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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00111
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00111
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 541
        Page 542
        Page 543
        Page 544
        Page 545
        Page 546
        Page 547
        Page 548
        Page 549
        Page 550
        Page 551
        Page 552
        Page 553
        Page 554
        Page 555
        Page 556
        Page 557
        Page 558
    Supplement: Senate debates for 9th May, 1968
        Page A 387
        Page A 388
        Page A 389
        Page A 390
        Page A 391
        Page A 392
        Page A 393
        Page A 394
        Page A 395
        Page A 396
        Page A 397
        Page A 398
    Supplement: Senate debates for 6th June, 1968
        Page A 399
        Page A 400
        Page A 401
        Page A 402
        Page A 403
        Page A 404
        Page A 405
        Page A 406
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 36; S.I. 94: Customs duties (the Barbados Sugar Producers' Association inc.) order, 1969
        Page B 1
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 36; S.I. 95: Income tax (registered unit trusts) (amendment) order, 1969
        Page B 2
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 36; S.I. 96: Industrial incentives (approved products) (polyurethene foam products) order, 1969
        Page B 3
Full Text










VOL. CIV.


1*fidal


semtte


PUBLISHED- BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 12TH JUNE, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Gazette Notices

Applications for Liquor Licences, Dist. "A"....... 553
Appointment of Temporary Ministers:
G. G. Fergusson, M.P., as Minister of Agriculture
Labour and National Insurance and Senator
H. Odessa Gittens as Minister of Education 555
Bye-election, 1969: Elliott Deighton Mottleyelected 541
Diplomatic: Presentation of Letter of Appointment:
Mrs. Winifred Gaskin, High Commissioner
of Guyana to Barbados...................... 555
Grant of Leave to Senator S. V. Ashby ................ 541
Industrial Incentives re specialized powdered limestone
as base for scouring powder..................... 549
re Special phonograph records (live sound
post card)........................................ 549
re Sanitary pads, Toilet tissue rolls, etc..... 553
In the Supreme Court: Bayley vs. King............... 555
Broome vs. Morris; Clarke vs. Skeete......... 552, 554
Coulthrust vs. Moaze; Edwards vs. Hunte ... 556
Edwards vs. Walkes; Maraj vs. Wallace....... 552, 554
Power vs. Waithe; Power vs. Hope............. 551
Rogers vs. Walrond; Williams vs. Gibson.... 550
Probate Advertisements dated 6th June, 199..... 550
Resignation: Miss Lorraine Y. Johnson, Clerical
Officer, from the Public Service............... 541
Trade Marks: "Coruba", Kellogg", etc.............. 542-548

Senate Debates for 9th May, 1968 and 6th June, 1968.

Legal Supplement

S.I. 1969 No. 94: Customs Duties (The Barbados Sugar
Producers' Association (Inc.) Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 95: Income Tax (Registered Unit Trusts)
S(Amendment) Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 96: Industrial Incentives (App
(Polyurethene Foam Products) Order 0)





m 3 ^fIo 0.


NOTICE NO. 397

GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Grant of Leave to Senator

Senator S. V. Ashby has been granted
leave of absence from his duty as a Senator
duringthe period 31stMay to 14th July, 1969.

(M.P. 0028)


Resignation

Miss Lorraine Y. Johnson, Clerical Of-
ficer has resigned from the Public Service
with effect from 2nd June, 1969.

(M.P. 7425)



Bye-Election, 1969

The Writ for the Bye-Election, 1969 to
fill the Vacant Seat for the City of Bridgetown
in the House of Assembly created by the death
of the late Louis Albert Lynch was returned
on the 31st day of May, 1969 with the name of
the following member elected certified there-
on by the Returning Officer.

N \ ELLIOTT IJEIGHTON MOTTLEY.


NO. 47


ighe








OFFCIA GAET Jue1,16


NOTICE NO. 398


TAKE NOTICE


THAT The Rum Company (Jamaica) Lim-
ited a Company incorporated under the Com-
panies Law of Jamaica, whose trade or
business address is 32/34 PortRoyal Street,
Kingston, Jamaica trading as Manufacturers
and Merchants, has applied for the registra -
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Rum and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 399

TAKE NOTICE


THAT The Rum Company(Jamaica) Lim-
ited a Company incorporated under the Com-
panies Law of Jamaica whose trade or
business address is 32/34 Port Royal Street,
Kingston, Jamaica trading as Manufacturers
and Merchants, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A' of Register
in respect of Rum and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 27th day \o May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


;June 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







JunO 12 l99 OFICA GAW


NOTICE NO. 400,

TAKE NOTICE


THAT Kellogg Company, a Company in-
corporated under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America, whose
address is 235 Porter Street, Battle Creek,
Michigan, United States of America, has ap-
plied for the registration of a trade mark in
Part"A" of Register in respect of meat, fish
poultry and game; meat extracts; preserved
dried and choked fruit and vegetables; jellies,
jams; eggs, milk and other dairy products;
edible oils and fats; preserves pickles; cof-
fee, tea cocoa, sugar, rice tapioca, sago,
coffee substitutes; flour and preparations
made from cereals; bread, biscuits, cakes,
pastry and confectionary, ices; honey, treacle;
yeast, baking-powder; salt, mustard; pepper,
vinegar, sauces; spices; ice, and will be en-
titled to register the same after one month
from the 12th day of June 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 401

TAKE NOTICE


THAT Kellogg Company, a Company in-
corporated under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America, whose
address is 235 Porter Street, Battle Creek ,
Michigan, United States of America, has ap-
plied for the registration of a trade mark in
Part "A" of Register in respect of meat, fish,
poultry and game; meat extracts; preserved,
dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jel-
lies, jams; eggs, milk and other dairy pro-
ducts; edible oils and fats; preserves,
pickles; coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tap-
ioca,, sago, coffee substitutes; flour, and
preparations made from cereals;' bread bis-
cuits, cakes, pastry and confectionery, ices;
honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt,
mustard; pepper, sauces; spices; ice, and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 12th day of June 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


June 12, 19691


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







, AAOA I I


NOTICE NO. 402
TAKE NOTICE

RUFFLETTE

That Thomas French & Sons Limited a
British Company whose trade or business
address is Chester Road, Manchester 15i
England has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of Curtain Heading Tape and will be
entitled to register the same after one month
from the 12th day of June 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFROD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 403

TAKE NOTICE






fNKA


THAT INKA COSMETICS GMBH whose
trade or business address is Zeibstr. 13,
Hannover in the Federal Republic of Ger-
many, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of Perfumes, Nonmedicated toilet pre-
parations, Cosmetic preparations, Essential
Oils, Soaps, dentifrices and preparations for
the hair, Pharmaceutical and Sanitary sub-
stances and disinfectants, and will be entitled


to register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such reg-
istration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 404



TAKE NOTICE


THAT Avis Rent-a-Car System Inc. a
corporation of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade of business
address is 900 Old Country Road Garden
City, New York 11534, United States of
America; a motor vehicle hiring Company
has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respectof
Printed publications and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


I- --- AVIS I


June 12, 1969


4AA'


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







June1 I O C G T


NOTICE NO. 405

TAKE NOTICE


THAT Kellogg Company, a Company in-
corporated under the laws of State of Del -
aware, United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 235 Porter- Street,
Battle Creek, Michigan, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of meat, fish, poultry and game; meat
extracts; preserved, dried and cooked fruits
and vegetables; jellies, jams, eggs, milk and
other dairy products; edible oils and fats;
preserves, pickles; coffee, tea, cocoa,
sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffee substitutes
flour, and preparations made from cereals;
bread, biscuits, cakes, pastry and confection-
ery, ices, honey, treacle, yeast, baking-pow-
der; salt, 'mustard; pepper, vinegar, sauces;
spices; ide, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 12th day
of June 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 406

TAKE NOTICE


THAT Kellogg Company, a Company in-
corporated under the laws of State of Dela-
ware, United States of America, whose trade
or business address is 235 Porter Street,
Battle Creek, Michigan, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of meat, fish, poultry and game; meat
extracts; preserved, dried and cooked fruits
and vegetables; jellies, jams, eggs, milk and
other dairy products; edible oils and fats;
preserves, pickles; coffee, tea, cocoa, sug-
ar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffee substitutes;
flour, and preparations made from cereals;
bread, biscuits, cakes, pastry and confec -
tionary, ices; honey, treacle; yeast, baking-
powder; salt, mustard; pepper, vinegar,
sauces; spices; ice, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me atmy office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969







OFICA GAZTT Jun 12, 196


NOTICE NO. 407

TAKE NOTICE


THAT The Coca-Cola Company, a cor-
poration organized and existing under the
laws of the State of Delaware, United States
of America, whose trade or business address
is 515 Madison Avenue, New York United
States of America, trading as Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect of
Non-alchololic beverages and preparations
for making the same, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office. The applicants disclaim
any exclusive right to the use of the word
"TONIC" and the device of a bottle.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 408



TAKE NOTICE




CORUBA

BLA N CA.


