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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00116
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00116
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 597
        Page 598
        Page 599
        Page 600
        Page 601
        Page 602
        Page 603
        Page 604
    Supplement: Senate debates for 25th July, 1968
        Page A 429
        Page A 430
        Page A 431
        Page A 432
        Page A 433
        Page A 434
        Page A 435
        Page A 436
        Page A 437
        Page A 438
        Page A 439
    Supplement: Senate debates for 1st August, 1968
        Page A 440
        Page A 441
        Page A 442
        Page A 443
        Page A 444
        Page A 445
        Page A 446
        Page A 447
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 105: Miscellaneous controls (control of prices) (amendment) (No. 6) order, 1969
        Page B 1
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 106: Customs duties (semi-finished hoods for the use in the manufacture of hats) 1969
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 107: Industrial incentives (approved products) (processed fruit, flavours, and flavouring compounds) order, 1969
        Page B 4
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 108: Directions given by comissioner of police re Barbados Rally Club on 18th and 29th June, 1969
        Page B 5
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 104: Land acquisition re land at Christ Church for the purpose of providing a playing field (second publication)
        Page B 6
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40; S.I. 103: Land acquisition re land at Saint Michael for the purpose of highway improvement (third publication)
        Page B 7
Full Text









VOL. CIV.


*Wirial


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS,26TH JUNE, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Acting Appointments: G. 0. Forde to act as Senior
Executive Officer, National Insurance Office and
Mrs. J. E. Forde to act as Administrative Assistant
Ministry of Communications and Works.;..,... 598
Appointments: Oswald E. Inqilj as Records Officer,
Ministry of Health and Community Development 597
L. A. Deane as Comptroller of Customs........ 597
0. J. Alleyne, as Principal, Government
Industrial Schools... ....... ..... ....... 597
H. M. Carter as Junior Laboratory Technician,
Health Centres......;;......;;; ....... ,.... 598
Assignment: Chezley R. Boyce as Magistrate Dists.
"B" and "C"................................ : 598
Diplomatic: Mr. Kuan Wu Feng, Second Secretary,
promoted to First Secretary........; ............... 598
Appointment of Miss Eileen R. Donovan as
Ambassador of the United States of America
to Barbados.................;; ........... 598
Income Tax Notice re Payment of Income Tax by 30th
June, 1969....................: ..........: 599
Licensing of Air Services (3)..;;;;;;.;:..;...;;.....;....560-56
Patent: "Improvements in or relating to organic
compounds'.'.......;;;. ;;. ;;;;.;. ;;;;.,:.:,;;;; .;;;... ; 598
Probate Advertisements dated 20th June, 1969........603, 604
Resignations: Jacqueline Dottin, Varitypist, Ronald O.
Gall, Clerical Officer and Sybil Clarke, Staff
Nurse, from the Public Service .;;.............. 597, 598
Senate Debates for 25th July and 1st August, 1968.
Legal Supplement
S.I. 1969 No. 105: Miscellaneous Controls (Control of Prices)
(Amendment) (No. 6) Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 106: Customs Duties (Semi-finished Hoods for
use in the Manufacture of Hats, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 107: Industrial Incentives (Approved Products)
(Processed Fruit, Flavours and Flavouiing Compounds)
Order, 1969.
S.I: 1969 No. 108: Directions given by Commissioner of Police
re Barbados Rally Club on 28th.and 29th June, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 104: Land Acquisition re land at Christ Church
for the purpose of providing a Playing Field.
(Second Publication)
S.I. 1969 No. 103: Land Acquisition re land at Saint Micha -
for the purpose of Highway Improvement. (Third u
Publication)


NOTICE NO. 447
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Appointments
Oswald E. Inniss, Senior Clerk, has been
appointed Records Officer, Ministry of Health
and Community Development with effect from
1st May, 1969.

(M. P. 1515/39/19/17)

L. A. Deane, Assistant Comptroller of
Customs, has been appointed to the postof
Comptroller of Customs,' with effect from
1st September, 1967.

(M. P. C. 443)
0. J. Alleyne, Vice Principal, Govern-
ment Industrial Schools,,has been appointed
to the post of Principal, Government Indus-
trial Schools, with- effect from 1st May, 1969.

(M. P. 4761)
Resignation
Jacqueline Dottin, Varitypist, Govern-
ment Printing Office resigns from the Public
Service with effect from 28th June, 1969.


X~~.7af
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NO. SI


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OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 26, 1969


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Assignment

Chezley R. Boyce has been assigned as
Magistrate, Districts "B" and "C" in con-
junction with his existing assignment as Mag-
istrate in charge of the Criminal Court at
District "A", with effect from the 28th June,
1969.


Acting Appointments

G. O. Forde, Executive Officer, has been
appointed to act as Senior Executive Officer,
National Insurance Office, with effect from
20th May to 26th September, 1969.

(M. P. 7664/9)

Mrs. J. E. Forde, Secretary, has been
appointed to act as Administrative Assistant,
Ministry of Communications and Works, with
effect from 1st June, 1969, until further
notice.

(M. P. 1515/39/20/9)

Appointment

H. M. Carter has been appointed to the
post of Junior Laboratory Technician, Health
Centres, with effect from 1st May, 1969.

(M. P. 5968/12)

Resignations
Ronald O. Gall, Clerical Officer, Water-
works Department, has resigned from the
Public Service with effect from 1st June,
1969.

(M. P. P.7529)
Sybil Clarke, Staff Nurse, Queen Eliza-
beth Hospital, resigns from the Public
Service with effect from 1st July, 1969.


(M. P. P. 8083)


Diplomatic


Mr. Kuan Wu Feng, Second Secretary
of the Embassy of the Republic of China, has
been promoted to First Secretary with effect
from 17th May, 1969.

(M. P. Ex- C. 23)


Diplomatic

The Government of Barbados has given
its agreement to the appointment of Miss
Eileen R. Donovan as Ambassador Extraor-
dinary and Plenipotentiary of the United
States of America to Barbados.

(M. P. EX-C. 12)



NOTICE NO. 448

PUBLIC NOTICE


Patents Act, 1903- 7, Sec. 10


NOTICE is hereby given that SANDOZ
PATENTS LIMITED of 590 Jarvis Street,
Toronto 5, Ontario, Canada lodged in this
Office an application and Complete specifi-
cation for a patent under the Patent Act
1903 (1903-7), for an invention for "IM-
PROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO OR-
GANIC COMPOUNDS"

The said Specification with amendments
has been accepted and is open to public in-
spection at this Office. The proposed amend-
ments are by way of corrections and minor
additions in view of typographical errors.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


June 26, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







June 26. 1969


L AICIFFO GAZET


.. ,^.599



Income Tax Notice


PAYMENT OF TAX BY 30TH JUNE, 1969


Income taxpayers are hereby reminded that in respect of re-
turns of income (for income year 1968) filed on or before 30th April,
1969, one half (1/2) of the tax estimated and unpaid is now payable on or
before 30th June, 1969.

2. Please pay early and by cheque or Postal Order if you can.
Do not remit cash through the post.

3. Failure to pay the tax by 30th June, 1969 will result in the
imposition of the following penalties:-

(a) 5% of the amount due and unpaid or $10.00 whichever is the
greater.

(b) interest at the rate of 1% per month calculated for each month
during which any amount of tax and penalty remained unpaid on the
largest amount of tax and penalty that was due and unpaid at any time
in that month.

(Sgd.) W. A. GITTENS
Commissioner of Inland Revenue.











Government Notice



LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES


The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received
the under mentioned application to operate a Scheduled Air Service:


1. Name and Address of
Applicant:


Air Canada,
1 Place Ville Marie, Montreal, Quebec,
CANADA.


2. Places between which


passengers and goods are
to be carried:

3. Places at which inter-
mediate landings are to
be made and the purposes
for which made:

4. Times or frequency of
the service:

5. Period for which the
Licence is applied for:

6. Latest date for making
representations or
objections:


Barbados/Trinidad



(a) For traffic purposes Nil
(b) Weather alternates Antigua;
Port-of-Spain.


5 Flights weekly.



5 years



10th July, 1969.


This Application will be considered by the Air Transport Licensing
Authority in accordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation (Licensing of Air
Services) Regulations, 1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this
application must be made in writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are
based and any conditions which it may be desired shall be attached to the licence
if granted. They should be addressed to the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing
Authority, C/o Prime Minister's Office, Government Headquarters, Bay Street, and
a copy sent to the applicant at the same time. Further details of the application may
be obtained from the Secretary.


June 26, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








V.


Government Notice


LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES



The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received
the under mentioned application to operate a Scheduled Air Service:


1. Name and Address of
Applicant:



2. Places between which
passengers and goods are
to be carried:

3. Places at which inter-
mediate landings are to
be made and the purposes
for which made:

4. Times or frequency of
the service:

5. Period for which the
Licence is applied for:

6. Latest date for making
representations or
objections:


Air Canada
1 Place Ville Marie, Montreal,
Quebec, CANADA.



Barbados/Toronto



(a) For traffic purposes Antigua;
Bermuda.
(b) Weather alternates Antigua;
Port-of-Spain.



3 Flights weekly.



5 years.



10th July, 1969.


This Application will be considered by the Air Transport Licensing
Authority in accordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation (Licensing of Air
Services) Regulations, 1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this
application must be made in writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are
based and any conditions which it may be desired shall be attached to the licence if
granted. They should be addressed to the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing
Authority, C/o Prime Minister's Office, Government Headquarters, Bay Street, and
a copy sent to the applicant at the same time. Further details of the applicationmay
be obtained from the Secretary.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


e nuJ 26 1969











Government Notice


LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES



The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received
the under mentioned application to operate a Scheduled Air Service:


1. Name and Address of
Applicant:



2. Places between which
passengers and goods are
to be carried:

3. Places at which inter-
mediate landings are to
be made and the purposes
for which made:


4. Times or frequency of
the service:

5. Period for which the
Licence is applied for:

6. Latest date for making
representations or


Air Canada
1 Place Ville Marie, Montreal,
Quebec, CANADA.



Barbados/Montreal



(a) For traffic purposes Antigua;
Bermuda.


(b) Weather alternates Antigua;
Port-of-Spain.


5 Flights weekly



5 years



10th July, 1969.


objections:

This Application will be considered by the Air Transport Licensing
Authority in accordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation (Licensing of Air
Services) Regulations, 1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this
application must be made in writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are
based and any conditions which it may be desired shall be attached to the licence if
granted. They should be addressed to the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing
Authority, C/o Prime Minister's Office, Government Headquarters, Bay Street, and
a copy sent to the applicant at the same time. Further details of the application may
be obtained from the Secretary.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 26, 1969








June 26 1969


PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-



PROBATE of the Will dated the 8th day of January, 1969 of ROSALIE VIOLET DOWNES
late of 1st Avenue, Pine Land in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died
on the 17th day of February, 1969, by ETHELBERT WINFIELD KING, the sole
Executor named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 25th day of August, 1967 of MARJORIE FRIEDA WARNER
late of "Peacehaven", Clermont in the parish of Saint Thomas in this Island who
died on the 7th day of August, 1968, by RONALD BASIL WARNER, one of the Ex-
ecutors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 16th day of August, 1967 of MILLICENT FREDERICK
PAYNE late of Country Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died
on the 29th day of July, 1968, by GRACE MITCHELL and ALBAN DEVERE
EDWARDS, the Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 18th day of November, 1966 of CLAIRE ELIZABETH
WARNER late of Marchfield in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who died on
the 27th day of September, 1967, by PRINCESS ALBERTHA BRANFORD, the sole
Executrix named in the Will of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of ELGIN FITZGERALD PRESCOD late
of the Pine Housing Area in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on
the 17th day of December, 1965 by THELMA DOREEN GILL, daughter of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION of FREDERICK WILLIAM DENISON HUNTE late of
Foul Bay in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who diedonthe 14th day of
January, 1968, by CLARA ERNESTINE HUNTE, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of HADRIAN ADOLPHUS FORDE late of
Lowthers Hill in the parish of Christ Church in this Island who died on the 24th day
of December, 1968, by IRIS VERONA FORDE, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of IDA GERTRUDE PHILLIPS late of
Near St. Stephens in the District of Black Rock in the parish of Saint Michael in this
Island who died on the 17th day of January, 1969, by GERALDINE EUPHENE
MAXWELL, cousin of the said deceased.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


603


June 26. 1969












PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS Co tinued


LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate ofLEONORA SMfh late of 18 Thatford
Avenue, Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America who died on the 26th
day of October, 1941, by CHARLES LLEWELLYN RILEY, the constituted Attorney
on record in this Island of PEARL EUGENE HOLFORD, daughter of the said de-
ceased.


LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CARMEN URSULA CHANDLER late of
2nd. Avenue, Promenade Road, Kew Land in the parish of Saint Michael in this Is-
land who died on the 9th day of April, 1969, by CASWOLD CHANDLER, son of the
said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of NAAMAN HOLDER late of Westbury
Road in the parish of SaintMichael in this Island who died on the 26th day of Novem-
ber, 1953, by ENID HOLDER, widow of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Advertise-
ment with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications
have been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.


Dated this 20th day of June, 1969.


C. A. ROCHEPORD
Registrar.


Government Printing Oice.
Government Printing notice.


-OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 26. 1969











THE


SENATE


DEBATES


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71
'


THE SENATE
Thursday, 25th July, 1968.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith PHILLIPS,
B. A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable
F. G. SMITH, Q.C. (Attorney General); Senator the
Honourable L.E. SANDIFORD, M.A. (Minister of
Education); Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H.
(Parliamentary Secretary); Senator C. L.
BRATHWAITE; Senator F.C.H. CAREW; Senator
S. V. ASHBY; Senator F.L. WALCOTT, O.B.E.
Senator M. A. KING; Senator H. F. ALKINS; Sena-
tor E. Lisle WARD; Senator D. A. WILES, C.M.G.,
O.B.E.; Senator W. W. BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator
S. A. BLANCHETTE and Senator Erma V. ROCK.

ABSENT

Senator the Honourable P. M. GREAVES, B.A.,
(Minister of Home Affairs); Senator Dr. R. B.
CADDLE, BSc.,M. B. B. S.; Senator P. G. MORGAN;
Senator R. G. MAPP; Senator N. A. BARROW.

Prayers were said.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith, Attorney
General, laid the following paper in the absence of
the Leader of the Senate:

Training Report for the year 1st April, 1967 to
31st March, 1968.

STATEMENT BY HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT

Before the business of the day was enteredupon
His Honour the President informed the Senate that
certified copies of only three Orders on the Order
Paper for the day had been received from the House
of Assembly and that in the circumstances it would
not be possible to deal with the remaining three
Orders under Government Business unless certified
copies were received before the meeting was ad-
journed.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) NO.11

The President called the second Order -A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $21,447 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1968 -
69 Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1968 69 No. 10 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Mr. Presi-
dent, The notes to this Resolution speak for them-
selves. As regards Item 151, Child Care Committee,
it is proposed to increase the annual subvention to
the Child Care Committee to enable it to meet
additional commitments due to the retirement on
pension of one of its nurses and to its proposals
to expand and intensify its work.

Paragraph 2 points out that the Government
proposes to assist the Child Care Committee with
the cost of a new motor van by way of a non-recur-
rent grant. The Committee's need for an additional
van arises from its plans for expansion.

I think that this Senate must be aware of the
work which this body is doing and must be aware of
the composition of this Committee which is concern-
ed with assisting young children in this community.
Already this Committee plays a very important role
in Public Health work. It cooperates fully with the
Public Health Department and the Department deal-
ing with Obstetrics etc. at the Queen Elizabeth
Hospital.

I am sure, that considering the work which this
Committee does, the increase asked for will meet
with the sympathetic consideration of this Hon. Sen-
ate. They can be no doubt that costs are increasing.
In the 1968 69 Estimates there was included a
vote of $9,690 as Government's subventionqtowards
the cost of the service. The increased cost which
the Child Care Committee is experiencing is main-
ly due to the increased Salaries of nurses and the re-
tirement of another nurse who has rendered yeoman
service and who will have to be given a pension on
retirement.

I could go into greater detail. This Committee
is a voluntary organisation and it rendered very
good service, and the Government would like to place


~I _











-n record its appreciation of the voluntary services
which are rendered. In this community I wish that
more people who are interested in giving of their
time and of their knowledge to the assistance of the
more unfortunate members of this community and
when one finds any organisation whose members
are so interested in improving the lot of the less
fortunate, I do not believe that you can praise them
too much, and you cannot do too much, if it is possi-
ble, to assist them financially.

It is interesting to note that some of the funds
on which this body operates are raised by voluntary
subscription. Independent collections in1965totalled
$5,000 and in 1966, $4,400. I would like to appeal
to any of those who may be motivated by charitable
interests to consider this committee, this voluntary
organisation, by contributing towards this work.

I beg to move that the Resolution be concurred
in.

Senator H. Odessa Gittens seconded the motion.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, all of us will be happy to support this Reso-
lution, and there can be no gainsaying that the Child
Care Committee is doing a fine job in certain very
difficult circumstances.

As the Attorney General has said, it is a volun-
tary Committee, and as its name clearly indicates
it is concerned with the care of children. Now, Mr.
President, the care of the children in this community
is a fundamental problem of Government,andhow-
ever well meaning and however effective the efforts
of a voluntary organisation may be, the Government
cannot escape this fundamental responsibility.

The administrative arrangements which existed
before the abolition of the Local Government Councils
to a large extent made the care of children the re-
sponsibility of the Council. I am speaking of those
children who are from destitute homes and who need
care. These children came properly under the care
of the Councils and now the aegis of the Public As-
sistance Board.

Mr. President. I happen to be Chairman of the
Public Assistance Board. The present Boardwas only
:appointed a matter of two or three weeks ago. I was
also Chairman of the last Board and if I had to sum
up my experience as Chairman of that Public Assis-
tance Board it could be done easily, and in one
word frustration.

It was a Board which, under the Act, was sup-
posed to have certain functions. Its main objects were
to be in charge of the administration of Public Assis-
tance throughout the island, to co-ordinate the efforts
of the various District Councils including the Bridge-
town City Council, to supervise the administration
of public funds and under the Act the Board is vested
with the authority to make recommendations which
will have legal power, and by this means the Board
- would be able to see that its policies are carried out.


The Public Assistance Board was, and is of
course responsible to the Government, The Public
Assistance Act of 1954 in Section 6 says that the
Board is, subject to the provisions of this Act,
charged with the direction and .control. of all matters
relating to the administration of public assistance
in this Island according to the law in force for the
time being.

Now, Sir, as is well known to members of this
honourable House, the Councils all went their own
way in almost everything especially in the admins-
istration of public funds, and the chief offender
amongst the Councils was the. Bridgetown City Coun-
cil, and they' are facts that cannot be disputed.

The Public Assistance Board was completely
powerless, and I declare Mr. President, that child-
ren who had perhaps the greatest need where the
administration of public assistance funds was con-
cerned were the greatest sufferers, and to a large
extent they still are.

That is why I am taking this opportunity to bring
to the attention of this Hon. House certain facts
which have been brought to my attention as Chair-
man of the Board. We all know that for quite some
time destitute children were housed in the infirm-
aries, where you had elderly people, people with
chronic diseases, housed under appalling conditions;
and these conditions still exist at the Bridgetown
Infirmary.


After considerable discussion and advice given
over the years it was finally decided that the child-
ren should be removed from these infirmaries and
housed in separate homes; but there are still a
large number of children in the Bridgetown Infirmary.



There are, Mr. President, 106 children in that
Infirmary, and these children share facilities such
as they are with about 494 adults. Housing for the
inmates is inadequate. The Infirmary is overcrowded
and there is difficulty in keeping the floors clean
because the floors, I understand, are in many in-
stances, bare earth, earth which has been hardened
in the process of time by people walking over it.



Sanitary accommodation is also inadequate and
there is a general need for proper sanitation. I do
not know if members are aware that there was an
infestation of rats and that has not been eradicated
to any appreciable extent. Efforts have been made
to deal with this but particularly during the rainy
season when the rats leave the cane fields they seem
to head straight for the Bridgetown Infirmary.



Of the 400 odd adult inmates, 50 per cent are
people with medical problems. These facts have to be


__1 __1 I











brought to light because it is against this background.
that you find children in this infirmary. Of the adults
105 are in extremist about six suffer from cancer
25 to 30 are blind, about10 are confirmed, alchololics
and there are about 75 psychopathswho do not qualify
for the Mental Hospital, but who have no homes to go
to and have to seek refuge in the Infirmary.

So the Infirmary seems to be a place where
those in the lower depths go and children are still
in that institution. Of the children, according to the
report that has been given to the Board, 50 per cent
need medical attention and 15 per cent are retarded.
With a shortage of trained staff at the Infirmary these
children cannot be properly dealt with. You cannot
begin to deal with mentally retarded children when
the conditions at the Infirmary are such as obtain.

Mr. President, I could go on, but I think that I
have said enough to give to this Hon. House some
indication of the conditions which exist at the Infirm-
ary. I do not wish to go into any background as to why
these conditions exist. I will say this, that certain
agencies in this community were aware for some
time of the conditions which exist there; but until
the Councils were abolished by legislation, the
persons who had the knowledge were to a large ex-
tent inhibited by fear from either speaking out or tak-
ing action or attempting to take action.

The administration of Public Assistance in the
metropolitan area was the preserve of the Bridge-
town City Council, but now that we have had the ad-
ministration of these Councils taken over by the
Central Government the problem is one that is
fairly and squarely in the lap of the Central Gov-
ernment and, Mr. President, it is unfortunate that
the responsibilities for the administration of Public
Assistance which were once the province of Local
Government Councils should be added to thosewhich
are now the province of the Interim Commissioner.

Let me put it this way. Since the Councils have
been abolished we all know that the Interim Commis-
sioner has under his port-folio the responsibility for
the affairs which were once the province of the
Councils, but it seems to me that this department is
overburdened.

It may well be that the Government should take
a careful look at this aspect of the Interim Commis-
sioner's portfolio because it seems to me that the
care of children is a top priority. It cannot be given
the attention it deserves when the department which
looks after it is over-burdened with problems which
may appear to be equally impressive.

I am aware that recently there has been Com-
mittee set up by Government inwhich certain persons
who have an interest in this work will get together
and advise the Interim Commissioner in respect to
the housing of children and the problem incidental
thereto. That is a step in the right direction; but as
far as I am concerned there can be no delay in a
matter of this nature. It is one of the utmost im-
portance.


