Group Title: EREC Report ;
Title: Sugarcane fertilization on muck and sand lands in South Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076880/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sugarcane fertilization on muck and sand lands in South Florida 1985 research report
Series Title: EREC Report ;
Physical Description: 17 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Anderson, D. L
Everglades Research and Education Center
Publisher: University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center,
University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Belle Glade, FL
Publication Date: 1985
Copyright Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subject: Sugarcane -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil fertility -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 16-17).
Statement of Responsibility: D.L. Anderson.
General Note: "May 1985."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076880
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 34711202

Full Text

May 1985


i- -' -" "* - .



c (+N
Sugarcane Fertilization on Muck and Sand Lands in South Florida
1985 Research Report

D.L. Anderson
Sugarcane Nutrition/Soils

University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center
Belle Glade, Florida


Introduction

The commercial production of sugarcane in Florida has existed since 1920 (Zepp,
1976), although only since lifting acreage restrictions and the importation ban on
Cuban sugar during the 1960's has sugar production been significant. In the 1984-85
season, 1.4 million tons of sugar was produced on 371,000 acres (150,255 ha) --
amounting to 17x of all sugar annually produced in the United States and 24x of
domestic consumption (Florida Sugar Cane League, 1985). Sugarcane is the most
important agricultural field crop commodity in Florida, more valuable than the
combined value of Florida's corn, soybeans, toba c c, .. p t .ps-* 4( idder, 1980)
-- amounting over 0600,000,000 (Alvarez and Shule hl LI RA' Y

The Florida sugarcane industry has been bless=j with highly fer le organic
soils, tropical to subtropical temperatures, a d abundant riainfll and sunshine.
Average production costs in Florida are less tha sugarcane production i the United
States (Hoff, 1984), especially production on h'.A a 4fnC. 1 fd e aid-70's,
the acreage used for sugarcane production begas m_ b.P no-nr soils. The
total acreage of mineral soils used for sugarcane production amounts to
approximately 70,000 acres (28,350 ha). Fertility requirements on organic and
mineral soils are quite different. It was estimated that fertility costs on organic
soils ranged $16-35/acre and on mineral soils ranged 680-125/acre (personnel
communications and survey information). On organic soils, adequate native supplies
of nitrogen are present in the soil to supply all the N requirements of sugarcane --
other nutrients are supplied by fertilizers. The mineral soils used for sugarcane
production are low in native fertility and must be supplied in one-time or split
fertilizer applications. Information reviewing sugarcane nutrition, soil fertility,
and fertility recommendations in Florida is available (Anderson, 1984; 1982; Ulloa
and Anderson, 1983).

1985 Fertility Research Prolects

A. Sugarcane Soil Fertility
1. CULTIVAR.P Sugarcane cultivar interaction with row-placed P application
(3 locations).
2. BROADCAST.P Response to broadcast P application (completed).
3. BROADCAST.ROW.P Response to broadcast and row-placed P application (at
6 organic and mineral soil locations).
4. BROADCAST.ROW.PS Response to P, S, placement and P application rate (1
location).
5. K.MG Sugarcane response to row applied K and Mg.
6. Mn.S Cultivar response to Mn and S application (2 locations).
7. BROADCAST.ROW.PSI Response to P, Si slag, P placement and P application
(2 locations).


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8. NPK Sugarcane response to row-applied N, P and K
9. N.SOURCE.RATE Response to N source and application rate (1 mineral soil
location).
*10. N.RATE Sugarcane response to N application rate.
11. P.K Sugarcane response to furrow-applied P and K
12. SILICA. RICE.CANE Rice/Sugarcane rotation response to silica slag and
rate of application. (Anderson, Snyder, and Jones)
13. Commercial crop/fertility survey. (J. Alvarez and D.L. Anderson)

B. METHODOLOGY RESEARCH
1. Tissue testing -- Sealed chamber plant digestion for tissue analyses
(Anderson and Henderson, USSC).
2. Tissue testing -- Comparison of digestion procedures used for tissue
analyses (Anderson and Henderson, USSC).
3. Soil test calibration methods (i.e., acid P test, double-acid and Bray).
4. Soil test calibration methods.
Objective: To calibrate the EREC Soil Testing methodology with other
methods (i.e., acid P test, double-acid and Bray).

