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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00120
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00120
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
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    Supplement: House of assembly debates for 3rd September, 1968
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Full Text












VOL. CIV.


ftffrial


PUBLISHED BY


(arette


AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, ioTH JULY 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices


Acting Appointments: Mrs. Elizabeth Husbands, as
Supervisor, Housecraft Centre..............
Miss Doreen M. Niles, as Senior Assistant
Supervisor, Housecraft Centre..;;.;.;.;.;
W. E. Burgess, as Superintendent of Prisons
C. Parris as Assistant Supervisor of Prisons


635
635
636
636


Appointments:
Mrs. Kathleen E. Payne as Assistant Matron,
Government Industrial Schools............:.... 635
J. F. Brewster, to be Assistant Town Planner 635
Appointment on promotion of persons in the Royal
Barbados Police Force........;.........;.......... 636
Appointment of a Temporary Minister: Mr. R. St.C.
Weekes, M.P. to be Minister of Health and
Community Development.......................... 637
Companies Act, 1910: John F. Hutson (1953)
Limited (2)................................. 639
Correction Notice:....;.;..... ................................ 637
Executorials: Daisy Perch Goodridge and Ada Priscilla
Small...;;.................. ..................... ..... 638
Industrial Incentives re Electrically welded wire
mesh etc.... ............. ............ .... ....... 637
In the Supreme Court: Beckles vs. Douglas..;.........;. 640
Carrington vs. Carrington............................ 643
Edwards vs. Knight, Gollop vs. Forte.......... 642, 643
Jordan et al vs. Small; Reid vs. Reid........ 639, 649
Watkins vs. Simmons; Watson vs. Gibson.... 640, 641
Probate Advertisements dated 4th July, 1969...... 648
Resignation: Mrs. J. P. Bourne, Stenographer,
Ministry of Communications and Works....... 637
Statement of Unclaimed Articles at various Police
Stations...;.............. ;............. ......... 644, 647
Withdrawal of persons from the Royal Barbados
Police Force................;.;................ .. 636



House of Assembly Debates for 3rd September, 1968.






y 8 00.6
G3a-s S


NOTICE NO. 457

GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Appointments
Mrs. Kathleen E. Payne has been appoint-
ed to the post of Assistant Matron, Govern-
ment Industrial Schools, with effect from 1st
June, 1969.
(No. 3652/6)

J. F. Brewster, Senior Inspector, Town
and Country Planning Office, has been ap-
pointed to the post of Assistant Town Planner,
with effect from 1st April, 1969.

(M. P. 8952/5 Vol. II)
Acting Appointments
Mrs. Elizabeth Husbands, Specialist
Teacher, Grade 1, St. Leonard's Girls'
School, has been appointed to act as Super-
visor, Housecraft Centre, with effect from
8th April, 1969, until further notice.

Miss Doreen M. Niles, Assistant Super-
visor, Housecraft Centre, has been appointed
to act as Senior Assistant Supervisor, House-
craft Centre, with effect from 8thApril, 1969,
until further notice.
(M. P. 821/39/7)







Ait


1- ~'


NO. 55


r


(1#1








OFIIL E ul


GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Acting Appointments
W. E. Burgess, Assistant Chief Officer,
Prisons, has been appointed to act as Super-
intendent of Prisons, with effect from 12th
to 23rd May, 1969.
C. Parris, 1st Class Officer, Prisons,
has been appointed to act as Assistant Super-
intendent of Prisons, with effect from 12th
to 23rd May, 1969.


(M. P. 797/39/10 Vol. II)

Withdrawals
No. 95 Police Constable Neville
Brathwaite, has been granted permission to
withdraw from the Royal Barbados Police
Force, with effect from 21st June, 1969.
(M. P. P. 7147)


The following persons have been granted
permission to withdraw from the Royal Bar-
bados Police Force:-

No. 6 Harbour Police Constable Emerson
N. Farley, with effect from 29th June, 1969;

No. 648 P. C. Alvin Branker with effect
from 5th May, 1969;

No. 242 P. C. Earl Crawford with effect
from 18th May, 1969;

No. 431 P. C. Alvin Desmond Clarke with
effect from 1st May, 1969;

No. 587 P. C. Lelan Leon Eversley with
effect from 1st August, 1969 and

No. 188 P. C. Nathaniel Greene with ef-
fect from 25th May, 1969.


Appointments on Promotion in the Royal
Barbados Police Force


George Kellman, Station Sargeant, has
been appointed Inspector with effect from 1 st
July, 19'69.

(M. P. 3657/8)



Cecil Jemmott, No. 177 Sergeant, has
been appointed Station Sergeant with effect
from 1st July, 1969.


Cecil Callender, No. 329 Sergeant, has
been appointed Station Sergeant with effect
frpm 1st July, 1969,


Mervin Holder, No. 67 Sergeant, has
been appointed Station Sergeant with effect
from 1st July, 1969.

(M, P. 3657/9)



The following persons have been appoint-
ed to the posts of Sergeant, with effect from
1st July, 1969:-


Corporal No. 508 Vincent Hoyte

S261 John Hinds

315 Clarence Husbands

87 Christopher Small

418 Pedro Parris

S546 Mervyn Watts

S328 Douglas Agard

24 Harold Jones


(M. P. 3816 Vol. VII)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


siy luJ 1969


(M. P. 3657/10)








July10,196 OFFCIA GAETT


GOVERNMENT NOTICES


Resignation

Mrs. J. P. Bourne, Stenographer "A"
Ministry of Communications and Works,
resigns from the Public Service with effect
from 16th July, 1969.

(P. 5682)


CORRECTION NOTICE

In the Official Gazette of July 3, 1969
(No. 53) there was erroneously published a
Government Notice under the heading 'Re-
signations' re No. 257 Police Constable
Grantley L. Riley and under the heading
'Retirement' a notice reMiss Juliet Toolsie.


In this
follows: -


issue the corrections are as


Retirement

No. 257 Police Constable Grantley L.
Riley to retire with effect from 25th July,
1969.

(P. 9196)


Resignation

Miss Juliet Toolsie, Stenographer has
resigned from the Public Service with effect
from 1st May, 1969.

(M. P. P. 9133)


Appointment of a Temporary Minister

In pursuance of section 68 of the Con-
stitution, His Excellency the Acting Governor-
General has appointed Mr. R. StC. Weekes,
M. P., Parliamentary Secretary to the Min-
ister of Health and Community Development,


to be temporarily Minister of Health and
Community Development during the period
4th to21stJuly, 1969, because of the absence
from Barbados of The Honourable C. E.
Talma, M. P.


(M. P. 8682/18 Vol IV)



NOTICE NO. 458

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963


The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purpose of the abovementioned Act,
the following product should be an approved
product and whether the following company
should be an approved enterprise in respect
of the relevant product.


Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of the product who objects to
it being declared an approved product or the
company being declared an approved enter-
prise for the purposes of the Industrial In-
centives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Industrial Development Cor-
poration, to reach them on or before Monday
July 14th, 1969, a statement in writing setting
forth the grounds of his objection.


Company:
Unic Industries
(B'dos) Ltd.


Relevant Product:
Electrically welded
wire mesh for rein-
forcing and general
purposes.


July 10, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







OFICA GAET Jl 0,16


NOTICE NO. 459
NOTICE

Re the Estate of

DAISY PERCH GOODRIDGE

deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon or
affecting the Estate of Daisy Perch Goodridge,
late of Maxwell Coast Road in the parish of
Christ Church in this Island who died on the
31st day of January, 1967, are hereby re-
quested to send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the undersigned in care of
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy, Lucas Street,
Bridgetown, Barbados on or before the 1st
day of September, 1969, after which date I
shall proceed to distribute the assets thereof
among the parties entitled thereto having
regard to the debts and claims of which I
shall then have had notice, and that I shall
not be liable for the assets so distributed to
anyperson of whose debt or claim I shall not
have had notice at the time of such distribu-
tion and all persons indebted to the said es-
tate are requested to settle their accounts
without delay.

Dated this 30th day of June, 1969.


C. G. L. ROGERS.
Sole qualified Executor of the
Estate of Daisy Perch Goodridge,
deceased.


NOTICE NO. 460

NOTICE

Re the Estate of

ADA PRISCILLA SMALL

deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim upon or
affecting the Estate of Ada Priscilla Small
late of Glebe Land in the parish ofSaint
John in this Island who died on the 7th day of
December, 1966 are hereby requested to
send in particulars of their claims duly attest-
ed to the undersigned in care of Messrs.
Carrington & Sealy, Lucas Street, Bridge-
town, Barbados on or before the 1st day of
September, 1969; after which date we shall
proceed to distribute the assets thereof among
the parties entitled thereto having regard to
the debts and claims of which we shall then
have had notice, and that we shall not be
liable for the assets so distributed to any
person of whose debt or claim we shall not
have had notice at the time of such distribu-
tion and all persons indebted to the said es-
tate are requested to settle their accounts
without delay.

Dated this 30th day of June, 1969.

EUSTACE CLAIRMONTE GILL and
JAMES ELBERTON BRATHWAITE
The qualified Executors of the Estate
of Ada Priscilla Small, deceased.


July 10, 1969


OFFICIAl, GAZETTE







l 0, 1I 639


NOTICE NO. 461

The Companies Act, 1910

In the matter of

JOHN F. HUTSON (1953) LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pur-
suant to Section 176 of the Companies Act,
1910, a meeting of the creditors of the above-
named Company will be held at my Office,
Pinfold Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the
8th day of July, 1969, at 2.30 o'clock in the
afternoon.

Dated the 21st day of June, 1969.


M. E. MURRELL
Liquidator.




NOTICE NO. 462


The Companies Act, 1910


JOHN F. HUTSON (1953) LIMITED


NOTICE is hereby given in accordance
with Section 173 of the Companies Act, 1910,
that JOHN F. HUTSON (1953) LIMITED by
special resolution passed on the 2nd day of
May, 1969 and confirmed on the 19th day of
May, 1969 resolved to wind up voluntarily on
30th day of June, 1969.


M. E. MURRELL
Liquidator.


NOTICE NO. 463
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE
High Court
No. 89 of 1969.
CHARLES CHRISTOPHER JORDAN and
MONTLEY St. CLAIRWATSON, the present
Trustees of the Saint Matthews Episcopal
Orthodox Church in Barbados: Plaintiffs

CHARLES SIDNEY SMALL: Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Deighton Road in
the parish of Saint Michael in this Island
containing by admeasurement four thousand
four hundred and forty four square feet or
thereabouts abutting and bounding on other
lands of the Vendors agreed to be sold to one
Best, on the Public Road called or known as
Deighton Road and on another Public Road
called Goodings Road or however else the
same may abut and bound which said parcel
of land is more particularly delineated and
shown on a plan certified the 24th day of
April 1968 byMr. DavidA. P. Trotman, Land
Surveyor, together with the unfinished church
building thereon and all and singular other
the buildings and erections of the said par-
cel of land erected and built standing and
being with the appurtenances.
UPSET PRICE: $2,500.00
Dated this 4th day of July 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


July 10, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


, 639








OFFICIAL GAET l 0,16


NOTICE NO. 465


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE


High Court

No. 86 of 1969

ETHELBERT WATKINS, Qualified Executor
of the estate of FITZGERALD ADOLPHUS
BEDFORD deceased: Plaintiff


BERESFORD SIMMONS:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate off Lodge Hill in the
parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement TWO ROODS
or thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands
now or late of DaC. Farmer, of Ivy Coward,
on lands of A. Bedford deceased, and on a
road in common leading to the public road,
or however else the same may abut and bound
with the appurtenances.

UPSET PRICE: $2,500.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


High Court


No. 259 of 1969

JOHN ARTHUR BECKLES:

HUBERT JOSEPH DOWELL:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 1lth
day of September 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Bay Street in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island con-
taining by admeasurement Three thousand
one hundred and sixty-one square feet or
thereabouts Abutting and Bounding on lands
now or late of E. Donavan on the sea, on
"Brownes Beach Fish Market" the proper-
ty of the Crown and on the Public Road called.
or known as Bay Street or however else the
same may abut and bound Together with the
message or store thereon.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $36,000.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 464


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


July 10, 1969








Jul 10 99OFCA AET 4


NOTICE NO. 466


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High C court


No. 90 of 1969


ALLAN ST. CLAIR WATSON:

CHARLES HERBERT GIBSON:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Thorpes in the
parish of Saint James in this Island con-
taining by admeasurement two acres twelve
perches or thereabouts (of which area
twenty-five and eight-tenths perches are con-
tained in the area of the Public roads here-
inafter mentioned) abutting and bounding
towards the East on lands of Rupert Blackett
and on lands of Orlando Younge towards the

North on lands of W. M. Denny towards the
West on the Public Road leading to Holders
and Husbands and towards the South on lands
of C. Brathwaite and on lands of C. H. Gibson
but separated therefrom by the Public Road
twelve feet wide or however else the same
may abut and bound and SECONDLY ALL
THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate
at Thorpes in the parish of Saint James in
this Island containing by admeasurement two
roods twenty-eight and six-tenths perches
or thereabouts abutting and bounding towards
the West on lands of C. Brathwaite towards
the South on lands of Prior Park Plantation
towards the East on lands of H. & G. Haynes


and on lands of Una Williams and towards
the North on the Public Road or however else
the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICES: $4,000.00 ; $946.11

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.

NOTICE NO. 467

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 254 of 1969


FRANK HERBERT REID:

FLORENCE ALBERTHA REID:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 1lth
day of September 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Church Village
in the Parish of Saint Philip and Island afore-
said containing by estimation Two Roods or
thereabouts be the same more or less Abut-
ting and Bounding on lands of Mr. Charles
Went on lands of the estate of Alexander
Sargeant on lands of Viola Brathwaite and on
the Public Road or however else the same
may abut and bound.


VALUE OF PROPERTY: $2,000.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


i 641


July 10, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








642 FFIIALGAZTTE uly10,196


NOTICE NO. 468

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Couirt


No 84 of 1969


LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS: Plaintiff

LOUISA KNIGHT et al: Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Marchfield in the
parish of Saint Philip and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement twenty seven
and two thirds perches or thereabouts (in-
clusive of One perch in the area of the road
hereinafter mentioned) abutting and bounding
on lands now or late of the Estate of R.
Brathwaite deceased on lands now or late of
E. Jarvis on lands now or late of E. Bannister
on a road formerly a road in common but
now a public road or however else the same
may abut and bound. ALSO ALL THATcer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at


Marchfield in the said parish of Saint Philip
and Island aforesaid containing by admeasure-
ment twenty seven and two thirds perches or
thereabouts ( inclusive of One Perch in the
area of the road hereinafter mentioned) abut-
ting and bounding on lands now or late of
L. Knight on lands now or late of E. Jarvis
on lands now or late of the estate of Gill de-
ceased and on a road formerly a road in
common but now a public road or however
else the same may abut and bound. AND ALSO
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land
situate at Marchfield in the parish of Saint
Philip and Island aforesaid containing by ad-
measurementtwo roods or thereabouts abut-
ting and bounding on lands now or late of the
estate of James Straughan deceased on lands
late of B. Wood et al on a road formerly a
road in commonbut now a public road and on
a road in common four feet wide or however
else the same may abut and bound.


UPSET PRICES: $900.00 ; $900.00
$1,200.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


July 10, 1969


642 i







Jl 1, 9O


NOTICE NO. 469


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Ca~rt


No. 99 of 1969

LIVINGSTONE ADOLPHUS CARRINGTON:
Plaintiff


AMBROZINE CARRINGTON:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Jackson in the
Parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barba-
dos aforesaid containing by admeasurement
One thousand four hundred square feet or
thereabouts Abutting and Bounding on lands
of one Richards on lands of oneLynch on
lands of one Tull and on the Public Road or
however else the same may abut and bound.