Children have got to be moved out of the infirm-
aries and they have got to go into homes which must
be run properly, and not like at the Nightengale
Home. Those who have anything to do with Public
Assistance know that the management of that insti-
tution is inept and totally wrong. There have been
instances where children had accounts at commer-
cial banks, not overwhelming amounts, but here itis
that you had public funds being administered to
relieve the poor and destitute and you had a home
which was a place where children who were desti-
tute were allowed to stay and to be looked after.

When you reached a certain age and some of
them were allowed to stay until they reached the
early twenties they went to work, and the money they
earned was put on bank accounts. There was no
question of contributing towards their upkeep or
giving the children a sense of responsibility and
making them realise that in life you have to make a
way for yourself.

This was an abuse of the whole purpose of Pub-
lic Assistance, and, Mr. President, I think that the
Government and I believe that the Government is
aware of these problems I think that the Government
will have to regard this as a top priority.

It is not sufficient to support the efforts of the
Child Care Committee; but in its own right I would
like to say that the Government should bring down
comprehensive legislation dealing with the question
of child care in this island. I mean legislation deal-
ing with the accommodation of childreninthe homes,
legislation dealing with the provision of properly
trained staff.

You had a situationwhere the staff at the Bridge-
town Infirmary were in some instances recruited
from the same children at the Nightengale Home.
They were children who were in the Nightengale and
who had no proper training but theywere on the staff
of the Bridgetwon Infirmary. They get no particularly
attractive wages, but they act as nurses.

That is the deplorable situation which you still
have, and which the Government has taken over and
about which something has to be done and done
without delay. You do not need a doctor to tell you
that the conditions are deplorable. You do not need
an expert to tell you that children should not be in
infirmaries or tell you that children in Children's
Homes should be trained to be useful citizens and
not to be parasites.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Mr. Presi-
dent, I have taken note of what Senator Phillips
has said, and the Government is at the moment con-
sidering draft legislation dealing with the re-organ-
isation of the entire Local Government System which
was abolished in 1967.

I can assure the Senator that legislation to settle
all aspects of Local Government is a colossal exer-
cise and consequently it has been employing the
Attorney General's Department for almost six











months. But whenever we are getting downto it some
other important issue comes up on which we have to
get work done as soon as possible.

The Government has shown its interest in child
care, not only by contributing to the worthwhile
organistation at Farrs, but that very contribution is
an indication that the Government is removing child-
ren from the almshouses. If you visit Farrs you will
see one instance of the Government's attitude to-
wards these unfortunate children who live in the alms-
houses, and I am glad that Senator Phillips has raised
the points that he has raised.

There can be no doubt that the whole system
of child care in the corporate area was a political
football used by people to give the impression that
they were helping them out; that they were giving
them money out of their own pockets whenthey were
using the peoples money to do it, and not even doing
it well.

That is one of the reasons that causes us to
abolish Local Government. Although there was no
corruption in the real sense of the word, people
had to hold their hands out as if they were begging
for bread, while they were being given out to the
taxpayers' money. The Government not only removed
it, but will put something in its place to improve
the condition of the children and the whole adminis-
tration of Local Government in this country.

In due course you will see the legislation which
will put this Committee on a proper footing and
provide the conditions which will make for the
improvement of the conditions which it is designed
to improve.

The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put and agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND MOTOR VEHICLES
TAX ACT, 1960

The President called the fourth Order A
Bill to amend the Motor Vehicles Tax Act, 1960.


SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Mr. Presi-
dent, I think that Senators must have listened to
the speech of the Hon Minister of Finance when he
made his Financial Statement and Budgetary Pro-
posals in the Other Place some time ago.

This Bill is just one of the numerous Bills
which will be coming before Parliament within a
period of four months to carry out the budgetary
proposals as mentioned on that occasion.

This particular Bill seeks to amendthe Motor
Vehicles Tax Act, 1960 (1960 -25) by amending
the Schedule. The amendment is set out in the Bill
and it shows that the purpose of the amendment is
to define "Motor Omnibus" as having seating
accommodation for more than six, but not more
than fifteen passengers.


In this particular Act, Mr. President, you will
see that the Schedule was based on the provision of
Section 3 (2) which says: "Motor Vehicles Tax
shall be payable in respect of every motor vehicle
of a class or description specified in the Schedule
to this Act which is landed in the Island on or
after the commencement day of this Act."

When you refer to Section 2 of the Motor
Vehicles and Road Traffic Act you will see various
definitions of motor vehicles, and it includes any
motor vehicles kept or used for hire or reward or
standing and plying for hire or reward for the
conveyance of more than six passengers, whether
at separate fares or otherwise.

We are convinced, Mr. President, that by care-
ful manipulation of that definition the tax which
should be paid was being evaded by the registration
of vehicles which could carry more than six and
which were constructed to carry more than six,
but which were registered under the section which
allowed the lesser registration.

In the circumstances, and to raise revenue, the
Hon. Minister of Finance inserted this amendment
blocking the loophole where less tax was being paid
on some vehicles than should be paidunder the exist-
ing legislation.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Hon. L. E. Sandiford seconded the
motion.

The question was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 3 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.


His Honour the President resumedthe Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford, the Bill was read a thirdtime and passed.

BILL TO AMEND RACING SERVICE BUSINESS
(REGISTRATION OF PREMISES) CT, 1964

The President called the fifth Order A Bill
to amend the Racing Service Business (Registration
of Premises) Act. 1964. *

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Mr. Presi-
dent, Again this is one of the consequential Bills











occupying g this Honourable Senate from time to time
to carry out the proposals of the Hon. Minister
of Finance as stated in his budgetary proposals. I
would not shed any tears when it comes to gambling
I am not a gambling man myself even though it is
said that if you do not have a ticket you do not have
a chance, because gambling can have a demoralis-
ing effect on a community.

I do not know if anyone will shed tears. I have
not heard of any closing down of betting shops be-
cause of the increased tax. They continue to get
money from people who can ill afford it. Under Section
4 of the old Act it is provided that the fee payable to
the comptroller for the grantor renewal of a certifi-
cate etc. a fee of $12,000. It is however provided
that the fee be reduced by $1,000 for each month
in such year which has expired prior to the grant
of such certificate.

What we did find was that people were coming
in and making a kill for three months, paying at the
reduced tax and coming back next year. According
to this Bill they must pay $20,000 in the first case
and there will be no reduction after.

Sir, this will increase the revenue of the count-
ry and we can in some way control the spread of
gambling in this community. We need not go into
the moral or religious aspect. It takes away from
people money which they can ill afford, but who hope
that they can immediately become millionaires. At
the same time, the money gained from the taxes
will help to provide some of the services which the
same people who gamble may at some time need.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be reada second time.

Senator the Hon. L. E. Sandiford seconded the
motion.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
have a slightly different point of view from the Hon
Attorney General. I myself am not a gambling man,
but I am not a person who objects to taking a chance.
What worries me is that in a community like ours,
a community of this size the extent of the gambling
that is being encouraged.

We have some extremely lazy people who will not
utilise any productive sources. The only source that
they are prepared to explot is gambling, and many
well meaning organizations which areknown for posi-
tive action, lure many into gambling weekafterweek
in the hope that they will be richer; but we know the
community in that sense is gradually becoming poorer
and poorer and you hear nonsense when direct tax-
ation is levied on a community that is gambling at
the rate of a million dollars a year.

When you look at national incomes we are gamb-
ling away more money than some of the developed
countries give away to underdeveloped countries,
and when these developed countries get this inform-
mation they themselves will say thay they cannot
_ford to put money into communities that canafford


to gamble away more money than they can afford to
put into these communities.

I think that the Government should investigate
this whole aspect of gambling. If you are going to
have gambling, nationalise it. Let it come through
one source. Utilise the money for the good of the
community. The Church cannot say no because the
Church carries on raffles when they want to make
money and they sell old things that have no value.

At present these people who feel that they can get
rich by gambling are not really adding any income to
the country. People gamble with the Barbados Turf
Club at the rate of $2,400 a year and with Bingo at
the rate of over $400,000 a year and in other direc-
tions it is about $400,000 a year and it is not going
into the savings banks. It is invested in any way.

These organizations give to charity. It is char-
tiable, as the Attorney General said, in the sense that
you take it away from them with one hand and put
them in the almshouses. Sometimes in a community
leaders must use a hard hand. People cannot be
free to do whatever they feel like doing and then
become charges on the community or state. Too
many people gamble and do not look for jobs.


It is time that we utilise these places that are
now used as betting shops for more productive pur-
poses. All that you are doing is extracting a few
cents. What is serious is that innearly all instances
the gambling shops are run by non-Barbadians; so
non-Barbadians have invented a way to slice away
the income of Barbadians. It is the same as dice games,
and I am sure that when the people who run these
shops get as much as they want and can go elsewhere,
they will go.


To be able to pay about $2,000 a month rent
and carry an overhead of $25,000 a year you will
realise what the turnover is. It is one of those things
that you have to take a careful look at. The trend
is that more and more people are gambling who
cannot afford to gamble.


You will find in this community what I would
call adult delinquency. People who gamble out their
money and then cannot go home to their families
will resort to malpractices andviciousness. You have
to be on the watch that they do not snatch your money
or beat you up. That is a problem that faces some
countries. We have not reached that stage yet; but
gambling is an insidious thing, and I hope that the
Government will consider the whole aspect. If it is
to be done let it be done in one way and stop the
proliferation of gambling shops.

The question that the Bill be reed a second time
was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. P. M. Greaves
seconded by Senator the Hon. L. E. Sandiford the








43M


Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.
Clauses 1 to 3 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.
His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was repor-
ted accordingly.
On the motion of Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith
seconded ny Senator the Hon. L. E. Sandiford the
Bill was read a third time and passed..

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE RECOMMENDATIONS
OF SPECIAL SELECTCOMMITTEE

The President called the seventh Order A
Resolution to approve the recommendations as con-
tained in the Report dated 4th June, 1958 of a Special
Select Committee appointed to consider and report
on the need for the employment of officers of the
Senate and to examine the terms and conditions of
employment of such officers.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, This Resolution stands in my name and it
is the result of a report of a Special Select Com-
mittee which this House set up on the 1st of Feb-
ruary. The Committee was appointed to consider
and report on the need for employment of officers
of the Senate and to examine the terms and conditions
of such officers.

Mr. President, the Report has been circulated
and hon members will note that the Committee has
recommended that the post of Clerk of the Senate be
one whereby the incumbent would be answerable to
this House.

Of course the Committee itself and I am sure
this House will have no fault to find with the manner
in which the duties of Clerk have so far been carried
out; but it is clear that the existing arrangements
whereby the Clerk is a Civil. Servant does present
certain difficulites and cannot be satisfactory from
either side.

The committee therefore recommends that steps
be taken to obtain the services of a barrister or
solicitor for the post of Clerk on a part time basis
at a salary of $2,400 a year and also a post of mes-
senger/ cleaner at 60 cents an hour.

As regards the stenographic duties of the Clerk's
office the Committee recommends that the possibility
of assigning these duties to the Senior Stenographer
Typist of the Other Place should be explored, if it
is agreeable, for $ a year.

Arising out of this, it is clear that the Committee
is not satisfied with the arrangements for reporting
the Senate debates. This matter is releventbecause
it has a direct bearing on the manner in which the
Clerk is called upon to carry out his duties and it


undoubtly affects the conditions underwhich the Clerk
has to function; but inasmuch as the present system
involves the Other Place, there was little that this
Committee should recommend.

I felt, that we should at least state our concern
at the inadequacy of the present arrangements.