C. SUGARCANE NUTRITION RESEARCH
1. Sugarcane cultivar demonstration plots (Donovan and Anderson).
2. Sugarcane rust Susceptibility and the plant nutrient status. [Miller,
Anderson, Dean, Glaz, Donovan, and Ulloa. (Univ. Fla., USDA and New Hope
Sugar)]
3. Tissue testing -- Cultivar tissue analyses affecting the Diagnosis and
Recommendation Integrated System (DRIS). (Anderson and Gascho)

D. SOIL CHEMISTRY RESEARCH
1. Natural abundance of 'milky-spore' disease in sugarcane grubs in relation
to soil factors. (A. Bouciasa, R.H. Cherry, and D.L. Anderson)
2. Effect of S, source and application rate on pH, P and Mn availability.
(Beverly and Anderson)
3. Sulfer influence upon nutrient mobility in soils of the Everglades.
(Anderson and Henderson, USSC)
4. Sulfur survey of soils of the Everglades. (Anderson and Hanlon, Soil Sci.
Dept.)

E. OTHER COOPERATIVE RESEARCH
1. The effects of leaf miner damage on celery yield and quanlity.(R. Foster
and D.L. Anderson)

* (those projects in astericks, will be discussed)


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Cultivar Differences and Responses to P -- Cultivar.P

Cooperator: A. Duda & Sons

Objective: (a). To determine the cultivar differences and responses of CP70-1133
and CP72-1210 to furrow-applied P, and (b). to determine the residue effects of P
applied at planting upon the ratoon crop.

A randomized complete block with 4 replication at 3 locations. Individual
plots consisted of 4 rows spaced 5 feet apart and 32.8 feet long. Phosphorus
applied using TSP at levels 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 180 kg P/ha were placed in the furrow
at planting. Nitrogen, K, S, and nicronutrients were also placed in the furrow as
recommended by the Everglades Soil Testing Laboratory. Ratoon crops were fertilized
with recommended levels of N and K, but no P.

Soils:

1. (BG) Lauderhill muck, Euic hyperthermic, Lithic medisaprist
(44-37-08, Blk Fl).
2. (N17) Pople varient, fine sand, Grossarenic ochraqualf, loamy,
siliceous, hyperthermic (42-32-17, Blk N).
3. (112) Bassinger, fine sand, Spodic psaamaquent, siliceous
hyperthermic (42-32-12).

Table 1. Average yields of CP70-1133 and CP72-1210 by year and location.

---------- CP70-1133 ---------- ---------- CP72-1210 ---------
Location
Year Brix Sucrose TPA SPTC SPA Brix Sucrose TPA SPTC SPA
-------I------------------------------------------------------------------
BG 1984 I 16.8 14.3 86.5 194 16,797 18.0 16.2 72.8 220 16,046

1985 18.6 16.2 71.5 222 15,925 20.4 17.9 68.6 242 16,620

112 1984 18.9 16.1 45.6 218 9,931 20.2 17.3 46.0 230 10,584
1985 19.8 18.4 23.0 259 7,791 19.6 18.1 32.5 250 8,151

N17 1984 19.2 15.7 44.7 208 9,273 19.7 15.3 46.2 192 8,894
1985 21.4 18.7 49.4 256 12,651 22.8 20.0 51.7 269 13,927

1. Generally the Brix and Sucrose of CP72-1210 were greater than of CP70-1133,
however differences in cultivar Brix and Sucrose were lesser when the cultivars were
grown on sandy soils.

2. The TPA of CP70-1133 greatly declined on the muck soil after the first year,
however no significant decline in tonnage of CP72-1210 was observed. The TPA of
CP70-1133 was greater than the TPA of CP72-1210 grown on organic soil, but the TPA
of either cultivar was not significantly different when grown on mineral soils.
Some ratoon vigor was observed by both cultivars on the mineral soils.

3. Generally both the SPTC and SPA of CP72-1210 were greater than that of CP70-1133
on all soils.


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DIscu3aion Notes:








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EREC Report EV-1985-6


Responses to Broadcast and Row--directed TSP

Uniform application of nutrients using solid and fluid fertilizers are
important to obtain uniform field stands and yields. Although crop management may
be optimum, the lack of stand uniformity due to poor fertilizer application may
embaraas the most competent manager and grower. In the Florida sugarcane industry,
primarily broadcast and row-directed applications of solid fertilizers are used.