UPSET PRICE: $800.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 470


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court


No. 96 of 1969


FRED WINLYN GOLLOP:

MIRIAM OTHALEE FORTE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of August 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Weston in the
parish of Saint James and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement Eleven thous-
and nine hundred square feet be the same
more or less Butting and bounding on lands
now or late of E. Reece, on the sea, on lands
now or late of Realtors Limited alnd M.
Armstrong and on the Public Road or how-
ever else the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $5,000.00

Dated this 4th day of July 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


69


July 10, 19i








OFFIIALGAZTTE--.J *, 97U7

POLICE NOTICE

Statement of Unclaimed Articles etc. in possession o the Police at Central,

Bridge & Harbour, Black Rock, Hastings, Worthing, Distric:,: "A", "B" and "C",

Seawell and Holetown Police Stations.


Date came
Description ito
into REMARKS
of PropertyPossession
Possession


CENTRAL POLICE STATION
One (1) Purse containing $3.00
One (1) Ladies' Wrist -watch
One (1) Three-Speed Sports Model Bicycle
One (1) Pack Cards and money
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) U. S. A. $10.00
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Knife
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses and one (1) Ball-point pen
One (1) Purse containing money
One (1) Purse with a handkerchief
One (1) Bunch of Keys and a Pen-knife
One (1) Wrist-watch
One (1) Bunch of Keys
One (1) Photograph
One (1) Bunch of Keys in a case
One (1) Key
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
Two (2) Keys
One (1) Wallet
One Gents 3-Speed Bicycle
One (1) Pr. Shades
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) 3-Speed Raleigh Bicycle
Two (2) Jackets, One (1) Shirt,
Four (4) School Bags, One (1) Shirt and
Pants, Two (2) Coats One (1)
Travelling Bag, One (1) Pr. Shorts,
One (1) Dress, One (1) Tie, One (1)
Pr. Shades and Six (6) Parasols,
One (1) Box containing pieces of cloth,
one (1) School Bag, One (1)
Shopping Bag, Two (2) Rain coats,
One (1) Hat, Two (2) Dresses, One (1)
School Bag with Books, One (1)
House Coat, One (1) Pr. Shoes, One
(1) School Bag with two (2) Bottles,
One (1) Food Carrier, Two (2) Pocket Books,
Two (2) Parasols, Two (2) Prs.
Eyeglasses, Two (2) Prs. Eyeglass Cases
and One (1) Cap
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) West Indies Sweepstake Book
Ten (10) Conduit Pipes
One (1) Barclays' Cheque


16. 4. 68
20.5 .68
26. 4.68
30. 4. 68
10. 6. 68
12. 6. 68
15. 6. 68
14. 6. 68
20. 6. 68
26. 6. 68
22. 6. 68
25. 6. 68
4. 6. 68
10. 7. 68
12. 7. 68

15. 7. 68
18. 7. 68
22. 7. 68
13. 7. 68
23. 7. 68
9. 8. 68

24. 9. 68
25. 7. 68
7.12. 68
29. 6. 68









During
April,
1968







15. 8. 68
19. 8. 68
22. 8. 68
22. 8. 68


Found in City
"on Bridge St., City
Tudor St., City
S Baxters Rd., City
Tweedside Rd., St. Michael
in Carrington Village
on Enterprise Rd., Ch. Ch.


SSuttle St., City
." High St., City
." Westbury Rd., St. M
", t"
Coleridge St., City
,t ,,
Richmond Gap, St. Iv
Princess Alice High
t" at Welches Terrace, St

On Prince Wm. Hem
in Queens Park, City
i 't Carrington Village
s" on Roebuck St., City
Broad St., City
to President Kennedy I
', i' Barbarees Hill, St. I
,t Black Rock Rd., St.
,t Deacons Rd., St. Mi
At Brandon Beach, St. 1









Found in Motor Transport Buses


Found on

9, t,
"


.ichael




ichael
way
t.M.

ry St.





Drive
M.
M.
chael
M.


Constitution Rd., City:
Broad Street, City
Kensington New Road
Country Rd., City


IlvJ i0n 9I n


OFFICIAL GAZETTE









July~~~ ~ ~ ~ 10 99OFCA AET


Police Notice-Cont'd


Description Date Came
of Property into REMARKS
Possession

CENTRAL POLICE STATION-CONT'D


One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
Seven dollars $7.00
One (1) Ladies' Watch
One (1) Phillips Bicycle
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Hopper Bicycle
One (1) Ring
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
Three (3) Keys
One (1) Penknife
One (1) Briefcase with an electric iron
One (1) Purse containing $5.57 and three (3) Keys
One (1) Shirt and One (1) BVD
One (1) Bicycle
One (1) Wallet with $7.10 and two (2) I.D. Cards
One (1) Ladies' Watch
One (1) Key
One (1) Gents" Bicycle
One (1) Goat and One (1) Ram


BRIDGE & HARBOUR STATIONS


One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Ladies' Hercules Bicycle
One (1) Ear-ring
Two (2) Keys
One (1) Powder Compact set and two (2) Keys
One (1) Pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Purse containing $2.70
Three (3) Keys
Five (5) Keys
One (1) Parasol
One (1) Purse with 50
One Motor cycle Pillion
One (I) Valise
One (1) Hair Brush
One (1) Raleigh Bicycle, 3-Speed
One (1) Ladies Rudge Bicycle
One (1) Gents' Bicycle
One Gents' Bicycle
One (1) Ladies Bicycle
One (I) Gents' Bicycle
One (1) 3 Speed Rudge Bicycle
One (1) Bag Flour
One (1) Gents' Watch
One (1) Purse with $1.00 & two (2) Keys


27. 8. 68
3. 9. 68
4. 9. 68
4. 9. 68
4. 9. 68
4. 9. 68
9. 9. 68
16. 9. 68
21. 8. 68
17. 9. 68
19. 9. 68
24. 9. 68
5.10. 68
18.10. 68
12.10. 68
Oct. 68
24.10. 68
1.11. 68
21. 9. 68




4. 7. 68
11. 7. 68
21. 7. 68
22. 7. 68
4. 8. 68
14. 6. 68
14. 6. 68
18. 8. 68
23. 8. 68
26. 9. 68
27. 9. 68
7.11. 68
9.11. 68
9.11. 68
13.11. 68
15.11. 68
3. 68
67
3. 68
3. 68

20.12. 68
22.11. 68
31.12. 68


Found on
I,* ,


:Pine Pltn. Rd., St. Michael
Broad St., City


o Spry Street, City


It

is
to
"t
"






of

of
to

tt
it









it



if
of





to



It
to
99


it


it
it
It
to


to
i




to



99
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"

"9
"


" Roebuck St., City
S Prince Wm. St., City
in G.P.O.
on Martindales Rd.
" New Orleans Rd.
of -
at Wm. Fogarty Store
on Broad St., City
" Mahogany Lane, City
" Wildey Rd., St. M.




on River Road, City
" Nelson St., City
Chamberlain Bridge
Worthing Rd., Ch. Ch.
Fairview Ave., Bay Land
Bay St., St. Michael
Fairchild St., City
King Wm. St., City
in Victoria St., City
in Probyn St., Car Park
Fairchild St.,B. Stand
Bay St., City
St. Gabriel School Pasture
Empire Theatre
Nelson St., City
Fire Station yard
Bridge & Harbour Stn.

"* 9 > "t


f ,i, t,


Constitution Rd., City
Y. M. P. C. Grounds St. M.
Fairchild St.


--


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


I


July 10. 1969








646


Police Notlce-Cont'd


Description Date Came
of Property into REMARKS
Possession

BLACK ROCK POLICE STATION


Nine (9) Keys
One (1) pr. Eyeglasses
Two (2) Keys
One (1) pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Bag containing groceries
One (1) pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) pr. Eyeglasses
Ninety-four cents
Four (4) Keys
Two purses containing toilet requisites
and cosmetic bag containing cosmetics
Two (2) suitcases containing clothes
one (1) camera, one (1) transistor
Radio and documents
One (1) Lock with keys
One (1) Hat

HASTINGS POLICE STATION

One (1) Ladies' Handbag
One (1) Towel
One (1) Lumber Jack & one (1) Towel
One (1) Wrist Watch
Five (5) Keys
One (1) Wallet
One (1) pr. Eyeglasses
One (1) Ladies Bicycle
One (1) Handbag containing one (1)
Pr. Eyeglasses, one (1) Hair Brush &
receipts
Four (4) American Express Travellers
Cheques

WORTHING POLICE STATION

Two (2) Keys
One (1) Transistor Radio
One (1) Ring
One (1) Tape Recorder
One (1) pr. Shades
One (1) Roll B.R.C. wire

One (1) Purse containing one (1)
Key and pictures and 950
One (1) Bank Book


11. 7.68
14. 7. 68
1. 8. 68
5. 8. 68
17. 8. 68
17. 8. 68
26. 9. 68
3. 6. 68
26. 6. 68

9.11. 68


9.11. 68
19.11. 68
24.11. 68



3. 7. 68
9. 7. 68
9. 7. 68
10. 8. 68
12. 8. 68
17. 8. 68
17. 8. 68
24.11. 68










26. 7. 68
6. 8. 68
10. 8. 68
11. 9.68
18 9.68
5. 3. 66


2.11. 68
17.11. 68


Found on Fairfield Rd. B/Rock St. M.
,, Spooners Hill, St. Michael
" B/Rock Rd. St. Michael
' at Bathsheba, St. Jospeh
i' on Jones Land, St. Michael
on Brighton Beach St. M.
t' Hill Rd. Bank Hall St. M.
Fairfield Rd. B/Rock St. M.
Farm Rd. Deacons Rd. St.M.

"Paradise Beach, St. Mic.




Deacons Rd. St. Michael
at Technical Institute


" in a car in Carlisle C/Park
S on Hastings Rd. Ch. Ch.
." Dayrell's Rd. Ch. Ch.
Rockley Beach
Flagstaff Rd. St. Michael
Dayrell's Rd. Ch. Ch.
Garrison Pasture St. Mic.
Harts Gap, Ch. Ch.


9" Hastings, Ch. Ch.

at Caribbee Hotel Ch. Ch.




Found on St. Lawrence Gap Ch. Ch.
S at "Glencairn" Worthing
S on Garden Gap, Ch. Ch.
" o" Worthing Rd. Ch. Ch.
" No. 42 Blue Waters Ch. Ch.
" at Junction of Graeme Hall
" and Maxwell Hill Ch. Ch.

" on Rockley Beach, Ch. Ch.
" at Carribbean Pepperpot, St.
Lawrence Ch. Ch.


__ __ __ __ __ __ __ r___ _ _


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


646


July 10, 1969








Juyls 99OFCA AET


Police NotIce-Cowacld


Description Date Came
of Property into REMARKS
Possession

WORTHING POLICE STATION CONT'D


Five (5) Keys and a Toy gun
One (1) Motor Car Hub Cap
One (I) Wallet
One (I) Electric Lamp
One (1) British Passport for St
Vincent
One (1) pr. Shades
One (1) Jacket, one (1) pants'
three (3) keys

DISTRICT "A" POLICE STATION

One (1) Raleigh Bicycle
One (1) Raleigh Bicycle
One (1) Bicycle
One (1) Raleigh 3-Speed Bicycle
One (1) Sheet
One (1) 3 speed Bicycle
One (1) travelling bag
One (1) Gold Pendant

DISTRICT "C" POLICE STATION

One (1) Handbag, one (1) torchlight
and one (1) pr. Pliers
One (1) Handbag containing a comb

DISTRICT "B" POLICE STATION

One (1) Shovel

One (1) Ladies' Handbag

One (1) .32 Revolver


SEAWELL POLICE POST

One (1) dollar
One (1) Coat

Three (3) Playing Records

Six (6) dollars
One (1) Gold Identification Disc

HOLETOWN POLICE STATION

One (1) 3 Speed Raleigh Bicycle


23.11. 68
27.11. 68
26.11. 68
7.12. 68

14.12. 68
17.12. 68

27. 6. 68


7. 68
7* 68
7. 68
8. 68
8.68
9. 68
9.68
7. 68


Found
t'
"


Rockley New Rd. Ch. Ch.
Graeme Hall Rd. Ch. Ch.
Worthing Beach, Ch. Ch.
St. Lawrence Rd., Ch. Ch.


" Pine Hill, St. Michael
" Bay St., St. Michael

" Rendezvous Terrace, Ch.Ch.


Found

3,

I,
"t




r,


18. 3. 68 Found on
22.10. 68 "


13. 8. 68

7. 9. 68

20.10. 68


22. 2. 68 F
26. 2. 68


20. 3. 68

18. 6.68
9. 3. 68


Government Hill, St. M.
Bridge Rd., St. Michael
Jackson St. Michael
My Lords Hill, St. M.
Upton Rd. St. Michael
Welches Rd. St. Michael
Pine Garden, St. Michael
Bus at Grazettes, St. M.





Bath, St. John
Stn. Hill Rd. St. Philip


Found on Boarded Hall Rd. St.
George.
Found in a field at Groves Agriculture
Station
Found on Charles Rowe Bridge, St.
St. George


ound at Health Dept.
" in Gents' room, Terminal
Building, Seawell
Terminal Building, Sea-
well
Route 12/M/Bus
Terminal Building
Seawell


Prospect Rd. St. James.


Juty ito 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


11. 9. 68 Found on










PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-

PROBATE of the Will dated the 14th day of September, 1954 of HELENA AUGUSTA PILE
late of Lodge Road in the parish of Christ Church in this Islandwho died on the 15th
day of September, 1959, by LEONARD LAYNE, the sole Executor named in the Will
of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 10th day of January, 1942 of GLADYS MAY HENDY late
of Strathclyde in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the 8th day of
January, 1969, by NORMAN ROY HENDY, the sole Executor named in the Will of
the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of GERALD SYLVESTER HARVEY late
of Grazettes Landing Scheme in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died
on the 17th day of February, 1969, by DAPHNE ADINA HARVEY, widow of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of ALMA KNIGHT late of Dottins Alley
in the City of Bridgetown in this Island who died on the 4th day of April, 1969, by
ETHELBERT KNIGHT, widower of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of OSMOND VANREEN HENRY late of
Black Rock in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the llth day of
January, 1969, by INA ROSLINE HENRY, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CLARENCE ADOLPHUS HINKSON late
of Sargeants Village in the parish of Christ Church in this Island who died on the
14th day of February, 1969, by DOROTHY FREDERICA HINKSON, widow of the
said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Advertise-
ment with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications
have been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 4th day of July, 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


Government Printing Office.


July 10, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











THE


House of Assembly Debates




(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Tuesday, 3rd September, 1968.

Pursuant to the adjournment, the House of As-
sembly met at 12 o'clock (noon) today.

PRESENT

His Hoiiour J. E. T. BRANCKER, Q.C., F.Z.S.,
(Speaker); Hon. J. C. TUDOR, M.A., (Leader of the House);
Mr. J. W. CORBIN, J.P.; Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, (Minister
of Trade, Tourism, Co-operatives and Fisheries); Mr.
R. ST.C. WEEKS, J.P.; Mr. W. R. LOWE, J.P.; Hon. N. W.
BOXILL, (Minister of Communications and Works); Mr. J. B.
YEARWOOD, J.P., (Chairman of Committees) and Mr.
C. A. E. HOPPIN.

