• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Figures
 List of Tables
 Abstract
 Background
 Objectives and study region
 Data sources
 Methodology
 Cartographic analysis
 Discussion
 Conclusions
 Recommendations
 Appendix 1. Sample FDNR derelict...
 Appendix 2. Sample field data...
 Appendix 3. Location and condition...
 Appendix 4. Location and condition...
 Appendix 5. Location and condition...
 Appendix 6. Area measurements for...
 Appendix 7. Low, medium, high,...
 Reference
 Back Cover














Group Title: TP ;, 70A, 70B
Title: Location and assessment of Hurricane Andrew damaged vessels on Biscayne Bay and adjoining shore areas
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076869/00002
 Material Information
Title: Location and assessment of Hurricane Andrew damaged vessels on Biscayne Bay and adjoining shore areas
Series Title: TP
Physical Description: vii, 58 p. : ill., maps, forms ; 28 cm. +
Language: English
Creator: Antonini, Gustavo A
Florida Sea Grant College
United States -- National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. -- Office of Sea Grant ( funder )
Publisher: Florida Sea Grant College Program, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1993
 Subjects
Subject: Hurricane Andrew, 1992   ( lcsh )
Natural disasters -- Florida -- Biscayne Bay   ( lcsh )
Boats and boating -- Effect of storms on -- Florida -- Biscayne Bay   ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Environmental aspects -- Florida -- Biscayne Bay   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Biscayne Bay (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-58).
Funding: Supported by the NOAA Office of Sea Grant
Statement of Responsibility: G.A. Antonini ... et al.
General Note: "June 1993."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076869
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 30650970

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    List of Figures
        Page v
    List of Tables
        Page vi
    Abstract
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Background
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Objectives and study region
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Data sources
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Methodology
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Cartographic analysis
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Discussion
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Conclusions
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Recommendations
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Appendix 1. Sample FDNR derelict vessel report
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Appendix 2. Sample field data form
        Page 32
    Appendix 3. Location and condition of hurrican damaged vessels
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Appendix 4. Location and condition of derelict vessels existing prior to Hurricane Andrew
        Page 52
    Appendix 5. Location and condition of damaged vessels existing in January 1993
        Page 53
    Appendix 6. Area measurements for potential impact locations
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Appendix 7. Low, medium, high, very high potentially impacted habitats, by location
        Page 56
    Reference
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Back Cover
        Page 59
        Page 60
Full Text
/c/


I -


LOCATION AND ASSESSMENT OF
HURRICANE ANDREW DAMAGED
VESSELS ON BISCAYNE BAY AND
ADJOINING SHORE AREAS



VOL. 1: TEXT AND APPENDICES



G.A. Antonini

P.W. Box
E. Brady

M. Clarke
H.R. Ledesma

J.L. Rahn




FLORIDA SEA GRANT COLLEGE PUBLICATION



OLL PORAN
COLLEAl PROORAc


TP-70A







Location and Assessment of Hurricane Andrew
Damaged Vessels on Biscayne Bay
and Adjoining Shore Areas




G.A. Antonini, P.W. Box, M. Clarke
E. Brady, R. Ledesma, J.L. Rahn

Cartographic Research Laboratory in Applied Geography
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Project No. PD-92-10
Grant No. NA89AA-D-SG-053

For copies:
Florida Sea Grant College Program
University of Florida
P.O. Box 110409
Gainesville, FL 32611-0409



rLORIN



COLLEGE PROGRAM

June 1993


$3.00



Florida Sea Grant college is supported by award of the Office of Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, grant number NA 89 AA-D-SG053, under provisions
of the National Sea Grant College and Programs Act of 1966. This information is published by the Sea Grant
Extension Program which functions as a component of the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, John T.
Woeste, Dean, in conducting cooperative Extension work in Agriculture, Home Economics, and Marine
sciences, State of Florida, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce, and Boards of
County Commissioners, cooperating. Printed and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of
May 8 and June 14, 1914. The Florida Sea Grant College is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action employ-
er authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.






















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


We are pleased to recognize the contributions of the following
individuals. A special note of thanks to Diana Molinari and members of the
Dinner Key Liveaboard Association who gave time and counsel during field
surveys despite their personal immediate needs of survival and recovery.

Ken Haddad, Frank Sargent, and Tim Leary, Marine Research Institute,
Florida Department of Natural Resources, St. Petersburg, provided the NASA
photography, digital files of source base maps and the National Wetlands
Inventory data.

Maj. Ken Clark and Lt. Lee Palfrey, Florida Marine Patrol, Miami,
supplied copies of derelict vessel reports and an emergency survey of
hurricane damaged vessels.

Bob Gregg, Metro-Dade Risk Management, Miami, provided the loan of
aerial photographs taken by his staff immediately after the storm.

Florida Sea Grant Extension Agent, Don Pybas, offered valuable guidance
in the field. Bradley Cornelius, University of Florida graduate planning
student, prepared the AML program for final map production.













TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS........................................................ ii

LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................ v

LIST OF TABLES ......................................................... vi

LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHS .................................................... vi

ABSTRACT...............................................................vii

SECTION

I. BACKGROUND .................................................. 1

II. OBJECTIVES ................................................. 3

III. STUDY REGION ............................................... 3

IV. DATA SOURCES ............................................... 5

V. METHODOLOGY................................................ 8
1. Aerial Photo Interpretation.......................... 8
2. Interpretation of Derelict Vessel Reports............ 8
3. Field Survey ....................................... 8
4. Base Map Compilation ................................ 8

VI. CARTOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ...................................... 10

VII. DISCUSSION.............. .................................. 16
1. Regional Analysis .................................... 16
2. Potential Impact Zones .............................. 22

VIII. CONCLUSIONS ................................................ 25

IX. RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................ 28

APPENDIX

1. Sample FDNR Derelict Vessel Report......................... 30

2. Sample Field Data Form ................................... 32

3. Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels........ 33

iii









Page


4. Location and Condition of Derelict Vessels Existing
Prior to Hurricane Andrew.................................. 52

5. Location and Condition of Damaged Vessels Existing
in January 1993 ............................................ 53

6. Area Measurements for Potential Impact Locations........... 54

7. Low, Medium, High, Very High Potentially Impacted
Habitats, by Location ...................................... 56

REFERENCES ....................................................... 57
















LIST OF FIGURES


Page


Figure


1. Location of Study Region..............................

2. Aerial Photographic Coverage..........................

3. Base Map (7.5' USGS) Coverage.........................

4. Vessels Damaged by Hurricane Andrew..................

5. Damaged Vessels at Marina Locations...................

6. Derelict Vessels Existing Prior to Hurricane Andrew...

7. Damaged Vessels Existing in January 1993..............

8. Hurricane Damaged and Derelict Vessels...............

9. Marine and Shore Habitats of Biscayne Bay.............

10. Concentrations of Hurricane Damaged Vessels...........

11. Density Distribution of Hurricane Damaged
Vessels and Relation to Damage Epicenter..............

12. Location of Hurricane Damaged Vessels
in Relation to Storm at Landfall .....................

13. Principal Locations of Potential Impact
by Damaged Vessels ....................................

14. Potential Impact Zones at Dinner Key..................

15. Potential Impact Zones at Key Biscayne...............

16. Potential Impact Zones at Virginia Key................

17. Potential Impact Zones on the Miami River..............


...... Vol.

...... Vol.

...... Vol.

...... Vol.

...... Vol.

...... Vol.


...... Vol

...... Vol

...... Vol

...... Vol


18. Potential Impact Zones at Coral Gables Waterway.....


....... Vol. 2















LIST OF TABLES


Page

1. Aerial Photography Specifications................................... 5

2. Summary of Hurricane Damaged Vessel Condition ...................... 11

3. Summary Condition of All Damaged Vessels............................ 12

4. Habitats and Damaged Vessels........................................ 13

5. Summary of Damaged Vessel Potential Impact Area .................... 17

6. Relative Potential Impact of Damaged Vessels by
Scaled Categories ................................................... 18

7. Relative Potential Impact of Damaged Vessels by
Habitat Zones ....................................................... 19

8. Areas of Potential Impact Zones .................................... 21

9. Index of Potential Impact on Habitats............................... 21




LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHS


1. Completely Submerged Vessel, Dinner Key............................. 9

2. Partially Submerged Vessel, Dinner Key ............................. 9

3. Wrecked, Aground Vessel, Pier House
Restaurant, Coral Gables ......................................... 9

Cover Photographs:
Vol. 1: Vertical photograph, Dinner Key Marina, Grove Key Marina,
Merrill-Stevens Dry Dock (left to right), 26 August 1992.
Vol. 2: Oblique photograph, Matheson Hammock Marina, 25 August 1992.


















ABSTRACT


Biscayne Bay, Florida, experienced damage to shoreline boating
facilities and docked/anchored vessels as a result of Hurricane Andrew. The
purposes of this project were to assess damage to in-the-water vessels, to map
the locations of these vessels, and to determine areas of potential impacts of
vessel sinkings and wreckage on the bay environment.

An initial count and characterization of vessel damage, as totally
submerged, partially submerged, wrecked but floating, and wrecked aground, was
made using remote sensing techniques. This damage assessment was compared
with a field determination of damaged/sunken boats remaining several months
after the storm. Remaining vessels were identified by type, hull material,
engine, fuel/holding tanks aboard, overall condition, afloat or submerged
status, and accessibility for removal. Actual/potential threats to the
environment, public safety implications, and navigational hazards also were
noted.

A Geographic Information System (GIS) data base and coverages were
created using the photo interpreted data and field observations. The GIS maps
include coastal features, habitats, vessel locations, and vessel attributes.
The analysis related damaged and sunken vessel location and distribution to
benthic, tidal and shore habitats. Vessel concentrations were used to define
low, medium, high, and very high potentially impacted areas of seagrasses,
non-living (barren) substrate, mangroves, and upland shore.

Problems encountered with available remotely sensed data sources and the
coordination of the data following such a sudden catastrophic event are
discussed. The project provides guidelines for developing hurricane vessel
damage assessment strategies to cope with similar future natural hazards.













BACKGROUND

Hurricane Andrew, the third most powerful hurricane in mainland U.S.
recorded history, struck south Florida on August 24, 1992, with sustained
winds of 234 kph, gusts of 282 kph, and a storm surge of 5 m (Culp and Wong,
1992; Rappaport, 1992). Andrew's wake in Florida left 40 people dead and over
$20 billion in damage (Lewis, 1993).

An army of relief workers and scientists descended on the storm blighted
area to provide assistance and to carry out baseline assessments of the
storm's impact (Mossberg, 1993; Ogden, 1992). The magnitude and extent of
damage to south Dade mainland communities, Homestead, Leisure City, Cutler
Ridge, South Miami, however, overshadowed the storm's impact on coastal and
shore facilities, vessels, and marine habitats. The estimated $200 million
(FEMA, 1992) damage to pleasure boats (vessels) paled alongside $20 billion in
damage to landside infrastructure. Dislocations of small waterside
communities, as the Dinner Key boat liveaboards, and, the damage or
destruction of some 1000 vessels, correspondingly, went unnoticed and
unattended.

In the days and weeks following the storm, questions about Hurricane
Andrew's potential impact on the multi-million dollar south Florida marine
recreational industry loomed dauntingly on the horizon. This impact was
difficult to predict since no comprehensive damage assessment estimates were
possible.

Rapid reconnaissance of the impacted shore area, in the post-hurricane
period, underscored the difficulty of estimating boat damage and assessing
potential impact to bay and shore environments by groundings, spillage,
flotsam. On-the-water inspection was discouraged by the authorities because
of safety risks from floating debris and submerged obstructions. Shore survey
was made difficult by impassable roads and by security restrictions imposed to
discourage looting. Aerial reconnaissance was implemented haphazardly and
much of the nearshore and bay areas were not systematically photographed until
months afterwards.