In tests performed during 1982-85, the focus of attention was upon (1). determining
the differences between broadcast and row-directed application of solid phosphate at
planting, and (2). determining the crop responses from the plant to 1st ratoon crop.
Previous information was published by Andreis (1973) concerning application of
fertilizers, of which no differences between broadcasting or row application of
fertilizers were determined. This has been the only information on application
methods for sugarcane in Florida to this date.

Cooperators: New Hope Sugar Coop. and Seminole Sugar Corp. (6 locations)

Objective: (a). To determine the differences in sugarcane response to broadcast and
row-directed P, and (b). to determine the optimum response levels of sugarcane to P.

22=r~=P=I Z Z:~PID==Z2-----2- -- -- -
BROADCAST.P: A randomized complete block with 4 replications. Plots consisted of 4
rows spaced 5 feet apart and 35 feet long with 5 foot alleyways between plots.
Levels of P at 0, 16, 32, 64, and 96 Ibs P205/A (TSP) placed in broadcast at
planting with 150 Ibs K20/a as KCI. Ratoon crop not fertilized with P, but with
KC1.


Table 2. Sugarcane (CP68-1026) response in 1983 and 1984 to broadcast applied
phosphate on a (43-39-10, pH 4.9, Pw=8, K=30, Ca=1900, Mg=160)

P ---------- 1982-83 ----------- ---------- 1983-84------------
Rate Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 15.8 17.1 45.9 231 10,683 16.1 18.2 49.6 232 11,537
16 15.8 16.7 44.3 234 10,429 16.3 18.1 47.5 235 11,197
32 16.3 17.1 43.9 243 10,692 16.0 18.2 51.0 229 11,730
64 15.8 16.9 40.9 234 9,617 15.6 17.6 44.3 223 9,934
96 16.2 16.6 43.7 243 10,815 15.7 18.1 46.4 225 10,493


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Discussion Notes:







P0tC'DAST.ROW.P: Randomized complete block experiments with 4 replications. 5ome
split-split block designs were used to study the effect of added S and silica slags.
Pl,.ts consisted of 4 rows spaced 5 feet apart and 32 feet long with 6.1 foot
alleyways. Applications in pounds of P205/A: 0, 20, 40, 80, and 120 using TSP. KCL
van micronutrient oxide sources were used at planting. The ratoon crop was not
erTtilized with P, but with KC1. At some locations additional treatments were added
to investigate the responses to Si slags and sulfur.


FiEre 1. Sugarcane (CP70-1133) plant and
applied P205 in a Okeechobee muck (43-39-23,
g 9200)




44 ---


ratoon response to broadcast and row
pH 5.2, Pw=4, Pa=10, K=100, Ca=2000,



1 Rev,'


250

24ev.

23 L


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LBS. P/ H


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'' ..---------------.- --










SI 30 45 (

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Table 3. Sugarcane (CP70-1133) plant response to broadcast and row applied P205 in
a Terra Ceia muck (42-38-15, pH 5.7, Pw=3, Pa=20, K=70, Ca=3500, Mg=320).

-------- Broadcast --------- ---------- Row -------------
Rate Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA
----- I-------------------------------------------------
0 15.4 17.7 64.2 211 13,577 15.9 18.5 66.1 217 14,399
15 15.5 17.9 64.6 211 13,689 15.7 18.2 66.0 213 14,092
30 15.5 17.9 65.2 211 13,794 15.4 18.0 65.9 210 13,857
60 I 15.3 17.7 66.3 208 13,867 15.4 17.8 66.2 211 13,942
90 1 14.9 17.3 68.1 204 13,911 15.5 17.6 66.8 214 14,314
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Between application methods, there are differences in Brix. No response to P205 at
this location, and slightly but consistently higher TPA, SPTC, and SPA with row
applied phosphorus at planting.
S=3=S3==S=..S=S=S-==-=as=========S======-==S= S============ ------------
Discussion Notes:





Table 4. Sugarcane (CP70-1133) plant response to broadcast and row applied P205 and
Si slag in an Okeelanta muck (42-39-02, pH 4.2, Pw=3, Pa=8, Ca=1200, Mg=82).