Prayers were read.

Mr. HINDS and Mr. MOTTLEY entered the House and
took their seats.
MINUTES

Mr. SPEAKER: Hon. members will recall that
there were five sets of Minutes, the confirmation of
which was left over until this Meeting inasmuch as
hon. members may not have had sufficient time to
persue those sets of Minutes. Those Minutes I am
prepared now to submit for confirmation unless any
hon. member objects. (After a pause). If no hon.
member objects, I declare each of those Minutes for
those five meetings duly confirmed.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS and Mr. SPRINGER entered
the House and took their seats.

PAPERS LAID

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, onbehalf of the
Hon. Prime Minister, Minister of Finance, and Min-
ister of External Affairs, I am commanded to lay the
following: -

Report on the Audit of the Accounts of the Auditor
General for the yearended 31st March, 1966 and 1967
respectively.


Investment Guaranty Agreement.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of a Bill to amend the Wireless Telegraphy
Act, 1968. I should also like to ask permission of
the House to deal with this Bill in all its stages today -
along with another Amendment which was on the Order
Paper some weeks ago.

REPLIES LAID

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice that the Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question
No. 229, asked by the hon. senior member for St.
James, and the Oral Reply to Parliamentary Ques-
tion No. 212, asked by the hon. junior member for St.
Peter, are ready.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, I should like
to draw to your attention that two sittings ago I gave
notice that the Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question
No. 214 asked by the hon. senior member for St.
James, and the Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question
No. 191, asked by the hon. junior member for St.
Peter, were ready.

QUESTIONS

Mr. HOPPIN: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the
appropriate Minister:-

Can the Minister say whether the gas found in
the wells at the Mount, St. George, will be used to
extend the natural gas service to the community?

Will the wells at the Mount make any substantial
difference to the belief that the exploration for oil in
Barbados has not yet proved commercial?

Mr. SERGEANT and Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS entered
the House and took their seats.

REPORT OF SELECT COMMITTEE

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, Ibegto report
that the Select Committee which was appointedto con-
sider and report on the Bill to incorporate the Lions
Club of Barbados met yesterday and recommended the
acceptance of the Bill by this Honourable House.








2105


Mr. SPEAKER: I thank the hon. memberforthat
information.

BILL READ A FIRST TIME

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, Ibegto move
that a Bill to amend the Wireless Telegraphy Act,
1968, be now read a first time.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

SELECT COMMITTEE DISCHARGED

Mr. SPEAKER: Before proceeding with the Or-
ders of the Day, I would like to discharge with my
thanks the Committee which was appointed to con-
sider and report on the Amendments of the Senate to
the Bill intituled "The Dairy Industry (Regulation
and Control) Act, 1968". The labours of that Com-
mittee have been completed and I beg to thank hon.
members who were associated with me fortheirco-
operation.

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
the suspension of Standing Orders 5. 14, 16, 18, 19,
40 and 45 for the remainderof today's sitting. Ques-
tion Time and Private Members' Business will be
taken in their due course.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Government Business be now taken.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
12.25 p.m.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Item No. 4 be taken as the first Order of the
Day.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

ESTIMATES OF THE PORT DEPARTMENT
FOR THE YEAR 1968-69

Mr. SPEAKER: Item No. 4 is the instant Order
of the Day, and it stands in the name of the hon.
junior member for St. Thomas, the Minister of


Communications and Works, and it is to move the
passing of a Resolution to approve the expenditure
requiredto supplement the Annexed Estimates of the
Port Department for the year 1968 -69 as shown in the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, first, I must
thank hon. members on the other side; secondly, I
must make an apology for the briefness of the
Addendum. The Port Department included a Capital
Estimates section in the presentation of their 1968-69
Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure making pro-
vision to purchase as replacements 2 launches, 1
pump and 1 truck.

Section 4 of the Barbados Harbours Act, 1960-29
provides:

"The Governor in Executive Committee is
hereby empowered to provide in accordance with
the provisions of this Act, or any subsidiary legis-
lation made thereunder, a co-ordinated and inte-
grated system of harbour facilities, lighthouses
and Port Services withinthe Islandbymeans of a
Department to be known as the Port Department."

I guess that everybody on the opposite side knows
of this.

The important thing in this matter, Mr. Speaker,
which hon. members would want to know, is that the
sum of $110,600 is required for Marine Equipment
$105,000, and Mechanical Equipment $5,600. Mr.
Speaker, this money is needed to supply 2 launches
1 pump and 1 truck. I beg to move that this Resolu-
tion do now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

Mr. MOTTLEY: Mr. Speaker, the Minister has
apologised for the short Addendum, because he
knows that when you ask for $110,600 and you say
2 launches, 1 pump and 1 truck, any awake opposition
would want to know how much for the launches, how
much for the pump, and how much for the truck. The
Addendum states that the Capital expenditure was
inadvertently omitted. We all know that the Port is
doing an excellent job, and we would hate even to
hold up for a minute this Resolution which the hon.
member so ably put forward. I am sure he will have
in his file the breakdown of this sum, and he can tell
us how much the launches will cost. If he cannot tell
us that, then I am sure the Hon. Minister of Trade
will know all about these launches, andhewill even
give him the names of the launches. I would also
like to know the cost of the pump and the cost of the
truck. I do not think I am asking him too much.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, undoubtedly the Min-
ister will be willing to tell us what is the age of this
truck that is going to be replaced. We ought to bear
in mind the fact that the Port Department has not
been in existence for so long as to cause a lorry to
suffer from considerable wear and tear, thereby
making it necessary to have a replacement.







'2106


I am sure the Minister will gladly tell us some-
thing about the age of these launches, and what ser-
vices they have rendered so far, so that we may better
be able to determine if the Port Department is getting
sufficient service from the launches and the truck.
I am sure the Minister will give us the information,
and let us get on with the Resolution.

Mr. SPEAKER: If there is no otherhon. member
who wishes to speak, let the Minister proceed.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: In reply to the question
asked by the junior member for St. Peter, the truck
would be in the vicinity of 7 years. So far as the
launches are concerned, all of us who had anything
to do with the waterfront will remember that when
the Harbour was first opened we were using some
skiffs, because it was not necessary to use proper
launches for mooring ships and so on. Apparently,
when the Harbour was opened, no provision was made
for certain things. This money is to replace a launch
that was given to us by the Canadian Government.
You will notice that I have looked around, before I
say what I have to say, to see whether any Canadians
are here. The launch was not the type of launch to do
the work required to be done in the Harbour. It was
not designed for this type of work. Anybody who
worked on a launch would know that the moment a
boat starts to make speed the bow would go up,
but this launch did the opposite; it was like a sub-
marine, and the moment it started to make speed
the bow would go down. That is the reason why it is
proposed to replace it.

In reply to the senior member for the City re-
garding the price of the launches, the three pieces of
Marine Equipment (2 launches and 1 pump) will cost
$105,000, and the truck will cost $5,600. I believe
that whenever the Government puts out tenders for
these vehicles, there is a notice to the effect that
it is likely that the vehicle to be replaced will be
traded in.
12.35 p.m.

I do not know if there is any other point which
I did not answer, but I think that is all.

The question that the Resolution do now pass was put
andresolved in the affirmative without division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 3 be the next Order of the day.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

THE DEMONETISATION (BRITISH CARIBBEAN
CURRENCY BOARD COIN) ACT, 1968

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, the Bill
which we now have before us is a comparatively sim-
ple one. As a matter of fact, I wonder if apart from
its being a formality it is really necessary, because
I cannot remember for years having seen these half-


cent coin in circulation. The Bill seeks to demonetise
the half-cent coin which was issued by the British
Caribbean Currency Board. The authority for issuing
of notes and coins now is the Eastern Caribbean
Currency Authority which is a different institution
from the British Caribbean Currency Board. The
Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority has issued
no half-cent coins, but when the British Caribbean
Currency Board in which both Guyana and Trinidad
and Tobago participated was dissolved, the coin
issue of the British Caribbean Currency Board was
taken over by the Eastern Caribbean Currency
Authority, but the old coins which were used by the
British Caribbean Currency Board in which Great
Britain, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobagowere the addi-
tional partners or signatories are still in circulation,
and except for the half cent coin which has not been
circulated for a very long time, there is also a large
amount of surplus coppe which the Currency Author-
ity has authorised to be sold, because it is surplus to
the requirements of the much smaller area which
the Eastern Caribbean Currency Authority now
covers.

Copper is now fetching a reasonable price on the
London Markets, and I think that is one of the reasons
why the Currency Authority has at this stage exam-
ined their vaults, as it were, in order to rid itself
of any unprofitable assets which they may be holding.
I do not think anyone will shed a tear. The cost of
living and the standard of living have improved
throughout all these Islands, and nobody can get a
half cent in salt or a half cent in fish cakes any
more nowadays. As a matter of fact, those days
disappeared way back in the thirties. There may
have been territories in the region that utilised the
half cent coin, but I do not think this coin was ever
in use or circulation in Barbados. Clause 3 is the
effective Clause of the Bill which demonetises the
half cent coin, and I therefore beg to move that this
Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I beg to second that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I am not
pressing this, but I just suggest thatitwould help us
if you circulated half cents, because when a seller
is pricing, if a thing comes to half cent, he is going
to make it a cent, and therefore the customer loses
every time. I onlywantedto say that without pressing
it. If a thing comes even to ninepence, they make it
a shilling.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: I would say that half cent
would have been only useful in paying some members
of this Assembly at the end of the month for what they
are worth, but they have no other use in Barbados
really.

The question that this Bill be now read a second time
was put and resolved in the affirmative without division.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon.
G. FERGUSSON, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the
House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in
the Chair.







2107


Clauses 1 to 3 inclusive were called and passed.


On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon.
G. G. FERGUSSON, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the passing of
one Bill in Committee, and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair
and reported accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded
by Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, the Bill was read a third time
and passed.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 1 be the next Order of the Day.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
12.45 p.m.

COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Mr. SPEAKER: Order No. 1 is the instant Order
of the Day, and it stands in the name of the Hon.
Leader of the House:- To move the House into Com-
mittee of Supply to consider the grant of sums of
money for the service of the Island.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that you do now leave the Chair and the House go into
Committee of Supply.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair, and the House went into
Committee of Supply, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES 1968-69 No.28

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION (5) SCHOOLS
ARREARS OF SALARY

A Resolution for the sum of $5,910 was called.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, this Resolu-
tion seeks to supplement the salaries vote of certain
schools. In the case of the Primary and Comprehen-
sive schools, a sum of $600 is required, and in the
case of Grammar Schools, $5,310. In the Primary
and Comprehensive Schools, there are three acting
Teachers who have not received arrears of salaries
and 28 teachers who have received arrears on their
basic salaries, but who were acting in higher posts,
and therefore they are also eligible for the arrears of
acting allowances.In the case of the Grammar Schools,
all the arrears of salary increases arising out of
salary recommendations have been paid with the ex-
ception of the Boy's and Girls' Foundation Schools.
In the case of the others, they all have savings to
meet the various amounts, but it is necessary to
supplement the vote in order that these two Founda-


tion Schools should be able to finalise their arrears.
I do not think that there is much more that I can add
to that; if there are any questions asked, I will try to
answer them. I beg to move that this Resolution do
now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

Mr. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, I just want to
enquire of the hon. Leader of the House if this pro-
vision will meet all the demands. We have been see-
ing a spate of letters in the Press relative to this
backpay, or whatever you like to call it, and I should
like to know if this provision will meet all the de-
mands for the last revision of salaries as regards
Teachers. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, that is correct).
This will meet all of it.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Chairman, I think that this
Resolution is about enough to convince this Honour-
able House that the time has come when education,
and all matters related thereto, ought to be reviewed
and examined with a view to seeing that a system
which was inherited by this Government and I want
to say that education today should be lookedup on as
a human body which was once heavy and suffering from
the lack of nourishment through some extraneous
cause of causes. It is now trying out for a diagnosis
of the ailment and we are to urge that such a diagno-
sis is very, very necessary at this time. We are to
say that we need a definite enquiry into the admin-
istration of education in this Island. Not one dime
more should be spent on education in this Island until
we are satisfied that this Government is prepared
to have from its own MinisterorMinisters of Educa-
tion down to the last Relief Teacher examined by
people who are capable of doing so. I am to say that
all. the Headmasters and Headmistresses of our
Secondary Schools in this Island Harrison College,
Queen's College, Lodge School, St. Michael's Girls',
Foundation Boys' and Girls', Coleridge-Parry,
Alexandra, Alleyne all the Headteachers in this
Island should be subjected to an examination or
inspection which would be more appropriate in the
case of Headteachers. Every Institution in this Island
which is providing education in any respect at the
Government's expense ought to be inspected, andwe
are to urge in this particular instance not that we
do not have people in Barbados with the expertise
necessary for such an exercise. We have them, and
they are willing to undertake such a task; but what
we fear is that just as happened some time in 1960-61
a survey of Independent Schools in this Island was
carried out by local personnel, ,and what we found
was that the Report was pigeon-holed and nothing
has ever been heard or seen of it. We are urging
this time that if it is necessary, team of Her Majes-
ty's Inspectors be brought here to examine educa-
tion in our Secondary, Primary and Independent
Schools which are receiving benefit from the Treas-
ury of this Island. It is not good enough to continue
in, our present stride.

Now, Sir, as to education in this Island and
this Resolution proves that in Government circles
we are suffering from administrative inertia. We







2108


are sufferingfrom alackof direction, we are suffer-
ing from a healthy inter-personal relationship and,
as we know, the Minister of Education has said that
we need more schoolbuildings. We are over-crowded
and therefore he cannot, until these things are at-
tended to, until they are given the attention they de-
serve, there can be little hope for any rapid success,
bearing in mind the sum of money, what portion of
our revenue education is now costing us in this
Island.
12.55 p.m.

Now, Mr. Chairman, the Minister of Education
has been telling the world that we are suffering from
the lack of trained and experienced Teachers. What
has the Minister done? What has be shown to make us
believe that he intends to use what material there is
at his disposal to perfect the system?

I can say that we have in this Island quite a
number of retired School Teachers. I am saying this
because the Minister, out of his own mouth, makes
us to understand that he cannot get trained and ex-
perienced personnel recruited to his staff from
amongst the young people who are now leaving schools.
Here is it we have these trained retired Teachers,
some of whom, I am sure, are quite willing to serve
again.

Mr. Chairman, we hear so much about In-service
Training, Team Teaching and the like. Who is better
able to teach or train the young whilst in service
than some of our experienced Teachers who
have come all through the ranks, and some of them
have put in about 30or40yearsin the Teaching Ser-
vice of this Island? You will find today that some of
these people are Headmasters and some are assis-
tant Masters and Assistant Mistresses. Nothing is
wrong with these people; they could easily come out
and give assistance. If they cannot work a whole
day, then they could be contracted on some sort of
basis. They could give three or four hours per day;
but the Government has no intention of making use of
such people, except in the case where they are about
five retired Teachers who are presentlyemployed. I
think there are two or three at St. Leonards' and
somewhere else. If you were to hear the story behind
how these few Teachers were brought back into the
Service, believe me, Sir, you would be shocked. But
let us leave that aside in this instance.

Mr. Chairman, what we are saying is that we
need some Specialists preferably, in this instance,
from abroad. They would have, let us say, a detached
and not a vested interest in the system, and what is
going on here. The point about it is that, if such a
Report is ever written, we must insist that it be made
public and that it be implementedwherever possible.
We must try and impress upon the Government that
it should set up a Commissionto have this necessary
enquiry carried out into our educational system. We
are not satisfied that things are working as well as
they. ought to at any stage in our First or Second
Grade Grammar Schools, and at the Primary Level
it is far from satisfactory.