The Report speaks for itself, Mr. President,
and I ask that it be approved and that steps be taken
to implement it with as little delay as possible.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I rise to second that
motion. In asmuch as mention has been of the unsat-
isfactory state in which the reporting of the Senate
debates finds itself, and inasmuch, Sir, as you have
appointed me as the representative of this Chamber
on the Debates Committee, I should like to take the
opportunity to let you and the Chamber know what the
situation is at present time of the reporting of
the Senate debates.

The position at today's date is that there are
outstanding 32 debates of this Chamber not yet pub-
lished. At the moment, 10 of these are still in the
hands of the Reporters, six are in the hands of the
Clerk and there are 16 in the hands of the Government
Printer.

Although I am not defending the Government
Printer, I would point out that one of the causes of
the delay is that for Official Gazette purposes these
debates have to be published in chronological order,
and you may have to hold up a dozen debates for one
proceeding the dozen and that is what has happened.

There was one which the Reporter was unable
to place in the hands of the Clerk, and at a meeting
of the Debates Committee I took the liberty of saying
do not hold up all the lot merely because one is
missing. The Debates Committee accepted this re-
commendation and the Government Printer was in-
structed to go ahead and publish the debates he had
in hand without waiting for the missing link.

Now, Sir, this situation is not at all satisfactory
It is a longtime now since any debate of this Chamber
has appeared in the Official Gazette and with 32
still not published, I think that everyone will agree
that this is a most unsatisfactory state of affairs.

Now, Sir, I have been a member of the Debates
Committee for some time. A member who spoke
earlier on another matter describedhis membership
of a certain Board as capable of being described in a
single word "frustration". I could use an even
stronger word; but "frustration" is a suitable word,
and I think the only parliamentary one I can think
of at the moment.

Now, Sir, the responsibility for the publication
of the debates rests with what is known a the Debates
Committee. This Committee comprises the Printing
Committee of the Other Place alongwithone member
of this Chamber and it might be informativeto mem-
bers if I ust read what they are to do.








435
I II II -


The Act making arrangements for the publication
of the debates was dated in 1894 andwas amended in
194 and it is the Act of 1954 under which we are
operating now, and it is from that Act that I will
read. It says:-

The Printing Committee for the time being of
the House of Assembly under the chairmanship of
His Honour the Speaker in conjunctionwith one mem-
ber of the Legislative Council (today that will refer
to the Senate) shall engage the services of such num-
bers of Reporters and Typists as are necessary, one
of which shall attend every meeting of the Legislative
Council (the Senate) and the others every meeting
of the House of Assembly take the proceedings thereof.
and with as much despatch as possible and in any
case not later than sixdays afterthe day of each such
meeting deliver to the Clerk of the House of Assembly
and Clerk of the Legislative Council alegible copy of
the said debates.

Sir, it is obvious that that has been honoured in
the breach for many years and it will continue to be
honoured in the breach. The position for some time
has been that the Senate has had a part time Reporter
who takes the proceedings and delivers, I hope, a legi-
ble copy to the Clerk of the Senate.

The Clerk is responsible for editing that and
seeing that it goes to the Government Printer. Sir,
the position is somewhat different today. We no
longer have a part time Reporter, but he is one of
four employed by the Debates Committee. He is not
yet a permanent member of the four, but one hopes
that he will qualify for that.

The qualification at the present moment is that
he must bring his arrears up to date.

I must add, Sir, that getting a meeting of the
Debates Committee together takes some doing, and
that is a charitable way of putting it. Meetings are
often abortive for lack of a quorum and the position
is highly unsatisfactory.

At every meeting of the Senate I have been
bringing up the question of the reporting of the De-
bates of the Senate and at a recent meeting it was
told to us by the Clerk of the Committee that a
difficulty has arisen.

I may say that the whole idea of ceasing to have
a part time Reporter was that we would have a re-
portorial staff available for both Houses of the Leg-
islature; but at a recent meeting we were advised
that the law says that one Reporter shall attend
every meeting of the Senate and the others every
meeting of the House of Assembly.

It was suggested that difficulty might be exper-
ienced in requiring the other Reporters to attend
every meeting of the Senate. That sounds to me like
nonsense and I so expressed my opinion. That aspect
of the matter is being gone into and will be on the
agenda for the next meeting of the Committee.


That is a brief background of the situation. It
has been a very difficult situation to get out of.
One difficulty is that once a Reporter has the notes
of proceedings it is difficult to do anything about
it except to encourage him to get them out or
they may be lost forever.

I think, Sir, that the situation will be greatly
eased if this Chamber has a Clerk of its own respon-
sible to the Chamber and who may be given specific
instructions. I hasten to say that the fact that we have
had a Civil Servant as our Clerk has not been an
obstruction. He has always done his best to see that
the work of the Chamber has not been held up, but
one cannot give him specific instructions if he does
not have a specific job.

That is one of the reasons whylwill support the
recommendations of the Committee that this Senate
should have its own Clerk.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
have heard Senator Alkins talk about the Debates
Committee. That Committee will soon have to deal
with the Reporters in a different manner. They are
professional people and you will soon have to face
the Trade Union.

You cannot expect to go on working under this
1894 system, and on Mondays when you go to that
meeting you will receive a letter informing you that
that they have joined the Trade Union and there
will have to be a completely different method of
dealing with them.

Without going further, I will remind Senator
Alkins and the Senate that those of us who know
anything about taking down debates know that this
system of asking one man to take down notes is a
joke. You cannot ask one man to take down verba-
tim notes over a period of time. It does not work
anywhere else.

Do you know the amount of words that the Re-
porter has to take down? When the Attorney General
speaks in a coninuous flow at over 120 words a
minute and you multiply that by the 60 minutes in
an hour do you know what it means?

About getting an independent Clerk I would like
to say to the Committee that I think you will be
wasting time and money. I agree with change, but
when change is necessary. It has been suggested
that preference be given to a barrister or solicitor,
Mr. President, if you have any idea of the method
of solicitor offices in Barbados you will realise
that the mills of solicitors' offices are like the
mill of Almighty God, only that they grand slowly
but not as fine.

Do you know how long it takes to get anything
out of a solicitor's hands? Their whole attitude
seems to be that time does not matter. My friend
on the right is a counsel for me. Senator Philips
is a counsel for me. They know the difficulties











_that I have had and counsel always tell you to speak
to the solicitors. Apparently counsel do not speak to
the solicitors, the clients have to do it.

Only recently I was away for six weeks leaving
something for a solicitor to do; but 42 days was not
enough. Now you want to change from a Civil Servant
to a barrister or solicitor. I would think that any
barrister serving even part time for $200 a month
is not much.

I would like the Chairman of the Committee to
look at the Senate in its true perspective. There is
an important relationship between the Leader of the
Senate and the Civil Service. You have the Attorney
General and other Ministers at Government Head-
quarters The Clerk of the Senate is nearer to them
and has close connection with them. If youget a man-
from outside you will get less done.

You, Sir, were in the Other Place. Only today
we had the example of not having received documents
with the signature of the Speaker. The Other Place has
an independent Clerk who is a Solicitor, and if this
is the pattern that we are going to introduce let us
beware.

The Other Place has two Clerks. One is full
time and the other is part time, and you could get
one man to do the work and still have time to go and
play tennis. The work in the House is not enough to
occupy the attention of a solicitor for three hours
a day. If I had a son and he told me that he wanted to
be the Clerk of the House of Assembly I would say
that it is time to go to the Mental Asylum. The job
is something that any good Clerk could do. It is
nothing to challenge any legal man.

I do not know what the Committee finds are
the basic difficulites in the Clerk of the Senate being
a Civil Servant. What are the basic difficulties? If
there are basic difficulties I am willing to be per-
suaded, but if this is only based on the fact that he is
a Civil Servant I do not see any difficulty in that
because the Senate is not a day to day organisation
and I think that whenever he is to be available he
will be available to the President.



The Organisation of the work of the Senate is
superior to the organisation of the work of the Other
Place, and if that is an indication this Chamber is
better off. I do not subscribe to change for the sake
of change. That is why I believe that some further
consideration should be given to this matter.

In so far as the Stenographers are concerned
I think that Senator- Alkins will agree with me. I
would like to say in defence of the Reporters that they
are professional people although they are not re-
garded so in Barbados. There is a system of em-
ploying verbatim reporters. They are not taking
down dictation like a Stenographer in an office.
They have to take verbatim the reports of all the
debates.


In the old days when this Chamber met for one
and a half hours or two hours it was a different
matter. You can go back and read the old debates and
see what it means. When you take up a debate today
you see how much it is even in the Senate. Look at
the transcript and you will see that it is impossible
for any one man to get it in in six days. It will send
the man crazy. The debates have to be set out in
paragraphs and edited. When we meet the Debates
Committee we will have to point out that the Senate
cannot operate with one Reporter.

For example, your Reporterwas here from three
o'clock without a break and it is now 4.15. No one
operates on that basis. In the Other Place you have
debates going on until midnight with three Reporters.
It is madness. Nearlyevery Reporteremployed inthe
Legislature has died a premature death. V dle the
Legislature meets one day a week, a meeting of the
Other Place that begins at noon and goes on.until
the following morning may well last for 10 hours.
If you say eight hours which is 480 minutes and you
take a minimum speed of 120 words a minute and
sometimes; it is as muzh as 200 words a minute,
you will see that the volamin of transcription is. You
cannot prodace- that without the ad'lquate ma:ch.iiry.

'When I was in the Other Place i I told them to
let us investigate what places like the United Nations
do. I undertook to speak to the officer in charge of
their reporters and I askedthem howtheygottheir
reports out the following morning. There was a
woman in charge and she said that the re must be two
teams a team of reporters and ateam of stenogra-
phers because you must have stenographers so that
when the reporters are ready the stenographers can
get on the typewriters and type as fast as he calls
back his notes.

Let us be frank. In Barbados by and large you
do not have quality stenographers available in %he
House of Assembly, not for the kind of money that
you are paying. You cannot get quality unless you
pitch your salary at $200 or $300 a month. You get
people practising in the House of Assembly and the
Senate.

The Government does not have these people who
can take shorthand at the rate of 120 words a min-
ute and type at a minumum of 50 to 60 words a
minute. They are not available. You have to put
your house in order.

What you really need is a minimum of two
Reporters for this Chamber. You need a team of
eight Reporters for the Legislature as a whole if
they are available. With less than that you will
always have a problem with your debates.

They have a system that the Reporter of the
Senate is also Reporter of the House of Assembly
So he had to take notes in the House on last week
and then work in the Senate on the Thursday. What
you really need is two Reporters in the Senate
because the Senate is an independent Chamber. You
do not want this criss-crossing of having men in











: the Senate this week and in the House next week.
You will not know who is responsible for the Sen-
ate debates.

When you talk about the Act of 1954 that is
14 years ago. I do not know who is responsible for
this There are some people to whom you should
give severance pay and :et them go home. But there
is this question of looking over your shoulder. If
a man is not doing his job let him go home on pen-
sion or give him severance pay; but do not allow
him to block up the whole work.

I hope that members of the Debates Committee,
and most of all Senator Alkins who represents the
Senate will be aware that we are asking for recog-
nition and that recognition will be given. I would
like to warn the Debates Committee this is not
a threat but the Reporters feel that they have reached
the stage where it is not fair that you should ask them
to work in conditions that are adverse andwhichdo not
obtain anywhere else.

The least you should have working in a Cham-
ber like this is two. One man cannot be expected to
write for an hour and half and more. You must give
him a break. He does not get a break from taking
notes from the time the session opens. It is a worse
position than in the House of Assembly. There is no
break for the Reporter here for the whole session.
This is a situation that will have to be rectified.