--------- Broadcast -------- ----------- Row------------
Rate Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA
-------------------------------------------------------------------
0 14.8 18.8 47.6 192 9,128 15.0 19.4 51.0 192 9,801
20 1 14.9 18.8 47.2 193 9,135 14.9 19.0 46.7 193 9,027
40 14.9 18.7 46.9 194 9,088 14.8 18.7 43.3 192 8,397
80 14.5 18.5 46.7 189 8,777 14.5 18.4 44.3 189 8,417
120 13.9 18.1 46.6 177 8,290 14.1 18.0 49.2 183 9,014

1000 lbs/Ac Si Slag _
in row
40 t 14.3 18.7 51.5 183 9.448
80 1 13.6 18.3 51.2 171 8,780
120 1 13.6 18.0 50.5 172 8,742

No response to phosphates nor application methods. There appeared to be no
advantage to apply Si slag in the row at planting. Silica slag depressed SPTC
but maintained higher TPA.

Discussion Notes:


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EREC Report EV-1985-6


Figure 2. 5ugarcane (CP72-1210) plant response to broadcast and row applied
phosphorus -nd sulfur in a Terra Ceia Muck (43-38-10, pH 6.7, Pw=3.5, Pa=32, K=48,
'a-4600, Mg-580


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Page 8


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May 1985





EREC Report EV-1985-6


Table 5.
(lbs/acre)
Mg=41).


Sugarcane (CP70-1133) response
in an Oldamar sand (43-40-06,


broadcast and row applied P205
5.25, Pw=10, Pa=21, K=28, Ca=300,


--------- Broadcast ---------
*


----------- Row -------------
*


Rate Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA
----1----------------------------------------------------------------
0 17.7 20.3 42.8 242 10,363 17.7 20.4 35.1 242 8,456
20 17.7 20.4 41.2 242 9,994 17.8 20.5 35.3 245 8,614
40 17.7 20.4 40.6 242 9,811 18.0 20.6 35.5 247 8,748
80 17.6 20.3 41.6 241 10,007 17.9 20.5 36.4 246 8,946
120 17.5 20.2 45.9 239 10,950 17.4 20.1 37.8 238 9,049
----I- -----------------------------------------------------------------

Although these results did not conclusively demonstrate a response to P application
except for SPTC, we saw that broadcasting nutrients for plant cane on sandy soils
has an advantage for TPA and SPA. Soil test results are not statistically calculated
as of yet.
-=S.==S..===S==-===================-==E--====S-=-Z -=== = == SS
Discussion Notes:






=======S=============S=====ZX=Z=5S=5====-Z=S Zz-------------==S=--..
Conclusions: There is advantage in row directed applications of P in some cases.
In other cases where soil levels of applied P are high no advantage was observed.
There was added advantage of row applied application of the fertilizer at 0 applied
P, but this was not qualified. There may be an effect of K, S or micronutrients
placed in the furrow at planting. On a sandy soil, broadcast P was favored.


If no advantage is expected,
application method should be chosen.


then the convenience, cost and accuracy of the


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May 1985






EREC Report EV-1985-6


FLAT TOP




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Cor clM: Vim Cho la e tlnk

FIGURE 14 CORRECTION oF POOR. A CrPCATiON PATTE
TO SATISFACTORY PATTERN
iv Ie^ ^ ic(itsiiii

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May 1985


tU.abla .b bhaM unwa t1s lU
CiclsM. M Ma t t a (waOs i spW LOT rttiona

FIGURE Is CO.FtECTION OF POOR APPLICATION PATTER
TO SATISFACTORY FCTTERM


CPrehie lAclit k ptft ntm ls k"
Corlrctm: Me c0 lt dAdw dC to "wtde
4r I Spa r


F)GLRE I. CORRECTION Of POOR APPLICATION PATTEF
TO SAr;SFACTURT PATTErcN


FIGURt IS CORRECTION OF POOR APPLICATION PFTTERt
TO SATISFACTORY PATTERaN


SMl5L SPiIlN


I MltE suMNrc


*~-..Y
sntim: ApplicnteI t lilhl Imd track
Carelten ihc.tuis ed oniaM


FIGURE i CORRECTION OF POOR APPLICATION PATTIRI
TO SATISFACTORY PATTERN







Problem: Double spinners offside application
Correction: Proper overlap & driving in oval pattern
to keep application in same direction. Start inside
& move out or start outside & move in.