I think that the Government has at its disposal
at the present moment the Petter Report which, I
understand has never yet seen the light of day, but
there are recommendations in the Petter Report
which could be implementedwith satisfaction. It would
assist considerably in the present system, because
I understand that the Petter Report made provision
that all children with the ability to benefit from
Advanced Level training should be concentrated as
to those in the eastern parishes (St. Philip, St. John
and the like) at Lodge School, and those for the
areas adjoining St. Michael couldbe servedby Harri-
son College and Queen's College, and that a similar
institution should be provided in the North for serv-
ing those children who could benefit from Advanced
level training there.

In that Report, I also understand that it made
provision for what is called Academic or Classical
Training in respect of one set of Grammar Schools,
and another set for bilateral: that is a system which
has both Academic or Classical and Technical
streams in the context. But you will see, Mr.. Chair-
man, that education in Barbados has gone through
numerous experiments during the past years. What
we are doing now is spending large sums of money
on it to find that there is very little benefit, in its
truest sense, to be derived; but of this lack of inter-
personal relationship we cannot getwhat parents are
demanding. I have to lay a considerable amount of
blame for what is going on in the face of parents of
children in this Island, because there can be no
doubt that many of the parents of children are not
paying sufficient attention to what their children
are receiving. All of this is in contrast with situa-
tions which obtained earlier. That is, in years past
we did not have what is called the triple control of
education which we have today.
Now, Sir, education is under a Minister; then
there is a Permanent Secretary, and there is a
Chief Technical Officer; but what we happen to know
is that you will find the Minister paying little or no
attention to what his Chief Technical Officer advises
and as for the Permenent Secretary, he is operating
in a Kingdom of his own.
1.05 p.m.

Now what is absolutely necessary, Mr. Chairman,
is that we ought to set about raising the age limit
in our Senior Department Schools, for children up to
eighteen years, and we ought to review our system
to such an extent that while our education remains
free, we would leave the wealthy people of this Is-
land whom we know are glad to pay for their educa-
tion to send their children to the private schools of
their choice and pay whatever the private schools
charge, making the space which they now occupy
in the Government Secondary Schools available to
our children.

I understand, Sir, that in the case of Lodge
School there is presently an attempt hbing made to
have a boy of twelve years or thereabouts who was
born in one of the other Islands drafted into Lodge
School. I have no objectionto suchaboy or girl from







2109


any of the Islands being taken into any of our schools
here to benefit from our educational system, free or
otherwise, and the only reason why Iunderstand this
boy has not been accepted up to the present is because
the Headmaster is insisting that he be boarded at
Lodge School if he is to take him in, whilst the parents
who are abroad want the boy to be taken in at Lodge
School, but that he will not be boarding there. What
we are concerned with is not the boarding part of it
at all. What we are saying is that by all means you
can take in this boy afteryou are satisfied that there
is no Barbadian child who is qualified for getting
that place at Lodge School.

Mr. Chairman, this Resolution for $5,910 calls
to mind one or two things about the Accounting Sec-
tion of the Ministry of Education. I am in a position
to say that unfortunately there are may Clerical
Officers in the Ministry who do not have the ability
of some of the Teachers withwhom they have to deal
from day to day, and there is a sense of frustration
and disgust running through many of these Teachers,
many of them very experienced. When they have to
go to the Ministry, they are tossedandturned about,
especially when it comes to the question of asking
about payment of salaries. Mr. Chairman, on pay day
last week there had to be postedupat Barclays Bank
at Broad Street a notice to the effect that salaries
have not yet been received from Government, so that
on pay day those Teachers whose salaries according
to their instructions were to be deposited at Barclays
Bank, Broad Street, or various other Banks in the
City turned up to be presented with a notice at the
Counter saying that salaries had not yet been re-
ceived from Government. That is not good enough,
and something is definitely wrongwith the Accounting
Department at the Ministry of Education. Were it a
case where for one month or for that matter two
months a situation had arisenwhere the salaries were
late in coming, Barclays Bank would not have been
driven to the extent of preparing a notice ready to be
sent out next morning, but it is a case where Teach-
ers have been leaving St. Philip, St. Peter and St.
Lucy and going to the banks on pay day to hear that
there is no money. We are asking that matters of this
sort be given better attention in the future. A School
Teacher has got his expenses to meet like anybody
else. They may owe house rent or other debts, and
the people to whom they owe money know when it is
pay day much better than the officer who is in the
service; so when an officer is expecting to receive
money on 25th, 26th or 27th or whatever date of the
month, and has to return home to tell his landlord
that there is no money that day, he just would not be-
lieve him. He would tell him that he is working with
Government.

Now. Mr. Chairman, I understand that there are
some Teachers who had been trained at the Rawle
Institute who had been serving, but thattheywere not
paid a sum commensurate with their qualifications.
I made some enquiries only this morning because
there was a case of a Teacher from St. Philip who
has gone abroad, and his mother has been to my
office about six or seven times, and on each occasion


I had to make contact with the Ministry of Education.
I could not ask her why she had not paid a visit to
one of her own representatives because she does
not seem to know them. However, I certainly did pay
some attention to her'problem, and I was informed
by the Ministry that a portion of this money that is
to be voted today is to make right with that lady's
son. She has been avery pleasant personto deal with;
she has borne her burdens, so to speak, because her
son left her to satisfy certain obligations of his here,
and by being able to get intouchwith one of the per-
sons who had been looking forward to a settlement,
she was able to rally through until this day, and I
sincerely hope that when this Resolution is passed
today, everything will be done to satisfy all these
Teachers and others who have been working and
receiving less than that to which they were entitled.
One thing we have got to bear in mind in this is
that this Resolution is to make adjustments format-
ters from as far back as 1966.
1.15 p.m.

That is what we have got to concern ourselves
with. We cannot denythat there are ClericalOfficers
who are responsible for preparing these accounts,
investigating salary claims and making the neces-
sary adjustments. Such officers would, of necessity,
refer matters which appear to be doubtful or which
were in any way found to be controversial, to their
Education Officers of the Department or their District
Education Officer. You will also find that they have a
Chief Personnel Officer to whom any such claims,
whatever they might be ought to have been referred
and then we come down to the Permanent Secretary.
You will see that there has been a team of officers
who have not paid enough attention to these matters
or they are now guilty of neglect, whatever it might
be; but it has brought the situation to the point where
we are at this particular moment. There are some
married women, I understand, who have returned to
serve and they, too, found that they were being paid
in a salary scale which was not the correct one, and
all of these matters now stand likely to be adjusted.

Mr. Chairman, I am appealing to the Governor
to get up a Commission to enquire into the admin-
istration of Education in this Island, and the sooner
that such a Commission is appointed and its recom-
mendations examined and made public and I want
to urge on the Minister that, in the event of an en-
quiry being conducted into the administration of
education in this Island, the Commission should con-
duct public hearings whereby members of the public
who, instead of being now encouraged to go up to the
Ministry on the last Wednesday in each month and
malign and balckmail School Teachers, these same
parties be encouraged to come forward and state
publicly all that they experience and what they have
to complain against in our educational system. Would
like to urge upon the parents of children and their
guardians to begin to showhow restless they are with
the conduct of the administration of educationinthis
island, and show themselves in readiness to demon-
strate publicly if things are not put into better shape
in the very near future.







2110


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, I think that
one of the things which can be said for the educa-
tional system is that you can have as many people
to support it as there would be the same number to
criticise it and you would have ........

Mr. HINDS: On a point of order. Is the hon. mem-
ber referring to education in Barbados?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Here andotherwise,andyou
would have just as many ideas on both sides of the
argument as there are people to argue, and nobody
would be rash enough to say that this or that argu-
ment is wrong, or that this or that suggestion is
wrong. Some suggestions may be taken up to be
unworkable, and others may merit further examina-
tion; but when you are talking about education, I think
that one ought to be very tolerantwhere one is criti-
cising the system or supporting it because it is a liv-
ing thing. It is the kind ofthingwhich can only thrive
on continual experimentation, trying out one method
and discarding it when it does network, trying other
methods and testing them in the light of given condi-
tions, and so on. I also think and this is a personal
opinion, but it comes from my own experience,
however limited this might have been that when-
ever, in any country there are social pressure on an
educational system, there is likely to be more dis-
content about it. In the days when fewer people had the
advantage and the opportunity of a good education,
there was little criticism about the educational sys-
tem. The case is altered now; awider cross-section
of the population is being brought into the system, and
because more and more people are exposed to more
and more benefits and opportunities, some of the de-
fects of the system become more and more apparent.
If you could suppose a country in which 98% of the
population could not read orwrite, youwouldbe see-
ing a country in which there was little or no quarrel
with the educational system; it would be only when
the population became more and more exposed to
greater and greater opportunities that the defects of
the system would become more noticeable.

The point I am trying to make is this; the hon.
member in his remarks on education, if I interpret
him rightly, tends to hold the argument that before
this Government came into power all was well with
our educational system, or most was well with it.
Mr. Chairman, you would be a very brave man in-
deed to be able to hold that view in the teeth of all
the arguments. The hon. memberhimself knows how,
in the old days when his views were somewhat al-
tered, he could find the defects in the system 6, 7, or
8 years ago, as I could find them, and I am wonder-
ing how be manages to square his opinions then with
his opinions now. Of course, he is quite entitled to
his opinions and to change them, but I do not think
you could truthfully say andwhen Isay "truthfully';
I mean from the point of view of finding arguments
and finding examples to substantiate the arguments -
I do not think you could say that there has been no
improvement in the educational system in the last
six or seven years.
1.25 p.m.


For instance, in the days when to get into a Gov-
ernment Secondary School was not only on merit but
on merit plus an interview, look how many children
were turned back from enjoying their rightful oppor-
tunities because they used to bring water from a
standpipe, or because they used to sit inthe half-door
with a bowl between their feet to eat their meals This
is the kind of question that used to be asked of chil-
dren in the old days. Nobody asks that kind of question
nowadays; they cannot, and more and more of that
type of child is getting the benefit of improved educa-
tion in places in the Government Grammar Schools.

One more point I want to make on that part of
my reply. I know as everybody knows, that there is
general dissatisfaction with the Grammar School
system, and certainly general dissatisfaction from the
point of view of the numbers of children who cannot
get places in the Grammar Schools. Here, again, the
reason for this dissatisfaction may lie partly in the
system of itself, but partly in the social pressures
surrounding this system. In the days whenthe son of
a carpenter, or of an agricultural labour, though,
perhaps, bright enough, had an ambition to enter
Harrison College, the whole structure of societywas
such that it was only in the most extraordinary cir-
cumstances that that ambition could be gratified.
(Mr. MOTTLEY: That is not so.)

Now the senior member for the City says it is
not so. It is a pity sometimes that people would not
listen. I have never said that sons of carpenters or
agricultural workers could not get into Harrison
College. I am saying that it was more difficult years
ago for that ambition to be gratified than it is now.
That is a fact. And how has it been made possible?
Not only because more of them can do it now, but
because the hon. member who is cross-talking me
has himself contributed to this by his own direct
experience. It was the hon. member who drew it to
my attention way back in 1963 that one of the con-
sequences of the changed system of Secondary Educa-
tion was that more children from disadvantaged
homes were gaining places, and, although they satis-
fied all the requirements intellectually, they did not
have the clothes, or the books, orthe lunch, to make
good those opportunities. So I had experience at
first-hand of what this thing is about.

Obviously, Mr. Chairman, if you are opposedto
a Government, you are in duty bound to find any
argument to defeat it if you can. No matter what
arguments you use, there are still certain facts that
you have to reckon with. Questions were askedof us
some months ago from the other side. I do not re-
member the nature of the questions, but I remember
the whole point of the questions. The point of the
questions was to elucidate statistically what percent-
age of children who gained places to the Grammar
Schools came from Primary Schools. When the figures
were disclosed, they showed that over 80%,. in each
year since 1962 or whatever year it was, of the
entrants into Government Schools came from the
Primary Schools.







2111


Atthis point, Iwant to take the hon. junior mem-
ber for St. Peter up on an argument which he used
and with which I profoundly disagree. I would yield
to nobody on that side in my interest in seeing that
everybody, or every child in this country, has the
best type of education. But at the risk of losing the
seat which I now hold, Iwouldbe bound to oppose any
suggestion which seems to insist that because a man
is rich, or is inagood position, his child should not
have the same opportunity to enter a Grammar
School, if he qualifies for entrance, as the child of a
person who is disadvantaged. This is an argument
that I would rebut most strenuously. If people pay
taxes and are citizens of this country, their children
have as much right to all the facilities which this
country provides as the children of anybody else. I
must disagree with him in this suggestion to let the
rich pay for their children in Private Schools. I pre-
sume he meant even if they qualify for places, and
we should keep the places for the others.

The solution would be, of course, to have more
schools of a certain type. But to have more schools
of a certain type, everybody in this Islandwould have
to provide the money forthese schools. Mr. Speaker,
I say this by way of parenthesis. The suggestions
which come from this side of the House, or which
used to come from this side when we were in Oppo-
sition, do not vary very much from one another.
Everybody wants to see improvements in education;
but neither when I was in the Opposition, nor is it
now the case with this Opposition, were there any
suggestions given, either to the Government of the
day, or to this Government, for raising revenue. All
the suggestions, good and valid as they are, are
suggestions for spending money, but very few sug-
gestions come to any Government anywhere in the
world for raising revenue.

I have said this when I was the Minister and I
say it now, because it is somethingwhichl basically
believe, that the people of any country can have the
best kind of educational system that there is any-
where to he had, provided they are prepared to pay
for it. If the people inthis country want more Gram-
mar Schools, they can have them, but they will have
to make the appropriate and commensurate sacrifices
to have them. (Mr. MOTTLEY: Repeat that.) I said
that if the people of this country, and I now add in
parenthesis, or any country but particularly of this
one, want more Grammar Schools they can have them,
but they must be prepared to pay for them. (Mr.
MOTTLEY: This is a question of priority.) Why any-
thing and not something else? I have said it, and I
repeat it again. Hon. members have an idea that in
the whole spectrum of education this or that aspect
is a priority. I say that is not so.
1.35 p.m.

I contend that this is not so; it is the whole edu-
cational system which is a priority. It is education
itself which is a priority. So you can argue not to do
this, but to do that. I can argue not to do this but to
do something else, and you can have a million argu-
ments, you can have as many arguments and prompt-
ings as there are people speaking on the subject telling


you to choose each of a million things and do it
first, but I do not take that view of it. It is all of the
things which form the priority in education. To tell
me that you should pay attention to Primary Schools
and leave out Secondary Education, to tell me that
you should pay attention to Secondary Education and
leave out the Primary Schools, to tell me that you
should make provision for further Education and do
nothing about either, to tell me that you should im-
prove Teacher Training and do nothing about the
School Welfare Service, to tell me that you should
attend to the School Welfare Service and do nothing
about Teacher Training, none of this I accept. What
I accept is that at one and the same time which
would be ideal but as quickly as possible, one
after another, if all cannot be done at the same time,
must be done. (Mr. MOTTLEY: Well, do the most
essential). Who is to argue what is more essential?
(Mr. MOTTLEY: If you have 10,000 children and they
cannot get into schools, that is essential.) All this
proves what I was saying. You can have as many
opinions about an educational system as you can have
people, and I have not yet said that hon. members
opposite are wrong except in respect of one of the
points I touched on on this question about the facili-
ties offered the rich and poor.