Fundamental questions, as -- how many vessels are damaged or destroyed?
where are they situated? what threat do they pose to public safety,
navigation, and the environment? -- could not be answered.

Florida Sea Grant initially requested that a survey be undertaken to
prioritize the removal of hurricane sunken and damaged vessels, using a
methodology developed for derelict vessel removal in the Florida Keys
(Antonini et al, 1989). It was estimated that between 500 and 1000 vessels
were sunken, aground, or ashore in a wrecked or damaged state following the
storm. Insurance adjusters and vessel owners were faced with the seeming









impossible tasks of trying to locate vessels and arrange for salvage, repair
or disposition. Despite chaotic conditions immediately following the storm,
however, most (60 to 80 percent) of the vessels were recovered from the water
within 3 months time (Pybas, 1992), and 95 percent were removed within 5
months. Our survey efforts, as a result, shifted from implementing a
prioritization plan for vessel removal, to mapping damaged and sunken vessel
locations and identifying potentially impacted marine and shore areas.














OBJECTIVES

The principal objectives of the survey were:

1. To locate vessels damaged or sunken by Hurricane Andrew and
to characterize the type of storm damage on the fleet.

2. To relate damaged and sunken vessels to baywater, tidal and
upland habitats.

3. To identify potential baywater, tidal, and shore impacted
areas.

4. To rate potentially impacted areas based on concentrations
of damaged or sunken vessels.

Secondary objectives were:

1. To evaluate post-Andrew reconnaissance and mapping quality
aerial photography for hurricane damage assessment.

2. To determine the feasibility of using geographic information
systems (GIS) for such mapping and analysis purposes.

3. To recommend improvements in post-hurricane damage
assessment methods.





III.

STUDY REGION

The study region, defined by field reconnaissance immediately after
storm passage, includes the area where most of the damaged vessels occurred.
It is bounded on the north by the 79th Street Causeway, and on the south by
the Card Sound Bridge IFigure 1). The area is 874 km The northern part is
in Dade County (793 km 90.73 percent); the southern part is in Monroe County
(81 km2, 9.22 percent).


























Study Region
-t-


Figure 1: Location of Study Region














DATA SOURCES

Aerial photography, flown within 2 weeks following Hurricane Andrew, was
the prime source for identifying vessel condition. Figure 2 shows photo
coverage and Table 1 lists photo specifications for principal sources.

Table 1: Aerial Photography Specifications

Source Scale Date (no. days Format Stereo
after storm) (inches)
Smith Aerial 1:7000 1, 14 3 x 5 No
Photography Inc.

Smith Aerial 1:2500 2 11 x 14 No
Photography Inc.

Continental 1:7400 2 9 x 9 No
Aerial Surveys Inc.

FDOT 1:6800 6 9 x 9 Yes

NASA 1:13500 5-12 9x9 No


Print copies of the National Ocean Service (NOS) 1:40,000 scale
hydrographic charts and US Geological Survey (USGS) 1:24,000 scale, 7.5'
quadrangles were acquired (Figure 3). Digital files of NOS bathymetry and
shoreline, US Census Bureau (TIGER) roads, and National Wetlands Inventory
(NWI) habitats were obtained from Florida Department of Natural Resources
(FDNR), Marine Research Institute (MRI), St. Petersburg.

The Florida Marine Patrol (FMP) provided derelict vessel (DV) reports
for the 45 DVs situated in the study region. These reports contained
information on vessel location and condition (Appendix 1). FMP also made
available an emergency survey of vessel damage caused by the storm (Palfrey,
1992).

US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, 1992) provided maps and photographs
of vessel debris from 153 sites in the bay. USACE information on the Dinner
Key outer anchorage was particularly useful.









































Smith


Continental


NASA


FDOT


0 5000
m=-ers
meters


Figure 2: Aerial Photographic Coverage









North Miami


Figure 3: Base Map (7.5' USGS) Coverage










The Dade County benthic map, 1:40,000 (DERM, 1983) was used to describe
bottom communities in Biscayne Bay.

V.

METHODOLOGY

1. Aerial Photo Interpretation

Photographs were mounted into strips and mosaiced. Areal coverages were
assembled and data gaps were noted. Preference for interpretation was given to
large-scale sources, as Smith, FDOT, Continental; smaller-scale NASA
photography was used to fill in missing areas (Table 1).

A lOx magnification scope was used to directly identify vessel status as
unaffected or affected by the storm, using diagnostic criteria (list, shape,
debris trail, etc.). Clearly identifiable affected vessels, further, were
distinguished as: totally submerged (Photo 1), partially submerged (Photo 2),
wrecked but floating, wrecked aground (Photo 3). Vessels where storm-damaged
condition was questionable, or where photo signatures appeared to be storm-
derived but unclear as to source, i.e., vessel, flotsam, etc., were designated
as unknown/other. Vessel location and condition were noted on photo acetate
overlays; this information was transposed to USGS 1:24,000 quadrangles.

2. Interpretation of Derelict Vessel Reports

Each DV report contained a photograph, vessel description and chart
location. DV condition categories paralleled storm-damaged vessel
designations. Location and condition for DVs were plotted on USGS quadrangles.

3. Field Survey

A field survey was conducted between 18-23 January 1993 to identify any
hurricane damaged, wrecked vessels or derelict vessels remaining in the water
or along the shore. These vessels were located on aerial photographs and
information was recorded on data sheets (Appendix 2). All cases were adjusted
to mean lower low water.

4. Base Map Compilation

A digital base map was compiled using shoreline (mean lower low water
datum) from NOS 1:40,000 hydrographic charts and road features from TIGER
1:24,000 files. Grid coordinate system was the Universal Transverse Mercator
(UTM), Zone 17.

An attempt was made to incorporate bathymetry from a preliminary issued
NOS digital file but problems in the file structure, like truncated contours
at channel cuts, spoil banks, and shoreline, made this impractical. All
hurricane damaged and derelict vessel locations, marked on aerial photograph





























Photo 1: Completely Submerged
Vessel, Dinner Key


Photo 2: Partially Submerged
Vessel, Dinner Key


Photo 3: Wrecked, Aground Vessel,
Pier House Restaurant, Coral Gables










acetate overlays, were transferred to USGS quadrangle (1:24,000) print copies.
Locations were digitized and vessel characteristics were recorded in attribute
tables.

A habitat map of benthic, tidal, and upland units was compiled from two
sources. Generalized seagrasses, hardbottom, and barren substrate units were
digitized from the DERM (1983) 1:40,000 scale map. Mangroves were selected
from the NWI (1984-1990) 1:24,000 digital map file. The DERM (1983) shoreline
served as the seaward boundary of the mangrove unit.

Mapping accuracy is related to the scale and resolution of the base map,
habitat maps, and photo interpretation. Base map scale is 1:40,000; habitat
map resolution distinguishes 11 units at 1:24,000. Photo interpretation scale
varies from 1:2,500 to 1:13,500. Map accuracy for maps produced from varied
sources is set by the smallest scale source, all other factors being equal. It
was reasoned, however, that map scale could be enlarged since map resolution
was reduced, or made coarser, by lumping 11 benthic units into 3 composite
mapping categories. Correspondingly, some project results are presented at
large scale: vessel locations where photo interpretation was carried out at
large-scale; and potential impact zones where boundaries are based on
combinations of concentrations of vessels with generalized habitat boundaries.
General regional maps are presented at approximately 1:90,000 scale.

VI.

CARTOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

The analysis followed a multi-staged approach. First, vessel locations
and damage conditions were mapped. Second, baywater, tidal and shore ecologic
units were synthesized from digital and printed sources and mapped. Third,
vessel locations were overlain on synthesized ecologic units to determine
relative vessel concentrations. Fourth, relative vessel concentrations were
scaled. Fifth, potentially impacted baywater, tidal, and upland areas were
identified.

Interpretation of aerial photography, taken within a 2 week period after
Hurricane Andrew, revealed 918 damaged and sunken vessels. These were mapped
in Figure 4; concentrations of damaged vessels at 4 marinas (Dinner Key,
Matheson Hammock, Black Point, and Homestead Bayfront) were mapped at large-
scale in Figure 5. Table 2 gives a summary of vessel locations and damage
conditions. Appendix 3 provides specific information for each identified
vessel.

There were 45 abandoned, derelict vessels existing in the study region
prior to Hurricane Andrew. These are shown in Figure 6 and described in
Appendix 4. A field reconnaissance, carried out during 18-22 January 1993,
revealed 51 vessels remaining in the water. These are mapped in Figure 7 and
described in Appendix 5. Table 3 summarizes conditions of the pre-storm
derelict vessels, hurricane damaged vessels existing in September 1992, and






















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vessels remaining in the water in January 1993. Figure 8 shows all (1001)
vessels, damaged or sunken in the study region, existing prior to or resulting
from Hurricane Andrew. (The map in Figure 8 served as the basis for deriving
vessel concentrations and potential impact assessments.)


A habitat map of Biscayne Bay and adjoining shore areas,
digital and print copy sources (NWI, 1984-1990; DERM, 1983) is
9. This concluded Stage 1 and Stage 2 analysis, preparation of
materials.


compiled
shown in
source


from
Figure


The Stage 3 overlay process combined maps in Figures 8 and 9 to identify
the location and number of vessels found on each habitat unit: seagrasses,
hardbottom, barren substrate, mangrove, upland within 100 m of the shoreline
(limit of photo interpretated damaged vessels). Area (total, percent) and
number of vessels situated in each habitat unit, are listed in Table 4.

Table 4: Habitats and Damaged Vessels


Area Vessels
Habitat km % subtotal %
Seagrasses 328 37.53 90 8.99
Barren 98 11.21 592 59.14
Hardbottom 172 19.68 0 0.00
Mangroves 76 8.70 23 2.30
Upland 119 13.62 273 27.27
Undetermined 81 9.27 23 2.30
Total 874 100.01 1001 100.00


Stage 4 scaling was carried out at regional and operational mapping
levels. In order to determine vessel concentrations per unit area, the region
was grided into .25 km2 cells and vessel counts per cell were tallied and
graphed (Figure 10). A vessel damage epicenter -- greatest concentration of
damaged vessels -- was identified and individual boat locations were plotted
to show the density and distribution of hurricane damaged vessels emanating
from the epicenter (Figure 11). The location of damaged vessels and their
distance from the epicenter were graphed in relation to the eyewall of the
hurricane at landfall (Figure 12). This concluded the regional analysis.

Scaling at the operational mapping level included overlaying the 1001
damaged vessels on the synthesized habitat zones. A buffer was delineated
around each vessel, of 100 m for those on baywater (seagrasses, hardbottom,
barren substrate) habitats, 50 m for vessels on tidal (mangroves), and 10 m
for ones on uplands. (A buffer is the theoretical area of potential influence
each vessel may have on its surrounding ecosystem.)















- 150




100
0



Z 50





0







250




200




150

0

100




50


1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 5 3 5 4 7 16 15 17 31 64
Number of .25 km2 Cells

Figure 10: Concentrations of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 23 25 30 31 36 44 45 46 47
Distance from Vessel Damage Epicenter in Kilometers


Figure 11: Density Distribution of Hurricane Damaged Vessels and
Distance from Damage Epicenter















































Card Sound Bridge


* Damaged Vessel





0 5000
meters



Figure 12: Location of Hurricane Damaged Vessels in Relation to Storm at
Landfall (Radar Miami, August 24, 1992, 8:30 UTC)










The analysis assumed that damaged vessels in baywater habitats may have
a potential impact of an order of magnitude greater than damaged vessels on
land; vessels situated on mangroves were scaled at midpoint. Further
assumptions were: that the potential impact of vessels on baywater and tidal
habitats, closer than 100 m and 50 m, respectively, to the shoreline, did not
extend landward of the shoreline; that the potential impact of damaged vessels
on land, closer than 10 m to the shoreline, did extend into adjoining tidal or
baywater zones. The analysis treated all vessels equally: no distinction was
made for condition, as completely submerged, partially submerged, floating, or
aground.