FIGURE It MFFOVIIN APP.ICATION WIT O PC ATTERN


?rRt~es Ii~E) ha nu tch uw he
Cwcrdwo BOthEr IuuA SC


IOit;E 20 CORRECTiON OF POOR APPLICATION PATTERN
TO SATISFACTORY PATTLAN


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EREC Report EV-1985-6


Sugarcane Response to Manganese Source and Sulfur

Table 6. Sugarcane (CP72-1210) response to Nn source and S application on a
Terra Ceia muck (pH 7.2, Pw=2, Pa=46, Kv42, Ca=5066, Mgq666).


Source Suc Brix TPA SPTC SPA Rate
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Granusol (40% Mn) 1 18.5 21.4 63.7 248 15,8341 5 lbs Mn/A
In Oxide (52% Mn) I 18.9 21.5 60.2 255 15,3651 5 lbs Mn/A
STM-5 (5% Mn, 85k S) I 18.9 21.6 59.1 254 14,9851 5 1bs Mn/A 85 Ibs S/A
S + Granusol I 18.9 21.6 58.2 255 14,8141 5 lbs Mn/A 85 lbs S/A

Granulated i 19.0 21.8 60.3 254 15,3341 0 lbs S/A
S (90x 3) I 18.7 21.6 58.1 250 14,5381 250 lbs S/A
I 19.0 21.6 61.5 256 15,7581 500 lbs S/A

There was no significant differences in the treatments. In the 1984-85 season, an
additional test was put in using cultivar CP63-588.


Discussion Notes:






S = ==S=SSS=S=======3SSSSSSSSS=S= SSS 3==3a


Su g arcaS e R es or se to N i tc rvc g e er

In studies that will be reported in a later publication date, nitrogen was
applied from 0 to 200 lba/acre in the plant crop, and 0 to 800 Ibs/acre in a ratoon
crop. The crop yields are reported below:

Table 7. Sugarcane response to nitrogen applied at the plant and ratoon crop on a
Paapano fine sand and Hyakka fine sand with a constant water table of 20-24 inches
maintained by sub-surface irrigation (Gaacho, Anderson and Ozaki, 1985).

-- Plant -- -- Ratoon --
Rate Cane Sugar Cane Sugar
----- I----------------------------------
0 24.1 3.1 15.5 1.7
50 29.7 4.0 20.3 3.0
100 1 27.7 3.9 22.5 3.0
200 I 32.7 4.4 27.7 3.9
400 1 --- --- 42.9 5.9 '
800 1 --- --- 33.3 4.0
----- I----------------------------------


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May 1985




May 1985


EREC Report EV-1985-6


These are some sources of nitrogen that are or can be used:


Ammonium chloride
Ammonium nitrate
Ammonium sulfate
Calcium nitrate
Urea
As Sulfate-Nitrate


26.0 N
33.5x N
21.0% N
15.5% N
45.0X N
30-0-0-4S


Potassium nitrate
Ammonium metaphosphate
DAP
MAP
APP
Ammonium ThioSulfate


13.8-0-38.7
16.7-73.4-0
21-53-0
18-46-0
10-34-0 11-37-0
18.9X N 43.1% S


Discussion Notes:







Figure 3. Sugarcane (CP72-1210) response to nitrogen application on a Holopaw fine
sand (43-39-06, pH 6.0, Pw=3, Pa-9, K-7, Ca=1000, Mg=44)


SoBB


U-.