Mr. Chairman, the ideas which are held on the
other side are perfectly arguable. When I was in
Opposition I used to say to the then Government, why
don't you do this particularly in respect, say, of the
School Meals Service, but they said they couldn't do
it. But I never put the whole thing out of focus and
balance by arguing that you must have a School Meals
Service as a priority. It is as important as any other
aspect in the educational system, and anybody who
argues that education works differently is arguing
against the facts. Of course you could say that for
the next year we are going to do nothing but build
Primary Schools or build Secondary Schools orwhat-
ever it is; but even so, when you are doing that, you
still have to be thinking of issues whichwill emerge
as soon as your schools are built. Suppost it turned
out you could get 100 new schools built over-night and
have them opened tomorrow morning, your Teacher
Training would be the same sort of priority as the
opening of the schools, because if you open the
schools and do not have the Teachers to teach the
children, you will have the children and the buildings,
but no Teachers.

Here it is, Mr. Chairman, that in a single aspect
of education like the extension to Primary Schools,
you have not one priority as you would think, but
two -- the teaching of the children and the building
of the schools. Somebody would then say that you
have the Teachers, you have made provision for
Teacher Training, you have the schools, what about
the ancillar services the School Dental Service,
the School Medical Service, the School Meals Service
and all that, and before you know where you are in a
single act of extendingyour Primary Schools, all the
so-called priorities of education come inbecause you
would find somebody to say that it is all very well to
build new Primary Schools, to train new Teachers, to
do this, that and the other, but don'tyou realise that







2112


in three or four years' time you are going to need
new Secondary Schools for X thousand extra young
people? Somebody would then say that if you are going
to need these new Secondary Schools for childrenwho
are now entering the Primary Schools you have just
built, how are you going to train those Teachers for
the Secondary Schools that you are going to need in
three or four years' time? Then somebody else
would say that if you are going to do that, the quality
of your Secondary Education has to improve now
because it is your Secondary people who will be the
Teachers in the new Secondary Schools when you
build them. Consequently, Mr. Chairman, the person
who insisted that Primary Education was a sole and
absolute priority would discover before he is finished
that in the very act of attending to that apparently
absolute priority, four or five other priorities were
drawn into the vortex. The same holds good of any
other aspect of education.

There are some people who look at an education-
al system not from the Primary School up. Some
people have a view of an educational system from
what they call Higher Education down, and would be
prepared to spend all their interest and all our coun-
try's money on improving the quality of High Educa-
tion. Well, they would net get very farwith that, be-
cause they would soon discover that the quality of
Higher Education is best improved when the stages
below that are well looked after to feed the Higher
Education system. It is probably good politics to
argue for individual priorities. It is not the kind of
argument that I can accept because I see all educa-
tion as a priority; and a country therefore which
works to keep abreast cannot take one or two as-
pects of a system and press them on the ground that
these are the most urgent and the others do not mat-
ter.

Hon. members, of course, opposite do not take
the extreme view that one or two things matter and
others do not; but it is an argument that some people
take and it is an argument which I just cannot accept.
We spend something like 25%, certainly more than
20% of the total budgetary provision on education. I
can agree not only from my observations before I was
a Minister, but in some of my observations as a
Minister and since that our spending could be better
and we could get more value. (Interruptions.)

Mr. CHAIRMAN: I would ask hon. members to
observe Standing Order No. 29(6). I am observing
the strain through which the Reporter is going to
write what one member is saying from the other; and
members would remember how often it is said that
Reporters do not write the things that members say.
Let the hon. member proceed.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I was saying, Mr. Chairman,
that we spend a lot of money on education, and I was
saying that from my own observations as a Minister
and from my general experience since and before I
was a Minister, I am convinced that we could get
more value out of the $12 million or $13 million or
whatever amount it is. There is a lotof wastage and
misdirection inside this system. This has not only


just appeared; this is something that has always been
there and seems to drag behind or alongside every
educational system, because most communities do
not like to stint money for Education; and because
Communities are generous in their spending onedu-
cation, educational authorities more often than not
believe that there is always more money where it
has come from, and they do not always look after
expenditure carefully, and do not always try to get
the most out of the dollar or the pound or the mark
or the bolivar or whatever it is. This happens all
over the world.

I want hon. members to recall this: if you ask
for a Commission of Enquiry, you are not asking
for anything which any reasonable person would be
opposed to, because it is a sensible thing for any
educational system to have a periodical re-evalua-
tion of itself; but while you are examining the system,
the system still has to go on. So you just cannot say
that because you want a thorough, down-to-earth
meaningful examination and evaluation of the whole
system, you must stop where you are while this is
going on. (A VOICE: Nobody said so.) I have never
said that anybody has said that; I am only saying,
which is true, that even while you are examining
the system, the system has to work. It is nothing
that can stop while you are examining it, because if
it does stop while you are examining it, you would not
get the truth about it because you have to see it as it
works.
1.45 p.m.

If an examination of the educational system took
three years, I do not know how long it will take, but
suppose it took two or three years! (Mr. MOTTLEY:
Why are you talking so long?) Is it not.my privilege
to talk now? (ASIDES.)

Mr. CHAIRMAN: Is the hon. senior member for
the City addressing the Chair? Let the hon. junior
member for St. Lucy proceed without interruptions.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I was saying, Mr. Chairman,
that it is working system which you would be exam-
ining, and all the time that the examination is pro-
ceeding, the system will have to be fed and nourished.
I would not like to undertake at this juncture to say
whether a Commission is a feasible or a necessary
thing; but what I would say is that I would not object
to it myself in principle because an educational sys-
tem ought to be re-examined and re-valued periodi-
cally. I want to say this much, that the educational
system in Barbados is not nearly as bad as the hon.
member tries to make out. (Mr. MOTTLEY: Which
hon. member?) The hon. member who is sitting on
the hon. member's right, the hon. junior member
for St. Peter. Obviously, and in the political game,
Mr. Chairman, members of the Opposition, as amat-
ter of fact, will be more directly brought into contact
with grievances than members of the Government.
The hon. member will recall in the old days how it
was. As a matter of fact, I am grateful to the hon.
member, and I say it now, for having drawn some-
thing to my attention years ago which, had it not
been for him I would not have known and upon which







2113


I was able to take some action. Some years ago, for
a reason which I will not mention here, the entire.
Fifth Form of St. Michaels Girls' School was not
entered for a public examination, and in circum-
stances for which there could have been no, justifica -
tion. I did not know about it, but I was supposed to be
the Shadow Minister of Education at the time. The
hon. member drew it to my attention. He has means
of information which were certainly denied me in
those days and obviously they are denied me now.
I was able, thanks to the hon. member, to investigate
the matter. I wrote a personal letter to the then
Minister of Education, Mr. Thorne, and had the
matter put right within three months. Therefore, I
say that, obviously, a Teacher or Teachers, parent
or parents will go to hon. members opposite with
grievances. I hope that they will come to us, but
they do not always do; most of them do, but some do
not and therefore if an hon. member comes in here,
as he has a perfect right to do, to give expression to
a grievance which is a genuine grievance and which
affects a citizen of this country, we must avoid
making it appear that the individual grievance or the
group of individual grievances gives an accurate
picture of the entire system. That is not always the
case, and I am convinced that the educational system
is not as bad as some people make out. What I am
convinced also about is this, that in any level of
society in any country or as soon as improvement
begin, you will hear more criticism about the sys-
tem. After all, the French Revolution came when
conditions in France were not at the very lowest.
They were improving, and it is the same thing with
the Russian Revolution. This is true of all societies.
As soon as something begins to improve, people
who were not before aware of its value, because of
the very improvement will become aware and start
to make more nosie about it.Unlike the hon. member
who may be alarmed about the educational system,
I am not alarmed about it, because the more criticism
I hear about it, the more I am convinced that it is
making a greater and greater impact upon the pop-
ulation; and as long as it is making that impact, they
have a right to be discontented with it until they get
it how they want it.

Mr. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, one of God's
greatest gifts is the ability to speak or to talk; but
another great gift is the ability not to be bamboozled
or fooled. The hon. member made a speech............

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: On a point of order. Mr.
Chairman, I just want to tell the hon. member that
I certainly did talk but I was not bamboozled.

Mr. MOTTLEY: I do not know if the hon. mem-
ber thinks that that is funny, but it is not funny for
me. Anyhow, I just want to make two points. The
hon. member in replying to the hon. junior member
for St. Peter, made a very long speech, which is
unlike him, because he has always, when he has a
good case, made his points and left it to his col-
leagues to vote. I suppose that, sotto voce, I made
some remarks which caused him to go on with his
speech. What I took objection to was the fact that -
if I misquote him he will pardon me the ambition


of carpenters' sons and the sons of people of the
like were not always given the opportunity when they
wanted to get to Harrison College and the like. I am
one of those people who granted the hon. member -
I supported the Government in power in their Food
Programme. The hon. member knows that and there-
fore he cannot suggest anything about me in this
matter. The hon. member knows that I made a con-
tribution in respect of giving people in the lower walk
of life opportunities such as getting Exhibitions,
whereas 26 or 27 years ago, I found that 20 Exhi-
bitions were given by the St. Michael's Vestry; and
when the hon. member and his Government sought
to take things away from me, I caused my colleagues
to give Scholarships to the U.W.I. Therewere some-
thing like 200 Exhibitions at the time, and I do not
think that the hon. member would disagree thatnone
of those went to the sons of rich people as he was
setting out here just now.

The point I want to make is this. I will always
suggest, and deep down in- the heart of the Hon.
Leader of the House, he knows that it is true, if
there are 10,000 children in this community post-
war with the present system of education you take
the Common Entrance Examination for children to
get into the Secondary Schools if I am wrong the
hon. member can stop me the hon. member and
his Government said: "We have over seven hundred
places," and are you suggesting to me that only 700
of the 10,000 could pass that Entrance Examination?
1.55 p.m.

Why am I saying a priority? I have often heard
the hon. member repeating this: "The greatestgood
for the greatest number." Now, if you establish a
Community College for 400 people; you have 10,000
children taking the Common Entrance Examination;
you say that you have places for 700 only; let us
assume that 3,000 or 4,000 out of the 10,000 passed.
It is not a priority to find places for the others? Is
it not necessary to see to it that 90% of the parents in
this country, who have an ambition to give their
children a smattering of a Secondary Education, are
given an opportunity to fulfil that ambition? Are
you telling me that it is not a priority to have more
Secondary Schools, but to have a Community College?
Down in the Minister's heart, he knows that this is
true. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I do not know that.) Per-
haps he does not want to say it.


If the Minister tells me that 10,000 children took
the 'Common Entrance Examination, and the Minis-
try had only 700 places, is it notobvious that some-
thing is wrong? He did not say that only 700 passed;
he said that he had places for 700 only. If you
have places for 700 only, and 10,000 took the Com-
mon Entrance Examination, is it not obvious that
you must look at the question of priority for Second-
ary Schools? If you are going to have 450 children
only in the Community College, the feeder to the
iCommunity College will be from the Secondary
Schools, I presume, as well as Government Aided
Secondary Schools. It is clear that there should be
a priority to have more Secondary Schools.







2114


Sir, if the Minister were to take a plebiscite in
this country tomorrow, with the strongest supporters
of the Democratic Labour Party, they will tell him
that every person in this country with a child 10 or
12 years old wants to give that child some sort of
Secondary Education. You can notice that eveninthe
Police Force. When boys get an opportunity to go
into the Private Secondary Schools apd they go into
the Police Force, you can see the difference. There-
fore you cannot say that this matter should not be a
question of priority. All we contend on this side is
that priority should be given to the provision of more
Secondary Schools, because more than 90% of the
parents in this country would certainly prefer to get
an opportunity to send their children to Secondary
Schools.

I would like to draw this matterto the Minister's
attention. Does the Minister know it is a most diffi-
cult thing to get a child into a Primary School today?
(Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I do not know that.) The hon.
member says he does not know that. Well, I can tell
him that; maybe my children are all big, but I have
grand children, and I know what I am talking about.
If you want to get a child into a Comprehensive
School, or a modern Secondary School, it is worse.

Some years ago I came inhere and reminded the
Hon. Minister that they were putting the children out
the Modern Secondary Schools at 15 years of age.
They were throwing them on the labour market, and
they are still throwing them out at 15, but the Minis-
ter is doing nothing about it. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR:
That is not true) Do not tell me it is not true; some
of them are even thrown out earlier. It is true to say
that if a child appears to be bright, you can manoeuvre
and possible see a Minister or somebody connected
with the Education Department and the child may be
able to remain in this Secondary School. You talk
about the greatest good for the greatest number, and
you still say that this is not a question of priority?
You are a Democratic Labour Party, and in this
modern day you are going to establish a Community
College to take care of 450 children; you have 10,000
children taking the Common Entrance Examination;
you admit that you have room for 700 only, and the
Minister of Education is walking around saying that
all of these Primary Schools are in a shocking
condition (ASIDES). I am not talking about Teach-
ers now, I am talking about places in Schools.

Sir, I know that the Minister has done a tremen-
dous lot in revamping the system of education with
which I have agreed. (ASIDES.) We feel strongly on
this matter. We feel that priority shouldbe given (a)
to the provision of a greater number of Secondary
Schools, or converting your Modern Secondary
Schools into Grammar Schools; and (b) having more
Primary Schools. That is how we feel about it.
(ASIDES.) For the Minister to suggest that we feel
he has done nothing is stupidity.

The question that a Resolution for $5,910 do now pass
was put and resolved in the affirmative without division.
(Mr. MOTTLEY: Time.)


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES 1968-69 No.30

A Resolution for $2,272 was called.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Could we not come out of
Committee with these two Resolutions? There are
two more small money Resolutions. Why do not we
do them? (Mr. MOTTLEY: "Time.") I am not pres-
suring the House unduly; I am just only drawing the
Committee's attention to the fact that we have two
more Resolutions, and we can finish them and come
out of Committee of Supply. There are two simple
Resolutions. If we finish them now, there would be
no need to go back in Committee of Supply, and we
could do something else when we come back.

Mr. Chairman, this Resolution is in consequence
of the Civil Estbalishment Order, which the House
passed two weeks ago in connection with the Staff
of the Ministry of Finance. It is for provision for
furniture and equipment for 5 new offices which the
House approved the appointments of. I beg to move
that the Resolution do now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES 1968-69 No.31.

A Resolution for $2,148 was called.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, the Addendum
speaks for itself. I beg to move that this Resolution
do now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
2.05 p.m.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon.
G. G. FERGUSSON, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the passing of
three Resolutions in Committee of Supply and Mr. SPEAKER
reported accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded
by Hon G. G. FERGUSSON, the Resolutions were read a first
and second time and agreed to.

SUSPENSION OF SITTING

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this sitting be now suspended for three quarters
of an hour.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.


The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division, and Mr. SPEAKER suspended the sitting
accordingly.







2115


On Resumption:

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, as I
observe that there is no quorum, I am asking that the
Bell be rung.

The Bell was rung and a quorum was obtained.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, before
the House resumes its business, there is a matter
which I would like to draw to its attention which, I
think, affects the courtesy which is due from this
House to Her Majesty the Queen. Some weeks ago as
you may remember, the House passed anAddress of
thanks in connection with the gift of books which had
come to us from the House of Commons of Great
Britain. As usual, it was expected that a copy of that
Address would be forwarded by Mr. Speaker to the
Governor-General for transmission to Her Majesty
I understand that that has not been done. I further
understand, Mr. Deputy Speaker, that the British
High Commissioner asked the Clerk of this House
for three copies of the Address which the Clerk de-
livered, one of which copies it was intended should
be transmitted to the Queen that way.