The ratio of buffered areas to the number of vessels revealed relative
areal concentrations. Curve breakpoints, of 1-5, 6-15, 16-25 and >25, were
used to define low, medium, high, and very high levels of vessel
concentration. The distribution of buffered areas in the four levels was: low
= 274, medium = 21, high and very high = 1 and 2, respectively. Table 5 gives
a summary of damaged vessel potential impact areas (in hectares, ha), in each
of the levels (low, medium, high, very high) for each habitat zone. Relative
(percent) potential impact of damaged vessels is given by scaled categories in
Table 6 and by habitat zones in Table 7.

Results of this phase of the cartographic analysis showed concentrations
of damaged vessels in small areas. These small areas were grouped into 9
principal locations (Figure 13). Table 8 gives the potential impact area for
each location. Appendix 6 lists area measurements, by location, level, and
habitat. Appendix 7 ranks potential impact levels in descending order by
location subtotal. Table 9 summarizes these data for each location by
indexing potential impact on habitats. Figures 14, 15, 16 17, and 18 map
potential impact zones at 5 selected locations.
VII.

DISCUSSION
1. Regional Analysis

Hurricane Andrew's landfall in the Ragged Keys placed Miami's moored
recreational vessels within the "dangerous semi-circle" of the storm's track.
This fleet was exposed to Category 4 hurricane force winds plus the forward
speed of the storm (Figure 12). A total of 918 hurricane damaged vessels were
identified within the area south of the 79th St. Causeway (north), north of
the Card Sound Bridge (south), and seaward from 100 m landward of the
shoreline. Roughly, and equally, one-third of the damaged vessels were
completely or partially submerged, damaged but floating, and damaged aground
(Table 2).

The site of greatest devastation -- the damage epicenter was landward
of Picnic Islands, Dinner Key (UTM 5770740/2845272). More than one-third of
damaged and sunken vessels were situated less than 2 km from this epicenter.
The high densities of vessels at some locations, as at Dinner Key, Coral
Gables Waterway, Coral Bay, combined with their location on the fringe of the

















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Figure 13: Principal Locations of Potential Impact by Damaged Vessels














Table 8: Area of Potential Impact Zones


Potential Impact Zone
Location (area in ha)
North Bay 102.54
Miami River 25.17
Virginia Key 29.50
Key Biscayne 38.09
Dinner Key 145.63
Coral Gables Waterway 53.23
Coral Bay 12.65
King's Bay 7.48
Ocean Reef 18.16
Other 43.51
Total 475.96


Table 9: Index of Potential Impact on Habitats at Selected Locations


Seagrasses Barren Mangroves Upland
Location L M H\V L M H/V L M H/V L M H/VH

North Bay 1 3 1 6 -
Miami River 4 2 10 7
Virginia Key 4 2 5 4 5 1
Key Biscayne 5 3 2 5 4 -
Dinner Key 1 1 1 6 1 1 8 3 1
Coral Gables Waterway 2 3 2 1 2 2
Coral Bay 6 9 6 4 7 2 -
King's Bay 7 8 5 9 5 -
Ocean Reef - 3 3
Other 3 8 7 3 2 6 4 3
(Index based on percent of scaled areal subtotals)
(high and highest combined; 1 = highest, 10 = lowest)










storm's northwall and within the "dangerous semi-circle," account for high
damaged vessel concentrations; about 325 cases were clustered in 4 (0.25 km )
locations (Figure 10).

Hurricane damaged vessels (Figure 4) were found onshore the mainland,
nearshore within Biscayne Bay, and on the barrier islands. Fifty percent of
the vessels were situated within the area bounded by Rickenbacker Causeway
(north), King's Bay (south), including Virginia Key and Key Biscayne (Table 2,
Figure 3). Vessels located in traditional storm havens ("hurricane holes"), as
No Name Harbor and Hurricane Harbor (Key Biscayne), Miami River, Angelfish
Creek (Key Largo), were sunken or damaged as were those at marinas and those
docked in residential canals. The track of this Category 4 storm took aim at
the area of highest concentration of floating recreational vessels in Dade
County, Florida.

Hurricane Andrew's mainland landfall was near the Deering Estate and
south of King's Bay. The 8 km open, shoal water area north of Soldier Key and
south of Key Biscayne, known as Biscayne Flats and Safety Valve, left the
floating recreational fleet completely exposed and vulnerable to the storm's
most forceful winds and surge. The 3 m storm surge at Dinner Key washed over
the spoil islands at Picnic Island Park where elevations are close to sea
level (Rappaport, 1992). Entrance channels south of Dinner Key, at Coral
Gables Waterway, Matheson Hammock Marina, Coral Bay, King's Bay, Black Point
Marina, Homestead Bayfront Marina, oriented approximately east west and open
to Biscayne Bay, made access easy by storm surge. Much of the damage to
vessels was caused by surge and resulted in sinkings at docks, empailments on
pilings, pile-ups of vessels at canal junctures and termini (Figures 13-18).

2. Potential Impact Zones

While a majority of vessels were removed within two months, questions
linger concerning the real and potential impact of 918 sunken and damaged
vessels on public safety, navigation and environmental quality (USCGS, 1993).
What types of baywater, tidal and shore habitats could have been impacted?
Where might these potential impacts be found? Can a relative scale of impact
be associated with location and habitat? Answers to these questions are found
in the following section. The damaged/sunken vessel population used in this
potential impact assessment includes the 918 hurricane damaged vessels, the
derelict vessels existing prior the storm, and those found in January 1993
(Table 3, Figure 8).

The study region covers 874 km2 (Table 4). An overlay of damaged
vessels on habitat showed no vessels on "living" hardbottom (corals and
sponges). Most vessels (59.14 percent) were on "non-living" barren substrate
(dredged and undredged); 27.27 percent of vessels were on upland within 100 m
of the shoreline; another 8.99 percent were on seagrasses. Only 2.30 percent
of vessels were on mangroves.

The potentially impacted area is 2 orders of magnitude below the
regional area. Five percent, 475.94 ha (100 ha = 1 km ), could have been










affected by vessel damage and sinkings (Table 5); 56.70 percent is at the low
level, and the remainder is about equally divided in the medium and very high
impact categories (Table 6).

Nine geographic areas of potential impact from hurricane and derelict
vessel damage and sinkings were identified (Figure 13). Table 8 shows that
Dinner Key covered the largest area (145.63 ha) followed by North Bay, Coral
Gables Waterway, Key Biscayne, Virginia Key, Miami River.

When potential impact (low, medium, high, very high) on habitats
(seagrasses, barren, mangrove, upland) was indexed to location, based on the
percent of scaled areal subtotals with 1 = highest and 10 = lowest, (Table 9)
the following results were obtained.

Dinner Key had the very highest potential impact on seagrasses (it
scored first in all 3 levels low, medium, high/very high); potential impact
on barren was first in the medium and high/very high levels); potential impact
on upland was first in the high/very high category, but third and eighth,
respectively, in medium and low levels.

Table 9 shows, from another standpoint, that the potential impact of
vessels on mangroves was low for several reasons: mangroves accounted for only
12.82 ha (2.69 percent) of the total potentially impacted area (this accounts
for only low scaled readings); and mangroves were found underlying damaged
vessels at only five sites. Coral Gables Waterway ranked first but at a low
potential impact level.

A description of potential impacts at each of the 9 areas follows.

1- Dinner Key: very high potential impacts, on seagrasses south of the
anchorage, on barren substrate at the marina and anchorage, and on upland
along shore from Dinner Key Marina north to Biscayne Bay Yacht Club; medium
potential impacts, in the lee of Fair Isle (south of Mercy Hospital), and in
the nearshore zone from Sunrise Harbor north (Figure 14).

2- Key Biscayne: medium potential impacts on seagrasses and barren near
Key Biscayne Yacht Club; low on barren substrate at No Name Harbor, Pines
Canal, and Hurricane Harbor; low on seagrasses south of Crandon Marina, and,
medium on barren substrate at Crandon Marina (Figure 15).

3- Virginia Key: medium potential impact on barren substrate and upland
at Rickenbacker Marina; low on barren (dredged) in the Marine Stadium; low on
upland along the spit west of the Stadium (Figure 16).

4- Miami River: medium potential impact on barren substrate downstream
from the 7th Avenue Bridge and upstream halfway to and at the junction of
South Fork; medium on upland at Nutta's Boat Yard and the Poland Yacht Basin
(Figure 17).










5- Coral Gables Waterway: very high potential impact in the Waterway on
barren (dredged) substrate and upland; low on upland and on barren in
secondary canals principally at canal junctions and termini; very high
potential impact on barren at Matheson Hammock Marina; low on seagrasses in
the bay at isolated locations (Figure 18).

6- North Bay: medium potential impact on barren substrate at Normandy
Isle and at the western end of Venetian Causeway; low on barren and upland on
the north shore of North Bay Causeway; low on barren in Indian Creek and along
Venetian Causeway; low on barren and upland at City Yacht Basin.

7- Coral Bay: medium to low potential impact on barren substrate and
upland in the residential canal system; low on seagrasses on shore at the
mouth of Snapper Creek.

8- King's Bay: medium on barren substrate at King's Bay Yacht and
Country Club; low on upland adjoining the Club; low in canals west of Paradise
Point.

9- Ocean Reef: low potential impact on isolated upland areas and within
canals and basins (habitat undetermined), at Ocean Reef Club, Crayvik, and Key
Largo Club.












VIII.


CONCLUSIONS

This mapping and assessment project of hurricane damaged vessels
provides insights for boaters faced with imminent hurricane threat as well as
for coastal managers concerned with post-storm recovery.

The message for boaters, marina managers and the marine insurance
industry is somber. Expect significant boat damage if your vessel lies in the
track of a Category 4 storm. The fate of Miami's moored recreational fleet
was sealed when a storm, such as Andrew, with a 3 m storm surge, took aim at
the Coral Gables Dinner Key area on 24 August 1992.

Significant boat damage was related to several factors. Waterway
entrances, open to seaward, allowed a rapidly rising dome of water to push
unimpeded into the canal systems; this surge was 2 m at Homestead Bay Front, 4
m at Black Point, 5 m south of King's Bay, and 3 m at Dinner Key (Rappaport,
1992). The outer anchorage at Dinner Key was completely exposed to open water
fetch as the hurricane moved westward across Biscayne Bay. The Picnic Islands
offered little, if any, protection to the inner anchorage and to vessels
docked at Dinner Key Marina, Grove Key Marina, Merrill-Stevens Dry Dock,
Biscayne Bay Yacht Club, and Coral Reef Yacht Club. Only a diked basin and
hurricane gate system would have guaranteed their protection.

The storm, furthermore, debunked the myth that "hurricane holes" provide
adequate shelter for small-craft under such conditions. Most of these safe
havens are dredged sites, with silt-mud soft bottoms. Stormwater runoff and
deposition of fine textured flocculated sediments contribute to poor holding
ground conditions at many of these sites.

A panel of experts concluded that the loss of life among the boating
population would have been significantly higher during Hurricane Andrew had
marinas exercised their lease requirement and forced boat owners to remove
their vessels at Hurricane Watch time (IMI, 1993). Many more vessels would
have sought shelter in so-called "safe havens." Dade County, subsequent to
Hurricane Andrew, eliminated the forced vacation clause from lease agreements
at county marinas.

The results, also, raise a number of intriguing questions why was
there more damage to vessels at some locations than at other locations? And,
at a particular location, why were some vessels spared while others were
totally or partially wrecked? Is a vessel's vulnerability to storm damage a
function of site (probability of storm occurrence, fetch, aspect, water
depth), presence of a protective barrier, mooring (dock, davits, anchor), type
of vessel, vigilence, experience, pre-storm preparation? In all likelihood,
all of the above impinge on a vessel's survival, but how? And, to what degree










is one factor more important than another? A review of the historic record of
localized impacts of storm events would provide invaluable insights.