=




i-I


0 45 90 180 270


Ii ________


0 45 90


180 270


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L~I


rl


0 45 90 180 270


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Everg 1 adCes Sc.i I Test ir- g L_ ZUaborat ory Upda-te

In the past three years of testing, soil fertility research has had one
principle objective: to improve and 'fine-tune' crop soil fertility recommendations
from the lab. This means that changes, although alight, should be expected as our
experience and the data give us better information of production interactions with
soil fertility and fertilizer application. From the comments I have recieved from
sugarcane growers, researchers (past and present), and my own data, the Everglades
water-soluble P (Pw) index has been inadequate for assessment of P fertility in
sugarcane production. As you are aware, vegetable growers have used this index
somewhat successfully, primarily because the Pw measures phosphorus intensity in
soil solution. This intensity changes quickly as soil conditions change. However
for vegetables dependant upon P availabity on the 'short-term', this index appears
adequate. Unfortunately the sugarcane has a nutritional demand over the 'long-term'
and production depends upon soil P reserves as well as the water-soluble or
readily-available P (Pw). Consequently our cooperators and myself have been
developing expertise with a new extraction procedure which extracts more of the
total P which becomes available over the 'long-term' -- the Pw does not. I am
calling this new P index, acid-extractable P (Pa). On all fertility tests conducted
for over 2 years, we have collected this data. Some cooperators are using Pa, and
it appears to favorably predict soil P availability potentials that the Pw could not
do. Below are data:


Table 8. Soil levels of Pw and Pa.
Soil Pw Pa Soil Pw Pa
--------------------------------------------------
ms 1 13 s 5 8
m 1 30 s 5 180
a 1 28 s 5 96
m 1 56 a 5 27

ms 2 15 a 6 13
as 2 7 a 6 96
a 2 96 a 6 102
m 2 30 as 6 25

m 3 20 s 7 12
m 3 14 a 7 14
m 3 60 a 7 16
as 3 36 a 7 162

ms 4 10 as 22 27
as 4 18 ms 12 29
m 4 36 m 10 150
s 4 120 a 15 26
a 4 40
--------------------------------------------------

The data for soil test correlation with crop yields has been collected but not
analyzed to this date. If this correlation is favorable, I will be recommending
that Pa be incorporated into laboratory procedures. Since Pw is indicative of
readily-available phosphorus and Pa is indicative of readily-available plus
slowly-available phosphorus, both index values will in all probability be used to
indicate the soil P status in sugarcane production. The Pw will not be eliminated


Page 13


May 1985






EREC Report EV-1985-6


nor changed. Accomodation of Pa in future laboratory procedures will entail a need
for improvement of facilities, support and equipment.


WHO'S WHO in the Lab


Table 9. Everglades Soil Testing Laboratory from the Years 1982-84.


LABORATORY USER 1982 1983 1984

Growers
Sugarcane 2,699 2, 14 3,073
Vegetable 2,130 1,777 :,983
Rice 64 165 120
Misc. 342 289 .42
TOTAL 5,235 4,536 5,318
Total Analyses 20,009 17,620 22,925

Research Faculty
TOTAL 855 2,418 2,646
Total Analyses 3,789 14,352 14,062

GRAND TOTAL 6,090 6,789 8,264
TOTAL ANALYSES 23,798 31,972 36,987


Page 14


May 1985




EREC Report EV-1985-6


Acknow1edgements

I wouid 1ike to acrnowlebae tne fc.:)Iwirn incividuals, ccmoanies, and sponsors
of which by their suo~cftrt his raCe tfis research oossibte:


Mr. Yodesto Ulioa
Mr. K. Porro
Mr. Wayne Browning
Mr. Gary Crews
Mr. Gene Dodger,
Mr. Bill Elliot
Mr. howard Lynn
Mr. 'Buddy' Reloh
Mrs. Sandy Davis
Mr. Bob Bullock
Dr. Frank Martin
Mr. Jaime Rifa

New Howe Sugar Cooo.
Seminole Sugar Coro.
A. Duda & Sons
Camayan Cattle
Florida Sugar Cane League
U.S. Sugar Cora.
Chemical Enterorises
Douglas Fertilizer
Westbridoe Research
Ronrtana Sulfur
Sunbelt Chemical


mr. Debris Woedgeworti
'r. Aiberto Sarclin
Dr. Ed Harlon
Dr. R. I;ey
Mr. Jim DeVore
Mr. A. Recic
Mrs. L. Roberson
.Mr. Norman harr~ion
Mr. Douclas Spenser
Mr. Pedro Sanchez
Dr. Rau: Percomo
Dr. R.B. Pever.y

Wedoewortth Fertilizer
lnterrn. inerai5 Corn.
Potasn arnd Phoszhate :nst.
Rova: Fertilizer
AIxeniai Products
Duv6: Sales Zor3.
Allied :Ibers I Plastics
-rav or Ohesfical
9C .orx-ratior,
Eagle Pitcner :rnustr~es, Zornr.


