trial, Spring 1960.


Concentration/
per 100
gallons


2/
Early blight ratings-'
5/12/60 6/6/60


Bacterial-'
blight
rating
6/6/60


Number of
stalks with
Rhizoctonia
lesions


Petiole3/
length
in inches


Weight per
stalk(lbs.)


.tr...as 5 /-/---- 6660 -n ,


Dyrene
Dyrene
Dyrene
Dyrene
Dyrene + Tribasic CuSO4
Dyrene + Agrlmycin 100
Triphenyltin Acetate
Maneb
Dyrene + TC 22
Maneb
Nabam + ZnSO4
L01763
Dyrene
TC-61
Maneb
Zineb
TC-22
Untreated


LSD


4-100 1.0
3-100 1.0
2-100 1.2
1-100 1.8
1-100+4-100 1.8
1--100+100 ppm 1.2
1-100 1.0
1-100 2.0
1-100+2 gal-100 1.6
2-100 2.4
2 qt.-100+3/4-100 2.4
2-100 2.0
--100 2.6
2 gal-100 3.0
1-100 3.0
2-100 2.4
2 gal-100 1.6
4.6


0.01
0.05


0.7
0.5


I


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.


2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.4
2.6
2.8
3.0
3.0
3.4
3.8
4.0
4.4
4.8
7.6

1.0
0.8


2.6
2.8
3.0
3.2
2.6
2.8
3.4
3.0

3.0
2.8
2.4
3.2






NS


3.6
6.8
5.2
7.4
11.8
6.8
7.4
9.8
13.2
11.0
12.6
14.6
9.6
14.8
16.4
19.8
19.0
29.0

9.6
7.3


9.3
9.1
9.5
9.7
9.2
9.7
9.2
9.0
8.6
9.0
9.2
9.0
9.3
8.8
9.1
9.3
9.1
8.7

Ns


1.53
1.45
1.39
1.52
1.39
1.60
1.36
1.39
1.38
1.42

1.48
1.41
1.27
1.42
1.52
1.34
0.87

.23
.17


SIn pounds unless otherwise designated.
2/ Used the Horsfall and Barratt system of rating, 1 = no disease and 12 = dead plants.
STwo outer petioles on 10 plants from each plot measured from the base to the first node.


rrnYI t 6 e r u i e r p g 0


I
- nmtfA^*+i'vQt






-8-


Spring 1961

Two fungicide trials were completed on t. lery in the Spring of 1961. The
first contained experimental materials for celery disease control along with
some standard fungicides, and new formulations or combinations of. standard
fungicides. The second contained materials principally for control of Rhiz-
octonia stalk rot combined.with standard early blight materials. Shell Develop-
ment Company's SD4901 was also included in this second trial alone and in com-
bination with maneb and Dyrene. This material, called an anti-senescent, con-
centrates nitrogen in the portion of the plant to which it is applied, and
thus delays breakdown in shipment and storage.

MATERIALS METHODS

The tests were arranged in a random block design with single row 25 foot
plots replicated five times. Plants were set in the field on February 13 and
14, 1961 at 7-inch intervals in rows 36 inches apart. Three thousand pounds
per acre of 0-12-16 fertilizer plus 0.2 percent MnO and 0.2 percent B203 was
applied to the plot area according to Experiment Station recommendations. A
sidedressing of 150 pounds per acre of NH4NO3 was applied on March 27. Randox
plus Vegedex was sprayed on the celery plots one day after transplanting for
weed control. Parathion was applied at bi-weekly intervals for insect control.
Fungicide treatments were applied at 4 to 5 day intervals for a total of 19
applications. Plots were harvested on May 31 and June 1.

Results

The Spring season in Belle Glade was exceptionally dry so little disease
development occurred until the last half of May after a few heavy rains.

Results of the first trial are presented in Table 7. A new dry formula-
tion of nabam was tested for the first time. Called nabam A40 it is manufact-
ured by Rohm and Haas Company. This new formulation was equal to the liquid
nabam for celery disease control, when used at 1 lb./l00 gal. which is roughly
equivalent to 2 qt. liquid nabam to 100 gal. Nabam A40 was also used at 2 lb./
100 gal. At this rate early blight was almost non-existent and excellent control
of Rhizoctonia stalk rot was obtained. Both treatments 4 and 5 were nabam 2
qt./100 gal. plus ZnSO4 3/4 1b./l00 gal., but in treatment 4 nabam was added
to the spray tank first then ZnSO4 and in treatment 5 the sequence was reversed.
In Erlenmeyer flasks in the laboratory a finer flocculation was obtained when
ZnS04 was dissolved first then nabam added. However, this apparently made no
difference in disease control.