The study offers coastal managers a method for defining the potential
impact of damaged and sunken vessels on marine and shore habitats. Vessel
locations were mapped and degree of damage was identified, as completely
submerged, partially submerged, wrecked floating, wrecked aground. The study
methodology provides a way of focusing scarce resources, during post-hurricane
recovery, on potentially impacted zones by eliminating from further
consideration areas where no apparent impact occurred. In the case of
Hurricane Andrew and Biscayne Bay, application of this methodology narrowed
the search area to 5.4 percent (4.75 km2) of the total region (874 km2).

Segmentation into discrete habitat zones, as shore upland, mangroves,
seagrasses, barren substrate, provides further areal discrimination by
revealing potential remediation needs, since vessel damage and sinking may
affect each habitat in unique ways. Groundings may damage or destroy
seagrasses and mangroves; debris may remain unnoticed in barren channels and
obstruct navigation; wreckage may accumulate on uplands adjoining the shore
and pose safety hazards. Categorizing damaged vessels by habitat and location,
further, may assist post-hurricane mitigation by enabling recovery teams to
task specific potentially impacted zones with specialized cleanup equipment
and personnel: upland wreckage accessible by road; vessels and debris lying in
mangroves and seagrasses reachable over shallow water; damaged vessels in
navigable channels and deep water.

In the days following Hurricane Andrew's landfall, questions raised
repeatedly were: how many vessels are damaged or destroyed? where are they
situated? what threat do they pose to public safety, navigation, and the
environment?

Answers to these questions required timely access to high resolution
aerial photography and cloud penetrating satellite imagery. Unfortunately, the
remote sensing products available after the storm were of marginally
acceptable quality. Satellite imagery (SPOT, LANDSAT), available to the
general public, was unapplicable because low resolution (10 m and 30 m,
respectively) made vessel identification impossible. Aerial photo coverage was
piecemeal and large segments of Biscayne Bay were not photographed, as the
Safety Valve, Ragged Keys, and Monroe County portion.

Two private firms, specializing in cadastral surveys and land
development, photographed segments of the disaster zone. Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOOT) photographed the barrier islands from Cape Florida (Key
Biscayne) north to Ft. Lauderdale. The National Aeronautical and Space
Administration (NASA) photographed the bay and adjoining shore but did not
provide complete coverage. These missions were conducted within 2 weeks of
Hurricane Andrew's landfall. National Ocean Service (NOS) photographed the
entire area 4 months after the storm. The most useful imagery for this mapping
and damage assessment project was 3"x5", hand-held oblique color photographs
taken by a private firm.










Timely receipt of the photography was hampered by several factors. EROS
Data Center and the National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), primary
sources for identifying existing photo coverages in the US, had no mechanism
for placing users in contact with suppliers in cases requiring immediate photo
missions following natural disasters. Determining photographic sources relied
on an informal network.

Weather conditions, in the days following the storm, did not meet photo
mission standards of private firms, state or federal agencies. Their mission
standards, however, were based on the firm or agency's "normal" mission
activities (e.g., cadastral, hydrographic, road surveys), not response to
disaster relief requests. Private firms were innudated with orders for
photography. Prints were received, in some cases, 4 to 10 weeks after orders
were placed. Acquisition of aerial photography proved to be the most vexing
task on this vessel damage assessment project.

Geographic information systems (GIS) technology made feasible mapping
and analyzing the project's large relational data bases. However, a number of
problems surfaced. Initial compilation tasks were performed on pc ARC/INFO.
Since GIS applications on this project required large memory (RAM), data
providers were asked to eliminate nonessential attribute data from source
files. This caused some time delays. Shoreline matching from 4 source files --
TIGER (roads), NOS benthicc communities), USGS (vessel locations), NWI
(mangroves) -- required extensive editing time. Overlay of roads (1:24,000
source) and shoreline (1:40,000 source) from different files placed roads in
the water and proved unsuccessful. Only major arteries were included for
general orientation. The digital NOS bathymetry file contained truncated
contours at channel cuts, spoil bank and shoreline, which made its
incorporation impractical. As the GIS task proceeded, work was transferred to
a workstation ARC/INFO environment. This facilitated final plot production.













RECOMMENDATIONS

This report summarizes the application of remote sensing and GIS
technology for siting hurricane damaged vessels and asssessing their potential
impact on nearshore ecosystems.

The critical factor in disaster assessment is the timely receipt of
information upon which relief and recovery efforts can be executed. Massive
destruction of roads and communications associated with hurricanes makes on-
the-water and land surveys impractical.

State-of-the-art remote sensing systems, as thermal infrared, cloud
penetrating radar, multi-channel imaging, high resolution photography, mounted
on airborne and satellite platforms, and operated by Department of Defense
(DOD) for military surveillance and intelligence gathering purposes, should be
directed to provide federal, state, and local agencies with image products for
disaster relief. DOD has the demonstrated capability to offer immediate
delivery of imagery and photography.

Timely receipt of such information can only happen if a national system
is in place, one that will automatically initiate aerial sorties and data
gathering missions once hurricane landfall has been determined. As is the case
of the national airborne weather reconnaissance system, that tracks hurricane
movements prior to landfall, the creation of a national remote sensing system
should be considered to image pre- and post-storm conditions.

The boating public needs to have addressed a number of key lessons from
Hurricane Andrew. The results of this research provide a baseline of
information on post-storm vessel location and damage. This information should
be linked to pre-storm vessel location, condition and storm preparation, to
explain why some vessels were damaged and others were not.

A more fundamental issue is whether a method can be developed to
construct a vulnerability scale of the relative hazard potential of mooring
sites to a range of storm events. This would permit a potential hazard
ranking of boating facilities, private and public, marina and residential,
docks and anchorages. Results of such follow-up research would provide
boaters and the recreational marine industry with guidelines to better prepare
for future similar storm events.

Boaters need to know bottom-holding characteristics and controlling
entrance channel depths for storm havens. Some sites may or may not provide
adequate protection under hurricane force conditions. The U.S. Navy provides
information on "hurricane havens," for large vessel operators (Turpin and
Brand, 1982). Recreational vessel owners' needs, similarly, should be
addressed. Current efforts, by Florida Sea Grant and the (Florida) West Coast










Inland Navigation District, to map at large-scale selected recreational boat
anchorages in southwest Florida is a step in this direction (Antonini and
Zobler, 1992).

The threat of a hurricane landfall places some boaters in triple
jeopardy: forced eviction from a marina facility under the eye of an advancing
storm; adequate storm protection provision for their vessel; safe removal of
the ship's crew to an inland location. The International Marina Institute
initiated a dialogue between marina owners, vessel owners, and coastal
managers to find an alternate strategy to forced vessel removals in times of
approaching storms. There is consensus on the need to satisfactorily resolve
this issue in a way that safeguards marina property, recreational vessels, and
individuals alike.











Appendix 1: Sample FDNR Derelict Vessel Report


Derelict Vessel #
Date


FMP District

I. Description of Vessel
Registry Number
Vessel's Owner


Add
City
Mot


County Chart Code No.



Vessel's Name


ress Approx. Length Approx. Width
Hull Material
or: Yes No ___ Type: Inboard Outboard


I. Condition and Location of Vessel
Vessel Condition: Stored Wrecked Junked Abandoned Dismantled
Water Depth ft. Permit granted or abandonment? Yes No
By Whom?
Degree Submerged at tide level *
Vessel Location: (a) Upon public waters at (b) at a port which is located at
on____s__nt(c)ataprivatei____h. If at a port, has the agency having jurisdiction given
consent? (c) at a private dock which is located at_. If docked
at private property, has the owner given consent? Name/Address of Owner


III. Vessel's Effect on Environment/Navigation
A. Obstructs or threatens to obstruct navigation? Yes No How?

B. Contributes to air pollution? Yes No How?

C. Contributes to water pollution? Yes No How?

D. Constitutes a danger or a potential danger to the environment? Yes No In what way?

E. Constitutes a potential health hazard? Yes No Type or nature of hazard?


IV. Vessel's Removal
Can it be towed without repair? Yes No Recommend Disposition: (a) Landfill
(b) Artificial Reef (c) Leave as is for marine habitat Estimated cost of removal

V. ***NOTE: TAKE AT LEAST TWO (2) COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS OF VESSEL FOR SUBMISSION
ALONG WITH THIS REPORT. MARK THE PHOTOGRAPHS WITH THE DATE, TIME, PLACE AND
SIGNATURE/TITLE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHER.

VI. COMMENTS (Use additional page if necessary)


Investing Officer & ID #



DNR 20-012-FMP
(4-84)


District Captain


30 Distribution: Original GHQ
1st Copy District
2nd Copy Region


Date








FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Division of Law Enforcement

01 Page of Pages
1. Date


2. Originating Office


3. 10-29 CHECK 4. OTHER AGENCY CASE NUMBERS 5. FMP CASE/COMPLAINT NUMBER
SPOS NEG

6. INFORMATION TOPIC

7. INFORMATION HAS BEEN RECEIVED THAT:






















ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION BELOW FOR FLORIDA MARINE PATROL USE ONLY

8. SOURCE NAME OR NUMBER 9. DATE AND TIME INFORMATION RECEIVED

10. SOURCE ADDRESS

11. SIGNATURE OF OFFICER RECEIVING INFORMATION 12. REVIEWING OFFICERS) DATE

13. INFORMATION EVALUATION 14. INVESTIGATION RECOMMENDATION
RELIABLE PLAUSIBLE [IMPROBABLE [I]IMMEDIATE [NORMAL []OPEN
CLOSE [DEX


15. CASE ASSIGNED TO: 16. ASSIGNED BY: DATE


THIS REPORT IS THE PROPERTY OF THE FLORIDA MARINE PATROL, NEITHER IT NOR ITS
CONTENTS MAY BE DISSEMINATED OUTSIDE THE AGENCY TO WHICH LOANED.


31 DISTRIBUTION: ORIGINAL GHQ
1ST COPY DISTRICT
2ND COPY OFFICER


DNR 20-083-FMP
(1-84)









FfF Date _____ Time______
_______ DUSGS Quad._____
On Photo #
Appendix 2: Sample Field Data Form Derelct Vessel FMP #
Photo Roll # Slide #_________
Field Observer
1. Description Of Vessel:
Vessel Name
Registry #

Length (actual) (approx)
Width (actual) (approx)

Hull Material: fiberglass; wood; unknown; other
Motor: No Yes

2. Condition and Location of Vessel:

Vessel Condition:
Stored; Wrecked; Junked; Abandoned; Dismantled:
Comments:

Photo-Inspection Designation: Field Inspection Designation:

1. sunken fully submerged 1.
2. sunken partially submerged 2.
3. damaged but floating 3.
4. damaged aground 4.
5. unknown/other 5.

Location: Private; Public; Protected Zone; Other
Specify

Accessible By Land; Water; Other

Water Depth feet
Tide

3. Vessel's Effect on Environment / Navigation

1. Obstructs or threatens to obstruct navigation? N Y
2. Contributes to air pollution? N Y
3. Contributes to water pollution? N Y
Fuel; Flotsam; Waste; Other
4. Constitutes a danger or potential danger to public safety?