THAT The Rum Company (Jamaica) Lim-
ited a Company incorporated under the Com-
panies Law of Jamaica and whose trade or
business address is 32/34 Port Royal Street,
Kingston, Jamaica trading as Manufacturers
and Merchants, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark inPart "A" of Register
in respect of Rum and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
12th day of June 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on appli-
cation at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969







June 12, 1 O.FICL GAZETTE '5[


NOTICE NO. 409

TAKE NOTICE


THAT Kellogg Company, a Company in-
corporated under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America; whose
trade or business address is 235 Porter
Street, Battle Creek Michigan, United
States of America, has applied for the reg-
istration of a trade mark in Part"A" of
Register in respect of meat, fish, poultry and
game; meat extracts; preserved, dried and
cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies, jams,
eggs, milk and other dairy products; edible
oils and fats; preserves, pickles; coffee, tea,
cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffee sub-
stitutes; flour, and preparations made from
cereals; bread, biscuits, cakes, pastry and
confectionery, ices; honey, treacle; yeast,
baking-powder; salt, mustard; pepper, vine-
gar, sauces; spices; ice, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from
the 12th dayof June 1969 unless some person


shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such reg-
istration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO.410
TAKE NOTICE

PERCOLETTE

THAT WELL AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT
whose trade or business address is 61 Darm-
stadt, Berliner Allee 65, in the Federal Re-
public of Germany, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of bleaching preparations
and other substances for laundry use; clean-
ing polishing, scouring and abrasive prepar-
ations; soaps, perfumery, essential oils,
cosmetics, hair lotions; dentifrices, products
for cleaning, conditioning and embellishing
the hair, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 12th day of
June 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Regsitrar of Trade Marks.


,547


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969







OFFCIA GAET Jn 2,16


NOTICE NO. 411
TAKE NOTICE

RUFFLETTE

That Thomas French & Sons Limited a
British Company whose trade or business ad-
dress is Chester Road, Manchester 15
England has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of Curtain in suspension fittings of
common metal and of moulded plastic mater-
ials and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 12th day of June
1969 unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 412
TAKE NOTICE

KOLESTON

THAT WELL ARTIENGESELLSCHAFT
whose trade of business address is 61 Darm-
stadt, Berliner Allee 65, in the Federal Re-
public of Germany, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of bleaching preparations
and other substances for laundry use; clean-
ing, polishing, scouring and abrasive pre-
parations; soaps; perfumery, essential oils,
cosmetics, hair lotions; dentifrices, pro-
ducts for cleaning, conditioning and embell-
ishing the hair, and will be entitled to register


the same after one month from the 12th day
of June 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark canbe seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 413

TAKE NOTICE


SANTIBA


THAT The Coca-Cola Company a corpor-
ation organized and existing under the laws
of the State of Delaware whose trade or bus-
iness address is 515 Madison Avenue, City of
New York, State of New York 10022 Manufac-
turers and Merchants has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of non-alchololic bever-
ages and preparations for such beverages
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 12th day of June 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 27th day of May 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


June 12, 1969


.OFFICIAL GAZETTE






June~~ ~ ~~ 12 99 FIIL AET


NOTICE NO. 415


THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963 THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963


(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance pursuant to Section 6 of the Indus-
trial Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives
notice thathe is about to be asked to consider
whether for the purposes of the abovemen-
tioned Act, the following product should be an
approved product and whether the following
company should be an approved enterprise in
repsect of the relevant product.

Any person interested in the manufac-
ture or importation of the product who objects
to it being declared an approved product or
the company being declared an approved en-
terprise for the purposes of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Industrial Development Cor-
poration, to reach them on or before Monday
June 23rd, 1969, a statement in writing set-
ting forth the grounds of his objection.


Company:
Fine Powders Ltd.


Relevant Product:
Specialized powder-
ed limestone as
base for scouring
powder.


(Section 6)

NOTICE


The Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance pursuant to Section 6 of the Indus -
trial Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives no-
tice that he is about to be asked to consider
whether for the purposes of the abovemen-
tioned Act, the following product should be an
approved product and whether the following
company should be an approved enterprise in
respect of the relevant product.

Any person interested in the manufac-
ture or importation of the product who objects
to it being declared an approved product or
the company being declared an approved enter-
prise for the purposes of the Industrial Incen-
tives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Industrial Development Cor-
poration, to reach them on or before Thursday,
June 19th, 1969, a statement in writing set-
ting forth the grounds of his objection.

Company: Relevant Product:
Instant Records Special phonograph
Barbados Ltd. records (live sound
postcard)


NOTICE NO. 414


June 12. 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE






OFFCIA GAET Jun 1216


NOTICE NO. 416


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court


No. 190 of 1969


GRAFTON DENNIS WILLIAMS:


DELCINA GIBSON:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Grand View in the
Parish of Saint Thomas and Island of Bar-
bados aforesaid containing by estimation
Eleven thousand one hundred and twenty
seven square feet or thereabouts Abutting
and bounding on lands of Daisy Williams on
Vaucluse Plantation on lands of Alexander
Alleyne and on the Public Road or however
else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $800.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 417

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Ccourt

No. 217 of 1969


CHARLES ROGERS:

MURIEL WALROND:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here -
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Brydens Avenue,
Brittons Hill in the parish of Saint Michael
and Island aforesaid containing by admeasure-
ment 11,291 square feet or thereabouts abut-
ting and bounding on lands of Hilda Best, on
lands of one Agard, on lands of Violet
Cadogan, David Roach and Mabel Holder, and
on the public road or however else the same
may abut and bound with the appurtenances.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $3,000.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969







June12, 969 FFICAL GZETT


NOTICE NO. 418

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 219 of 1969


ORVILLE ARTHUR POWER:

IONA CARLOTTA WAITHE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Paynes Bay in
the parish of Saint James in this Island contain-
ing by admeasurementone quarter of an acre
or thereaboutsabutting and bounding on lands
of the ESSOGas Station, on lands of C. W. W.
Greenidge, on lands of one Britton and on the
public road or however else the same may
abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,000.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 419

,IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court
No. 206 of 1969


ORVILLE ARTHUR POWER:

GWENDOLYN LYOTTA HOPE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Holders Hill in the
parish of Saint James in this Island contain-
ing by admeasurement three thousand nine
hundred and forty six square feet or there-
abouts Abutting and Bounding on land of
E. Forte, on lands of Rosalie Alleyne, and on,
a public road or however else the same may
abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,200.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


June 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







552 OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 12, 1969


NOTICE NO. 420

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High C art

No. 209 of 1969


GEORGE ANTHONY BROOME:

RACHEL ADINA MORRIS:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 14th day
of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate in Hoyte's Village
in the parish of Saint James and Island of
Barbados abovesaid containing by admeasure-
ment One rood twenty perches be the same
more less Butting and bounding on lands now
or late of John B. Allamby on lands now or
late of William Spencer, deceased, on lands
now or late of Charles Brandison Thompson,
on lands now or late of Charles H. Cummins
and on lands now or late of William Maynard
or however else the same may butt and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,600.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 421

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 207 of 1969


LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS:

ELVIRA JANE WALKES:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Barker's Road in
the District of Haggatt Hall in the parish of
Saint Michael and Island aforesaid containing
by admeasurement Forty six thousand one
hundred and seven square feet or thereabouts
abutting and bounding on lands of Delcina
Flemming on lands of one Harlow on lands of
Prince Mullin and on the public road known
as Barker's Road or however else the same
may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $5,000.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969


552l








Jun 12 196 OFIIL AET


NOTICE NO. 422


THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963


(Section 6)

The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purposes of the abovementioned Act,
the following products should be approved
products and whether the following company
should be an approved enterprise in respect
of the relevant products.



Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of the products who objects to
them being declared approved products or the
company being declared an approved enter-
prise for the purposes of the Industrial In-
centives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Industrial Development Cor-
poration, to reach them on or before Tuesday
June 24, 1969, a statement in writing setting
forth the grounds of his objection.


Company:
Prosan Ltd.


Relevant Products:
Sanitary Pads
Toilet tissue rolls
Household towels
Sterilized disposable
Sheets
Pillow cases
Surgical gowns
Elastic braids.


NOTICE NO. 423
LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES
(Act 1957 40)
APPLICANT: LIONEL C. KING
OCCUPATION: Director of Johnson,
King & Co. Ltd.
ADDRESS: Cheapside


PREMISES:


The upper storey of a
stone building located
over the Shoppers'


Centre.
Dated this 4th day of June 1969
Signed: LIONEL C. KING
Applicant.
This Application for a Grant of Res-
taurant Licence will be considered at a Li-
censing Court to be held at Magistrates'
Courts District "A" on Thursday the 29th
day of June 1969 at 9 o'clock a.m.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.

APPLICANT: DENNIS STRAKER
OCCUPATION: Shop-keeper
ADDRESS: Bath Village
Christ Church.
PREMISES: Wall building situated at
Bath Village,
Christ Church.

Dated this 1st day of June, 1969.
Signed: P. STRAKER
Applicant,
This Application for a Retail Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts District "A" on
Thursday the 26th day of June 1969 at
9 o'clock a.m.
GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority,


June 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








OFICA GAET Jn 2,16


NOTICE NO. 424

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF. JUDICATURE

High Court


No. 194 of 1969


JOSEPH CONRADE CLARKE:


MATILDA AUGUSTUS SKEETE:


Plaintiff


Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the.property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on. oath to me on or brfore the 14th
day of August 1969.



PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT cer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at Rock
Hall in the parish of Saint Lucy in this Is-
land containing ,by admeasurement Three
Roods Thirty Five Perches and three tenths
of a perch or thereabouts Abutting on lands
of Cleophus and Beryl Baker on lands of
Eldica Payne on the public road on lands of
Adrianna Skeete, Preston Babb on the parcel
of land secondly herein described and on
lands of one Arnold O'Neal or however else the
same may abut AND SECONDLY ALL THAT
certain piece or parcel of land also situate at
Rock Hall in the parish of Saint Lucy in this
Island containing by admeasurement One
Rood Nine Perches or thereabouts Abutting
and Bounding on the parcel of land first
herein described on lands of Arnold O'Neal


deceased on lands of Cottage Plantation and
on lands of Preston Babb or however else the
same may abut.
VALUE OF PROPERTY: $2,000.00
Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.

NOTICE NO. 425

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE
High Court

No. 185 of 1969


RAMNATH MARAJ:

PERCY WALLACE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Silver Sands in
the parish of Christ Church and Island of
Barbados containing by admeasurement one
rood twenty eight perches or thereabouts
Abutting;and. bounding on lands now or late of
Charles C. Powlett on lands of Montrose on
lands of one Yard on lands of the estate of
S. C. Millar deceased and on the public road
or however else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $6,000.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969








June~~~~ 12 99OFCA AET


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Appointment of Temporary Ministers

In pursuance of section 68 of the Consti-
tution, His Excellency the Governor-General
appointed the following persons to be tempo-
rary Ministers in respect of the periods in-
dicated: -

The Honourable G. G. Fergusson, M.P.,
to be temporary Minister of Agri-
culture, Labour and National Insur-

ance during the period 2nd to 30th
June, 1969, because of the absence
from Barbados of the Honourable
K. N. R. Husbands, M. P.


Senator Odessa Gittens to be temporary
Minister of Education during the
period 2nd to 6th June, 1969 because
of the absence from Barbados of
Senator The Honourable L. E.
Sandiford.

(M. P. 8682/18 Vol. III)



DIPLOMATIC

Presentation of Letter of Appointment

Her Excellency Mrs. Winifred Gaskin,
High Commissioner for Guyana to Barbados,
with residence in Jamaica, presented her
letter of appointment to the Rt. Hon. E. W.
Barrow, M. P., on 4th June, 1969.


M. P. EX-C. 92


NOTICE NO. 426
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE
High Court
No. 216 of 1969

EDMUND ALEXANDER BAYLEY: Plaintiff

ARTHUR ROBERT EYARE KING: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land (part of the lands of the
Mount Plantation) situate in the parish of
Saint George in this Island containing by ad-
measurement Four hundred and ninety thous-
and seven hundred and ninety-nine square feet
or thereabouts BUTTING AND BOUNDING to-
wards the North on other lands of the Mount
Plantation, towards the West on lands of the
Farm Plantation, towards the South on lands
formerly of Ellerton Plantation but now of
Sundry owners and on other lands of the Mount
Plantation and towards the East on the Public
Road which leads from Bulkeley to Drax Hall
or however else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $169,414.20

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969







OFIIL AETEJn 1,16


NOTICE NO. 427

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High C urt

No. 184 of 1969


VASHTI URI COULTHRUST:

MARVA LORETTA MOAZE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certainpiece
or parcel of land part of Mount Hillaby
Plantation situate in the parish of Saint An-
drew and Island aforesaid containing by ad-
measurement Two roods four and three fifths
perches or thereabouts Abutting and Bounding
on lands of Lionel Alleyne on lands of one
Elizabeth Alleyne, Archibald Goodman and
Harold Grant on other lands of Hillaby
Plantation and on a public road or however
else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OR PROPERTY: $2,200.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 428

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High C urt


No. 218 of 1969


LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS:

TABITHA MINERVA HUNTE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authen-
ticated on oath to me on or before the 14th
day of August 1969.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Prospect in the
parish and Island aforesaid containing by ad-
measurement Twenty Perches or thereabouts
abutting and bounding on lands of Isaac Jacob
Benskin on the seashore on lands of the Es-
tate of FitzHerbert Sandiford deceased and
on the Public Road or however else the same
may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $5,000.00

Dated this 2nd day of June 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-


PROBATE of the Will dated the 15th day of December, 1964 of WINIFRED CARMEN
YEARWOOD late of "Brigade House", Garrison in the parish of SaintMichaelin
this Island who died on the 2nd day of February, 1969,by ALFRED DeCOURCY
BOYCE and Sir ERNEST STANLEY ROBINSON, the Executors named in the Will of
the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 20th day of March, 1948 of MABEL CLAIRMONTE
KINCH late of the Mental Hospital in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on the 15th day of September, 1967, by CORAL CARLISLE KINCH, one of the
Executricies named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 7th day of September, 1965 of PEARL GERTRUDE
BRANKER late of Tichbourne, Howells Cross Road in the parish of Saint Michael in
this Island who died on the 28th day of October, 1967 by EVELYN ROWENA
BRANKER, one of the Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 5th day of March, 1969 of LEONARD ALLEYNE also known
as LEONARD OSBOURNE late of London Road, Brittons Hill in the parish of Saint
Michael in this Islandwho died on the 7th day of March, 1969 by VICTOR LAYNE, the
sole Executor named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 12th day of May, 1962 of OWEN UPLAND McCONNEY
late of "Waverley", Worthing in the parish of Christ Church in this Island who died
on the 20th day of February, 1968 by JOYCE OWEN STOUTE and ANTHONY DAVID
McCONNEY, the Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estae of EDWIN THEOPHILUS GRAHAM also
known as PHILIP THEOPHILUS GRAHAM late of St. Philip's Infirmary in this Island
who died on the 29th day of January, 1969 by ACHILLES THEOPHILUS GRAHAM,
son of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of RICHARD THEOPHILUS BRATHWAITE
late of Vicarage Lane, St. Stephens in the District of Black Rock in the parish of
Saint Michael in this Island who died on the 25th day of October, 1968, by EVA
NICOLA BRATHWAITE, widow of the said deceased.


June 12. 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS Coatiued


LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION DE BONIS NON to the Estate of CHARLES ORMOND
KNIGHT late of Roaches in the parish of Saint Lucy in this Island who died on the
17th day of September, 1951, by LEMUEL ASHBY KNIGHT, brother of the said de-
ceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION CUM TESTAMENTO ANNEXO to the Estate of IDA
BLANCHE WILLIAMS late of Deacons Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Is-
land who died on the 23rd day of May, 1949, by ENID WILLIAMS one of the Benefi-
ciaries named in the Will of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged withinfourteendays from the date of this Advertisement
with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications have
been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 6th day of June, 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD

Registrar.


Government Printing Office.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 12, 1969











THE


SENATE


DEBATE


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE

Thursday, 9th May, 1968
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith PHILLIPS,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable
P. M. GREAVES, B.A. (Minister of Home Affairs);
Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q. C. (Attorney
General); Senator the Honourable L. E. SANDIFORD,
M.A. (Minister of Education); Senator F. C. H.
CAREW; Senator S. V. ASHBY; Senator F. L.
WALCOTT, O.B.E.; Senator M. A. KING; Senator
D. A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E.; Senator E. Lisle WARD;
Senator W. W. BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator S. A.
BLANCHETTE; Senator Erma V. ROCK; Senator
P. G. MORGAN; Senator R. G. MAPP; Senator N. A.
BARROW, B.A.

ABSENT

Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Par-
liamentary Secretary); Senator H. F. ALKINS; Sen-
ator C. L. BRATHWAITE; SenatorDr. R. B. CADDLE
B.Sc., M.B.B.S.

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer excuses for the absence of Senator
H. F. Alkins and Senator H. Odessa Gittens from the
day's meeting.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves, Minister
of Home Affairs and Leader of the Senate, laid the
following papers: -

1. Statement showing Net Customs and Ex-
cise Receipts for twelve months ended 31st March,
1968.


2. An Account of the transactions in Rum in
the several districts of the Island for the quarter
ended 31st March, 1968.

3. The Abstract of Statistics of Barbados for
the year 1965.

4. The Customs Duties (Wet Water Concen-
trate for use in the Combating of Sugar Cane Fires)
Order, 1968.

5. The Caribbean Free Trade Association
(Adaptation) Order, 1968.

6. Supplementary Agreement under Article
31 (3) of the Agreement for the establishment of the
Caribbean Free Trade Association.

7. The Civil Establishment (Teachers)
(Amendment) Order, 1968.

8. The Twenty-ninth Annual Report and
Statement of Accounts of the Agricultural Credit Bank
for the year 1st June, 1965 to 31st May, 1966.

9. Financial Statements of the Barbados
Agricultural Development Corporation for the year
ended 30th June, 1966.

10. The Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic
(Amendment) Regulations, 1968.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.1

The President called the first Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $84,229 at the disposal
of the Government to supplement the Estimates 1968-
69 Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1968-69 No. 1 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: Mr. President, Relationships be-
tween Church and State in history have been charac-
terised by various attitudes on both sides, namely
that they have ranged from harmony on the one
hand to conflict on the other, and from peace on the
one hand to war on the other; and it has not been











unknown that from beneaththe clerical cloak dagger'
have been drawn In pursuit of the interest of the
Church.