We can assure the Senate and the Legislature as
a whole that we will insist on quality of work. We will
not condone inefficiency. We believe in professional
skill and ability. Now that the Union is in this you can
expect the same kind of high standard chat we insist
on in other walks of life.

I hope that Senator Alkins and his colleagues on
the Debates Committee are aware that it is our inten-
tion to give you professional advice on how the re-
portorial structure of the Legislature should be put
on a decent footing, and how the staff should be given
proper equipment with which to work, and conditions
under which staff should work.

There should be proper lunch quarters and an
office that is fit to work in, not the present make
shift arrangements. There is no office for these
people. All that you have is a long table like the one
used for the Feast of the Passover. A Reporter is
calling back his notes and there are cross conver-
sations going on. I hope that we can reach common
views on this; and reach an understanding.

As far as the Senate is concerned, I do not think
we need to change. We will be taking a sledge ham-
mer to crack a nut. I have already spoken of the
closeness between the Clerk of the Senate and the
Ministers. I believe that if you go outside and get
a part time solicitor you will have to ring up the
whole island to find out where he Lives.

Sometimes you cannot find the man wvho carries
the Mace in the Other Place. Sometimes the Clerk


has to improvise and carry the Mace, and then
sometimes you cannot find the Clerk. Calling it part
time does not say when the job begins and ends.

I am not a believer in Civil Servants per se
because they have a brand of peculiar approach
which is puzzling to me, but it will be good to re-
cord the service given by people like the late Mr.
Hinds who did an efficient job in this Chamber. I
am afraid that if you have something that you know
of it is better to keep it than to go searching to
bring in something that you do not know about. I
am suggesting to the Senate to keep what they have.

I do not know what you mean by part time Mes-
senger/Cleaner. If you mean persons who will work
for two hours for $1.20 those persons are not avail-
able. I would advise that if you want a person to do
this job that you employ someone on the understand-
ing that the person is employed to do everything in
connection with the building. There is enough to be
done every day. People come and visit this Chamber.
It should not be a closed place andyou want someone
here with responsibility.

You do not have to go through the Civil Service
for that. You can get these things done outside the
old fashioned way, but not at 60 cents an hoar. You
want someone who can take off his jacket aad clean
the place and put back on his jacket. You want a man
with a split personality.

It is not enough to want a Messenger/Cleaner.
You want a personal assistant to the President. You
do not want this old fashioned system of getting four
men to do four jobs.

Where the Clerk is concerned, I must repeat that
I am not in favour of the proposed change. I think that
we should continue with the system we have and if
there is any difficulty bring it to the attention of the
Minister concerned.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I just rise on a point
of explanation. If I understood Senator Walcott cor-
rectly, he seems to think that eitherIor the Debates
Committee felt that the debates can be handled by
one Reporter. If I gave that impression it is wrong.
Neither I nor the other members feel that this is a
job which can be done by one person taking the pro-
ceedings.

It was because of that, because of the fact that
only one Reporter was doing the Senate that I was
told by the Clerk of the Debates Committee that this
difficulty had arisen in connection with the wording
of the Act.

I may add that we asked if the other Report-
ers refused to come to the Senate on those grounds
and there was a difficulty inexplainingwhythey have
not come I do not want to go into detail about the
Debates Comm'ttee meetings.

I agree entirely that the whole thing needs re-
organising. No job can be done without proper ar-












.ragements and proper organisation and the will-.
ingness of every man on the job to do that job and
I think that the whole fault has been the lack of
proper supervision.

Our Reporter has had a very difficult time, and
I am sure that he cannot say that he has not met with
sympathy and every consideration from the Debates
Committee. We have given him every opportunity
to make good his arrears and bring his work ap
to date. But again I would say that his record has
net been one of which he can be proud.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Senator
Walcott has given me some hope that now that he
is organising the Reporters, when he himself makes
speeches in the Senate he will not overtax them.

I would like to say that I am a member of this
Committee. As will be seen from Paragraph 7 we
recognize the inadequacy of the arrangements and
we recommend that the matter be taken up by the
Debates Committee.

The interpretation which has been put on the Act
referred to is shovn by the presence here of only
one Reporter. He has been here since 3 o'clock and
it is a totally impossible situation. If four can do it,
let us have enough people who can carry out the
taking of our debates in a satisfactory manner.

We are complaining about the inadequacy of the
arrangements, and we are asking to see what can
be done in the interest of better reporting. I agree
with Senator Walcott and I know from my experience
that there are many problems in political life in
Barbados and people are afraid to offend some per-
sons who are doing nothing or to defend some for
what they are doing in the national interest.

I will have something to say when I am moving
the adjournment of the Senate. I have no quarrel
with the Civil Servants who have served this Senate
over the years. They have done a very good job,
something which we expected of them. But some
time ago when we ran into trouble over the Common-
wealth Parliamentary Association, we were so pleas-
ed with our Clerk here, that we recommended that
he should be joint Secretary of the local branch of
the Association.

However, Sir, we got a letter from the head
of the Government telling us that he was a Civil
Servant under the jurisdiction of the Public Ser-
vice Commission and we could not appoint him to an
office without consulting the Commission. That placed
us in an embarrassing position because we assumed
that in a Parliamentary Association the Clerk of the
Senate would be joint secretary.

I am sorry that I do not have a copy of the letter
which told us that we could not tell the Clerk what
to do; that he is under the jurisdiction of the Public
Service Commission. He is appointed to myoffice as
a Public Servant and he will do what I permit him
-to be able to do for the Senate.


It is customary in the House of Commons and
in Jamacia I am not sure if in Trinidad to have
as Clerk of the Assembly a person legally trained.
It is customary to have such a clerk because, say
in the case of the Senate, there may be occasions
when there might be need for legal advice which,
from the Government's point of view, such advice
should not be given by myself or Senator Greaves
or Senator Phillips. We were therefore prepared to
give His Honour the President the benefit of a legal-
ly trained adviser in the capacity of Clerk.

That is the reasonwhywe have resortedto lawyers
or solicitors as Clerks of the Other Place. As far
as the Senate is concerned, we may meet one
Thursday a month or two or three Thurdays de-
pending on the amount of work that comes up. We
felt that there was no need to appoint a full time per-
son, that he could work part time every Thursday or
two or three Thursdays. We did feel also that he
would have more time to edit the debates of the
Chamber than a Civil Service Clerk.

As Senator Alkins has drawn to the attention
of the Chamber, some of these debates in arrears
are in the hands of the Clerk. The Clerk is a Civil
Servant and he has files to carry home. He has got
to do his Civil Service work before he can do his
work as Clerk of the Senate. You cannot quarrel
with him. On the other hand, if we hired a Clerk
of our own we could fire him if he was inefficient
That is why we hope to get a responsible man from
whom we can demand service for the money that we
are paying.

I would not hesitate in recommending the dis-
missal of a man who is drawing the taxpayers' money
and not doing his job. There is too much talk about
remembering the man's family. He should know that
he has a family and do the work for which he is paid.

We felt that we should have a Clerk whom we
would be able to control.

I will promise the Debates Committee that if
after they have talked with Senator Walcott, they can
come up with some recommendations for a new Bill
to try to remedy the situation with the debates and
come to some satisfactory arrangements I will try
to hurry it through in the interestof better reporting.

As regards the 60 cents anhourforthe proposed
Messenger-Cleaner, we worked it out onweeklypay,
that is, that is the rate at whichhe would be paid for
full time work. There was no intention of just pay-
ing him for two hours aday. These are recommenda-
tions and these are the figures that occurred to us.
We did not have the benefit of the Chief Establishments
Officer, but we do realise that something has to be
done. We are an independent Chamber and we have
to show some sense of responsibility.

To return to the question of the Clerk, it is a
Civil Servant and if the Leader of the Senate went to
the Clerk and the Clerk says that he is doing some
thing for the Prime Minister he will have to wait.


=











If the part time man accepts the job we will
endeavour to see that he is the type of person who
can be found without having to issue a search war-
rant. The situation that arose today would not arise
in getting our papers before the Chamber. The full
time Clerk of the Other Place could only get three
here today by 3 o'clock. We expect to have a part
time Clerk whom we will have to hunt down if he
wanted to keep the job.

These proposed figures are not unchangeable. I
must repeat that our Clerk is a Civil Servant. Sup-
pose we wanted to send him somewhere we would be
told that we cannot. I think that we have reached the
stage where we should have our own Clerk. In Jama-
ica the Clerk of the House of Assembly is a solicitor.
I do not think that $200 or $240 a month may be to
attend one meeting is a low standard. We should set
our house in order and have some efficiency in the
running of this Chamber.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Iwouldlike to thank
the Hon Attorney General for his explanation. I am
quite satisfied.

The question that the Resolution be approvedwas
put to the Senate and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Mr. Presi-
dent, Before I move the adjournment of this Hon.
Chamber I would like to apologise to senators for not
being in a position to do three items of Government
Business sent to them on the Order Paper.

Now, as I said little while ago, we have reached
a stage in Barbados when, whatever the consequences
we have got to be men.

The Clerk of the Other Place has a duty to send
fair copies signed by the Speaker to the Clerk of the
Senate. The last time the Other Place satwas on the
16th and 17th of July this year eight days ago in
an island 14 by 21 and only at 3 o'clock today, in
spite of the fact that the Order Paper was sent out
on time, was the Clerk of the Senate able to get the
certified fair copies of the three items that we were
able to deal with today.

I want to go on record as exonerating the Clerk
of this Senate completely. Yesterday he contacted
the Clerk of the Other Place and told him that he
must have these copies for the meeting of the Senate
today, and he only got three by 3 o'clock this after-
noon.

I am not concerned with how the Other Place is
being run. That is a matter for them. They can run
their Chamber as they feel like; but when what they
do holds up the work of this Senate we have a right
to comment because we can only work when work
comes from them.

I want to go on record as saying that a situation
-in which we have had to postpone three items of


Government Business, one dealing with Income
Tax, is a situation which calls for the strongest
censure which we, as a responsible Chamber, can
make. One Resolution deals with sea defences and
this is the hurricane season. Another Resolution
deals with a school and the school year opens in
September. The Bill to amend the Income Tax Act
seeks to give certain allowances.

If the Other Place is afraid to fire its Clerk we
have reached a stage in public life where I do not
know where we stand. There seems to be a premium
on cowardice and efficiency. We cannot go on very
much longer with this type of atmosphere in which
John Brown can do what he likes and the same
John Brown can get promotion.

I do not want to go into this any further, but I
feel very strongly on it. The blame lies with the
Other Place where cowardice and failure to see that
officers do their job are responsible for Senators
having to come here again next week when we could
have finished this business today.

Senators are busy men in public life and they
give of their time to come here. There is no honour
in being a senator except that you are serving the
community. You could draw your salaries and
bonuses without coming here. Those Senators nomin-
ated by the Governor-General must feel that their
time has been wasted by inefficiency in the running
of Parliament. (Cheers).
SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -
It seems that I have not been singing a solo. In Bar-
bados we have reached a stage where too many
people are coming to the defence of inefficiency,
negligence and incompetence. You will find it getting
very popular that people are willing to defend these
sorts of things, but when a man is a success people
want to break him down.
In this island one of the best qualifications for
public office is to be a failure. I find too many in-
stances where Parliament is affronted. There are
too many instances of inefficiency in the Other Place.
That is a problem we have in this island people
being afraid in public life to say that this man is
incompetent..
People talk about remembering the man has
children. All of us have children I do not think that
I should be blamed for another man's children. I
do not think that it is anything that I have to be
worried about. This idea that a man has a job for
life even if he is inefficient is wrong.
I want to join with the Attorney General in say-
ing quite openly that we should say to our represen-
tative on the Debates Committee that we regard it
as a positive insult to this Chamber, and we should
draw this matter forcibly to the attention of the
Speaker.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford the Senate adjourned sine die at 5.15 p.m.