Last but rot least, 1 do rcor, forget the fzre su.:cr-t Staef :cF the E~EC to wh~iCh
thank.


Page 15


May 1985






EREC Report EV-1985-6


Re ferences


Acorn, F.P. and E.B. Wright. 1973. Fertilizer spreading patterns and how to
correct. Tennessee Valley Authority, Division of Agricultural Development.

Allen, Jr. R.J., G. Kidder and F.J. Gascho. 1978. Predicting tons of sugarcane per
acre using solar radiation, temperature and percent plant cane. Proc. Am. Soc.
Sugar Cane Tech. 7:18-22.


Alvarez, J., D.R. Crane,
model for Florida sugarcane.


T.H. Spreen, and G. Kidder. 1982. A yield prediction
Agric. Systems 9:161-179.


Alvarez, J. and K.D. Shuler. 1983. Economic importance of the Everglades
Agricultural Area, 1982-83. AREC Research Report EV-1983-8. Agr. Res. and Ed.
Center, University of Florida, Belle Glade, Florida.

Anderson, D.L. 1982. Soil Testing and Analysis. Research Report EV 1983-5. AREC,
Belle Glade, Florida. 16 pp.


Anderson, D.L. 1984. Sugarcane nutrition and soil fertilty.
1984-11. EREC, Belle Glade, Florida. 14 pp.


EREC Report EV


Andreis, H.J. 1973. Broadcast versus the band method of fertilizer application to
stubble cane on Everglades peaty muck soil.


Crane, D.R., T.H. Spreen,
stubble replacement decision
Food Agr. Sci., University of


J. Alvarez, and G. Kidder. 1982. An analysis of the
for Florida sugarcane growers. Bulletin 822. AES/Inst.
Florida, Gainesville.


Florida Sugar Cane League. 1985. unpublished data.

fForsee, W.T., Jr., V.E. Green, Jr., and R. H. Webster. 1954. Fertilizer
experiments with field corn on Everglades peaty muck soil. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer.
Proc. 18:76-79.

Gascho, G.J., D.L. Anderson, and H. Ozaki. 1985. Nitrogen efficiency of sugarcane
varieties. (In Agron. J. review).

Gascho, G.J. and G. Kidder. 1979. Responses to phosphorus and potassium and
fertilizer recommendations for sugarcane in South Florida. Bulletin 809. AES/Insti.
Food Agric. Sci. University of Florida, Gainesville.

Gascho, G.J. and F.A. Taha. 1972. Nutritional deficiency symptoms of sugarcane.
Agricultural Experiment Stations. IFAS/University of Florida. Circular S-221.

Hoff, F.L. 1984. Sugar: background for 1985 Farm Legislation. Economic Resear'ch
Service, USDA. Agric. Information Bull. No. 478 (September).

Kidder, G. 1980. A traveler's guide to Florida sugarcane. Agronomy Facts, Number
105. Florida Coop. Ext. Ser., University of Florida, IFAS, Gainesville, Florida.

Lucas, R.E. June 1982. Organic soils (Histosols): formation, distribution,
physical and chemical properties and management for crop production. Crop and Soil
Sciences Department, Michigan State University, Agricultural Experiment Station and
Extension Service, East Lansing. Agricultural Experiment Stations, IFAS/University


Page 16


May 1985





EREC Report EV-1985-6


of Florida, Gainesville. Research Report 435.

Ulloa, M. and D.L. Anderson. 1983. Fertility practices of the Florida sugarcane
industry. Sugar J. 46(11):21-22.

Waksman, S.E. 1936. Humus. Williams and Wilkins Co., Baltimore, Md.

Zepp, G.A. 1976. The Florida sugar industry: Its past, present, and future
prospects. Sugar and Sweetner Report 1:45-50.


Page 17


May 1985




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