I am happy to state that the relationships be-
tween Church and State in Barbadoe have not reached
this stage, and when the major points of settlement
have been agreed upon I do not think that there will
be any need to fear that they will.

Towards the end of last year a draft of the A.n-
glican Church Settlement Bill was submitted to the
Anglican Bishop for study, and the comments of the
Church were returned to the Government for con-
sideration. The major points have subsequently been
agreed to, so much so, that it was envisaged that from
the 1st of April the beginningof the Financial year
1968-69 the State would have been free from the
Church.

Unfortunately, the legislation in its final form
has not been completed, and it is therefore necessary
to make certain amendments to the financial pro-
vision in the Estimates to enable the clergy to re-
ceive their emoluments.

In the Estimates for 1967-68 a sum of approx-
imately $133,000 was set aside for the personal
emoluments of the clergy, but under the terms of
the agreement reached between the Church and the
State it is envisaged that there would be in the first
year of the operation of the new arrangements
$248,000 which would have to be a block vote grant paid
by the Government to the Church and so this sum was
included in the 1968-69 Estimates under statutory
expenditure.

As I have said already, no provision was made
for the payment of personal emoluments because it
was envisaged that the legislation would have been
completed by that time. It is now necessary to pro-
vide for the personal emoluments, and the sum of
$84,229 is being asked for in order to ensure that
those emoluments of the clergy can be met.

I would like to state that the clergy are some-
times very understanding and long suffering, and I
am happy to state that in this particular instance
they have not created any undue rumpus because
their emoluments were not forthcoming. Iwouldlike
to say that I am very grateful for their understanding
in this matter.

However, sir, it is necessary to get this pro-
vision through as speedily as possible, and I there-
fore move that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH seconded
the motion.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President -
I am very glad to hear from the Hon. Minister of
Education that everything is good between the Church
and the State. That has been said for almost a year
now. I remember when the Estimates were being dis-
cussed in this Chamber in 1967 the excuse was raised


that nothing could be done about the Church because
there was an agreement between the Church and State.
One was wondering why this Enabling Act could not
be brought forward.

The Minister has said today that the clergy are
long suffering. It is not the clergy alone whom we have
to consider today. Every Anglican inthis community
is very much upset that two weeks ago when the
clergy went to the Treasury they were told that
nothing was there for them. It caused alot of incon-
venience.

What is the reason for their being treated in that
way? What has the Church done that it is being
treated in this way? When the amount of $248,000
was put in the Estimates it should have been known
that it could not be paid out until the enabling Act
was passed, and when the Estimates were sent down
and discussed in March they ought to have known that
the enabling Act would not be passed by the end of
March.

Sir, the same day that the Government came down
with a Resolution for $2 million for the Caribbean
Broadcasting Corporation they could have come with
this Resolution for $84,000 to save clergymen the
embarrassment they suffered at the Treasury. Peo-
ple are asking if it is true that the clergy did not get
their money at the end of the month.

I hope that something will soon be done to have
the enabling Act passed and allow the Church to get
its house in order. It is not just the $84,000 that the
Church wants. The Church wants to serve the com-
munity of Barbados in the best way. The present
position is very embarrassing.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, I want to correct one or two im-
pressions given because the tenor of Senator
Blackman's speech was that the Government is at
fault, that the Government should have had the Act
passed by the 1st of April.

The mere fact that itwas not passedwas because
of the Government's intention to satisfy the Church on
certain requests that they had put up.

When we submitted the first draft in 1967 there
was no legal obligation to do so. If the Church comes
out every now and then with some other point or at-
titude towards church schools or whether they will
bury the dead free is another thing. To suggest that
because the Bill has not beenpassedthe Government
has treated the Church shabbily is not a reflection of
the truth.

Senator Blackman knows that when the Act was
submitted to the Church, the Church put up sugges-
tions and the Cabinet discussed them. Then the
Church came back again and that has been happen-
ing for the last 10 to 15 years.

The Church may want to be free of the Govern-
ment and the Government wants to be free of the


_ I I


-qqq











Church. I hope that there will be evidence of their
desire to serve the community when they can no
longer go to the Treasury as they did last month.

Senator Blackman is a pillar of the Church and
he knows that we are trying to arrive at a proper
settlement. He should not give the impression of
Jimmy Hatlo's cartoon "They'll Do It Everytime."
Because a financial difficulty has arisen it is being
blown up out of all proportions, and it is being sug-
gested that the Government is taking advantage of
the Church. If we wanted to do that we would have
introduced the Legislation had it passed and that
would have been an end of the matter.

There would be no reason why we would bring
down these Estimates in order to save inconvenience.
There is no love lost where we are concerned. We
do not want them to go to the Treasury at all at
month end or any other time to be embarrassed.

Senator Blackman talked about people being up-
set because the Clergy did not get their money. Do
you think that anyone in Broad Street or anywhere
else is upset because the clergy did not get paid?
It is not even a question of two weeks after the end
of the month. Today is the 9th of May.

Let us be realistic. We will as early as possible
introduce legislation without acrimony on either side,
but facing up to financial realities and all other as-
pects in which the Church has served the community
in the past.

The delay is not any question of laxness, but be-
cause of the negotiations in which both sides have
been involved.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: This dramatic picture which Senator
Blackman has drawn about clergymen going to the
Treasury and not being able to draw their funds does
not in fact represent a true picture. The Bishop was
informed of the situation and knew of it and further-
more the Bishop and nine rectors and eight vicars
drew part of their salaries for the month of April.
That is under statutory expenditure. It is the re-
maining part which they have not got. I do not know
where Senator Blackman got his picture from. Some
clergymen went to the Treasury and got part of their
salaries. To suggest that they got nothing is not in
accordance with the true situation.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT (GENERAL)
(AMENDMENT), (No. 2) ORDER

The President called the second Order- A Reso-
lution to approve the Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) (No. 2) Order, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President About three years ago there had been


found some difficulty in the secondmentofa suitable
person for the post of A.D.C. to the Governor-
General. Since 1961 the post has been filled by the
secondment of a person in a pensionable office of the
Civil Service.

This seconded officer was paid a special allow-
ance in addition to the salary of his substantive post,
and it was agreed that he i should hold this post of
A.D.C. for $120 as acting salary. The officer on
secondment to the post has requested that he return
to the Civil Service in the interest of his career, and
it has also been drawn to our attention that under the
Constitution, the Governor-General has complete
control over his staff, including the A.D.C., and it
is not considered desirable that that post should be
filled by a Civil Servant.

There is difficulty in filling the post, and there
have been difficulties which did not allow the
Governor-General the full time service of a uni-
formed, experienced A.D.C. It is proposed to faci-
litate the recruitment by amending the 'Civil
Establishment Order to pay duty allowance to the
A.D.C. where it is inconvenient for him to live at
Government House.

The amount that it is proposed to pay is set out
as $150 a month. This is not the only officer in the
Civil Service who will be receiving such an allow-
ance for not occupying quarters to which he is en-
titled.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President I
believe that the Minister said that this would not be
the only officer enjoying this allowance for not oc-
cupying Government quarters. Has he any further in-
formation on that?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
A short time ago this Chamber voted money for
house allowance for the Commissioner of Police.
It will be remembered that the last holderof the post
occupied Government quarters. The present holder
does not and he is entitled to allowance.

The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put and agreed to.



BILL TO REGULATE CONTROL AND
DISTRIBUTION OF MILK

The President called the third Order A Bill to
provide for the regulation and control of the pro-
duction and distribution of milk and milk products
in the Island, to establish a Milk Advisory Board and
for matters connected therewith and incidental
thereto.


I I -- ---- L LI _~ III











SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, The Objects and reasons of this
piece of legislation are clearly set out. "The object
of this Bill is to provide for the regulation and con-
trol of the production and distribution of milk and
milk products in the Island with a view to pro-
moting and expanding the local dairy and livestock
industry and the provision thereby of an adequate
supply of milk and milk products of the best quality
at reasonable prices."

Now, sir, in this country there is a milk plant.
At the same time it should be known that the Gov-
ernment only owns 25 per cent of the shares and is
only represented by one director in the person of
the Chief Agricultural Officer.

I am not prepared to go into the question of
whether the plant is running efficiently or not. It is
not the concern of the Government except in how it
affects the cost of living, in relation to the cost of
the product. I am not prepared to go into this, al-
though I have been forced to listen to criticisms
which any citizen who is literate can indulge in.

It is well known that the Canadian Government
has given to Barbados a very generous loan of
$250,000 (Canadian) for the expansion of the Dairy
Industry. Cattle have come in under this scheme and
are now at the Government Agricultural Station at St.
Andrew. The Government is concernedwiththe health
of the Community. The Government realises the im-
portance of milk to school children and the community
as a whole from the cradle to the grave. The Gov-
ernment is also aware of the hazards anddifficulties
of the industry now that so much money is being spent
on expansion, and the Government is committed to the
expansion of the industry.