Now this is entirely wrong, Mr. Deputy Speaker,
and it is very unfortunate. The Governor-General is
the Queen's personal representative in this country
and is the direct link between this House and the
Sovereign.The British High Commissioner represents
the British Government, and has no connectionwhat-
soever and is not in anyway involved in any Message
which go from this House to the Sovereign. This is
a most unfortunate occurrence and I would not like
it to occur again. I am suggesting I do not know
if the Leader of the Opposition would agree with me -
that whether or not that copy has got to the Queen
through that means, an authentic copy of the Address
should still go from this House to His Excellency
the Governor-General because if this is not so, this
House would be put in the unfortunate position of
having by-passed the Governor-General in a matter
in which he is the method of transmission. As I say,
it is most unfortunate and I hope it does not occur
again, but I would like it to be perfectly well known
that it is something which the House cannot condone,
and through you, Mr. Deputy Speaker, I would like it
to be knownto the Clerks-at-the-Table that Messages
from this House to the Sovereign must go through
His Excellency the Governor-General andbyno other
means.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: When the Leader of the
House informed me that this thing had happened, it
struck me as being extraordinary that the Chief Clerk
who has been connected with this House for so long
could possibly not see that it was not for the High
Commissioner,jbut for the Governor-General, to sub-
mit any Message from this House to Her Majesty. I
did not say this to the Leaderof the House, but I say
it now: it looks to me that he is in an awkward posi-
tion. I think the House will agree thatyou must send
a copy, late though it be, to the Governor-General, but
the awkward position would be whether the Queen
has already received a copy through the High Com-


sioner. She might have been told of it, but might not
necessarily have seen the actual copy. It would be
difficult to ask the Governor-General now to officially
send along a copy. On the other hand it might be
best, and I throw out the suggestion tothe Leader of
the House, to find out from the High Commissioner
in London who could by roundabout means find out
from the Household,some one of Her Majesty's Clerks
or Secretaries, whether she has received it as offi-
cially coming from Barbados already, andif she does
not herself know, whether the High Commissionerwill
arrange that the Governor-General's copy should
nevertheless go to one of Her Secretaries, maybe with
an apology that it was not officially originally sent
through the Governor-General's Office. In short, that
they should go to the Governor-General, and the
Governor-General's copy should go so thatwewould
have it on the record that Her Majesty received it in
an official way from the Governor-General; but there
should be no question of duplication at the other end.
Maybe Sir Lionel Luckhoo can clear that point up for
us. I too regret with the Leader of the House. I feel
as strongly as he does about it. It is one of those
things that should not have happened, and we have to
hope that matters of that sort do not happen again.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I want
to put a suggestion to the other side not in respect
of this matter we have just discussed, but in respect
of the resumption of business. I amgoingto be quite
frank. The remaining item of Government Business
is a matter of which the Hon. Ministerof Communi-
cations gave notice earlier today and of which he
circulated the copies. Would the House like to deal
with this and then do Questions and Private Members'
Business, or would it insist that we put this off until
4.30 p.m.? I am asking this because the hon. member
would like to be accommodated. I believe the hon.
senior member for St. Thomas, the hon. junior mem-
ber for St. Thomas and the hon. senior member for
St. Joseph would like to attend the funeral of someone
in St. Thomas, and if we could just shift it around,
everybody else on this side would be here except the
hon. junior member for St. Thomas; so Question
Time and what Private Members' Business we have
to do can still be done. I awaiting for an indication
from the other side. (After a pause.) I thank hon.
,members opposite.
3.00 p.m.
RESUMPTION OF GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg
to move that Government Business be now resumed.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
RESOLUTION TO APPROVE WIRELESS TELE-
GRAPHY (AMATEUR TRANSMITTER)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS,
1968

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg to
move that Order No. 2, under Government Business
be the nextOrder of the Day.







2116


Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The instant Order ofthe
Day is Order No. 2 and it stands in the name of the
Hon. Minister of Communications and Works:- To
move the passing of the following Resolution:-

A Resolution to approve the Wireless Telegra-
phy (Amateur Transmitter) (Amendment) Regulation,
1968.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, hon.
members on the other side will remember that about
three weeks ago or a little longer, this item was on
the Order Paper. I didnotdealwithit because I had
some consequential amendments to make,and I wanted
to make them all at the same time since they all
dealt with the Wireless Telegraphy Act. This Resolu-
tion is asking the House to approve these Regulations,
and I will read them back for the benefit of those
hon. members who have not got a copy of them. The
Regulations are as follows:-

"1. These Regulations may be cited as the
Wireless Telegraphy (Amateur Transmitter)(Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1968.

2. Regulation 3 of the Wireless Telegraphy
(Amateur Transmitter) Regulations, 1953 (in these
Regulations referred to as the principal Regulations)
is hereby amended as follows:-

(a) By deleting the words "is of British
Nationality" in paragraph (1) (a) and substi-
tuting therefore the words "is a Common-
wealth citizen;"

(b) By inserting immediately after paragraph
(1) the following as paragraph (1A) -

"(1A) Notwithstanding paragraph (1) a
licence may be granted under that
paragraph and in accordance with
Article 41 of the Radio Regulations,
Geneva, 1959, to a person who is a
national of a foreign country as de-
fined in section 2 of the Citizenship
Act, 1967, if the Minister is satis-
fied that a reciprocal agreement be-
tween the Government of the country
of which that person is a national
and the Government of Barbados in
relation to the granting of licences
to keep, install, erect or use ama-
teur wireless transmitter."

(c) by deleting the words "two dollars and
fifty cents" appearing at the end of para-
graphs (3) and (b) and substituting there-
for "five dollars".
3. The Notes to the form of applications for a
licence to keep, install, erect or use an Amateur


Wireless Transmitter set out in the Schedule are
hereby amended as follows:-

(a) by deleting the word "British" wherever
it appears in Note 1;

(b) by deleting the words "and who are them-
selves of British nationality" appearing in
lines 3 and 4 of Note 2."

Mr. Deputy Speaker, we all know that we have
"ham" radio operators throughout the world, and they
serve a useful purpose too; but it has so happened
that according to the Wireless Telegraphy Act, 1940
since Barbados has become independent, we are
changing the words "British Commonwealth" to the
words "a Commonwealth Citizen" which would in-
clude a Barbadian, a Trinidadian and Commonwealth
people. It also gives the Minister the power that if
somebody from the United States of America wants
to operate this thing, once we know that there is
reciprocity that a Barbadian can do likewise there,
or a British National, but more especially a Barba-
dian, the Minister would grant that permission, but
not necessarily the United States of America, Canada
or anywhere else for that matter. Itgives the Minis-
ter the authority to allow reciprocity in these matters.
I beg to move that this Resolution do now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question that the Resolution do now pass was put
and resolved in the affirmative without division.

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY (AMENDMENT)
BILL

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, as I
pointed out when I first got up, the reason why I
kept back the Resolution to approve the Wireless
Telegraphy (Amateur Transmitter) (Amendment)
Regulations is that I knew about these amendments
that were to come down in relation to the same Wire-
less Telegraphy Act and I did not want to come and
have six or seven bites at the Wireless Telegraphy
Act. This Bill, which is now before us, pertains to
the same Wireless Telegraphy, but only in a different
sense. That is why I circulated copies of this Bill
early this morning and I hope that hon. members
have read the Bill carefully. We will all remember
that just a few months ago, I came to this Chamber
and asked that the Government back a note for the
C.B.C. to the tune of $1 million, I think it was; it
may be $1.1 million. The reason why we are here is
this .......

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, on a point of
order. It does not appear to me as if I have anything
of what the hon. member is introducing now. (ASIDES).

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I
should like to enquire through you if every hon.
member has a copy of this Bill. I must apologise to
hon. members who have not got a copy of it, but it is
not my fault. The first thing Ididbefore putting Gov-







2117


ernment Business on the Order Paper was to issue
copies of this Bill or I gave out copies of this Bill to
be issued to hon. members. I must apologise for this
because I do notwant hon. members onthe other side
to think that anybody on this side was trying to pull
anything fast on them. I say that because I brought
down more than enough copies.

As the Object and Reasons of this Bill set out:
"This Billwould amend the Wireless Telegraphy Act,
1940-22, in order to make provision for the Carib-
bean Broadcasting Corporation to issue licences in
respect of wireless broadcast television receivers
and to collect fees for such licences and for matters
incidental thereto and connected therewith."

Years ago members of the community had to pay
for radios whether they be Rediffusion, private radios
or otherwise, but we did not think that we were col-
lecting the amount of fees. We were getting a lot of
trouble to collect the fees, and so forth, and that was
dropped. After the Government got TV, my Ministry
was responsible for collecting the licence fees
through the Electrical Department.
S3.10 p.m.

We found that it was not only cumbersome, but it
was not working well, because a lot of the people
who were selling Television Sets were more in-
terested in making sales than in collecting revenue
for the Government. The law as it was then, as far
as I can remember, was that a Television Set could
only have been sold on the presentation of a licence
fee.

Hon. Members on the other side will remember
that a few weeks ago we came here for a guarantee
to back a note for C.B.C., because they were in
straitened circumstances financially. The reason for
this amendment to the Wireless Telegraphy Act
does not mean that as the Minister of Communica-
tions I will be giving up the Wireless. Licences for
Wireless will still be under my portfolio, but in
order that C.B.C. would be able to collect the fees,
which they will be able to do in a much better way
than the Electrical Department because this Bill
also gives C.B.C. the right to enteronpeople's pre-
mises to certify if anybody has a Television Set and
is paying for it. Hon. members on the opposite side
I believe, must have read this Bill. It is late and we
all want to get out, and I do not think I should detain
the House any longer. Any question that any member
on the opposite side wants to ask that is pertinent to
this Bill, I will be quite willing to answer. I beg to
move that this Bill be now read a second time.

Mr. LOWE: I beg to second that.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, this Bill seeks
to place the onus onpersons. In other words, it puts
a defendant in the position of having to prove himself
innocent. The complainant has to prove the defendant
guilty. An accused person is innocent until he is
found guilty, but this Bill places the onus on an ac-
cused person to prove himself innocent, and I do not
think it is fair.


I observe from the Billthat at alltimes the Min-
ister of Communications can give a person the right
to go into somebody else's house and determine
whether he has a television receiving set. It states
here:

"It shall be lawful for -

(a) the Electrical Engineer or any other per-
son appointed by the Minister in that behalf
in respect generally of the provisions of this
Act or any regulations made thereunder; or

(b) any person appointed by the Caribbean
Broadcasting Corporation ......"

You know, Sir, that the Caribbean Broadcasting Cor-
poration has a record for doing things that are not
always straight.

When we take, for instance, the recent appoint-
ment of the present Manager of the Caribbean Broad-
casting Corporation and the method'employed therein,
what went on behind the scene and so on, one has to
be very careful when the Bill States:

"any person appointed by the Caribbean Broad-
casting Corporation." Who is going to have the actual
authority to act on behalf of the Caribbean Broad-
casting Corporation? The Manager, or the Board as
a whole? That is a point we would certainly like to
have cleared up because, as you know, Mr. Deputy
Speaker, everyone did not show a general apprecia-
tion, or express satisfaction, at the appointment of
the present Manager of C.B.C., and, as a result, we
saw that a portfolio was split in two.

Now, let us for argument's sake, Sir unless we
know whether the Manager of C.B.C. is going to have
the authority to act under this Act, one might find
that persons who did not find it possible to accept the
present Manager may one day or one night find that
the Manager has given authority to wreak vengance
in a situation such as this to make up for all the
wrongs, or what he felt was wrong during the con-
sideration of his appointment. We would like to know
in the case of any person appointedbythe Caribbean
Broadcasting Corporation,who at the Corporationwill
have the authority to delegate someone to go into a
man's home and make a search?

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Deputy Speaker,
I much regret that I not only have not got a copy of
this Bill, despite what, I believe, the Ministerin his
best efforts has endeavoured to explain, but I did not
even know it was going to be dealtwith. This business
of wireless licences has been bothering me for a
number of years, two or three years, ever since
C.B.C. has been sending out notices demanding one's
wireless licence when, apparently, C.B.C. had no
authority to receive it, far less to demand it. I my-
self, after having paid my television licence, have
had notices threatening me with prosecution. On
one occasion I had occasion to remember the case of
Thorne v. The British Motor Dealers Association,
which Your Honour will no doubt recall, when the







2118


Secretary of the British Motor Dealers Association
was convicted of blackmail for demanding payment
which he was not entitled so to do from a member of
the Association. But still I knew that $10 a year was
the licence fee, and therefore, I paid it.

Mr. Deputy Speaker, the first thing that we, as
a House, must go into is who authorised C.B.C. to
receive the money without statutory authority, and to
send out demands without statutory authority, if no
such statutory authority has existed up to this time.
Who authorised C.B.C. to sendoutdocuments threat-
ening to lock up people for $10, if C.B.C. could not
at that time collect the money under the authority of
the Act? That is the point. It would not be possible
to make Regulations in my guess, Mr. Deputy
Speaker, it wouldn't be easy under Section 16, or any
other Section of the Act, for the licensing of televi-
sion broadcast receivers as opposed to the ordinary
wireless apparatus which is defined by the Act of
1940.

Nevertheless, Mr. Deputy Speaker, it is quite a
good idea for C.B.C. to receive the money, but I do
not think the Minister is aware that in time one can
envisage a situation when a licence fee oneach tele-
vision set begins to exceed the revenue actually re-
quired by the television station for its operations.
3.20 p.m.

The best known licensing system in the world, I
suppose is that of the B.B.C., and the annual licence
fees paid in England by owners of television sets is
upwards of 60 million, which is more than enough
for running the B.B.C. even though it had 17,000
employees. Sooner or later if C.B.C. continues to
collect licence fees, we can imagine perhaps some
day licence fees would go up to $15 or $20, you may
find 50,000 television sets in Barbados that after
all would be the optimum point, atelevisionin every
household and 50,000 sets even at $10would bring
in a revenue greater than the present expenditure of
C.B.C. Therefore you are going to have some pro-
vision for the payment back to the Government of
some of the money that is collected. This problem
was faced by the B.B.C. What happens in England
is that the Post Office collects the money and hands
over a certain amount to the B.B.C.; itis not a ques-
tion of the B.B.C. doing the collections. Ido not know
how the Ministers' advisers could have told him that
it was a clumsy system for the Electrical Engineer
to collect it. It may well be a clumsy system for us,
but it will be found clumsier in the future when
C.B.C. is collecting more money from television sets
than it needs, and then you will have to devise a new
procedure to get some of that money back into the
general channels of taxation. That may happen in the
future.