The new materials, Stauffer MV-221 and Niagara 5769 controlled early blight
satisfactorily, but 5769 was somewhat phytotoxic as evidenced in reduced yield
and MV-221 did not give sufficient control of Rhizoctonia stalk rot. L.H. Nash's
materials, Zimaneb and Nambam did not give adequate control of either disease.

The addition of oil to tribasic copper sulfate improved control of early
blight when used at 2 to 4 qt./l00 gal. The combination of 2. qt. oil with
copper was as good for early blight control as the higher concentrations.and
the 3 and 4 qt. levels were objectionable since there was a noticeable oil
deposit on the plants at harvest. Surprisingly these high concentrations bf
oil caused no apparent phytotoxicity.






-9-
Results of the second trial are presented in Table 8. Both Thylate and
tribasic copper sulfate gave good control of Rhizoctonia stalk rot. Combin-
ations of copper and the carbamate fungicides did not reduce the effectiveness
of either for disease control. In fact maneb plus copper gave better control
of early blight than maneb alone. The addition of oil to the copper-carbamate
combinations did not affect disease control. The new material from Upjohn,
U2069 and Dyrene reduced Rhizoctonia stalk rot, but were not as effective as
Thylate or tribasic copper sulfate.

Shell's SD4901 significantly reduced early blight when used alone and
improved the early blight control of maneb. SD4901 had no apparent effect on
Rhizoctonia stalk rot.

Table 7. Celery fungicide trial #1, Spring 1961.
SStalks
Yield in lbs. Early blight with
Treatments Concentration per 20' plot 5-22-61 5-24-61 Rhizoc.
1. Dyrene 1--100 100 1.2 1.6 12
2. Nabam A40 + 1-100 + 3/4-100 97 2.0 2.0 16
ZnSO4
3. Nabam A40 + 2-100 + 1-100 94 1.0 1.2 2
ZnSO4
4. Nabam(liquid) + 2 qt.-l00 + 3/4-100 96 2.0 2.8 10
ZnSO4
5. Nabam(liquid) + 2 qt.-100 + 3/4-100 104 1.8 2.2 11
ZnSOL
6. MV-221 2-100 93 2.2 2.6 13
7. Zilaneb 1-100 94 4.0 4.8 15
8. Niagara 5769 5-100 76 1.6 2.2 6
9. Nambam 2 qt.-100 101 2.6 3.2 19
10. TBcS 4-100 102 3.0 3.4 6
11. TBCS + oil 4-100 + 1 qt.-100 98 3.0 4.0 5
12. TBCS + oil 4-100 + 2 qt.-l00 98 2.4 2.6 4
13. TBCS + oil 4-100 + 3 qt.-100 92 2.2 2.8 4
14. TBCS + oil 4-100 + 4 qt.-100 99 2.0 2.2 1
15. Check 73 6.2 7.0 27
LSD 0.01 18 1.1 1.3 10
0.05 13 0.8 0.9 7


dead plants.


I/ In pounds per 100 gallons unless otherwise designated.
2/ Horsfall and Barrett rating system: 1 = no disease and 12 =