This is only a Bill, but in due course there will
be Regulations. Regulations carry the force of law if
they are made in accordance with the provisions of
the Act. There are occasions when from the point of
view of proper drafting power can be given to some
person or persons to make Regulations which can
have the force of law. I think it is a good thing to
pay more attention to Regulations which are drafted
under an Act. This is a piece of advice to the Oppo-
sition because no one in the Opposition really seems
to worry about Regulations. That was so even when
I was in the Opposition.

In this Bill you will see the definition of milk
products, dairy, dairy keeper, milk processor etc.
It will be seen from Section 2 that the "appropriate
authority" means the Chief Agricultural Officer or
such other public officer as may from time to time
be designated by the Minister;

Then as regards the licensing of dairy keepers
the provisions will be seen in Part 2 of the Bill. So
let us not hear any talk that the Government wants to
hurt the small-dairy keeper or the poor man with
one or two cows. One cow may have tuberculosis,
or a dozen cows can produce milk dangerous to the
public.


Let us be practical and educate people as to
what is right in 1968. At the moment the Govern-
ment is engaged in a very big operation in pro-
tecting health according to modern standards. Do not
let us say that a man should continue to sell ice-
cream in his back-yard under conditions that are
not right. The health of the community is of far more
importance to those who take their business seri-
ously.

As will be seen from the provisions of the Bill,
the Government is concerned with the health of the
dairy-keeper, the health of the animals and the con-
ditions under which the animals are housed andkept.
If he can show that he has a certificate of health and
that his animals are healthy he will be granted a
licence. Fees are prescribed, and they are not pro-
hibited.

If a man falls from the conditions under which
he got a licence the licence maybe cancelled by the
appropriate authority. There is a definition of milk
processor which means any person who processes
milk or milk-products intended for human con-
sumption. Here again you will find that the health of
the applicant and the conditions under which he pro-
duces, sells or transports milk are important.

I repeat that there is no intention to put anyone
out of work or to push anyone. We are fortunate that
there has been no outbreak in Barbados arising from
the insanitary conditions under which some food is
served. This Bill is trying to tighten up on sanitary
and hygienic methods employed in the processing and
sale of milk and milk products.

As will be seen from Section 33 of Part 5 of the
Bill, the Government is proposing to set up a Milk
Advisory Board, and you will note that the Board is
as representative of the Milk Industry as possible.
As Sub-section (3) says, "Of the members of the
Board -

(a) two shall be appointed from among per-
sons who are representatives of licensed
dairy keepers;

(b) two shall be appointed from among per-
sons who are representatives of licensed
milk processors;

(c) two shall be appointedfrom among per-
sons who are not licensed dairy keepers
or licensed milk processors or repre-
sentatives or agents of licensed dairy
keepers or licensed milk processors."


Sub-sections (7) and (8) of Section 34 and Sec-
t.ons 36 and 37 deal with the functions of the Board
and the remuneration of members. Section 37 (1)
reads:- "It shall be the duty of the Board to make
recommendations to the Minister from time to
time as to the prices which shouldbe paid from time
to time for milk produced by licensed dairy keepers
and offered for sale by them to licensed milk pro-


I I-











icessors or licensed milk sellers, and generally as
to the prices of milk and milk products."

Section 39 merely says that for the carrying out
of its functions under the Act the Board will have
power to summon before it any person, who in its
opinion, may be able to assist in its deliberations
etc.

Part 6 contains miscellaneous Sections in the in-
terest of justice. It gives an applicant who has been
refused a licence the right of appeal in cases where
he feels that his licence has been unjustifiably with-
held or forfeited.

Under Section 43 power is given to an au-
thorised person to enter and inspect premises used
for the production, processing or sale of milk or
milk products, to take samples and make various
examinations including the takingof extracts in order
to ensure that the milk does not contain an undue
amount of extraneous substances.

Under Section 44 the Minister responsible for
Agriculture and the Minister responsible forHealth,
acting jointly, have the power to make regulations.
This is an important Section, and the Ministers will
act jointly because it is not only a matter of Agri-
cultural Production, but the proper processing of
milk also involves the health of the communitywhich
is very important.

Naturally, sir, you must have a penal section.
Section 45 deals with this and sets out the penalty for
the contravention of various sections of the Bill.
There may be criticisms of the milk-plant in Bar-
bados. That only concerns the Government where the
price and quality of milk is concerned. This Bill
seeks to put the industry on a proper footing and to
make milk available to as many people as possible
and to see that milk reaches the community in an
uncontaminated form.

This is only one of the pieces of Health Legis-
lation which the Government plans to bring into effect
as soon as more urgent matters are dealt with in the
Attorney General's Chambers. There is the Education
Bill and other things to be dealt with, and it is not
easy to deal with these matters at one time. This
Bill is a move to provide protection where the pro-
duction of milk is concerned, and I would again ad-
vise members to scrutinise the Regulations when they
come down because they will have the force of law.

I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I do
not think that any of us would have any quarrel with
this Bill. In fact, I think that we all agree that it is
necessary at this time. In fact I raised the question
in a former debate when I said that a Marketing
Board or some sort of Board was necessary if we
are taking steps to diversify agriculture. They are
part and parcel of the same thing.


What was amusing was to listen to the Attorney
General trying to get something out of our minds that
he could not get out of his. I do not see how he could
expect that we could get it out of ours. If we are
taking steps to diversify, taking steps to produce
other than sugar, things like milk, vegetables etc.,
if you are producing more milk you must put it on a
proper footing. You must have proper standards and
you must have an Advisory Board to bring it to those
standards.

If you are going to produce more milk, you not
only want good milk, but if the animals are not healthy
and if they are reared under conditions that are not
good they cannot produce good milk. These are inter-
connected factors. There is no use producing more
milk and then you cannot get rid of it.

I could not understand the Attorney General say-
ing that it is no concern of Government in respect of
our milk plant except that it affects the cost of living
ef the man in the street. That is the whole point. The
Government must be concerned just as the Govern-
ment of the U.S. mustbe concernedwith the running
of a steel plant because it will affect the whole econ-
omy of the U.S. In this case the Government must be
concerned with the running of the milk plant even if
it has a minority of shares and only a representative
on the Board of Directors because it is fundamental
to the diversification scheme.

How can the Attorney General tell us only to con-
cern ourselves with the Regulations? It is impossible.
I am not going to concern myselfwiththe milk-plant
to the exclusion of everything else connectedwith this
matter. I will concern myself with other things as
well. I would say that we think that the Government
should beware of the dissatisfaction especially among
small-farmers. Only today I had a chat with a far-
mer from Canada whowas in the dairy industry. An
oil company bought him out and he is looking in the
West Indies for a place to set up a farm because he
likes farming. He is faced with the same problems
in Canada that we have in the West Indies high
labour cost etc.

Mr. PRESIDENT: All that is very interesting, but
it has, nothing to do with this Bill.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am getting to the point.
When they first set up a Milk Board in Canada small
farmers were out of the industry because the Board
was insisting that they put down proper buildings for
housing their animals and other things in accordance
with the new standards set up by the Board.

It led to a lot of dissatisfaction and in many cases
the Government had to step in and pay out special
subsidies to some of these farmers. Now, sir, for
obvious reasons that we cannot go into now, we will
not have the same difficulties because we are not so
strongly established as a dairy industry as it was
even at that time in British Columbia. We will have
those difficulties on a minor scale. It is likely that
there are some farms which may be affected and
who will find some financial difficulty in surviving











if the Government in the Regulations steps up the
standards.

I am throwing out a hint that the Government
should consider whether it is not possible at this
particular time to subsidise milk in this island. The
price of milk in this island is too high. With the cost
of living as it is, the average person is finding it
difficult to buy milk in sufficient quantities to serve
his household. If the Government could reduce the
price of milk, more milk would be sold, thereby
helping the milk-plant and the difficulty of pro-
ducing more than you can sell would be taken care of.
This is a matter which I feel that the Government
should investigate.

We have a situation today the details of which I
cannot go into because it is before the Law Courts.
I do not know if there has been a case of this sort
in any other part of the world. Can the Government
say that it is not concerned? Here is a plant in which
the Government has shares and in which they have a
lot of control. I do not want to go too far, but a case
hlas been brought against the plant by a Government
Price Officer. I do not want to embarrass the At-
torney General, but the point is that the Government
cannot say that it is not concerned about these mat-
Sters.

The Attorney General has to choose his words
very carefully. I am a layman and I have to choose
mine carefully, perhaps more carefully. The Gov-
ernment is very much concerned with all bodies
which are concerned with the public affairs of this
island. The Government should be taking positive
steps and concern itself with reducing the price of
milk especially in view of the fact that the plant is
saying that they cannot pay even the present prices
to' the producers, and the producers are saying that
they cannot afford to sell at a price which would not
be profitable. The Government will have to give full
consideration to subsidise in this industry.

Obviously sir, you will have to fix a reasonable
price for the producers of milk. You will have to
control. I believe that there is some provision in
the Bill for control. In other countries production
is controlled. No matter how much you may dislike
controls or however irksome they may be, they are
necessary. I am not saying that the controls at pres-
ent set up are right. All that I am saying is that some
control is necessary.

There is not much more that I can say about the
Bill itself. The Attorney General told us about Regu-
lations. He said that as a member of the Opposition
he was interested in regulations. I am interested in
them because I know that they are important in re-
lation to this industry. We want to see how far the
Government will go or will not go. We must be in-
terested in regulations.