Now, Mr. Deputy Speaker, I must also mention
the question of Clause 11 where any person appointed
by the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation in respect
of the provisions of this Act or Regulations may at all
times enter premises ......Mr. Deputy Speaker,what
kind of business is this? We thought this was the
kind of thing you got in Colonial days when the Gov-


ernment was regarded as all-wisejandtherefore no-
body would abuse provisions given like that. Can an
hon. member sleep safely inhis bednowwhen some-
body can come and knock at the door at 2 o'clock in
the morning and say he has come from C.B.C. to see
if he has a television set? Think of that, Mr. Deputy
Speaker Let all hon. members sitting around this
Table think if they want to put such a police power
into the hands of their political opponents, whoever
their political opponents may be? A policeman
cannot come into your house without a warrant from
a Magistrate, and the C.B.C. are to authorise some-
body to enter your house at all times

Mr. Deputy Speaker, this is avery serious busi-
ness. The old power gave the Electrial Engineer
authority to enter and inspect any vehicle, apparatus,
motor, installation, machinery or appliance for the
purpose of satisfying himself that such provisions
of the Act and the Regulations are being observed. It
is not too much to suggest, Mr. Deputy Speaker, that
that provision is intended to prevent persons under
section 10(1) which says "if a Magistrate is'satis-
fied by information on oath that there is a reasonable
ground for supposing that a Wireless Telegraphy
Station has been established with a licence ........"
It is not unreasonable to suppose that the situation
that was envisaged by the framers of that Act was
that they were aiming to suppress people, because
this was after all passed in 1940, who wanted to
broadcast information to the Germans. This is a
war-time Act which we are amending, Mr. Deputy
Speaker. Can it seriously be intended in 1968 to give
C.B.C. greater power over a man's home than the
Commissioner of Police or the Minister of Home
Affairs? I call on the Government to have another
look at this. We should be limiting the power under
the old Section 11, not extending it, andI am not satis-
fied, Mr. Deputy Speaker, that it is constitutional.
I am not satisfied that it is within the constitutional
provision dealing with security of a man's home and
matters such as that. The Act is very severe in any
case because we are having a section now that says
that the television licence can be recovered as a civil
debt, and then it says you have to prove that you have
paid the licence. This will be the only case in the
Magistrate's Courts of District "A" where the plain-
tiff sits down, or where the Minister can put every-
body that he does not like who has a television set in
court and force him to the trouble of proving the
case, and where the burden of proof is on the defen-
dent. I know of no other situation in the Civil Courts
of District "A" where the burden of proof is placed
on the defendant.

Mr. Deputy Speaker, this is a very severe Act,
and Iamveryworriedthatldidnot see it before. Any
person appointed by C.B.C. can come into my house
at all times This is not right, Mr. Deputy Speaker.
I repeat at the risk of goingoverit again and under-
lining it suppose we even have confidence in the
members of the Government! I cannot say Ihave con-
fidence in all of them, andI do not believe that every
member of the Government would get up and say he
has confidence in all of us that such a power would
never be misused. I am not talking about this year or







2119


next year some time. I am talking about ten years or
fifteen years from now. Is every Government that
gets into power and appoints a Boardto tie C.B.C. to
be trusted with the authority to send somebody in at
people's houses at any time of the night to find out if
they have a television licence? That could be a way
of evading the safeguards that have grown up over
900 years under the Common Law to stop policemen
coming into your house. If youwant to get a policeman
into somebody's house, say you suspect he has a
television set in it and get the policeman in. I do not
think it is good enough and I am very sorry this is
being rushed through at this stage. After all, C.B.C.
in collecting the money anyhow before hand may have
been acting without authority.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Deputy Speaker,
the point made by the hon. member that this is a
war-time measure could not have been stronger. My
recollection is that one of the things that urged peo-
ple to get this Bill on the Statute Book was the fact
that there was a suspicion that somebody, apart from
the professional people, so to speak, inwireless, was
or had been in contact with Germans who had landed
in Trinidad, and that these men were in contact with
him. It went so strong that in the actual 1940 Act it
said "at any time of day or night". They had to be
emphatic. You would wonder nowadays why a man
has not got wireless, loudspeaker and allthat rather
than the reverse, and therefore the question has not
arisen as to whether you should go and see if this man
has apparatus that he has not paid a licence for. When
the war was over nobody was going to question it, and
nowadays 20 years after with everybody trying to
have a wireless in his house of one form or another,
nobody questions it. If this Act had been the sort of
Act that was intended to be operative in peace time,
you would have torn this to pieces long ago. To give
anybody authority to go at any hour of the day or
night is a thing that can be defended only in an
emergency or during the actual state of war. I am
not satisfied that the draughtsmen of these amend-
ments have paid enough attention to them, and I hope
that the Minister or the Leader of the House would
not think that we are just trying to be obstructive.
3.30 p.m.

This should not be dealt with this afternoon be-
cause, as the hon. memberwho has just sat down has
said, he has not had time to read it. I did not have
time to read it; I only got this Volume with the 1940
Act a few minutes ago. Obviously, you cannot, in
ordinary legislation, put the onus on the defendant to
prove that he is innocent, as the hon. junior member
for St. Peter has pointed out; therefore, I suggest to
the Hon. Leader of the House that he postpone the
consideration of this Bill. The draughtsman has not
paid sufficient attention to it. You have to cut out
that section which puts the onus on the defendant to
prove himself innocent. After all, look at the stupid-
ity of itl You give an Inspector the right to go in to
see whether the law is being broken, and then you tell
a defendant: "You have to prove that you are not
breaking the law". Why do you send inthe Inspector
except to find that out? You take this war-time legis-
lat1i and you look at it forgetting when it was made,


and why it was made, and you pass something which
is not at all suitable forpeace time. It is easy to have
amendments this afternoon haphazard, straightway
as they are ready at all times, without referring to
the old Act. If I had this legislation at home last
night, I would have done what I have just done here.
The obvious amendment is to say "at all reasonable
times," but this haphazard amendment on the spur of
the moment is not good enough.

This is why I have appealed to the Hon. Leader
of the House to suggest to the Minister in charge to
postpone consideration of this Bill so as to draft it
in proper language, cutting out the bit about the onus
being placed on the defendant, putting in the word
"reasonable" and have the wording "at all reasonable
times" as an interpretation that every police Magis-
trate would know. As soon as one Police Magistrate
says that 8 o'clock at night is reasonable, all Police
Magistrate will follow him provided that there is no
appeal which upsets that. As I say, haphazard drafting,
even by lawyers in the House, is not good enough. I
suggest again and I sit down on that without saying
anything more. (ASIDES). I am suggesting that what-
ever the appropriate language is, further considera-
tion of this Bill be postponed rather than merely
make the amendment which I have suggested, the
obvious amendment "at all reasonable times"; but
I do not think that that is a sufficient amendment for
the whole Bill.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I rise to second
the motion for the postponement, but before doing so,
I should like to say that I did not have the chance to
read this Bill; but listening very attentively to the
Hon. Minister, he pointed out that the Electrical
Department failed to collect these licence fees and
they are taking the opportunity to give C.B.C. the
chance to collect it. Also that they will be able to go
into one's home at any time in order to discover
whether he has a set or if he has paid for it. Sir, that
is a very serious statement, because there is a cer-
tain time of the day or night when I cannot even go into
my own place, and I suppose that you cannot even go
into your own place. There is a certain time and a
certain place that you cannot go whenever you like,
and it is your place. I want to know how we can sit
here and give a stranger power to go into my home
or your home at any ti;ne. Sir, there is a certain
time when the Minister cannot go certain places in
his home whenever he likes. He has to knock at the
door at least, and ask for permission to enter, and
now we are giving a stranger permission to go into
one's home to look-for what? A TV set.

If the Government was really taking this matter
very seriously and as the Minister has said, that
the sellers of these sets are only interested in mak-
ing money or selling the sets the Government still
has the trump card. Nothing can come into this coun-
try except through the Customs or through the Port,
and you have Customs Officers, you have some of
everything; you must produce your invoice and things
of that sort in orderto getthe sets out. I believe that
the Government will be able to say: "John Brown
imported so many sets this year, May Atkins imported







2120


so many", and put them together and make checks
to see how many sets they have sold, and the onus is
on them to see to whom they have sold those sets. It
is not a question of leaving it to the Electrical Inspec-
tor or to C.B.C. to find that out; the Government has
it in its hands to findout howmany of these sets have
come into the Island before even the importers. When
you make a check that an importer imported 12 TV
Sets for the year, and at the end of the year you make
another check and you find only two sets, that means
that he has disposed of ten sets and he will have to
satisfy you as to who has or have bought these ten
sets. You do not have to be running around or making
legislation appointing people to go into other people's
homes at any time to find that out, because I know
the attitude of some people. There are some people
who would be only too glad for that at election time;
and if they are supporters of the D. L. P. and they want
to expose a B. L. P. member, I know that can happen.

Mr. Deputy Speaker, I cannot vote for this amend-
ment, not as it isworded. If therewere no other ways
and means that the Government could make sure that
they are collecting these taxes, they would have to
do something of that sort; but they can find out. The
onus should be placed on the seller to give an account
of the sets which he imported into this Island and to
whom he has sold them and then the Government
could work. When one is buying a set he has to pay
the licence before he gets it, andthis, I believe, will
be only after that year is ended. After that year has
ended, you still have on your books who is the owner
of a set and to record what has happened, and that
the particular owner refused to pay. There are other
ways and means to collect the licence fees rather
than send people into other people's homes and at
anytime? I wonder if the Ministerwas serious. I want
to know if he has read this Bill because knowing the
Minister as I do, I am sure that he would not agree
for one to go into his home at any time looking for a
set. Sir, he may go in and find the wrong set.
(Laughter).
3.40 p.m.



I believe that this Bill has been circulated to
the Minister the same time I got mine, and that is
just now. I did not get a chance to read my copy,
and I do not believe he had a chance to read his.
Imagine a Minister going home late from a dance
and his mistress is dragging him over the coals for
coming in late, and then another man comes to the
house and knocks! If the light is on, he will knock.
Are you to allow a man to call at your house at any
time? I cannot get into certain parts of my house at
any time? I cannot understand it, Sir.


Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the
hon. member has given way. I am going to move that
further consideration of this Bill be postponed. (An
hon. MEMBER: That was done already.) I had for-
gotten that. If he were to look at the Laws of Barba-
dos, Vol. V, 1928-5 1942-8, he would see on page
602, Section 11:


Entry on pre-
mises for pur-
poses of in-
specting instal-
lations, etc.


"(1) It shall be lawful for the
Inspector or any other person ap-
pointed by the Governorinthatbe-
half at all times to enter any
premises, vessel or aircraft or to
inspect any vehicle, apparatus,
motor, installation, machinery, or
appliance for the purpose of satis-
fying himself that the provisions of
this Act and the regulations made
hereunder have been and are being
observed."


Now, going back to the Constitution. I am no
lawyer, and I do not pretend to be a lawyer, but I,
certainly, am no fool. If you were to look at page 18
of the Constitution it would allay the fears of hon.
members. This is what the Constitution states:

Clause 17. 17.(1) Except with his own con-
Protection sent, no person shall be subject to
against arbi- the search of his personor his pro-
trary search perty or the entry by other on his
or entry. premises.
(2) Nothing contained in or
done under the authority of any law
shall be held to be inconsistent with
or in contravention of this section
to the extent that the law in ques-
tion makes provision that is rea-
sonably required -
(a) in the interest ofdefence,
public safety, public or-
der, public morality,
public health, town or
country planning, the de-
velopment or utilisation
of mineral resources, or
the development or utili-
sation of any other pro-
perty in such manner as
to promote the public
benefit;
(b) for the purpose of pro-
tecting the rights or
freedom of other per-
sons;
(c) for the purpose of au-
thorising an officer or
officer or agent of the
Government,orof local
Government authority or
of a body corporate es-
tablished directly by law
for public purposes to
enter on the premises of
any person in order to in-
spect those premises or
anything thereon for the
purpose of any tax, duty,
rate, cess or other im-
post or inorderto carry
out work connected with
any property that is law-







2121


fully on those premises
and that belongs to the
Government. or that au-
thority or body corpor-
ate as the case may be.

I am accepting -

Mr. SMITH: Sir, I gave way, but the Hon. Minis-
ter is strecting things too far. He is making a speech;
She is reading the Constitution and so on. He does
not have a soft spot in his heart for lawyers, but he
now allows one to sit at his side and confuse him.
He reminds me of the Chairman of Committees, be-
cause he is reading wrong sections. He is far from
the point, and I cannot allow him to go any further.
Sir, ask him to take his seat; he is a Minister, but he
is not the boss in here. Whenhe is at the Pine, he is
the boss; I am on my feet, Sir, you must ask the
Minister to take his seat.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: On a point of elucidation.

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The hon. juniormem-
ber for St. Thomas has made his point of elucidation.
Would the hon. senior member for St. Joseph proceed.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, on a
further point of elucidation. Why I am accepting the
postponement of further consideration of this Bill is
that I do not wanthon. members on the other side to
feel that -

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, on
a point of order. I wish to draw attention to May's
Parliamentary Practice, page 448, Sixteenth Edition:

"A member may again be heard to offer an ex-
planation of some material part of his speech which
has been misunderstood, but he must not introduce
new matter, or endeavour to strengthen it by new
argument ......."

The hon. member is completely out of order. I
thought the hon. members on that side were more
anxious to get away.

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Has the hon. junior
member for St.Joseph risenonapointof order? I am
hearing the hon. junior member for St. Thomas who
says that he is speaking on a point of elucidation.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the
reason why I am accepting the suggestion from the
other side is that I do not want it to be said that we
were forcing this Bill through because we have the
numbers. Therefore I am accepting the postponement
of the Bill.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, ask the hon.
member to take his seat; two of us are on the floor.

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The Chair is quite
willing the hear the hon. senior member for St.
Joseph.


Mr. SMITH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the Hon. Min-
ister got up and read the Constitution. I do not know
if it is the one up by Fort Royal Garage. If I steal
anything and it is suspected that it is in my home,
you can apply for a searchwarrant andyou can enter
my home at any time. I will agree with anything of that
sort.
3.50 p.m.

Do not tell me that I buy a television set or
radio from a firm, pay the licence fee there and then,
if I fail to pay afterwards, this Government or this
House must agree to a Bill to send any sort or all
sorts of persons into my home at anytime. We have
to be very careful, because after we say "AYE" to
this Bill, it is finished.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I am craving the indul-
gence of the House. I do not want to make another
speech, but I am merely drawing to the attention of
the draughtsman of any amended Bill he may send
down, that under this amendment Section 10 of the
original Act is not repealed, and in section 10 the
apparatus that we find unlicenced is forfeited to the
Crown. If you do not amend that, that can happen for
the future; so tell the draughtsman to do the amend-
ment properly before he sends it back to the House.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Deputy Speaker, Imust
thank the hon. junior member for St. Joseph, but I was
telling the hon. member that Iwas accepting the pro-
posal which he had suggested.

The question that further consideration of this Bill be
postponed was put and resolved in the affirmative without
division

QUESTION TIME

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker,Ibeg to
move that Question Time be taken for half an hour.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

QUESTION re WATER SUPPLY IN ST.
PETER AND ST. ANDREW

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Question No. 191 stands
in the name of the hon. junior member for St. Peter.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the question
reads as follows:-

To enquire of the appropriate Minister:-

Is Government aware that residents of Bosco-
belle in the parishes of St. Peter and St. Andrew and
Mount, St. Peter and St. Andrew, receive an inter-
mittent supply of pipe-borne water of less than three
hours in a period of a twelve-hour day?

2. Will Government take steps to remedy this
state of affairs?







2122


Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, the Reply is.
as follows:-

1. Yes, Sir.

2. A new well at Alleynedale is being put into
supply shortly and this will improve the water supply
to some of the intermediate level areas in the Bosco-
belle and Mount districts. Consideration is also being
given to the erection of a reservoir in the Boscobelle
area to improve the water supply to the high eleva-
tions.

QUESTION re NUMBER OF DRUGGISTS

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Question No. 212 stands
in the name of the hon. juniormemberfor St. Peter.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the question
reads as follows:-

To enquire of the appropriate Minister:-

Is Government aware that the number of druggists
presently engaged in the dispensing of medicine is
hopelessly inadequate to cope with the needs of the
Island's population?