Table 8. C6lery fungicide trial /2, Spring 1961.
SStalks
Yield in Ibs. Early blight w ith
Treatments Concentration per 20' plot 5-24-61 5-31-61 Rhizoc.
1. Dyrene + Thylate 1-100 + 2-100 86 1.0 1.4 6
2. Maneb + Thylate 1i--100 + 2-100 86 1.4 2.2 3
3. Nabam A40 + ZnS04 1-100 + 3/4-100+ 95 .1.2 1.8 2
+ Thylate 2-100
4. Dyrene + TBCS 1-100 + 4-100 82 1.0 2.0 1
5. Maneb + TBCS 1l-100 + 4-100 97 2.0 2.4 2
6. Maneb + TBCS 3-100 + 4-100 107 1.6 1.8 2
7. ;hneb + TBCS + 1-100 + 4-100 + 102 1.4 2.2 2
oil 2 qts.-100
8. Nabam A40 + 1-100 + 3/4-100 + 99 2.0 2.4 3
ZnSO4.+ TBCS 4-100
9. Nabam A40 + 1-100 + 3/4-100 + 96 2.0 2.2 3
ZnSO4 + TBCS +.oil 4-100 + 2 qts.-100
10. Maneb + U2069 1-100 + 1-100 95 2.0 2.6 11
11. Dyrene + SD4901 11-100 + 5 ppm 84 1.0 1.4 9
12. Maneb + SD4901 1l-100 + 5 ppm 93 1.4 2.4 18
13. Maneb 1- -100 101 2.8 3.8 18
14. sD4901 5 ppm 84 4.o 4.6 29
15. Check 71 5.2 6.6 28
LSD 0.01 18 1.0 1.4 .7
0.05 13 0.7 1.0 5


In Ibs. per 100 gals. unless otherwise
Horsfall and Barratt rating system: 1


designated.
= no disease and


12 = dead plants.






-11-


SWEET CORN
1960-1961

The only previously reported experiment with fungicides in combination
with spreader-stickers is that of Stoner (Plant Disease Reporter 35: 487-488.
1951) in which he used zineb with and without the following additives: poly-
ethylene polysulfide, Triton B 1956 and DuPont sticker-spreader. He found that
none of the spray additive materials affected the control obtained, and offers
as a possible explanation the light disease incidence in this experiment.

Methods

Two tests were conducted, one in the fall of 1960 and one in the spring of
1961. The fall test was planted October 24, in 5 randomized blocks; each plot
consisted of two 30-foot rows of the same corn variety. One of the rows of
each plot was left untreated. Treatments included 4 fungicides with or without
the addition of Plyac as a sticker-spreader. There were 2 varieties: Golden
Security and lobelle 104. Insecticides, mostly DDT, were sprayed as needed.
Fungicides were applied on November 21 and 28, December 5, 12, 19, 27, January
6 and 16. Disease rating was done January 17. Soon after that the test was so
badly lodged by heavy rains and wind it had to be abandoned without harvesting.
The list of treatments and the average disease ratings are presented in Table 9.
There was no significant difference between treatments within the same variety.
As was to be expected the differences between treated and untreated checks was
highly significant. lobelle 104 proved to be less susceptible to H. turcicum

In the spring test, planted March 7, 1961, only Golden Security was used,
as only Northern Leaf Blight was expected in the spring and Golden Security is
one of the most susceptible varieties. The plots consisted of two 40' rows,
both of which were treated. There were 14 treatments arranged in 4 randomized
blocks. Insecticides, DDT + Parathion were applied as needed. Fungicides were
sprayed on April 11, 19, 25, May 3, 8, 12 and 19. Because of unusually dry
weather the blight did not appear until the beginning of May. Under conditions
of frequent rains there could have been larger differences between the treat-
ments and the influence of spreader-stickers could have been more pronounced.
In Table 10 the treatments are listed together with the weight of ears from
60 feet of row from each plot and the disease ratings according to the method
of Horsfall and Barratt. There were hardly any differences in yield between
the fungicide treatments, but the check plots yielded significantly less. There
is no explanation for the fact that Maneb with Plyac, Maneb + Thylate with
Triton B 1956 and Nabam + ZnS04 with DuPont sticker-spreader yielded more than
the other treatments. The significantly lower disease ratings of the treatments
with Plyac as an additive (with the exception of Nabam + ZnS04) may be an indi-
cation that Plyac was the better spreader-sticker. However, the test should be
repeated in spring under conditions of frequent rains.







-12-
Table 9. A list of treatments for the control of Helminthosporium blight of
sweet corn and their effect on disease incidence, rated according to
the method of Horsfall and Barratt. Planted 10-24-60. Disease ratings
1-17-61.
Concentrations Spray Disease
Treatment per 100 gallons Additive Variety rating



Maneb
Maneb + Thylate
Maneb
Zineb
Maneb
Maneb + Thylate
Maneb
Zineb

Maneb
Maneb + Thylate
Maneb
Zineb
Maneb
Maneb + Thylate
Maneb
Zineb

LSD, 5%


1-- Ilbs..
1 lb., 1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lbs.
1- Ibs.
1 lb., 1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lbs.