I see that the Bill provides for appeals. It looks
like appealing from Caesar to Caesar. A man may
feel that his licence has been refused on unreasonable
grounds. To whom will he appeal? To the Minister.


I know that I will be told that the Appropriate Au-
thority mentioned here is the Chief Agricultural Of-
ficer. I hope that there will be no political pressure
on the appropriate authority. I am very sceptical
about these appropriate authorities. The way how
they operate may well mean that you are appealing
from Caesar to Caesar. No civil servant nowadays
will take on matters on his own. None of them will
take it on themselves to do anything under this Act
or carry out their own authority for fear.

Sir, I want to say this because I know that it will
be said. I was a Minister myself and I know that in cer -
tain cases where individuals were concerned it was
not a case of the Minister saying do this. If a good
case was made out, and even if the Minister might
want to see a particular case heard, it was the head
of the department who had the last word.

Today the officer would refer a case to the Min-
ister before he takes any decision and will be ap-
pealing from Caesar to Caesar. Apart from this I
have nothing else to say, not even about the milk-
plant, except of course the importation of processed
milk from Belgium. The report for the first three
months of this year shows that we imported twenty
nine thousand lbs from the U.K. and seventy-seven
thousand six hundred lbs. from Belgium. We are
helping the people from Belgium, and not the people
from Barbados. If we continue at the same rate it
will be almost $1 1/4 million ofevaporatedmilk and
cream that we will be importing.

It is a heavy cost that we are taking. These
things are not good enough. If the Government has a
policy of diversification we cannot discuss one as-
pect and forget the other. I am in favour in a broad
outline with the principle of the Bill.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President -
Sometimes I get worried about coming to the Senate
and having to listen to Senator Mapp. He agrees that
this Bill is necessary, buthewentonto make a seri-
ous indictment on civil servants. He has said that
when he was in the Government public servants went
against what the Minister said.

It is understood in any community that there is
an element of political patronage. The community
expects it. Senator Mapp was a Minister and some-
times you saw close relatives getting appointments
in the public service. He would know thatwhen he was
a Minister someone was appointed in the public
service after he returned here because his brother
was a Minister.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I hope that Senator
Walcott is not saying that I had anything to do with
the appointment.


SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: What is the point
of saying that when he was a Ministerhe had nothing
to do with these appointments and now suggesting that
you will be appealing from Caesar to Caesar because
your civil servants are now handicapped?


1











What amazes me is that no one was worried when
this power was in the hands of the Colonial Secretary.
Now you are worried about Minsterial Authority. No
one worries about Ministerial Authoritywhichis en-
shrined in the Constitution of the U.K. No one ques-
tions that.

Senator Mapp was a member of the Government.
One of the reasons that the Transport Boardwas not
the success that it should have been was the char-
acter of the Board. They took up a lot of trash and put
on the Board and that is why it was a failure. They did
not have people of calibre.

There is nothing sinister about this idea that if
you put people on a Board the Minister could control
them. It is evil to expect a Ministerto put on a
Board people who are opposed to what he is doing.
How would Senator Mapp expect if a Minister was
going to establish a Board to ask him to be chair-
man? You do not get into power by wishful thinking.
Obviously your supporters will expect you and the
Government to do something to benefit them. There
is nothing improper about putting people on Boards
who are sympathetic to the particular political party.

In the U.S.A. the Chief Justice is appointed by
the President. When there is a next President he
will choose one most favourable to him. No one has
said that the system in the U.S.A. is corrupt. In the
U.K. Mr. Wilson has the authority to determine who
will be the next Lord Chief Justice because he de-
cides who will be Lord Chancellor. This is not done
by any Judicial Committee. It is decided by the Prime
Minister and no one says that it is a failure of Bri-
tish justice.

In Barbados the suggestion is that a party in
power selects its friends. Only a foolish politician
would select his enemies. I am not saying that you
should select incompetent friends. In politics who is
capable of telling a politician who has succeeded -
especially those of us who have not succeeded -
what to do? If you believe in democracy and you
were not elected, how can you tell those who are
elected what to do?

The party that Senator Mapp belongs to when
they came into power they removed all the statutory
authorities. I went into the exercise too. Iwas in the
House of Assembly and when the party was elected
to power Iwas removed from all the Statutory Boards.

What I would like to suggest to the Minister is
that if he has anAdvisory Boardhe should put some
teeth in it. I am ingeneral agreement with the com-
position of the Board; but I would like to point out
that there is a growing tendency in Barbados that
the representative of the workers should not be on
Boards like these. I am not accusing the Govern-
ment of anything dealing with this general principle,
but I feel that on a Board like this the workers'
representatives' have a vital part to play. You are
dealing with things that affect the country in a cer-
tain way, and I hope that it is not regarded that
._-workers representatives' like members of the Trade


Union, have no part to play. For example you set up
a committee to deal with Company Law. When that
was done in England the T.U.C. had a lot to say. I
think this was an oversight, and I hope that in this
matter the Attorney General will take some further
steps about food handling.

The preparation of food and food handling in Bar-
bados is very poor indeed, and we are extremely
lucky that more people do not fall ill. I would say
that judging from the whole process of Legislation
in food handling and public health we are still living
in a primitive society. You do not know if the person
who cooks your food has ever seen a doctor. If you
insist on that you are not doing any injustice to the
employee.

Senator Mapp said that the price of milkis high.
That is true. It is true that the milk plant cannot
utilise all the fresh milk coming to them. It is also
true that there is a tendency in Barbados to use
more condensed milk than fresh milk. The reason
-for that is that condensed milk keeps. The poorer
sections of the community are affected because they
buy the kind of milk that they can keep and use with-
out refrigeration.

Senator Mapp talks about subsidisation. If there
is a shortage of milk there is a demand for sub-
sidisation, but if there is a glut there is no point in
subsidising a surplus. I think that that is one of the
problems which the Government will have to face if
you are going in for any diversification. You will
have to go in for a policy of subsidisation from the
point of view that if you want to promote something
local you will have to give some incentive co it.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order.
I am sorry that Senator Walcott did not seem to un-
derstand my point. I did say that if the price was
reduced more milk would be sold and therefore the
consumption of milk would go up.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: How can you reduce
the price of milk without taking into account other
factors? The dairy keeperwill not take kindly to the
reduced price of milk when he is facedwith the high
price of animal feed.

I too would like to see more fresh milk used in
Barbados. I think that the plant is wrong in having
fresh milk sold only in two-pint containers. There
are certain things that need more attention. I do not
see how you can have a successful industry unless
you have a Board with people sitting around the ta-
ble and paying more attention to it. The Board must
advise on vital issues.

What I find is that politicians are too much
afraid of being accused of increasing the cost of liv-
ing. Senator Mapp will remember how afraid they
were and how they said that bus fares will not go up.
They were so afraid that. they will not touch it. They
even had the statement that "bus fates will go up
over my dead body". A commission recommended
the increase of bus fares.











If you set out a Board which says that the price
of milk should go up the politicians would be too
afraid to take the chance. You will have to have
strong men on the Board and if they have strong
reasons for recommending an increase and the min-
ister does not accept it theywillhave to resign. That
is the only area inwhichI see any possible conflict.

In certain departments of Government I do not
regard it as ministerial interference but a case
where the civil servant is not a strong man. Take
teachers for example. Teachers are the most weak-
kneed people in any group of people. That is one of
the dangers in our society. Civil Servants as a whole
have an old-fashioned Victorian concept of dealing
with matters.

I hope that the Government in appointing this
Board will see to it that persons other than those in
the industry are appointed. I am pleased to see this
Bill and I hope it will remove the criticism of people
like Senator Mapp.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: Mr. President I
heartily agree with this Bill. WhatIwouldlike to say
is that it is not easy under the present conditions to
produce milk in Barbados. It is a known fact that this
Bill is necessary whether you have a milk-plant or
not because you must protect the health of the com-
munity.

Going back to the price of milk, one has to re-
member that the Government of Canadahas given the
people of Barbados a certain amount of money. At
the present moment although the industry has only
just started to utilise that service we are producing
more milk than we can absorb under our present
conditions. That is proof that our milk is too ex-
pensive to produce I mean that type of milk.

It should be the Government's policy to produce
cheap milk for the inhabitants of this country. I am
an agriculturist, and I am in favour of diversification,
but when one goes into a new system one would like
to have some idea of the economic outcome of the
product. We are still experimenting with milk, it
seems, and while the making of Regulations might
be good, it might force some small people out of
business.

What I was wondering is ifitwouldnot be possi-
ble for the Minister of Education to absorb some of
the surplus milk for the School Meals Programme
and avoid the importation of powdered milkto supply
the schools. That is perhaps matter of economics.

As I have said, the dairy at the: present moment
is experimenting in these things. Today you are pro-
ducing milk that you cannot produce at less than 15
cents a pint. Now you have to send the milk to the
plant before it goes to the consumer. There is no
use fooling yourself that you can diversify where
milk is concerned without putting the price up. That
is necessary whether there is a milk plant or not.
If conditions do not change, the milk plant will die
a natural death.