THE


SENATE


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE

Thursday, Auqust 1, 1968.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable
F. G. SMITH, Q.C. (Attorney General); Senator the
Honourable L. E. SANDIFORD, M.A. (Minister of
Education); Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator
F. C. H. CAREW; SenatorS. V. ASHBY; Senator Dr.
R. B. CADDLE, B.Sc., M.B.B.S.; Senator F, L.
WALCOTT, O.B.E.; Senator M. A. KING, Senator
H. F. ALKINS; SenatorW. W. BLACKMAN,M.B.E.;
Senator S. A. BLANCHETTE; Senator ErmaV. ROCK
and Senator R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator the Honourable P. M. GREAVES, B.A.,
(Minister of Home Affairs); Senator E. Lisle WARD;
Senator P. G. MORGAN; Senator N: A. BARROW;
Senator H. Odessa GITTENS (Parliamentary Secre-
tary); Senator D. A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E.

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer excuses forthe absence of Senator H.
Odessa Gittens and Senator D. A. Wiles from the
day's meeting.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith offered an
excuse for the absence of Senator the Honourable
P. M. Greaves, Minister of Home Affairs and Leader
of the Senate, who was out of the country on Govern-
ment Business.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith, Attorney
General, laid the following papers:-


1. Statement
Excise Receipts for
1968.


showing Net Customs and
three months ended 30th June,


2. Statement of sums of money paid over to
the Accountant General by the Commissioner of
Police for quarter ended 31st March, 1968.

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SEEK LEAVE
TO DEAL WITH ITEMS NOT ON THE
ORDER PAPER

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:Mr.
President, Members will have seen with their
Order Paper a notice that I proposed to ask leave to
deal with two Resolutions which have been circulated.
One is a Resolution for $6,114 forwork at the Lodge
School, and I presume, Mr. President, that it is non-
controversial in view of the fact that the Government
hopes to do most ofthe work when the school is on
holiday.

I would also like to dealwith anon-controversial
Resolution to approve the Pensions (Pensionable Of-
fices) (Amendment) Order, 1968.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.10

The President called the first Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $21,447 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1968-69
Part I Current as shownin the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1968-69 No. 10 which form the Schedule to the
Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, The Addendum to this Resolution sets
out quite clearly that the sum of $21,447. is required
to meet the cost of repairs to areas along the sea
coast which have been damaged by the sea and to
make provision for any minor damage which may oc-
cur during the current financial year.

I think that the Honourable Senate will appreciate
that we are in the midst of the hurricane season
where the likelihood of damage to our coast which
we hope will be remote is still a possibility which
we have to contemplate as an annual exercise.


DEBATE


-











That is the main purpose of this Resolutionwhich
also contains provisions for the carrying out of re-
pairs to damage done by heavy seas last year. I
therefore beg to move that the Resolution be con-
curred in. If there is any further information that
senators may need I will try to supply it.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CAPITAL) No.12

The President called the secondOrder A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $20,540 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1968-69
Part II Capital as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1968-69 No. 12 which form the Schedule to the
Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: Mr. President, The Alexandra School
opened in 1894 with some 34 pupils. Its purpose was
to provide a sound education for female students of
the northern parishes. With that small beginning in
1894 the roll increasedto 365 in 1964 with a staff of
15 teachers including the headmistress, and with
teaching being carried on in 11 classrooms.

At that time there was no library, and the head-
mistress' house was used for a staff room, a com-
mercial room, two small offices and a book store.
By 1967 the roll had increased to 422 and the staff to
19.

It therefore became necessary and urgent to pro-
vide additional classroom facilities for the pupils of
that school, and the present sum requested- $20,540
- is to complete classrooms; work on which has al-
ready been started. There are four classrooms and
four practical rooms under construction.

It is desired to have these classrooms completed
by the beginning of the coming academic year so that
the pupils who enter the school and those who are
already there will have the facilities with which to
continue the business of education.

I beg to move that.the Senate concurin the Reso-
lution.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

SENATOR Dr. R. B. CADDLE: Mr. President, I
would like to make some comments. I would like to
inform this Chamber that the position in this school
is far from satisfactory. Much of the building is
over-run by wood ants. We had a special meeting of
the Governing Body this week and one of the things
brought to our attention was that at one place where
repairs had been commenced close to the roof, it was
soon found out that the floor also was very bad and
money which had been set aside to do something else
was asked to be released. When the floor was


,examined by employees of the Ministry of Education
it was found that most of the props were in very bad
condition.

At the same time, one has to bear in mind that of
the building which the headmistress occupies she is
only permitted to use the bedroom because most of
the other rooms are occupied by members of the staff.
We believe that this is very unfair to the headmis-
tress who has to pay part of her salary for the use of
the building.

It is true, Sir, that new buildings are under con-
struction, and that by virtue of the passing of this
Resolution the work will be completed. It is to be
noted, however, that when the buildings are finished
they will not relieve the pressure on accommodation
in that the present use made of some of the rooms
of the headmistress' office will continue.

I hope that the Minister of Education will make a
special effort to improve the conditions that obtain
at present in the school.

In passing, Sir, I think that we should take a
whole look on the placing of schools in the country.
In this area there are two schools, one for boys and
one for girls on which we spend $130,000 annually. If
we look aw the success of some of the private secon-
dary schools which are run on a co-educational basis,
I wonder if the Government should not give serious
consideration to placing these schools on a co-
educational basis?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I would like to reply to Senator Caddie
who has drawn to my attention the conditions in which
the buildings at the Alexandra School are at present.
I would like to assure Dr. Caddie that the condition of
the buildings has been drawn to my attention, and a
delegation from the Governing Body and I myself have
paid two visits to that school and looked at the con-
dition of the buildings.

I would like to state generally that this Gov-
ernment is very much aware of the need for addi-
tional places at the secondary level in order that
provision can be made for the opportunities we pre-
sent for secondary type education. At the same time
we are also aware that very soon actionwill have to
be taken to provide additional facilities which are
required.

I do not think that there canbe any question that
a Government which has done so much to increase the
provision of education in this country both in terms
of quantity and qualitywould be unmindful of the needs
of our young citizens.

To this end, Sir, I intended at the earliest possi-
ble opportunity to have a survey carriedout into the
educational plan both at the secondary and primary
level to determine in what ways that plan is deficient.
I also hope that from that survey recommendations
can be made as to how best the additional facilities
can be provided.











We await the results of that survey before em-
barking on any scheme to incorporate the two in-
stitutions in the North as a single co-educational
institution. We have now under active consideration
proposals to expand our secondary schools signifi-
cantly and increase the places now available in these
schools.
Wherever land is available in the vicinity adjoin-
ing these schools my Ministry will seriously con-
sider putting up proposals for expanding these
schools up to around 1,000 students.

The estimate for the work at the Alexandra
School was provided by the particular Government
Ministry which deals with these matters and it is
on this basis that we have come to the House with this
Resolution for this particular sum of money.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND INCOME TAX ACT

The President called the third Order A Bill to
amend the Income Tax Act, 1921.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F.G. SMI rH: Mr.
President, I think that we in the Senate are getting a
bit tired of hearing references to the Income Tax Act
without getting the necessary relief.

I myself was pleased to read :hatinthe Budget-
ary Proposals made in June 1967 the Hon. Minister
of Finance proposed an increased allowance on
earned income for wives from $420 to $540, removal
of the limit of medical expenses for children and al-
lowance on capital expenditure on buildings used for
scientific research.

Mr. President, it had been originally hoped that
these proposals could have legal effect for the Income
Year 1967 in conjunction with the draft income tax
legislation prepared with the assistance of Mr.
Douglas Lambert, the Canadian Technical Assistance
Adviser. However, that was not possible, and as I
have mentioned before, that particular piece of legis-
lation is now being put into shape.

Therefore, Sir, it is necessary thatthis amend-
ing Bill have effect only from the Income Year 1968.
Opportunity has also been taken to amend the short
title to the Act to read the Income Tax (Amendment)
Act, 1968, since although the Act was introduced into
the Other Place in 1967, itwas passed by both Houses
of Parliament in 1968.

The Objects and Reasons set out the proposals
of the Bill very clearly, and I move, Sir, that the
Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
am pleased to see this legislation before us. It is long
overdue. But what really worries me is what does it


take to make the Government amend the Income Tax
Act. All Governments seem to be afraid of Income
Tax.

It seems to me that with Ministerial Government
and ministers' salaries about which the Attorney
General spoke some time ago, they cannot escape
the pressures like other people.

What I am worried about is that this Bill in its
Objects and Reasons speaks about the extension of
the scope of the allowance in respect of medical ex-
penses to admit claims where the taxpayer is refer-
red for medical attention overseas or incurs medical
expenses while overseas.

Suppose he is not referred. Ihave the experience
where a Doctor in Barbados informed me that it was
not necessary for me to take mywife overseas for
medical attention. I did not accept his advice.
What would happen as regards income tax allowance?
I am glad that I did not accept the advice. It subse-
quently proved that I was right. I would like to know
from the Attorney General what happens in such
cases.

Again, Sir, I could never understand what basis
is used for arriving at allowances. Is it done on a
scientific basis? The Government has been attempt-
ing to fix these allowances and doing it in little bits
and bites. There is now proposed an increase from
$420 to $540. I often wonder what is the formula.

If they do this thing every two or three years,
people always feel that it is something to nibble at. It
does not seem to be anything substantial.

Another point is, that I cannot understand the log-
ic chat if the Government wants to help people with
housing, at the same time,they tax you for owning a
house. House ownership ir this country is a very good
thing and that is something that the Government should
go into.

Sometimes the Government will lend money
at 4 1/2 per cent for housing and then say in another
field that rental value is income tax. The only ex-
planation I can get is that if the person was not living
in his own house he would be paying rent. It does not
seem to me to be logical.

Finally, with respect to National Insurance. If
you are running a business and you are paying na-
tional insurance on behalf of the people you employ
it is not allowed for tax purposes. You are paying
money into the Treasury on behalf of your employees.
Although it is not much money, the principle is that
these people are engaged in earning a living through
working for someone. You cannot call it personal
income.

I cannot see why income tax should not be allow-
ed to persons who pay national insurance on behalf
of employees. I think that generally speaking, people
are regarding income tax allowances as fanciful, to
put it mildly. Allowances are unscientific. Theylave











no relation to money matters, to wages now being
paid and to values which are so different from 10 to
14 years ago.

I think that the whole structure should be looked
at money wise and not percentage wise. Things have
reached a stage where the value of money in Barbados
is not the same as it was. When a man works for
$700 it is not the same thing as in 1925. It does not
have the same bearing. The only thing that remains
the same is income tax. It is unrealistic.

Now, Sir, it is true that there are some people
who are not paying their fair share. I believe that the
lawyers have a saying that it is better that 100 guilty
men should escape than that one innocent man be con-
victed. That is to preserve the sancitity of justice.
I feel similarly about income tax. Ipay mine willing-
ly and I hope that I will be able to live longer to pay
some more.