2. Is Government aware that the list of
Druggists as constituted at February, 1968, does not
present a true picture as to the number of registered
druggists, since some of the names thereon are of
persons long dead?

3. Will Government assist the local Pharma-
celtical Society in ways and means of enrolling more
under-studies to fill the needs of the profession and
assist it in discharging its very grave responsibility
to the community?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, on
behalf of the Hon. Minister of Health, the reply is
as follows:-

1. No, Sir.

2. No, Sir. The list includes the names of two
persons who died since itwas published in February,
1968.

3. Yes, Sir. At present employment of an
apprentice is purely a matter of private arrange-
ment between the apprentice and a registered drug-
gist. However, my Ministry has been investigating
the possibilities of developing a regular system of
training for paramedical professions,including phar-
macy. Preliminary discussions have already been
held with the Pharmaceutical Society.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I want to thank
the Hon. member, but I am surprised he did not give
it to the actual Ministerof Social Services to give the
reply.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Don't stir up any strife. The
question has been answered.


QUESTION re HOLETOWN POST OFFICE

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:Question No. 204 stands
in the name of the hon. seniormemberfor St. James.

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the question
reads as follows:-

To enquire of the Minister of Communications
and Works:-

Is the Minister aware that because of the in-
creased business at Holetown, St. James,the Holetown
post office should be extended as soon as possible?

2. Is the Minister aware that the driveway
leading to the said Post Office is too small to
accommodate the members of the general public who
attend there?

3. Will the Minister see to the extension of
the driveway and Post Office referred to as quickly
as possible?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Deputy Speaker,
on behalf of the Minister of Communications and
Works, the Reply is as follows:-

1. Yes, Sir.

2. No, Sir.

3. A proposal to extend the St. James Post
Office is being examined in the Ministry of Commu-
nications and Works.

QUESTION re GOVERNMENT-OWNED
HOUSE OR FLATS

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:Question No. 228 stands
in the name of the hon. seniormemberfor St. James.

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the question
reads as follows:-

To enquire of the appropriate Minister:

Will the Minister state the number of Ministers
of Government (other than the Prime Minister)who
during the past two years have occupied Government-
owned houses or flats in this Island?

2. Will the Minister state the names of any
such Ministers and what rentals each such Minister
paid in respect of the occupation of such houses?
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the
Reply is as follows:-
The Ministerof Education occupied "Windmar",
Flint Hall, from 10th September, 1967, to 7th Octo-
ber, 1967. The Minister of Communications and
Works occupied the said house from 9th October,
1967, to 15th May, 1968.
2. Both Ministers paid the rental rates
normally paid by other occupants of the letting at the
rate of $69.00 per month.







2123


Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Deputy Speaker, would the
Minister be able to state if this is the policy of Gov-
ernment for Ministers of Government to have such
houses or flats, or is this some preferential treat-
ment given to either of the two Ministers who occu-
pied the House?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Itwas certainly not the latter.
First of all, the hon. member may not know this, but
Government lettings are administered by a Commit-
tee of the Ministry of Home Affairs. These two Min-
isters applied in the usual way, and the facility was
granted to them on grounds which satisfied the par-
ticular Committee.
4.50 p.m.

Mr. HINDS: I wonder if the Minister can tell us
if the rental was arrived at onthe basis of a percen-
tage of the salary as is done inthe case of Civil Ser-
vants.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: If the hon. memberhad heard
the reply, he would recall that I said that both Minis-
ters paid the rental rates normally paid by other
occupants of the letting, that is, at the rate of $60 a
month. That is what, as far as I can understand it,
is normally charged for that particular letting.

Mr. HINDS. I would like to have from the Minis-
ter some idea as to whether these are three-bedroom
flats or four-bedroom flats or what. Is it a house
with ten rooms or what? In other words, I want to
know if the Minister was getting his $60 a month's
worth.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Since it is perfectly possible
that the hon. member knew about this before I did,
he is probably better informed. I really do not know,
I cannot assist him in that. All I know is that this
House is'4n Flint Hall.

Mr. HINDS: I wonder if the Leader of the House
has ever visited this particular flat at Flint Hall.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, I have never.

ACQUISITION OF LAND ADJOINING THE
HOLETOWN POST OFFICE

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Question No. 229,stand-
ing in the name of the hon. senior member for St.
James. That is on page 20.

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Deputy Speaker, to enquire of
the appropriate Minister:-
Will the Minister take steps to acquire compul-
sory or otherwise, the parcel of land south of and
adjoining the Holetown Post Office forthe purpose of
providing an Esplanade for the use of the parishioners
of Saint James?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the
Reply to the hon. member's question is as follows:-

"Government does not at present propose to
acquire the parcel of land South of the adjoining
Holetown Post Office."


Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, does the Min-
ister mean that the Government would consider ac-
quiring this land at a future date?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, it does not mean that. It
means that it is not considering it at present.

Mr. HINDS: I asked if he would consider acquir-
ing it at some future date. I understandthe Minister
to say that the Government is not at present consid-
ering acquiring this land for this purpose. From that
am I not to understand that the Governmentis likely
to consider it at a future date?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: That is possible. WhenI say
this, I do not assist the hon. membermuch. I can say
it is possible that he would consider it, but the point
is that, at the moment, there is no proposal to do
so. This would not bind the Government for the fu-
ture.

Mr. HINDS: Am I to understand the Minister
that there is not a proposal to acquire the land at this
present moment for this particular purpose?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, you understand me
correctly.

Mr. HINDS: Are you presently acquiring this
land for some other purpose? That is what I am ask-
ing the Minister.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, Sir.

Mr. CRAIG: Is the Minister saying then that
the need for an Esplarade in St. James, south of
Holetown is not really necessary.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, Sir, I am not saying that.

ACCIDENTS OCCURRING AT FOUR-CROSS
ROADS JUNCTION

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Question No. 193,stand-
ing in the name of the hon. junior member for St.
Peter.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, to enquire of
the appropriate Minister:-

1. How many accidents involving vehicles,
persons, and other than vehicles and persons, have
been reported to the Police Authorities as having
occurred at the four-cross roads junction known as
Eagle Hall Corner in the parish of St. Michael since
the installation of traffic lights there?

2. How many such accidents have been so
reported as occurring in the corresponding period
previous to the installation of the said lights?

3. How many of the accidents occurring in
each period involved two or more persons, and two
or more vehicles in one and the same accident?

4. How many persons suffered injury in each
corresponding period?







2124
------


5. Is the Minister aware that the point of
intersection of the highways converging at this cor-
ner does not afford a sufficient area for driving
around same without endangering the safety of vehi-
cles and persons not turning right orleft, as the case
may be?

6. If the answer to No. 5 above is in the
affirmative, will Government take steps to make
travelling at this junction safer for the general pub-
lic?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, the
Reply to the hon. member's question is as follows:-

1. Sixty-eight accidents involving vehicles
were reported to the Police since the traffic lights
were installed in 1960.

2. This information is not available since no
records were kept.

3. Fifty-seven accidents of the 68 reported
from 1960 involved two or more vehicles. There
was one accident involving vehicle andtwo or more
persons.

4. Twenty-three persons were injured inthe
68 accidents reported since 1960.

5. No, Sir.

6. Does not arise.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, does the
Minister not consider that 57 out of 68 accidents
involving two or more vehicles and the 23 persons
present a somewhat dangerous situation at this cor-
ner?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: As I understand it, Mr.
Deputy Speaker, most of the accidents occurred in
swinging right from Black Rock going to Barbarees
and left from Bank Hall going into Barbarees; but
never or rather seldom swinging right from Bank
Hall into Eagle Hall, or left from Black Rock going
into Eagle Hall.
4.10 p.m.

Mr. HINDS: From the information the Minister
has just given us, does it notoccurto him that there
is something wrong at the point of intersectionwhen
coming from Black Rock and turning into Barbarees
Road, or going from Bank Hall into Barbarees Road?
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I agree with the hon. mem-
ber that there does seem to be something wrong. It
could, of course, be a mixture of bad judgment, for-
tuitous circumstances, or a greater concourse of
people and vehicles making the right and left turns
on that side than make the right and left turns on the
other side. I cannot give any scientific reason, but it
seems to me that it could be a mixture of all three.
Mr. HINDS: In the light of the replies that the
Minister has just given, does the Minister still main-
tain that his reply to Question No. 5 is "No"?


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, I still, but only because
I am not able to pinpoint the reasons for the fre-
quency of accidents. If I could, I would agree with
the hon. member.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, was the object
of the Questions not to cause the Ministerto cause an
investigation into what was the cause of these acci-
dents?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: This was done, but it would
seem to me that the people making the investigations
were in no better position to give a reason for these
accidents than I myself or, perhaps, even the hon.
member. They just could not find a reason.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Deputy Speaker, is the Minister
saying that the persons who were investigating the
matter have reported before they completed their
investigations?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I have
every reason to believe that the investigations were
thorough, but there comes a point, in a matter like
this, when you have to hazard sensible guesses be-
cause you cannot pinpoint the reasons.

Mr. HINDS: Can the Minister tell us if any en-
gineers were involved in the investigations?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes.

Mr. HINDS: Did the Police assist in carrying out
the investigations?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes.

Mr. HINDS: Did your Town and Country Planning
Officers assist in the investigations?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes.

Mr. HINDS: Did they go and try to observe the
movement of traffic at this particular point?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: They did everything except
become involved in accidents themselves.

Mr. HINDS: Does the Minister agree that they
have done everything to cause him to come head on into
a collision in this House?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No. I do not believe that I
have come head on into a collision. I believe that
the hon. member's judgment is such that he will
avoid me.


PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg
to move that Private Members' Business be now
taken for half an hour.


Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.







2125


The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.


REPORT OF SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE
BARBADOS ASSOCIATION OF MENTALLY
RETARDED CHILDREN BILL

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I begleave to
present the Report of the Select Committee appointed
to consider and Report on the Bill to incorporate the
Barbados Association of Mentally Retarded Children.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

REPORT OF SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE
LIONS CLUB OF BARBADOS BILL, 1968

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I begto move
that the Report of the Select Committee which sat
on the Bill to incorporate the Lions Association be
the next Order of the Day.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg to move
that this Report be adopted.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, Iwould
like to say, in respect of this Bill, that the Cabinet
has no objection to it, and will be pleased to support
it.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg to move
that the Bill be now read a third time.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg to move
that this Bill do now pass.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative

i without division.
BARBADOS ASSOCIATION OF MENTALLY
RETARDED CHILDREN BILL, 1968

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I begto move
that the Report of the Committee on the Bill to in-
corporate the Barbados Association of Mentally
Retarded Children be the next Order of the Day.


Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I begtomove
that this Report be now adopted.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I begto move
that this Bill be now read a third time.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, Iwould
like to say, in respect of this Bill, that the Cabinet
has no objection, and the Bill is supported.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

4.20 p.m.

Mr. LYNCH: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I beg to move
that this Bill do now pass.

Mr. HOPPIN: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: It seems to me, Mr. Deputy
Speaker ........

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Deputy Speaker,
I was just conferring with the hon. seniormember for
St. James. I do not propose to dealwith any of mine,
and the hon. senior member for St. Joseph and the
hon. senior member for Christ Church not being in
their places, I was just asking the hon. senior mem-
ber for St. James which item standing in his name
he would like to do. I understand he wants to do No.
16, in which case I begto move that Order No. 16 un-
der Private Members' Business be the nextOrderof
the Day.

Mr. CRAIG: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

RESOLUTION re MOTOR VEHICLE INSURANCE
(THIRD PARTY RISKS) ACT, 1952

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Deputy Speaker, a Resolution
of this nature would have taken the assistance of some
of the legal luminaries, but unfortunately they happen
not to be here. As the moverof this Resolution, I can
only speak on iutout of case which was drawn to my
attention by one of my constituents in St. James. I do
not pretend to be any expert on this type of insurance,
but I feel very unhappy, after hearing of the circum-







2126



stances surrounding a man who found himself in the
ignorant position of not having full third party insur-
ance because he did not know any better, and because
of the cost of it, he withdrew himself and decided to
have what Government provides for as the minimum
insurance which one should have for the purpose of
having a vehicle on the road. This arises out of the
unfortunate situation of a man who finds himself with
the fantastic bill of $327 to pay because this Third
Party Risk Act as it now stands does not provide him
with the coverwhich anyone should normally have.The
difference which I have observedbetweenthe amount
of money which one pays for the minimum amount of
insurance on his car under the Act as against what
he pays for Full Third Party can, I think, be filled in
if this Act is looked into more carefully.

Mr. Deputy Speaker, I am not going to proceed
further with this Resolution at this stage because I
believe that many of my colleagues inthe Legal Pro-
fession would be quite eager to speak on it and are at
present not in the Chamber. I therefore beg to move
that further consideration of this matter be post-
poned.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

ADJOURNMENT

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, I think
this comes to the end of all Government Business
for today's sitting. I consulted with the Hon. Leader
of the Opposition in person as well as with my own
colleagues on this side, and there is a consensus that
we are all very tired and we do not wish to see each
other for quite some time.

I therefore beg to move, and againIdo this with
the concurrence of the hon. member opposite andwith
the agreement of this side, that this House do now
adjourn until Tuesday, 29th October, 1968, at 12
o'clock noon.

I take this opportunity to wish Your Honours, His
Honour the Speaker and yourself, and His Honour the
Chairman as well as all hon. members both on this
side and the other, a very enjoyable and refreshing
recess and to express the hope thatwe shall all come
back after the recess ready for the fray again.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I second the motion, Mr.
Deputy Speaker, and heartily endorse all that the hon.


member has said especially as regards yourself, Mr.
Speaker, Mr. Chairman of Committees and the Offi-
cers of the House. I will repeat, without in any way
wanting it to be taken as a suggestion that the Hon.
Leader of the House would not have told his colleagues
what I told him today, that I hope members of the
Government will see that all Questions are ready for
answer when we come back. He assured me that he
has been taking steps to see that this was done; so I
am glad of that. It would ease considerably the feel-
ingon this side of the House that the Government does
not really care whether the Opposition's Questions
are answered. I wish to congratulate the Hon. Leader
of the House in reaching the stage when he feels that
these Questions have been hanging fire for too long,
some as far back as the middle of last year. That is
a little too bad, considering that as all hon. members
must know, every day in the House of Commons a
hundred questions are on the Order Paper and are
answered unless hon. members happen not to be in
their places, and they ask supplementaries.You buy
Hansard every day and discover the answers are
there set out. Spend more money rightly and properly
in being up to date as much as possible. Nobody on
this side of the House is going to object to the expen-
diture of money in the right direction; so I hope that
members will pardon me for making use of this oppor-
tunity when it ought to be only a question of wishing
each other a happy recess and all the rest of it, but
which is perfectly lawful to use always on the question
of the adjournment of the House to say anything.


I wish hon. members of the Government Benches
a rest during which time they will have opportunity for
reflecting as to their sins and becoming good Chris -
tians.
4.30 p.m.


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Deputy Speaker, inwind-
ing up I should like to associate myself with the re-
marks made by the hon. member. I give him the
assurance which he has asked for and to tell him that
we should certainly reflect on our sins, but we may
not do it quite well because the sins of the hon. mem-
bers opposite are so weighty that we may not have
time to reflect on both; but we will try. (Laughter).


The question that this House do now adjourn !.til
Tuesday 29th October, 1968, at 12 o'clock (noon) was put and
resolved in the affirmative without division, and Mr. SPEAKER
adjourned the House accordingly.
4.34 p.m.




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