What the Regulations will mean when they come
down is another thing. Senator Smith said that the
Regulations will control the conditions of the sale of
milk. I agree with Senator Mapp that it is difficult not
to be able to speak on both the Bill and the Regula-
tions at the same time, because one hinges on the
other. I want the Government to realise that Barba-
dos, under the present conditions, cannot produce
cheap milk.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President I
wish to add my support to this Bill because, like
other members, I think that we need urgently to do
something about the handling of food. I hope that
legislation which will embrace an area outside of
milk will come down early.

I do not know if anyone knows how many cases
of illness result from eating hamburgers and black
pudding and souse. I am sure that if we could get
these statistics they would show a serious position.
I hope that we will get this food handling Legislation
as soon as possible. But at the same time, I think
that there is a job to be done. Some effort should be
made to get across to people practical examples of
how their health is affected when this type of legis-
lation is not in force. However, we still need com-
prehensive legislation dealingwith the whole question
of the handling of food in this country.

There is another aspect of this Bill, and Senator
Ward spoke on it. One or two people may suffer. I
have been wondering about the financial benefits
which the Government gives to farmers. I know that
cattle have come in. There are still terms on which
people are allowed to get cows. I am told that in
Trinidad, for instance, the terms are much more
generous. I would like the Government to examine
the situation and see if the terms here are suffi-
ciently generous.

As regards the Bill itself it is obvious that hard-
ships may result in some cases. While we do want
to protect the health of the community we do not
want anyone to suffer a loss of livelihood.

Sir, most of what I intended to say has been said
by other senators, but there is one point on which I
would like to add a contribution, and that is about
whether time and effort could not be savedby having
a Central Licensing Authority, that the work now
done by the Barbados Police Force could be cen-
tralised.

Much has been said about the price of milk and
about subsidising milk. It is fairly clear that there
are two aspects of a subsidy. It is not only a question
of making it cheaper to the consumer, but also of
keeping it at a price on which the plant can make a
profit.

My final point also concerns the question of
price. It is all right to have an Authority to say what
the price should be, but your basic price may be a
result of importation. I cannot believe that it is not
related to this question of a monopoly. I do not be-











lieve that there is any incentive to the milk plant to
get their house in order if they can get sufficient
profit now.

I do not want to go into the discussion of putting
people on Boards. If we accept the fact that we have to
put Government supporters on Boards, we have to be
careful because there are some people who abused
their position on Boards in this Government and in
the last.

I regard this Bill not only as necessary, Mr.
President, but as the forerunner of wider legislation
to plan for the proper handling of food in the future.

SENATOR M. A. KING: Mr. President There
are certain issues which have been drawn to my at-
tention from time to time in relation to the standards
of quality of milk. Some provisions have been made
under the Food Products Adulteration Act, but they
deal with determining standards in connection with
food products generally; but since 1933 until this
present day no Regulations have been made which
determine quality and standards relative to milk.

The result is that we find that the Courts depend
to a large extent on the evidence of the Government
Analyst who will give his evidence as to the proper
contents of fats. If Regulations are to be drafted for
the control and supply of milk, some serious atten-
tion should be given to bringing up to date measures
which include the standards of its contents. I do not
know if that is contemplated in the forthcoming
Regulations. Even if that were so this Bill as such
would not seem to contemplate provisions for Regu-
lations whereby the quality of milkwillbe controlled.

Sir, I urge on the Government to consider the
question of Regulations which should be made for the
proper guidance of the authorities.

I have one general comment. It is a pointthat
Senator Phillips is always making. In lots of these
matters where we fall down is in the actual ad-
ministration. This Bill has the support of the Senate,
but it can fall down easily if the proper administra-
tion is not set up. The Government should give some
serious attention to the question of administration
because it is in that area that so much of the work
of the Government takes place.

I will refer in passing to a point made by Sena-
tor Mapp and on which Senator Walcott spent some
time. That is the provisions in the Bill dealing with
appeals from the appropriate authority. The position
taken by Senator Mapp does not surprise me because
in Senator Mapp's time people in positions of au-
thority lent themselves to being influenced or bullied
by the Ministers.

When we hear Senator Mapp and his colleagues
say that this Government is concerned with setting
up a dictatorship in this island that is to make us
believe that people appointed to these responsible
positions do not have the guts to carry out their
functions properly or that they do not understand


what are their proper functions, or that the Minis-
ters, in exercising their powers are irresponsible
or corrupt.

We have heard criticisms of the Director of
Public Prosecutions for example. They will have
us believe that the Prime Minister hands decisions
to the Director of Public Prosecutions. That is what
they want the public to believe.

I think that it is significant that in spite of what
he says about appealing from Caesarto Caesarthere
is no concrete suggestion as to what form it should
take or as to whether he thinks that the decision of
the appropriate authority should be final. He does not
suggest any alternative. His remarks seemed aimed
only to direct attention away from the real issues.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President -
I rise to support this Bill. It is the duty of the Gov-
ernment to see that the health of the community is
maintained. As to fears about the poor man with a
cow we need not have anyfears because as one goes
around the countryside one does not see this grazing
of a cow as it used to be seen. That does not obtain
today. You do not see labourers on their way home
grazing cows. What you see now are labourers going
home with bundles of meat. Even if there were still
these small cow rearers, they must see that they
would have to conform to certain standards.

What puzzles me is that here there is a glut of
milk. When the Canadian Government decided to as-
sist us where the purchase of cattle is concerned, I
thought that the idea was that people should get as
much fresh milk as possible. Now we hear from
Senator Ward that milk cannot be produced cheaply
and yet there is a glut.

I think that the Government should see to it that
the milk given to school children in schools should
be produced in Barbados and not inAustraliaor New
Zealand, and I mean children at all levels including
those in the Grammar Schools. I think that if milk
was sent to the school children in half pint bottles
they would spend their money on milk instead of on
soft drinks. We want to see children drink as much
milk.as possible.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent -general satisfaction has been expressed around
the table about this Bill and the setting up of this
Board, but looking at the Bill as a whole, it does not
seem necessary to have this Board set up.

That brings me to the point made by Senator King
that the real problem confronting the Government is
one of administration. In the Ministry of Health there
is machinery set up and I see no reason why that
machinery could not do what this Board is to be es-
tablished to do and why people involved in the Milk
Industry could not be called upon from time to time
to attend and give the benefit of their experience.

The functions of the Board are, as set out in
Section' 37 mainly to make recommendations with


I ~











regard to the price of milk. The Board is essentially
an advisory body. It is not responsible for adminis-
tration like the Transport Board or the Natural Gas
Corporation. It seems to me that the relationship be-
tween this Board and the Ministry will be of a pe-
culiar nature. It seems to me that it will raise
difficulties which have hitherto not arisen as such
between the ordinary statutory board and the particu-
lar Ministry.

Although, for example, the functions of the Na-
tural Gas Corporation are advisory, it also has other
functions in that it is responsible for the distribution
of natural gas in this island; and because of that it
has to give from time to time certain advice to the
Ministry concerned; but that is not its sole function.

When you have a Board, the sole function of which
is to advise a Minister, it seems to me that this is
erecting an unnecessary structure rather than
streamlining the system. We are only adding some-
thing which can be used as a pretext.

I am saying this with a great sense of responsi-
bility. It happened that I have servedona Board and
from my experience it is not so much the decision
of the particular Boards that really cause this Gov-
ernment or any other Government a headache. It is
the system. It is time thatwe examine the whole con-
text of statutory boards and their whole structure.

I have been a member of the Natural Gas Cor-
poration. Senator Blanchette is a member too. We
have a situation where a member appointed by the
Ministry has attended one meeting since he was ap-
pointed a year ago. The Corporation has drawn this
to the attention of the Ministry, but nothing has been
done about it. I do not think that anyone will dispute
that in such a situation that member should be called
on to resign.

With regard to Section 39 of the Bill Iwould like
to inquire from the appropriate Minister, or in this
case the Attorney General, about the provision that
the Board may summon before it any person who, in
its opinion, is able to assist it in its deliberations,
and can require any person summoned to produce
documents etc. I want to know if this means that the
Board will have authority in law to summon or re-
quire evidence of a person. Will the summons of the
Board be like that of a Court of Law or is it just an
invitation. I do not see any penalty for a refusal to
attend.

I am not seeking free legal advice, but I think
that the point is one of some substance. Not only
must the Board be aware of the scope of its au-
thority, but the public should be aware of the scope
of the Board's authority. It seems that that is an-
swered by reference to Section45 (1). That answers
my query.

As I have said, I am not overjoyed about the ap-
pointment of this Board because as I see it it will be
just another example of machinery that needs to be
looked at, rather than making further additions to it.


The object of the Bill is commendable one, and
no one in his right senses would refuse to support it.
If it happens that one or two people are forced to give
up keeping cows it seems to me that that is what we
are setting out to do. If you want to raise the stan-
dards of milk production, I do not see how you can
still be worried if a few people are forced out. You
must expect' that those who cannot comply will be
forced out.

If a man is found not to be in good health he will
be forced out, and it seems tome to be a very cheap
emotional appeal to suggest that the Government
might be unfair by insisting on certain standards.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: Mr. President, It is gratifying to
note the measure of support given to the Bill; but if
it was controversial or contentious, one could
imagine the time it would have taken to get through
with it.