5. Constitutes a potential danger to the environment? N 7'
6. Scenic Impairment? N Y

4. Additional Comments:










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
875 566049.8 2816706 Arsenicker Keys X
876 566916.9 2816392 Arsenicker Keys X
877 566880.3 2816296 Arsenicker Keys X
878 566896.8 2816366 Arsenicker Keys X
879 566177.8 2816165 Arsenicker Keys X
880 566220.9 2816167 Arsenicker Keys X
881 566215.2 2816167 Arsenicker Keys X
882 566273.8 2816168 Arsenicker Keys X
883 566316.9 2816172 Arsenicker Keys X
884 566277.6 2816065 Arsenicker Keys X
885 566271.8 2816126 Arsenicker Keys X
886 566232.4 2816050 Arsenicker Keys X
887 566229.6 2816062 Arsenicker Keys X
888 566226.7 2816128 Arsenicker Keys X
889 566216.1 2816071 Arsenicker Keys X
890 566189.3 2816060 Arsenicker Keys X
891 566189.3 2816113 Arsenicker Keys X
892 566274.7 2816104 Arsenicker Keys X
893 566230.6 2816054 Arsenicker Keys X
894 566227.7 2816085 Arsenicker Keys X
895 566227.7 2816081 Arsenicker Keys X
896 566226.7 2816108 Arsenicker Keys X
897 566192.2 2816067 Arsenicker Keys X
898 566174.9 2816119 Arsenicker Keys X
899 566268.9 2816138 Arsenicker Keys X
900 566189.3 2816107 Arsenicker Keys X
901 566175.9 2816111 Arsenicker Keys X
902 566161.5 2816086 Arsenicker Keys X
903 566220.0 2816136 Arsenicker Keys X
907 574421.6 2801683 Card Sound X
908 574406.1 2801048 Card Sound X
909 574320.1 2801058 Card Sound X
910 574288.8 2801336 Card Sound X
911 574320.1 2801375 Card Sound X
912 572961.1 2800531 Card Sound X
913 573203.3 2800720 Card Sound X
914 573336.0 2801077 Card Sound X
915 573015.8 2800253 Card Sound X
916 571836.5 2800263 Card Sound X
917 571828.8 2800214 Card Sound X
918 572109.9 2800928 Card Sound X
919 573211.1 2800760 Card Sound X
920 573304.8 2801067 Card Sound X
921 573297.0 2801048 Card Sound X
922 573414.1 2801127 Card Sound X
923 572492.5 2800045 Card Sound X
924 572102.0 2801127 Card Sound X
925 571297.7 2799737 Card Sound X
926 571836.5 2800243 Card Sound X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
927 571735.0 2800233 Card Sound X
928 573172.1 2800710 Card Sound X
929 570989.8 2799600 Card Sound X
930 572493.0 2799540 Card Sound X
931 572426.8 2799540 Card Sound X I
932 572459.9 2799540 Card Sound X
933 570696.8 2799017 Card Sound X
934 571958.8 2799125 Card Sound X
872 577343.1 2808795 Elliott Key X
873 581019.3 2815829 Elliott Key X
124 584072.3 2838785 Key Biscayne X
125 583793.8 2839989 Key Biscayne X
126 584055.3 2839972 Key Biscayne X
127 584038.3 2839989 Key Biscayne X
128 584007.7 2839855 Key Biscayne X
129 584058.6 2839812 Key Biscayne X
130 583833.1 2840585 Key Biscayne X
131 583476.8 2840779 Key Biscayne X
132 583905.1 2840580 Key Biscayne X
133 583893.1 2840733 Key Biscayne X
134 583765.0 2840860 Key Biscayne X
135 583821.1 2840865 Key Biscayne X
136 583708.9 2840789 Key Biscayne X
137 583608.9 2840753 Key Biscayne X
138 583532.9 2840764 Key Biscayne X
139 583676.9 2840768 Key Biscayne X
140 583924.4 2843806 Key Biscayne X
141 584574.8 2844962 Key Biscayne X
142 584318.6 2845345 Key Biscayne X
143 584603.7 2845288 Key Biscayne X
144 584640.9 2845335 Key Biscayne X
145 584698.7 2845377 Key Biscayne X
146 584393.0 2845109 Key Biscayne X
147 584298.0 2845156 Key Biscayne X
148 584298.0 2845167 Key Biscayne X
149 584298.0 2845288 Key Biscayne X
150 584673.9 2845340 Key Biscayne X
151 584632.6 2845466 Key Biscayne X
152 584620.3 2845277 Key Biscayne X
153 584074.0 2846058 Key Biscayne X
154 584001.4 2846864 Key Biscayne X
155 583309.9 2847174 Key Biscayne X
156 583349.4 2847107 Key Biscayne X
160 582719.3 2847807 Key Biscayne X
161 582602.6 2847771 Key Biscayne X
162 582667.1 2847725 Key Biscayne X
163 582719.3 2847817 Key Biscayne X
164 582709.3 2847829 Key Biscayne X
165 582783.8 2847632 Key Biscayne X









Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
166 582787.1 2847638 Key Biscayne X
167 582490.3 2847687 Key Biscayne X
168 581311.3 2847592 Key Biscayne X
169 580459.4 2847569 Key Biscayne X
170 580749.3 2847566 Key Biscayne X
171 581086.9 2847556 Key Biscayne X
172 580052.9 2847880 Key Biscayne X
173 580065.9 2847869 Key Biscayne X
174 580022.0 2847855 Key Biscayne X
175 580049.6 2847865 Key Biscayne X
176 579367.8 2847548 Key Biscayne X
177 579438.6 2847581 Key Biscayne X
178 579522.6 2847652 Key Biscayne X
179 579779.3 2847792 Key Biscayne X
180 579056.0 2847217 Key Biscayne X
181 579139.2 2847220 Key Biscayne X
182 579300.8 2847462 Key Biscayne X
183 579092.8 2847001 Key Biscayne X
184 578079.9 2846849 Key Biscayne X
185 578138.0 2846861 Key Biscayne X
186 578129.1 2846811 Key Biscayne X
187 578349.3 2846847 Key Biscayne X
188 578484.6 2846844 Key Biscayne X
189 578173.4 2846730 Key Biscayne X
190 577936.9 2846749 Key Biscayne X
191 578097.6 2846586 Key Biscayne X
192 578140.6 2846636 Key Biscayne X
193 578196.2 2846739 Key Biscayne X
194 578393.6 2846850 Key Biscayne X
195 578465.6 2846850 Key Biscayne X
196 578451.7 2846849 Key Biscayne X
197 578211.8 2846420 Key Biscayne X
198 578217.4 2846450 Key Biscayne X
199 578220.2 2846466 Key Biscayne X
200 578334.4 2846580 Key Biscayne X
201 577929.8 2846472 Key Biscayne X
202 577790.4 2846417 Key Biscayne X
203 577660.8 2846377 Key Biscayne X
204 577730.4 2846374 Key Biscayne X
205 577541.1 2846343 Key Biscayne X
206 577536.7 2846351 Key Biscayne X
207 577536.7 2846366 Key Biscayne X
208 577392.8 2846215 Key Biscayne X
209 577265.3 2846244 Key Biscayne X
210 577311.3 2846232 Key Biscayne X
211 577411.3 2846005 Key Biscayne X
212 577492.5 2845886 Key Biscayne X
213 577411.3 2845967 Key Biscayne X
214 577264.6 2846094 Key Biscayne X









Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged i
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
215 577197.5 2846050 Key Biscayne X
216 577069.6 2846040 Key Biscayne X
217 577064.9 2845935 Key Biscayne X
218 577055.5 2845943 Key Biscayne X
219 577064.9 2845925 Key Biscayne X
220 577033.6 2845975 Key Biscayne X
221 577043.0 2845965 Key Biscayne X
222 577024.3 2845973 Key Biscayne X
223 577030.5 2845967 Key Biscayne X
224 576933.8 2846003 Key Biscayne X
225 576982.2 2845953 Key Biscayne X
226 577024.3 2845911 Key Biscayne X
227 577038.3 2845884 Key Biscayne X
228 577022.8 2845894 Key Biscayne X
229 576975.9 2845945 Key Biscayne X
230 576929.1 2846001 Key Biscayne X
231 576921.3 2845997 Key Biscayne X X
232 576930.7 2845989 Key Biscayne X
233 576996.2 2845939 Key Biscayne X
234 577004.0 2845917 Key Biscayne X
235 576888.5 2845949 Key Biscayne X
236 576891.6 2845981 Key Biscayne X
237 576901.0 2845993 Key Biscayne X
238 576955.6 2845971 Key Biscayne X
239 576999.3 2845921 Key Biscayne X
240 577008.7 2845913 Key Biscayne X
241 576926.0 2845782 Key Biscayne X
242 576947.9 2845798 Key Biscayne X
243 576916.6 2845794 Key Biscayne X
244 576936.9 2845802 Key Biscayne X
245 577007.1 2845907 Key Biscayne X
246 577207.9 2846295 Key Biscayne X
247 576852.9 2845791 Key Biscayne X
248 576866.9 2845782 Key Biscayne X
249 576859.9 2845791 Key Biscayne X
250 576891.6 2845777 Key Biscayne X
251 577037.9 2845311 Key Biscayne X
252 577027.0 2845323 Key Biscayne X
253 577021.6 2845334 Key Biscayne X
254 576919.7 2845450 Key Biscayne X
255 576921.5 2845471 Key Biscayne X
256 576968.8 2845591 Key Biscayne X
257 577007.0 2845552 Key Biscayne X
258 577028.8 2845535 Key Biscayne X
259 577019.7 2845566 Key Biscayne X
260 576841.4 2845445 Key Biscayne X
261 576854.3 2845431 Key Biscayne X
262 576890.6 2845392 Key Biscayne X
263 576928.8 2845341 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
264 576936.1 2845323 Key Biscayne X
265 576968.8 2845279 Key Biscayne X
266 576912.4 2845318 Key Biscayne X
267 576903.3 2845272 Key Biscayne X
268 576717.8 2845397 Key Biscayne X
269 576801.5 2845311 Key Biscayne X
270 576852.4 2845235 Key Biscayne X
271 576816.1 2845216 Key Biscayne X
272 576763.3 2845318 Key Biscayne X
273 576725.1 2845351 Key Biscayne X
274 576712.3 2845371 Key Biscayne X
275 576750.5 2845228 Key Biscayne X
276 576668.7 2845316 Key Biscayne X
277 576694.2 2845279 Key Biscayne X
278 576746.9 2845195 Key Biscayne X
279 576916.5 2845565 Key Biscayne X
280 576966.9 2845520 Key Biscayne X
281 576985.3 2845487 Key Biscayne X
282 576968.4 2845396 Key Biscayne X
283 576983.8 2845409 Key Biscayne X
284 576983.8 2845372 Key Biscayne X
285 577015.9 2845341 Key Biscayne X
286 577025.1 2845365 Key Biscayne X
287 576833.9 2845435 Key Biscayne X
288 576838.4 2845427 Key Biscayne X
289 576858.3 2845407 Key Biscayne X
290 576881.3 2845382 Key Biscayne X
291 576887.4 2845374 Key Biscayne X
292 576945.5 2845316 Key Biscayne X
293 576983.8 2845269 Key Biscayne X
294 576965.4 2845273 Key Biscayne X
295 576957.8 2845300 Key Biscayne X
296 576965.4 2845291 Key Biscayne X
297 576942.5 2845293 Key Biscayne X
298 576795.6 2845491 Key Biscayne X
299 576754.3 2845440 Key Biscayne X
300 576752.8 2845427 Key Biscayne X
301 576769.6 2845413 Key Biscayne X
302 576777.3 2845382 Key Biscayne X
303 576810.9 2845372 Key Biscayne X
304 576829.3 2845357 Key Biscayne X
305 576846.1 2845339 Key Biscayne X
306 576858.3 2845324 Key Biscayne X
308 576833.9 2845326 Key Biscayne X
309 576893.6 2845275 Key Biscayne X
310 576905.8 2845261 Key Biscayne X
311 576921.1 2845273 Key Biscayne X
312 576910.4 2845281 Key Biscayne X
315 576872.1 2845314 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating. Aground Undetermined
316 576890.4 2845297 Key Biscayne X
317 576878.3 2845289 Key Biscayne X
318 576872.1 2845293 Key Biscayne X
319 576719.1 2845435 Key Biscayne X
320 576745.1 2845359 Key Biscayne X
321 576757.4 2845341 Key Biscayne X
322 576734.4 2845343 Key Biscayne X
323 576838.4 2845269 Key Biscayne X
324 576827.8 2845277 Key Biscayne X
325 576815.5 2845263 Key Biscayne X
326 576800.3 2845275 Key Biscayne X
327 576795.6 2845285 Key Biscayne X
328 576813.9 2845294 Key Biscayne X
329 576654.9 2845374 Key Biscayne X
330 576657.9 2845333 Key Biscayne X
331 576679.4 2845308 Key Biscayne X
332 576703.8 2845271 Key Biscayne X
333 576711.4 2845263 Key Biscayne X
334 576729.9 2845273 Key Biscayne X
335 576763.5 2845205 Key Biscayne X
336 576737.5 2845217 Key Biscayne X
337 576723.8 2845244 Key Biscayne X
338 576743.6 2845203 Key Biscayne X
339 576517.2 2845472 Key Biscayne X
340 576982.3 2845520 Key Biscayne X
341 576979.2 2845510 Key Biscayne X
342 576979.2 2845378 Key Biscayne X
343 576976.2 2845386 Key Biscayne X
344 576989.9 2845396 Key Biscayne X
345 576996.1 2845386 Key Biscayne X
346 577018.9 2845370 Key Biscayne X
347 576996.1 2845359 Key Biscayne X
348 576847.6 2845438 Key Biscayne X
349 576869.0 2845413 Key Biscayne X
350 576896.6 2845384 Key Biscayne X
351 576902.7 2845378 Key Biscayne X
352 576953.2 2845310 Key Biscayne X
353 576959.3 2845310 Key Biscayne X
354 576974.6 2845285 Key Biscayne X
355 576985.3 2845256 Key Biscayne X
356 576974.6 2845263 Key Biscayne X
357 576968.4 2845256 Key Biscayne X
358 576960.9 2845279 Key Biscayne X
359 576948.6 2845297 Key Biscayne X
360 576933.3 2845302 Key Biscayne X
361 576927.2 2845308 Key Biscayne X
362 576922.6 2845314 Key Biscayne X
363 576901.2 2845324 Key Biscayne X
364 576896.6 2845330 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
365 576893.6 2845361 Key Biscayne X
366 576872.1 2845394 Key Biscayne X
367 576748.2 2845419 Key Biscayne X
368 576728.3 2845384 Key Biscayne X
369 576806.4 2845314 Key Biscayne X
370 576795.6 2845293 Key Biscayne X
371 576787.9 2845294 Key Biscayne X
372 576809.4 2845294 Key Biscayne X
373 576815.5 2845302 Key Biscayne X
374 576821.6 2845289 Key Biscayne X
375 576673.3 2845310 Key Biscayne X
376 576737.5 2845234 Key Biscayne X
377 576743.6 2845197 Key Biscayne X
378 576478.9 2845464 Key Biscayne X
379 576488.1 2845464 Key Biscayne X
380 576546.3 2845452 Key Biscayne X
381 576549.3 2845448 Key Biscayne X
382 576553.9 2845442 Key Biscayne X
383 576560.0 2845436 Key Biscayne X
384 576563.1 2845433 Key Biscayne X
385 576547.8 2845438 Key Biscayne X
386 576552.4 2845431 Key Biscayne X
387 576977.7 2845602 Key Biscayne X
388 576973.1 2845514 Key Biscayne X
389 576937.9 2845448 Key Biscayne X
390 577003.7 2845366 Key Biscayne X
391 576852.3 2845411 Key Biscayne X
392 576881.3 2845404 Key Biscayne X
393 576907.3 2845332 Key Biscayne X
394 576940.9 2845302 Key Biscayne X
395 576749.8 2845483 Key Biscayne X
396 576847.6 2845326 Key Biscayne X
397 576893.6 2845287 Key Biscayne X
398 576578.4 2845440 Key Biscayne X
399 576677.8 2845316 Key Biscayne X
400 576762.0 2845221 Key Biscayne X
401 576766.6 2845213 Key Biscayne X
402 577040.4 2845551 Key Biscayne X
403 576852.3 2845310 Key Biscayne X
404 576340.9 2845358 Key Biscayne X
405 576488.9 2845505 Key Biscayne X
406 576449.3 2845498 Key Biscayne X
407 576342.4 2845429 Key Biscayne X
408 576307.3 2845423 Key Biscayne X
409 576444.9 2845509 Key Biscayne X
410 576481.5 2845526 Key Biscayne X
411 576433.2 2845507 Key Biscayne X
412 576411.3 2845501 Key Biscayne X
413 576875.8 2845546 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partiallyl Floating! Aground Undetermined