However income tax practices should not reach
the stage where they make people want to cease work;
reach a stage where people cease to use their brains;
ask and what is the use of working? Sir you will get people
withdrawing from active participation in certain
things because they say that it does not make sense
and you lose a valuable contribution. I do not think
that income tax matters are given enough publicity
so that people can have their notice brought to these
things.

SENATOR Dr. R. B. CADDLE: Mr. President,
There are two points that I would like to comment
on. The first deals with income allowance to working
married women which is to be increased from $420
to $540.

In a developing country like Barbados, one thing
that has to be taken into account is the sfiortage of
trained persons. I understand that in order to avoid
this income tax return which is compulsory, many
married women prefer to stay at home. You'have
nurses and teachers and women in other fields of em-
ployment find that it is better to remain at home than
to go out and work when a joint return has to be made.

I think that the Government should consider
whether it would not be worthwhile to allowhusbands
and wives to make separate returns. Many people
feel that if you did this you would be making a con-
cession to those who need it most. Would like to see
that concession because itwouldbe beneficial to the
people who need to work and the country would be get-
ting the benefit of the contribution of these people.

The other aspect of this Bill on which I want to
comment is the extension of the scope of the allowance
in respect of medical expenses to admit claims where
the taxpayer is referred for medical attention over-
seas or incurs medical expenses while overseas.

I am more concerned about the word "referred".
People in Barbados are concerned about the type of
medical attention they get in the country, and as time
goes by, they are more eager to go overseas for at-
tention. I would not be able to go into the question


as to whether that attention is better than what they
get in Barbados.


I am not saying that what goes on in Barbados is
desirable or even the best or to put the Government
in an embarrassing position; but when it comes to a
consideration of medical expenses overseas those
expenses in the countries to which Barbadians nowgo
are very high.

A room in a hospital can cost (U.S.) $80 a day
without mentioning the cost of drugs and the expenses
of a surgeon or physician; and very often when you
seek medical attention you have to deposit before you
can enter.

The Government may find itself with some very
impressive claims for these tax concessions. I am
beginning to think that the Government is trying to
draw the line. If you are referred by a doctor and
you go overseas you make a claim andyou get a con-
cession.

But then the Government has a hospital and there
are certain things which have to be determined. After
all, a doctor is a man and a man likes to know that
his opinion is accepted, and equally, he does not like
to know that his opinion is not accepted.

There is much that I would like to draw to the
Government's attention concerning the medical at-
tention that is obtainable in Barbados and what is not.
If it is obtainable in Barbados and a man goes abroad
what happens when he brings back a medical bill to
be considered for concession for income tax pur-
poses? I do not think that it would be possible. It is
different from when a man goes abroad and takes
ill from when a man leaves in Barbados in a con-
dition which can be treated in Barbados.

Then, Sir, when one looks at the world one has
to face up to the facts of what can happen because
of personal relationships in a small community.
Mr. A may well get referred in a case not very de-
serving and Mr. B may not get referred. Things can
be done from the personal angle.

I support the view that restricting this conces-
sion to people who are referredcan cause uneasiness
to people who want to go abroad and get atten-
tion; but I still feel that if the attention is obtainable
in Barbados you should not be allowed to go abroad
and then present the Government with a Bill asking
for a concession.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I
suppose that one should be grateful for mercies
however small and therefore we welcome this relief;
but I must agree with Senator Walcott that the relief
in this Bill is not, I would say, fanciful, but leaves
something to be desired.


There are a lot of things that I would like the
Hon. Attorney General to explain when he is replying,
and that is in connection with the word "referred"
which appears in the Objects and Reasons of the Bill.











It seems to me that the person who wrote the Objects
and Reasons was not the personwho drafted the Bill:'

If you look at section 4 it says nothing about med-
ical expenses incurred as a result of somebody being
referred for medical attention. If I read it correct-
ly, it speaks of medical expenses incurred not only
locally, but abroad. It says nothing about they being
in connection with a local medical practitioner, but
one gets a different impression from the Objects
and Reasons.

However, Sir, are we not making heavy weather
out of it? Senator Caddie said that a man may go
abroad and run up a large medical bill; but for
income tax concession you can only claim up to $130
whether he gets the medical attention in Canada, the
U. S. or anywhere else. The maximum is $130 and that
includes medical expenses for children. I would like
to be corrected on that, but it does seem to me that
it is much ado about nothing.

Now, Sir, if I understood the Attorney General
correctly, he said that these proposals were too late
to be incorporated for the assessment year 1967,
but one can make use of them when one makes out
his return for the income year 1968. Does that mean
that the Consolidating Bill will not come intime to be
applied in 1968? I would like that point clarified.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President, -
As another senator has asked Iwonder if these in-
creases in allowances come down in bits of $120?
The sum of $120 seems to be sacrosanct to the Gov-
ernment. Some time ago it was increased by $120,
and now it is being increased by another $120.

I have said already, and will say again that a
married woman who goes to work will need a maid
to carry on her duties at home. To obtain the services
of a maid will cost at least $15 a week, something
like $800 a year, but we find an allowance of $1,400
for a married man and his wife. Does that bear any
relationship to present day living conditions.

When a married man is working for $120 a month,
he has to pay $60 at leastforhouse rent. To live on
the other $60 is asking them to starve. I think that any
Government should seek to ease its people as much
as possible, but I feel that the Income Tax laws of
Barbados are a burden to the taxpayer.

Then, Sir, if you cannot pay, 5 percent is added
within a certain time and then 6 per cent monthly
so that the burden increases and proves more burden-
some on the taxpayers. I cannot conceive of any
business house adding 6 per cent to the debts of its
customers.

Let the Income Tax Commissioner prosecute the
person and any judge would make reasonable allow-
ance according to the man's salary etc. No 6 per
cent should be added.

I also agree with .using) house ownership for in-
come tax purposes. A poor man goes and buys a home


and it is mortgaged. As soon as it is finished he has
to pay income tax. It does not encourage thrift; it en-
courages a man to go on renting for 50 years and then
he has nothing. I hope that when this new Bill comes
down it will be less burdensome than the laws of today.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH Mr.
President, The Income Tax is one onwhich any tax-
payer can talk volumes. Ministers of Government pay
taxes, the same burdensome taxes. My wife is a pro-
fessional woman and we have to make joint returns.

Again, Sir, when you criticise income tax, you
have to look at it from the point of view of the eco-
nomy of the country, and realise that every Minister
is interested in making the most generous allowances.
They cannot burden the general public without bur-
dening themselves. If Ministers got tax free salaries
you could cut off our heads.

Of course it would be nice to have a tax free
system like in the Bahamas and Bermuda and some
of the Pacific Islands. I agree that allowances are not
generous and indeed not realistic; but what can you
do in a. country with one crop economy, and two main
sources of revenue? Where will you get the money to
run the country? What manna will you find?

We are now prospecting for oil. We do not have
bauxite. We have to be sensible in our approach. In
no country that I know of, where there are allowances, is
there any yardstick by which you can say that they are
reasonable. They are always purely arbitrary. There
is no standard.

Whether it is a basic allowance, or whether it is
some concession, you have got to realise that you
always have to think in the economic context, in terms
of what you will lose by wayof concessions. Take the
example of CARIFTA, you have to study how much
you will lose, and how you will make it back.

In most countries, allowances on income tax are
never excessive. It is to bear some relation to
whether there are alternative sources of income. If
tomorrow we found Barbados producing oil in com-
mercial quantities so that youhad an alternative
source which could take some of the burden off the
taxpayers to the tune of $2 million or $3 million, you
might be able to give bigger concessions. So as I
have said, it is a question of what you lose and
whether you have enough money to run the country.

I am prepared to say that the allowances do not
bear any relation to the cost of living. We realise
that. We suffer by it too. Ministers of Government
also feel the pinch. The Government will have to see
what, it can do in in the course of time, in the light
of our revenue, to give better concessions.

If I understand Dr. Caddie correctly, he is say-
ing that if a husband and wife work and the income is
less than $5,000 give them the benefit. I cannot sup-
port that. You are saying that if a teacher marries a
nurse they get the benefit, but if a lawyer marries
a doctor they do not get it.











You cannot discriminate. You cannot tax educa-,
tion. You cannot say that two teachers should get a
better allowance than two qualified physicians. You
will be putting a premium on less earning power
over higher skills and higher earning power. You
should no t discriminate against the earning powers
of anyone.

I feel that income tax, difficult as it is to give
people what they consider reasonable allowances, is
still a fair tax on those who live in the community
and who wish to contribute to the services of the
community in which they live.

I agree that the system is arbitary. We must also
realise the phase through which sugar is passing.
You cannot expect in these circumstances to get too
generous allowances.

The next point which seems to have caused some
concern is that there seems to be some difference
in thinking as regards persons who are referred for
medical attention overseas. If you are overseas and
you take ill andhadtopay medical bills, you would
have incurred those expenses overseas. If you are in
Barbados and you take ill and a doctor decides that
you must go overseas you can also claim for medi-
cal expenses overseas.

All that we are doing is dividing these persons
into two categories. There is no need to get worried.
It is just extending the circumstances in which you
can get allowance if you had to pay a doctor who
is not in Barbados.

If you look at Section 4you will see that it makes
provision for payment made in a, country or terri-
tory outside Barbados to a person who was quali-
fied by the lawof that country or territory as a medi-
cal or dental practitioner, nurse or midwife or to a
public hospital or private clinic or private nursing
home under the directV control and supervision of a
person so qualified.

It is merely an extension of the circumstances
in which a taxpayer gets medical attention overseas,
and there is no need to worry.

The removal of the limit on the number of chil-
dren for whom medical expenses claims can be
made is another instance of how we are trying to
make some concession to taxpayers. We have been
paying lip service to the fact that Barbadians have
large families. While a person may have two children
who fall ill, one may have five children who fall ill.

Instead of limiting it to two children, we are say-
ing that if any of the children fall ill you will get an
allowance instead of getting it for two. It is not fair
to limit it to two children. You will imagine the relief
that it can bring to large Barbadian families.

I tomorrow would join any Government who
could introduce income tax free salaries to the gen-
eral public and to Ministers. I do not think that there
is anything more that I can say. Yes, Sir, on the


question of the consolidated Bill, it will come before
us before the year is out, except that Parliament may
go into Summer recess.

In this Bill will be incorporated all the promises
which the Hon. Minister of Finance made. It will
be appreciated that with a subject of this nature, where
so many people feel they have such sound views in
income tax, all of which have got to be examined,
it is important that you take your time, otherwise you
will have to start amending it every year.

If the Government could take away income tax
tomorrow it would be in power for evermore; but
we have to be realistic and responsible. We have
to look at it in the context of the revenue and expendi-
ture of the country. Apart from the political mileage
you can make, you still have to run the country and
keep it stable and economically viable.

I am prepared to accept the suggestions of sena-
tors on a Bill of this nature; but in the community
in which we live we cannot be overwhelmingly gen-
erous. We cannot afford it. Let us be realistic.

The Government will bring the consolidating Bill
before the Other Place after the Summer recess.
The only consolidation I can give is to say "for small
mercies may the Lord make us truly thankful".

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clause 1 of the Bill was called and passed with-
out debate.

Clause 2 was called.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: I asked a question
about the payment of income tax in connection with
National Insurance.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I remember this question coming before me some
months ago and the necessary advice was given on,
it. Government's opinion is that since you are com-
pelled to make these payments they should be allowed
as tax relief. I will pursue the matter and see if it
got lost, but I am under the impression that it was
accepted and that the claim can be made. I will check
it and let the senator know.
The question that Clause 2 stand part was put
and agreed to.
Clauses 3 to 6 of the Bill were called and agreed
to without debate.
The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.
His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.