1I Ibs.
1 lb., 1 lb.
1 lb.
2 Ibs.
1 Ilbs.
1 lb., 1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lbs.


Plyac
11


-
"i





Plyac
--1
--


Golden Security



11 a1


It o f
It If
tr I

lobelle 104




it ft
ii It

iT ii
it 11


A list of treatments for the control
Golden Security sweet corn and their
incidence. Planted 3-7-61. Disease


of Helminthosporium blight of
effect on yield and disease
rating 5-22-61. Harvest 5-23-61.


Concentration Spray Weight of. ears Disease
Treatment ,per 100 gallons additive from 60' rating

Maneb 1l Ibs. 71. 4.5
Maneb + Thylate 1 lb., 1 lb. 69.8 4.5
Nabam + ZnSO4 2 qts. 3/4 lb. -- 69.0 4.8
Check "- -- 53.6 8.0
Maneb 1 ibs. Plyac, 8 oz. 73.1 3.5
Maneb + Thylate 1 Ib., 1 b.. 71.0 3.3
Nabam + ZnSO4 2 qts., 3/4 lb. 70.8 5.0
Maneb 1 Ibs. Triton B1956,
4 oz. 68.6 4.3
Maneb + Thylate 1 lb., 1 Ib. 73.3 4.3
Nabam + ZnSO4 2 qts., 3/4 lb. 71.4 4.5
Maneb 1 Ibs. DuPont 4 oz. 68.1 4.0
Maneb + Thylate 1 lb., 1 1b. 68.8 3.8
Nabam + ZnSO4 2 qts., 3/4 Ib. 73.1 4.8
Check -- 55.8 7.8

LSD 5% 3.9 0.6
1% 5.2 0.9


6.4
7.2
7.2
6.6
6.2
6.4
5.8
6.4
8.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.2
4.6
4.8
5.0
5.6
0.73
0.97


Table 10.


---





-13-
PEPPER
1960
A spray trial on peppers was completed in the spring of 1960. Eight experi-
mental materials from the Pfizer Company were compared with coppers, Nabac,
and Agrinycin for control of bacterial spot. California Wonder pepper plants
were spaced 15 inches in 36 inch rows. Plots were single row 30 feet long,
arranged in a random block design with four replications. Alternate rows were
left unsprayed as buffers between plots. Experimental materials were applied
at 4 to 5 day intervals at 50 to 150 gal./acre. Two bacterial spot ratings
were made and the results are presented in Table 11. Bacterial spot control
was not good with any of the materials, however, the coppers and agrinycin
did significantly reduce disease incidence. The liquid coppers (treatments
9 and 10) were toxic to the pepper plants and so are dropped from further
testing even though they did reduce bacterial spot. The plants became infected
with virus Y before any yields could be taken.

Table 11. Bactericide trial on peppers, Spring 1960.
Bacterial Spot 1
Treatments Concentration Rating -/

May 7, 1960 June 3, 1960
1. Pfizer 35-1 100 ppm 3.2 6.1
2. Pfizer 35-2 200 ppm 2.8 6.0
3. Pfizer 35-3 100 ppm 2.7 6.0
4. Pfizer 35-4 200 ppm 2.7 6.0
5. Pfizer 35-5 100 ppm 3.5 6.3
6. Pfizer 35-5 200 ppm 2.7 6.3
7. Pfizer 35-6 100 ppm 3.4 6.2
8. Pfizer 35-7 100 ppm 3.1 6.5
9. TC-22 2 gal-100 1.9 5.7
10. TC-61 2 gal-100 2.1 5.8
11. Tribasic CuSO4 4-100 1.9 5.4
12. Nabac 25 1-100 2.7 6.0
13. Agrimycin 100 100 ppm 2.9 5.4
14. Agrimycin 100 200 ppm 2.9 5.1
15. Agrimycin 100 400 ppm 1.7 5.0
16. Untreated ---- 3.5 6.3

LSD 0.05 1.0 0.4
0.01 NS 0.5


H/ Horsfall & Barratt's rating system used: (Phytopathology abstr.
35: 655) 1 = no disease and 12 = dead plants.







Mimeo Report 62-3
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