414 577086.3
415 577117.4
416 577125.3
417 577082.4
418 577140.8
419 577117.4
420 577105.8
421 577094.1
422 577098.0
423 577098.0
424 577129.1
425 576847.0
426 576889.1
427 576939.4
428 576424.8
429 576960.4
430 576918.4
431 576414.3
432 576424.8
433 577013.0
434 576338.7
435 576321.9
436 576345.0
437 576391.2
438 576353.4
439 576414.3
440 576473.1
441 576510.9
442 576725.2
443 576811.3
444 576447.9
445 576117.9
446 576089.4
447 576030.6
448 576025.8
449 576011.6
450 576017.9
451 576008.4
452 576017.9
453 575917.8
454 575889.3
455 576127.5
456 576097.3
457 576021.1
458 576111.6
459 576041.8
460 575757.9
461 575591.6
462 575666.4


2845536
2845516
2845437
2845516
2845427
2845407
2845432
2845452
2845471
2845486
2845466
2845182
2845198
2845230
2845137
2845225
2845134
2845043
2844953
2845124
2845083
2845105
2845102
2844931
2844905
2844899
2845145
2845164
2845110
2845027
2845129
2845194
2845225
2845103
2845113
2845049
2845037
2845071
2844964
2844851
2844881
2845275
2845115
2845097
2845105
2845057
2844696
2844537
2844452


Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
464 575764.2 2844555 Key Biscayne X
465 575631.1 2844508 Key Biscayne X
466 575516.6 2844389 Key Biscayne X
467 575708.1 2844529 Key Biscayne X
468 575772.5 2844402 Key Biscayne X
469 575793.4 2844381 Key Biscayne X
470 575531.2 2844384 Key Biscayne X
472 575624.9 2844331 Key Biscayne X
473 575572.8 2844357 Key Biscayne X
474 575568.6 2844347 Key Biscayne X
475 575562.4 2844354 Key Biscayne X
486 575629.3 2843049 Key Biscayne X
487 575618.4 2843125 Key Biscayne X
491 575506.6 2843070 Key Biscayne X
492 577487.6 2845438 Key Biscayne X
493 577205.8 2845373 Key Biscayne X
494 577231.4 2845326 Key Biscayne X
495 577227.8 2845363 Key Biscayne X
496 577253.3 2845322 Key Biscayne X
497 577246.1 2845396 Key Biscayne X
498 577366.8 2845298 Key Biscayne X
499 577462.0 2845122 Key Biscayne X
500 577542.5 2845122 Key Biscayne X
501 577586.4 2844982 Key Biscayne X
502 577681.6 2844870 Key Biscayne X
503 576605.6 2845019 Key Biscayne X
504 576784.9 2844940 Key Biscayne X
505 576784.9 2844870 Key Biscayne X
506 576839.8 2844959 Key Biscayne X
507 576880.1 2844922 Key Biscayne X
508 576927.7 2844889 Key Biscayne X
509 576934.9 2844870 Key Biscayne X
510 576836.2 2844880 Key Biscayne X
511 576960.6 2845080 Key Biscayne X
512 576986.2 2845103 Key Biscayne X
513 577044.8 2845136 Key Biscayne X
514 577044.8 2845168 Key Biscayne X
515 577103.3 2845187 Key Biscayne X
516 577008.1 2845042 Key Biscayne X
517 577044.8 2845042 Key Biscayne X
518 577055.7 2845080 Key Biscayne X
519 577106.9 2845154 Key Biscayne X
520 577117.9 2845126 Key Biscayne X
521 577110.7 2845098 Key Biscayne X
522 577121.6 2845075 Key Biscayne X
523 577180.2 2845047 Key Biscayne X
524 577205.8 2845108 Key Biscayne X
525 577191.1 2845159 Key Biscayne X
526 577235.1 2845112 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad i Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
527 577366.8 2845052 Key Biscayne X
528 577026.4 2844931 Key Biscayne X
529 577132.6 2844945 Key Biscayne X
530 577128.9 2844898 Key Biscayne X
531 577158.2 2844898 Key Biscayne X
532 577319.3 2844898 Key Biscayne X
533 577326.6 2844968 Key Biscayne X
534 577392.4 2844884 Key Biscayne X
535 577385.2 2844866 Key Biscayne X
536 576814.2 2845145 Key Biscayne X
537 576590.9 2845284 Key Biscayne X
538 576609.2 2845261 Key Biscayne X
539 576572.6 2845280 Key Biscayne X
540 577088.7 2845052 Key Biscayne X
541 577081.3 2845122 Key Biscayne X
542 577030.1 2845080 Key Biscayne X
543 577059.4 2845187 Key Biscayne X
544 577088.7 2845210 Key Biscayne X
545 577070.4 2845164 Key Biscayne X
546 576971.6 2845010 Key Biscayne X
547 576982.6 2845131 Key Biscayne X I
548 577213.1 2845382 Key Biscayne X
549 577315.6 2845359 Key Biscayne X
550 577224.1 2845415 Key Biscayne X
551 577348.6 2845387 Key Biscayne X
552 577399.8 2845233 Key Biscayne X
553 577359.6 2845177 Key Biscayne X
554 577308.3 2845173 Key Biscayne X
555 577074.1 2845010 Key Biscayne X
556 577187.5 2845001 Key Biscayne X
557 577191.1 2845015 Key Biscayne X
558 577392.4 2845070 Key Biscayne X
559 577377.8 2844959 Key Biscayne X
560 576623.9 2845196 Key Biscayne X
562 582902.3 2841527 Key Biscayne X
563 582902.3 2841521 Key Biscayne X
564 582851.1 2841527 Key Biscayne X
565 582744.3 2841126 Key Biscayne X
566 583287.8 2842384 Key Biscayne X
567 583296.6 2842406 Key Biscayne X
568 583287.8 2842406 Key Biscayne X
569 583281.2 2842403 Key Biscayne X
570 583276.8 2842409 Key Biscayne X
571 583239.5 2842406 Key Biscayne X
572 583250.5 2842428 Key Biscayne X
573 583329.5 2842451 Key Biscayne X
574 583340.5 2842470 Key Biscayne X
575 583329.5 2842476 Key Biscayne X
576 583309.8 2842490 Key Biscayne X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


boat id
577
578
579
580
581
582
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
26
27
28
29
30a
30b
30c
30d
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43


UTM Coordinates
X Y
583287.8 2842503
583283.4 2842509
583259.3 2842442
575989.9 2843240
576318.6 2842359
575949.4 2841113
583444.9 2859123
582140.6 2857397
582140.6 2857382
582154.3 2857391
582152.4 2857399
582158.1 2857367
582142.6 2857365
582110.1 2857403
582104.4 2857392
582213.3 2857661
582201.9 2857650
587642.4 2858658
587872.8 2857758
587798.4 2857056
587840.9 2857333
587927.4 2856957
587757.3 2855994
587873.3 2856102
587142.5 2855835
587743.9 2855906
587861.9 2855826
587825.0 2855521
587676.3 2854687
587608.7 2854466
586412.0 2850056
586325.1 2850222
586298.9 2850271
583132.9 2858921
583132.9 2858921
586298.9 2850271
582912.1 2858978
582818.5 2859168
582138.1 2858763
581932.7 2858804
581941.6 2858809
581955.9 2858815
582082.8 2858799
581859.4 2858759
581696.8 2858713
581798.7 2858720
582772.5 2858515
582256.8 2858659
582282.0 2858635


Submerged
Comoletelv Partialiv


Floatingl Aaround Undetermined


USGS Quad
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Key Biscayne
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami


1 I










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially| Floating! Aground Undetermined


582759.8
582157.3
581964.3
581624.6
581505.1
581513.4
581536.0
581658.4
581644.1
581647.0
581719.9
581711.4
581760.0
581580.8
581576.3
581749.0
580125.9
580093.1
579954.8
579849.3
579730.5
579537.3
579545.1
579048.8
578898.8
578706.9
578387.0
577485.9
577474.2
577782.3
577356.6
577394.2
577039.1
576965.1
576938.3
576959.8
575742.1
576106.8
581660.7
585160.5
581373.7
581378.6
581373.7
581354.3
580888.8
580286.9
580358.1
580533.8
580267.9


2858543
2856953
2855921
2855154
2854006
2853980
2853998
2852371
2852528
2852471
2852430
2852573
2852471
2851311
2851210
2851030
2850569
2850625
2850894
2850868
2851037
2851160


Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami


2851160 Miami
2851518 Miami


2851540
2851601
2851784
2852009
2852156
2852099
2851872
2852153
2852440
2852457
2852382
2852419
2853009
2852828
2852652
2848785
2849657
2849707
2849608
2849589
2848631
2848214
2848292
2848389


Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami


X


2848216 I Miami


I










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


S UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat idY X Y USGS Quad Completel Partially Floating Aground Undetermined


96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
157
158
159
813
814
815
816
817
818
819
820
821
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831


580381.8
580470.4
580604.9
580475.2
580549.6
580568.5
580467.3
580560.6
580565.3
580554.3
580601.8
580593.8
582954.3
582908.6
582638.5
582895.7
583133.3
583025.9
582335.8
583012.8
583035.6
583006.3
582937.9
582950.9
582762.2
582690.6
582563.6
583036.5
583007.4
582832.6
567001.4
567012.1
567021.0
567074.5
567083.4
567090.6
567097.7
567220.8
567236.9
567238.6
567308.2
567286.8
567286.8
567304.6
567374.2
567354.6
567359.9
567352.8
567418.8


2848304
2848306
2848415
2848316
2848379
2848365
2848320
2848387
2848383
2848393
2848403
2848407
2852633
2852629
2852616
2852393
2852625
2851540
2851925
2851503
2851557
2851569
2851826
2851797
2852157
2852633
2852616
2848201
2848127
2848049
2824400
2824398
2824389
2824398
2824405
2824396
2824403
2824521
2824523
2824596
2824514
2824596
2824625
2824568
2824541
2824593
2824600
2824605
2824528


Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine
Perrine










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


b


oat id
832
833
834
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
855
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
863
864
865
866
867
868
869
870
806
807
808
809
810
811
463
471
476
477


UTM Coordinates Submerged
X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating! Aground Undetermined
567417.0 2824543 Perrine X
567413.5 2824593 Perrine X
567411.7 2824586 Perrine X
567417.0 2824580 Perrine X
567417.0 2824623 Perrine X
567413.5 2824648 Perrine X
566910.4 2824478 Perrine X
566940.7 2824471 Perrine X
567574.0 2824453 Perrine X
567297.6 2824534 Perrine X
567297.6 2824589 Perrine X
567297.6 2824616 Perrine X
567376.1 2824525 Perrine X
567374.2 2824618 Perrine X
567433.1 2824543 Perrine X
567433.1 2824530 Perrine X
567422.4 2824571 Perrine X
567424.1 2824555 Perrine X
567422.4 2824589 Perrine X
567420.6 2824618 Perrine X
567425.9 2824612 Perrine X
567424.1 2824609 Perrine X
567422.4 2824600 Perrine X
567429.6 2824596 Perrine X
567424.1 2824593 Perrine X
567415.3 2824641 Perrine X
567422.4 2824648 Perrine X
567220.8 2824502 Perrine X
567236.9 2824505 Perrine X
567302.8 2824607 Perrine X
567290.4 2824650 Perrine X
567381.4 2824534 Perrine X
567377.8 2824514 Perrine X
567376.1 2824591 Perrine X
567376.1 2824568 Perrine X
567358.2 2824627 Perrine X
567420.6 2824680 Perrine X
567449.1 2824725 Perrine X
567558.3 2824484 Perrine X
584173.6 2830356 Soldier Key X
584155.1 2830346 Soldier Key X
582937.3 2823311 Soldier Key X
582820.5 2823076 Soldier Key X
582348.3 2820735 Soldier Key X
582242.1 2820846 Soldier Key X
575456.3 2844405 South Miami X
575344.0 2844193 South Miami X
575354.8 2844081 South Miami X
575237.3 2843753 South Miami X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


boat id


Submerged
j Completel, Partially Floating Aground Undetermined


UTM C
X


478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
488
489
490
583
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621


575416.1
575224.4
575308.8
575319.0
575296.0
575232.1
575216.8
575278.1
575479.4
575364.9
575473.9
575201.3
575214.1
575134.5
574230.2
574808.2
575142.9
575073.2
575073.2
574964.7
574690.9
574634.1
574597.9
574605.7
574644.4
574672.8
574417.2
574920.8
574605.3
574352.8
574568.6
574196.8
574541.1
573985.5
575172.7
574723.7
573825.7
573847.4
573811.3
575031.4
574035.7
573782.2
575220.9
574855.7
574821.5
574797.6
574732.8
574207.1
574439.2


oordinates
Y USGS Qua
2843779 South Miami
2844100 South Miami
2843857 South Miami
2843918 South Miami
2843756 South Miami
2843756 South Miami
2843753 South Miami
2843769 South Miami
2843025 South Miami
2842917 South Miami
2843090 South Miami
2843060 South Miami
2843096 South Miami
2843066 South Miami
2843118 South Miami
2842749 South Miami
2842813 South Miami
2842962 South Miami
2842938 South Miami
2842860 South Miami
2843070 South Miami
2842801 South Miami
2843067 South Miami
2843067 South Miami
2842801 South Miami
2843067 South Miami
2842998 South Miami
2842882 South Miami
2842238 South Miami
2842320 South Miami
2842396 South Miami
2842256 South Miami
2842268 South Miami
2841835 South Miami
2841465 South Miami
2841755 South Miami
2841695 South Miami
2841714 South Miami
2841603 South Miami
2841428 South Miami
2841410 South Miami
2841677 South Miami
2841340 South Miami
2841370 South Miami
2841422 South Miami
2841427 South Miami
2841427 South Miami
2841236 South Miami
2840997 South Miami









Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged F
boat id X Y USGS Quad !Completely; Partiallyl Floating Aground Undetermined


622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
647
648
649
650
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658!
659'
660
661!
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670


573715.5
573517.5
573520.9
573520.9
575190.2
574691.8
574172.9
574370.9
573537.9
573766.7
573749.7
574180.9
574166.1
574158.8
573813.5
573875.2
574422.6
574388.1
574343.7
573973.8
573949.1
573959.1
573944.2
573902.3
574040.4
574030.6
574033.0
573362.3
573391.8
574309.2
574057.6
574074.9
574097.1
574119.3
574092.2
574084.8
574065.1
574018.2
574037.9
574025.6
574074.9
574288.6
573972.1
573917.1
573752.1
573669.5
572894.6
572810.0
573470.5


2840915 South Miami
2840958 South Miami
2840893 South Miami
2840875 South Miami
2841392 South Miami
2841105 South Miami
2841010 South Miami
2841036 South Miami
2840828 South Miami
2840862 South Miami
2840884 South Miami
2840542 South Miami
2840551 South Miami
2840548 South Miami
2840539 South Miami
2840542 South Miami
2840253 South Miami
2840310 South Miami
2840335 South Miami
2840244 South Miami
2840272 South Miami
2840291 South Miami
2840259 South Miami
2840294 South Miami
2840363 South Miami
2840313 South Miami
2840303 South Miami
2840535 South Miami
2840661 South Miami
2840043 South Miami
2840272 South Miami
2840325 South Miami
2840281 South Miami
2840291 South Miami
2840294 South Miami
2840306 South Miami
2840291 South Miami
2840272 South Miami
2840247 South Miami
2840262 South Miami
2840275 South Miami
2839467 South Miami
2839012 South Miami
2838837 South Miami
2838697 South Miami
2838557 South Miami
2839306 South Miami
2838316 South Miami
2837827 South Miami










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
671 573435.8 2837636 South Miami X
672 573470.5 2837915 South Miami X
673 572403.2 2837546 South Miami X
674 572424.8 2837091 South Miami X
675 572400.8 2837338 South Miami X
676 572321.6 2837320 South Miami X
677 572271.2 2837335 South Miami X
678 572364.8 2837161 South Miami X
679 572307.1 2837122 South Miami X
680 572540.1 2837021 South Miami X
681 572609.8 2837152 South Miami X
682 572662.6 2837109 South Miami X
683 572415.2 2837238 South Miami X
684 572314.4 2837259 South Miami X
685 572432.1 2837372 South Miami X
686 572347.9 2837271 South Miami X
687 572626.6 2837143 South Miami X
688 572604.9 2836835 South Miami X
689 573597.8 2837214 South Miami X
690 573406.5 2837227 South Miami X
691 573382.9 2837278 South Miami X
692 573285.6 2837111 South Miami X
693 572787.9 2837039 South Miami X
694 572829.4 2836888 South Miami X
695 572829.4 2836915 South Miami X
696 572865.3 2837046 South Miami X
697 572859.6 2837039 South Miami X
698 572931.3 2836982 South Miami X
699 572931.3 2836967 South Miami X
700 572982.2 2836967 South Miami X
701 572867.2 2837118 South Miami X
702 573027.5 2836962 South Miami X
703 573042.6 2836799 South Miami X
704 573163.3 2837171 South Miami X
705 573197.2 2837166 South Miami X
706 573212.3 2837111 South Miami X
707 573138.7 2836728 South Miami X
708 573138.7 2837171 South Miami X
709 573285.8 2837157 South Miami X
710 573214.1 2836819 South Miami X
711 573072.7 2836869 South Miami X
712 572863.4 2836821 South Miami X
713 572921.8 2836814 South Miami X
714 572938.9 2836802 South Miami X
715 572967.1 2836948 South Miami X
716 572737.0 2837118 South Miami X
717 573131.2 2837109 South Miami X
718 573225.4 2837123 South Miami X
719 573249.9 2837174 South Miami X









Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partiallyi Floating! Aground Undetermined
720 574109.3 2840302 South Miami X
721 574102.0 2840307 South Miami X
722 574084.3 2840322 South Miami X
723 574057.7 2840223 South Miami X
724 574044.5 2840243 South Miami X
725 574239.2 2840326 South Miami X
726 574190.4 2840281 South Miami X
727 574203.8 2840272 South Miami X
728 574219.9 2840290 South Miami X
729 574255.4 2840255 South Miami X
730 574261.3 2840260 South Miami X
731 574354.1 2840238 South Miami X
732 574317.3 2840187 South Miami X
733 574376.3 2840185 South Miami X
734 574355.6 2840165 South Miami X
735 574326.1 2840146 South Miami X
736 574379.3 2840150 South Miami X
737 574357.1 2840125 South Miami X
738 574382.2 2840133 South Miami X
739 574388.1 2840140 South Miami X
740 574395.4 2840148 South Miami X
741 574414.7 2840163 South Miami X
742 574405.8 2840174 South Miami X
743 574395.4 2840200 South Miami X
744 574394.0 2840217 South Miami X
745 574293.7 2840287 South Miami X
746 574261.3 2840326 South Miami X
747 574224.4 2840296 South Miami X
748 574079.9 2840266 South Miami X
749 574045.9 2840298 South Miami X
750 574015.0 2840275 South Miami X
751 574059.2 2840230 South Miami X
752 574234.7 2840318 South Miami X
753 574239.2 2840307 South Miami X
754 574246.5 2840315 South Miami X
755 574286.3 2840281 South Miami X
756 574259.8 2840256 South Miami X
757 574283.4 2840238 South Miami X
758 574367.4 2840240 South Miami X
759 574358.6 2840232 South Miami X
760 574349.8 2840234 South Miami X
761 574321.7 2840193 South Miami X
762 574314.4 2840197 South Miami X
763 574299.6 2840174 South Miami X
764 574307.0 2840200 South Miami X
765 574312.9 2840210 South Miami X
766 574401.3 2840221 South Miami X
767 574388.1 2840213 South Miami X
768 574380.8 2840208 South Miami X