On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford the Bill was read a third time and passed.

CONSIDERATION OF MATTERS
NOT ON ORDER PAPER

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, Earlier I intimated that it was my
intention to ask leave to deal with two Resolutions
which were circulated earlier in the day. I assume
that they are not controversial and I now ask formally
for leave to deal with these two Resolutions at today's.
meeting.

There being no objection, leave was granted.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CAPITAL) No. 16

The President accordingly called the nextOrder
A Resolution to place the sum of $6,114 at the dis-
posal of the Government to supplement the Estimates
1968-69 Part 11 Capital, as shown in the Supple-
mentary Estimates 1968-69 No. 16 which'form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L.E. SANDIFORD:
Mr. President,- Speaking earlier on the provision
of funds for the completion of classrooms for the
Alexandra School, I made mention of the need for
such work to be performed speedily in order that
facilities may be ready at.the start of the next aca-
demic year.

The same reason is behind this present request
at this time. Sometime in 1966, mindful of the need
to provide ever increasing places at the secondary
level for our citizens, it was decided that a new
stream should be started at the Lodge School, and
some 27 pupils entered the new stream during that
year.

At the same time two science ldborotorieswere
constructed in order to provide additional accomo-
dation for the teaching of science subjects. It was
envisaged then that there should be the provision
of three classrooms to deal with the increased
school population at that institution. Work has
started on the classrooms and the sum of $6,114
is now required for the completion of the work.

Mr. President, I do not know if senators would
wish me to give them all the details of the work to
be carried out, but they include toilet facilities, re-
instating the rifle range, plumbing and alterations
for the library, provision of an S. B. roof and in-
creased wages making a total of $6,114.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -
I am in favour of the Resolution but I would like
to draw to the attention of the Minister what I re-


gard as a fundamental weakness about repairs or
renovations to school buildings and Government
buildings generally.

There is the old fashioned idea that you have to
find work for an army of occupation of old fashioned
carpenters every year. I wonder sometimes if it
would not be better to pull down a whole building
erect a new one and stop this piecemeal business
of repairs every three or four years.

Some of these buildings have too many roofs
when you think of the money you have to spend
doing these little rooms. Some of them were not
designed for this age anyhow. You see heavy walls
four and five inches thick. When you realise the
money that it takes to cut down some of these
things, you spend more on destruction and then
renovation than on putting up something new.

Some of these schools want tearing right down
and putting up new buildings from the ground up. I
do not know the position at Lodge School and I do
not mean Lodge School per se; but I am speaking
in a general way. If a hurricane or some disaster
destroyed them you would have to build new ones,
and it would be a good thing. Old work is never
productive. Compare men putting up a new building
with those repairing an old one.

The Government goes on in perpetuity and ed-
ucation is one of the debts that you can pass on to
posterity.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L.E.SANDIFORD:
Mr. President, I would like to re-assure Senator
Walcott that I share his view that a tremendous
amount of building activity should take place where
school buildings are concerned. I would state that I
have no intention of pulling down the Lodge School
although I am taking a critical look at the boarding
establishment at that particular institution.

I have already said during the course of this
meeting that I expect a survey to be carried out of
the educational plan. I would think that the Lodge
School which now has a roll of about 470 students
is well poised for extension to go to about 1,000 over
the next few years.

Whether it will be done by old workmen who do
not get very excited by chopping and changing or
whether it will be a completely new block which can
take an additional number of students I cannot say at
this stage.

The work will not necessarily be done through
the Works Department of Government. It may be given
out to private enterprise. We have already started
on this, and construction of additional classrooms
at the Springer Memorial School has already been
done by private contract.

I would like to say that the Ministry of Education
is being facilitated as from today by the transfer of
the subjects of Broadcasting, Press liaison, Public










Relations and the Caribbean Broadcasting Corpora-
tion and the Government Information Service to the
control of the Prime Minister, and the Ministry of
Education will be free to devote even more attention
to matters of direct educational concern.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

PENSIONS (PENSIONABLE OFFICES)
(AMENDMENT) ORDER 1968.

The President called the next Order A Reso-
lution to approve the Order entitled The Pensions
(Pensionable Offices) (Amendment) Order, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President This Order seeks to bring up to date.
the number of pensionable offices. Under Section 2
(IA) of the Pensions Act the Order has to be made by
the Governor General and approved by both Houses of
the Legislature.

This Order is necessary because everyyear new
offices are created or there is found to be an error
or errors, and it is now necessary to bring one of
these Orders almost as an annual exercise.

As I have said, it has got to be approved by both
Houses of the Legislature. The Other Place has al-
ready approved it, and I now move formally that the
Resolution be concurred in.


Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.

SENATOR C.ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. President,
There is one thing that puzzles me. Why delete
"Office of the Prime Minister" and substitute the
words "Prime Minister's Office"? I ask that at the
risk of exposing my own ignorance.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I will have to defer the reply to that. There must be
some reason why the draftsman wanted "Prime
Minister's Office."



The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, I am deeply grateful to senators
for turning out today in spite of their other respon-
sibilities to deal with matters that should have been
disposed of last week. I now move that the Senate do
now adjourn.

Senator the Honourable L.E.Sandiford seconded
the motion and the Senate adjourned at 4.48 p.m.




Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 40
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 51 dated 26th June, 1969.



S.I. 1969 No. 105

The Miscellaneous Controls Act, 1958
(1958-42)

ORDER MADE BY THE COMPETENT AUTHORITY
UNDER SECTION (4) (1) (c) OF THE MIS-
CELLANEOUS CONTROLS ACT, 1958

This Order may be cited as the Miscellaneous
Controls (Control of Prices) (Amendment) (No. 6)
Order, 1969.
2. The Schedule to the Control of Prices (De-
fence) Order, 1942, as contained in the Miscellaneous
Controls (Control of Prices (Amendment) (No. 12)
Order, 1966 is hereby further amended by deleting all
the words, occurring in the columns marked "WIOLE-
SALE PRICE" AND "RETAIL PRICE" in respect of
the Article "ONIONS" and substituting therefore the
following:-


WHOLESALE PRICE RETAIL PRICE
ARTICLE
(not more than) (not more than)


ONIONS 17o per lb. 22t per Ib.



Made by me the aforesaid Competent Authority
this twenty-third day of June, one thousand nine WE
hundred and sixty-nine.

P. McCONNEY
Permanent Secretary C
o2, *, 7^7 Ministry of Trade.

0w ^~:





2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 106

The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF THE
CUSTOMS ACT, 1962

The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962, here-
by makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Customs
Duties (Semi-finished Hoods for Use in the Manufac-
ture of Hats) Order, 1969.

2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act 1962, is hereby amended by the addition thereto
of the following new item:-


-"Semi- 224-
finished Hoods
for Use in the
Manufacture
of Hats.


Semi-finished hoods which are proved
to the satisfaction of the Comptroller
of Customs to have been imported by
or on behalf of a person or company in
this Island, engaged in the manufacture
of hats in a factory employing not less
than fifteen persons, on the certificate
of such person, or in the case of a
company on the certificate of the
Secretary of such company, that such
articles are imported for use exclusive-
ly in the manufacture of hats in such
factory, subject to such conditions
as to the keeping or rendering of ac-
counts in respect of the use or disposal
of such articles as the Comptroller may
require."





STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


3. This Order shall remain in force for a period
of two years from the date of its commencement.
Made by the Minister this 18th day of June, 1969.

ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.





4 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 107

The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963
(1963-31)

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES (APPROVED PRO-
DUCTS)(PROCESSED FRUIT, FLAVOURS AND
FLAVOURING COMPOUNDS) ORDER, 1969.
The Minister in exercise of the powers con-
ferred on him by section 3 of the Industrial Incen-
tives Act, 1963, hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Industrial
Incentives (Approved Products) (Processed Fruit,
Flavours and Flavouring Compounds) Order, 1969.
2. The following products of manufacture are
hereby declared to be approved products for the
purposes of the Industrial Incentives Act, 1963:-
Processed Fruit, flavours and flavouring
compounds.
Made by the Minister this 18th day of June,
1969.


ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


(M.P. 7018/66/174).





STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 5


S.I. 1969 No. 108

DIRECTIONS GIVEN BY THE COMMISSIONER OF
POLICE WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE MINIS-
TER OF HOME AFFAIRS UNDER REGULA-
TION 58A OF THE MOTOR VEHICLES
AND ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATIONS,
1952.

1. In these directions, "traffic" means the pas-
sage of vehicles of every description, pedestrians
and all animals being ridden driven or led.

2. On Saturday, the 28th day of June, 1969
between the hours of 2.30 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. the
Belle Plantation Private Road in the Parish of St.
Michael from its junction with a track leading off
the main road north of the Belle Factory to the
road leading to the Belle Pumping Station and thence
on the road leading from the Belle Pumping Station
to the Belle Factory shall be closed to all traffic
except vehicles bearing an appropriate identifica-
tion mark issued by the Barbados Rally Club.
3. On Saturday, the 28th day of June, 1969
between the hours of 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. Paragon
Private Road in the Parish of Christ Church from
Paragon to the H.A.R.P. Gunsite and thence to
Spencers Plantation on a private road leading to
Highway 7., shall be closed to all traffic except
vehicles bearing an appropriate identification mark
issued by the Barbados Rally Club.

4. On Saturday, the 28th day of June, 1969
between the hours of 4.30 p.m. and 6.30 p.m. Hannays
Plantation Private Road in the Parish of Christ
Church from its junction with Lower Greys, thence





8 STATUTORi INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 104 (second publication)
LAND ACQUISITION ACT 1949
(Notice under Section 3)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it appears to
the Minister responsible for Lands that the parcel of
land described in the Schedule hereto and situate in
parish of Christ Church is likely to be needed for
purposes which in the opinion of the Minister are
public purposes: namely, for the purpose of providing
a playing field.



SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate
in the parish of Christ Church containing by admea-
surement 5 Acres 1 Rood 33.5 Perches or thereabouts
Abutting and Bounding on lands of the Barbados
Housing Authority, on lands of Susan Lovell, on lands
of Norgrove, on lands of C. T. Barrett deceased, on
lands of J. R. Peterkin and on the Public Road or
however else the same may abut and bound.

Dated this 20th day of June, One thousand nine
hundred and sixty-nine at Government Headquarters,
Bay Street in the parish of Saint Michael in the Island
of Barbados.

A. W. SYMMONDS
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Home Affairs.






STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 9


S.I. 1969 No. 103 (third publication)

LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949

(Notice under Section 3)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it appears to
the Minister responsible for Lands that the parcel of
land described in the Schedule hereto and situate in
the parish of Saint Michael is likely to be needed for
purposes which in the opinion of the Minister are
public purposes: namely, for the purpose of Highway
improvement.

SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate,
in Lhe parish of Saint Michael containing by admeasure-
ment .3,100 square feet or thereabouts Abutting and
Bounding on lands of one Simon Jordan, on a public
road known as Halls Road and on a public:road known
as Tweedside Road or however else the. same may
abut and bound.

Dated this 17th day of June, .one thousand nine
hundred and sixty-nine at Government Headquarters,
Bay Street,, in theparish of Saint Michael in the Island
of Barbados.

A. W. SYMMONDS
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Home Affairs.




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