Appendix 3: Location and Condition of Hurricane Damaged Vessels


UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
769 574343.9 2840174 South Miami X
770 574382.2 2840198 South Miami X
771 574391.1 2840206 South Miami X
772 574401.3 2840213 South Miami X
773 574413.2 2840182 South Miami X
774 574422.0 2840185 South Miami X
775 574128.5 2840197 South Miami X
776 574156.6 2840320 South Miami X
777 571371.4 2834719 South Miami X
778 571280.4 2834708 South Miami X
779 571215.4 2834713 South Miami X
780 571011.8 2834812 South Miami X
781 570730.3 2834752 South Miami X
782 570470.5 2834774 South Miami X
783 570492.1 2834763 South Miami X
784 570513.7 2834862 South Miami X
785 571055.1 2835154 South Miami X
786 571029.2 2835154 South Miami X
787 570929.5 2835225 South Miami X
788 570834.3 2835401 South Miami X
789 570803.9 2835401 South Miami X
790 570691.3 2835407 South Miami X
791 570717.3 2835363 South Miami X
792 570708.6 2835330 South Miami X
793 570695.6 2835324 South Miami X
794 570699.9 2835319 South Miami X
795 570682.6 2835269 South Miami X
796 571198.0 2834730 South Miami X
797 570544.0 2834840 South Miami X
798 570812.6 2835319 South Miami X
799 570725.9 2835253 South Miami X
800 570760.6 2835286 South Miami X
801 570855.9 2835275 South Miami X
802 570994.5 2834955 South Miami X
803 570738.9 2835220 South Miami X
804 571081.1 2835154 South Miami X










Appendix 4: Location and Condition of Derelict Vessels Existing Prior to Hurricane Andrew

UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
1 586339.4 2867505 North Miami X
2 586745.4 2863315 North Miami X
43 562228.3 2797205 Glades X
44 562444.6 2797080 Glades X
45 562640.9 2797006 Glades X
46 562739.4 2796856 Glades X
47 562877.1 2796705 Glades X
39 574629.0 2852913 Hialeah X
40 574828.6 2853789 Hialeah X
41 574257.2 2854297 Hialeah X
42 573975.9 2854550 Hialeah | X
26 577969.2 2842908 Key Biscayne X
27 575945.3 2844208 Key Biscayne X
28 576023.8 2844632 Key Biscayne X
29 576515.1 2844283 Key Biscayne X
30 576652.8 2844183 Key Biscayne X
31 576986.6 2844782 Key Biscayne X
32 576416.7 2844982 Key Biscayne X
33 576986.6 2845107 Key Biscayne X
34 577085.1 2845157 Key Biscayne X
35 577379.8 2845232 Key Biscayne X
36 577320.8 2845332 Key Biscayne X
37 577242.2 2845532 Key Biscayne X
38 583339.5 2847932 Key Biscayne X
4 581261.2 2859074 Miami X
5 583250.9 2858939 Miami X
7 583949.4 2859249 Miami X
8 583990.1 2859497 Miami X
9 585950.2 2859598 Miami X
10 583239.4 2851888 Miami X X
11 585619.3 2852087 Miami X
12 580078.4 2850658 Miami X
13 580044.4 2850696 Miami X
14 579950.7 2850810 Miami X
16 579465.3 2851281 Miami X
17 579069.4 2851492 Miami X
18 578728.8 2851654 Miami X
19 578380.8 2851740 Miami X
20 578292.1 2851767 Miami X
21 578262.5 2851778 Miami X
22 577508.6 2852132 Miami X
23 577050.3 2852300 Miami X
24 576816.4 2852437 Miami X
25 575587.6 2853002 Miami X
3 583500.9 28285301 Soldier Key X










Appendix 5: Location and Condition of Damaged Vessels Existing in January 1993

UTM Coordinates Submerged
boat id X Y USGS Quad Completely Partially Floating Aground Undetermined
105 563052.9 2797028 Card Sound X
106 562739.4 2796856 Glades X
107 562877.1 2796705 Glades X
108 562444.6 2797080 Glades X
100 583339.5 2847932 Key Biscayne X
101 582617.1 2847874 Key Biscayne X
102 583274.9 2847327 Key Biscayne X
103 583940.2 2839888 Key Biscayne X
104 583643.5 2840852 Key Biscayne X
121 575517.4 2843151 Key Biscayne X
124 577529.1 2845213 Key Biscayne X
125 576128.2 2845024 Key Biscayne X
126 576071.4 2844963 Key Biscayne X
127 577341.4 2845402 Key Biscayne X
128 577367.5 2845379 Key Biscayne X
129 577415.5 2845368 Key Biscayne X
1 577526.8 2852107 Miami X
2 577502.1 2852124 Miami X
3 577560.1 2852098 Miami X
4 576853.3 2852421 Miami X
5 579982.8 2850830 Miami X
6 580035.8 2850773 Miami X
7 579876.8 2850861 Miami X
8 579365.1 2851605 Miami X
9 582142.6 2857365 Miami X
10 585774.8 2851847 Miami X
11 587357.4 2856111 Miami X
12 587922.8 2856974 Miami X
13 587965.0 2857988 Miami X
14 583253.8 2858961 Miami X
15 584066.5 2859187 Miami X
16 583981.4 2859866 Miami X
17 583008.9 2851869 Miami X
18 578423.9 2851783 Miami X
69 578750.6 2851646 Miami X
77 577394.2 2852153 Miami X
80 576938.3 2852382 Miami X
122 587813.0 2856223 Miami X
123 578532.1 2851719 Miami X
109 573237.3 2837098 South Miami X
110 573346.3 2837179 South Miami X
111 573374.4 2837112 South Miami X
112 573033.3 2836951 South Miami X
113 572899.7 2837045 South Miami X
114 572963.1 2836928 South Miami X
115 573340.3 2840819 South Miami X
116 574256.0 2840579 South Miami X
117 574278.8 2840550 South Miami X
118 573892.7 2840540 South Miami X
119 573590.1 2840800 South Miami X
120 575331.9 2843196 South Miami X










Area Measurements for Potential Impact Locations


North Bay (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Barren 72.74 10.40 0.00 0.00 83.14
Mangrove 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Upland 19.31 0.10 0.00 0.00 19.41
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)
Total [ 92.05 I 10.50 0.00 0.00 102.55

Virginia Key (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 4.78 3.92 0.00 0.00 8.70
Barren 7.30 8.92 0.00 0.00 16.22
Mangrove 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Upland 2.74 1.83 0.00 0.00 4.57
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)
Total 14.82 14.67 0.00 0.00 29.49

Miami River (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Barren 9.87 15.16 0.00 0.00 25.03
Mangrove 0.00 0.00 1 0.00 0.00 0.00
Upland 0.07 0.06 0.00 0.00 0.13
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County) i
Total I 9.94 [ 15.22 0.00 0.00 25.16

Dinner Key (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 12.98 5.40 0.00 I 40.35 58.73
Barren 5.35 18.43 0.00 55.90 79.68
Mangrove 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Upland 0.67 0.26 0.00 6.30 7.23
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)
'Total 19.00 1 24.09 0.00 i 102.55 145.64

Key Biscayne (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 4.69 1.77 0.00 0.00 6.46
Barren 19.51 8.44 0.00 0.00 27.95
Mangrove 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Upland 3.69 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.69
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)
Total I 27.89 I 10.21 0.00 0.00 38.10


Appendix 6:










Coral Gables Waterway (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 12.79 0.00 0.00 0.00 12.79
Barren 18.86 0.00 0.00 9.39 28.25
Mangrove 3.95 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.95
Upland 8.14 0.00 0.00 0.10 8.24
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)
Total ICo ) 43.74 I 0. 0.00 9.49 I 53.23

KCoral Bay (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 0.28 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.28
Barren 1.17 7.52 0.00 0.00 8.69
Mangrove 2.22 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.22
Upland 1.13 0.34 0.00 0.00 1.47
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County) ____ _
[Total 4.80 7.86 0.00 0.00 2.66

Kinq's Bay (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Barren 3.29 3.24 0.00 0.00 6.53
Mangrove 0.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25
Upland 0.57 0.13 0.00 0.00 0.70
Undetermined 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
(Monroe County)____
Total 4.11 I 3.37 I 0.00 0.00 I 7.48

Ocean Reef (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Barren 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Mangrove 3.02 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.02
Upland 3.79 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.79
Undetermined 11.36 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.36
(Monroe County)
Total 18.17 0.00 I 0.00 0.00 I 18.17

Other (area in ha)
Habitat Low Medium High Very High Subtotal
Seagrasses 10.24 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.24
Barren 2.01 4.51 3.37 0.00 9.89
Mangrove 3.38 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.38
Upland 1.27 0.15 0.09 0.00 1.51
Undetermined 18.48 0.00 0.00 0.00 18.48
(Monroe County) _
Total 135.38 I 4.66 13.46 0.00 43.50














Appendix 7: Low, Medium, High, and Very High Potentially Impacted Habitats, by Location


Low Potentially Impacted Locations (area in ha)
(ranked in descending order by location impact area)


Seagrasses Barren Mangroves Upland Undetermined


Location


North Bay
Coral Gables Waterway
Other
Key Biscayne
Dinner Key
Ocean Reef
Virginia Key
Miami River
Coral Bay
Kina's Bay


0.00
12.79
10.24
4.69
12.98
0.00
4.78
0.00
0.28
0.00


72.74
18.86
2.01
19.51
5.35
0.00
7.30
9.87
1.17
3.29


0.00
3.95
3.38
0.00
0.00
3.02
0.00
0.00
2.22
0.25


19.31
8.14
1.27
3.69
0.67
3.79
2.74
0.07
1.13
0.57


0.00
0.00
18.48
0.00
0.00
11.36
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00


Subtotal

92.05
43.74
35.38
27.89
19.00
18.17
14.82
9.94
4.80
4.11


lTotal 1 45.76 140.10 I 12.82 41.38 29.84 296.90


Medium Potentially Impacted Locations (area in ha)
(ranked in descending order by location impact area)
Location Seagrasses Barren Mangroves Upland Undetermined Subtotal

Dinner Key 5.40 18.43 0.00 0.26 0.00 24.09
Miami River 0.00 15.16 0.00 0.06 0.00 15.22
Virginia Key 3.92 8.92 0.00 1.83 0.00 14.67
North Bay 0.00 10.40 0.00 0.10 0.00 10.50
Key Biscayne 1.77 8.44 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.21
Coral Bay 0.00 7.52 0.00 0.34 0.00 7.86
Other 0.00 4.51 0.00 0.15 0.00 4.66
King's Bay 0.00 3.24 0.00 0.13 0.00 3.37
Total 11.09 I 76.62 0.00 2.87 0.00 90.58



VeryHigh Potentially Impacted Locations (subtotal in ha)
Location Seagrasses Barren Mangroves Upland Undetermined Subtotal

Other | 0.00 3.37 0.00 0.09 0.00 3.46
Total 1 0.00 3.37 i 0.00 0.09 0.00 3.46



Very High Potentially Impacted Locations (area in ha)
(ranked in descending order by location impact area)
Location Seagrasses Barren Mangroves Upland Undetermined Subtotal

Dinner Key 40.35 55.90 0.00 6.30 0.00 102.55
Coral Gables Waterway 0.00 9.39 0.00 0.10 0.00 9.49
Total i 40.35 i 65.29 I 0.00 6.40 0.00 112.04












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