A number of points have been raised. Senator
Walcott sees the need for metamorphosis or com-
plete change of thinking in this community specifi-
cally in relation to the handling of food. This is a
matter which concerns my Ministry particularly
inasmuch as children are very sensitive to any type
of illness which may result from food that has not
been properly prepared or handled.

We see outside schools sometimes certain ven-
dors who from their benches orboxes sell food which
may be covered with cloths of varying degrees of
cleanliness. This is a. matter which concerns the
Ministry of Education very much, and there is no
legislation yet prepared to deal with the matter. I
would like to appeal to these vendors to ensure that
the wares that they are selling to the children of
Barbados are presented as a clean service.

The Ministry of Education is very concerned that
proper health standards are inculcated in the youth
of the island. It is for this reason that we introduced
the present school meals programme. It is for this
reason also that we have included in the Estimates
provision for the purchase of 50 churns of milk
from the plant to supply some 11 schools.

It is the policy of this Government to introduce
to the schools milk from the dairy plant because it
has been demonstrated that the children prefer this
milk to powdered milk; but we cannot do this all at
once. It has to be phased out.

This phasing period will be longer, and it is
doubtful when it will come to anendunless the price
of milk is reduced. The fact is that we have bought
two or three purchases of milk from the plant but it
is much more expensive than powdered milk.

The Ministry of Education is prepared to speed
up the introduction of milk in addition to the other
services if there is an indication that the price of
milk will be reduced; but it is merely sending up the
cost of the nutrition programme to take milk from


--L-e L I










the plant which is much more expensive than pow-
dered milk.

I was very disturbed to hear Senator Ward say
that the price of milk cannot come down.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: On a pointoforder.
I said that it could not come down in the present
circumstances, including the price of animal feed.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I merely wanted to make clear these
two facts that the Ministry of Education is concerned
about the handling of food and that the children of this
island can get their pint of milk aday providing that
the price is not too high.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President Senator Mapp spoke about appeals.
I happen to be the only Ministerpresentto whom ap-
peals could be made against the decisions of the de-
partment. When appeals are made we have a team
of reporters who hear the appeal and advise. In this
respect it is similar to the Milk Advisory Board but
it does not have the statutory authority.

I do not share the fears of Senator Phillips that
it is merely a cover. I know that the system of re-
porting appeals from the Town and Country Planning
Office works reasonably well. I would like to say
that the Board merely advises on the course of ac-
tion that should be taken. He is usually a man of
some legal experience and of some standing in the
community. There was a time when Sir Eric
Hallinan was Chairman and I would say that there
are few actions inwhich the Reporters have recom-
mended that the appeals should be disallowed. That
is in reply to whether this is a matter of appealing
from Caesar to Caesar.

If Senator Mapp as a Minister of Governmentwas
so impartial as he wants us to believe, there is no
reason why the present Ministers of Government
should not be equally impartial.

I am glad that members have supported this Bill.
It is a Bill that is long overdue. I am also glad that
members have expressed their views in the im-
portant question of food handling in this country.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, There is one point in my opening re-
marks which seems to have led to some misunder-
standing. Senator Phillips seemed to think that Iwas
speaking as a layman. I was speaking as a lawyer.
What I was saying was that the milk plant is a limited
liability company incorporated under the laws of
Barbados and even if the Government has shares in
it and there is any breaking of the law by the plant,
action has to be brought against it.

The public has often been misled into believing
that the Government owns the plant. The Government
has no controlling interest in the milk plant, but the
Government is interested in seeing thatit does func-
tion, and the administrative functions are performed


UIIL


by a Board of Directors on which the Government
has only one member.

Senator Mapp calls for subsidisation and yet he
turns around and criticises the importation of milk.
That is a form of subsidy. If the price of imported
feed makes It difficult to bring down the price of
milk, it is the company's duty, if they want to sell
their product, to bring it within the price range 'of
the majority of consumers.

Fortunately, sir, yesterday the Government lost
five of its critics atone fell swoop, and the Govern-
ment did not turn a finger to cause it. God does not
"like ugly". They will have to find somewhere else
to criticise this Government again.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith seconded by Senator the Hon. P. M. Greaves
the Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 were called andagreedto with-
out debate.

Clause 3 was called.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith moved that
Clause 3 be amended by substitution of the words
"dairy keeper" for the word "person" in line 2.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

The question that Clause 3 be amended as pro-
posed was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that Clause 3 as amended stand part
of the Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

Clauses 4 to 43 were called and passed without
debate.

Clause 44 was called.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith moved that
Sub-section (d) of Clause 44 be amended by deletion
of the word "registration" in line 2 and the commas
appearing before and after that word.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

The question that Clause 44 be amendedaspro-
posed was put to the Senate and agreed to.


The question that Clause 44 as amended stand
part of the Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.


Clauses 45 to 47 were called andpassedwithout
debate.











The question that the passing of the Bill with
amendments be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee with two
amendments was reported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, the Bill was read a third time and passed.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

RESOLUTION re BREACH OF PRIVILEGES
OF THE SENATE

The President called the next Order a Reso-
lution to deem a motion made in the Other Place on
27th February, 1968 by Sir Grantley Adams, Leader
of the Opposition, as a breach of the privileges of
the Senate.

SENATOR P. G. MORGAN: Mr. President This
Resolution stands in my name and I believe that it is
self-explanatory.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President On a
point of order, Senator Morgan alludes to some


Resolution which I have not seen. I have not seen it
come into this Chamber.

Mr. PRESIDENT: It is a Resolutiononthe Order
Paper of the Other Place. The Senatormay proceed.

SENATOR P. G. MORGAN: This matter is very
simple. It is that this Honourable Senate should not
tolerate anyone, however exalted he may be, trying
to dictate what the Senate should do or not do.

His HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: Under Standing
Order No. 25 (3) it is laid down that:-

"No debate shall take place on a motion under
this Order, but if the President decides that a prima
facie case has been made out he shall so state and
refer the matter to the Committee of Privileges."

I feel that a prima facie case has been made out
and I will refer this case to the Committee of Pri-
vileges for their consideration after which they will
report their findings on the matter.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith the Senate adjourned at 5.58 p.m. sine die.


I II I I I I I I I

















DEBATE


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE
Thursday, 6th June, 1968.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 4 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith PHILLIPS,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable P.
M. GREAVES, B.A., (Minister of Home Affairs);
Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q.C., (Attor-
ney General); Senator the Honourable L. E.
SANDIFORD, M.A., (Minister of Education); Senator
C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator F. C. H. CAREW; Sena-
tor S. V. ASHBY; Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE, B. Sc.,
M.B.B.S.; Senator M. A. KING; Senator D. A. WILES,
C.M.G., O.B.E.; Senator E. Lisle WARD; SenatorW.
W. BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator S. A.BLANCHETTE;
Senator Erma ROCK; Senator P. G. MORGAN; Sena-
tor R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parlia -
mentary Secretary) (On leave until 20th June, 1968).
Senator H. F. ALKINS; Senator F. L. WALCOTT,
'O.B.E. (On leave until 15th July, 1968.); Senator N. A.
BARROW, B.A.

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer an excuse for the absence of Senator
H. F. Alkins from the day's meeting.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

His Honour the President read the text of the
following Message from the Speaker of the House of
Assembly:

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
.TO
THE HONOURABLE THE SENATE

The House of Assembly have the honour to ack-
nowledge the receipt from the Honourable the Senate
of-


The Dairy Industry (Regulation and Control) Bill,
1968 which has been passed by the Honourable the
Senate with the amendments shewn written on pages
5 (section 3) and 24 (para. (d) of section 44) of the said
Bill.


2. The House respectfully request the ap-
pointment of a Select Committee of the Honourable
the Senate to consult jointly with a Select Committee
of the said House upon the Amendments which have
been passed by the Honourable the Senate -at a time
and place to be settled between His Honour the Pre-
sident of the Honourable the Senate, and His Honour
the Speaker of the House.

28th May, 1968.

J. E. THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker, House of Assembly.

ANNOUNCEMENT

His Honour the President informed the Senate
that he had granted the following applications for
leave:-

Senator H. Odessa Gittens from 4th to 20th
June, 1968,
Senator F. L, Walcott from 3rd June to 15th
July, 1968.
PAPERS
Senatorthe Eon, P. M. Greaves, Ministerof Home
Affairs and Leader of the Senate, laid the following


papers:
(1)


The Local Government (Pensions) (Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1968.


(ii) The Barbados Harbours (Amendment) Re-
gulations, 1968.

(iii) The Tenth Annual Report of the Transport
Board for the year ended 30th September,
1965.

(iv) The Ninth Annual Report of the Barbados
Tourist Board for the year 1966-67.

(v) The Financial Statements of the Barbados
Marketing Corporation for the year end-
ed 30th June, 1966.


THE


SENATE











(vi) The Financial Statements of the Barbados
Marketing Corporation for the year end-
30th June, 1967.

(vii) The Quarterly Digest of Statistics Sep-
tember 1967.

(viii) The Customs Duties (Wood Preservatives
for use in the Treatment of Lumber) Or-
der, 1968.

(ix) Statement of sums of money paid over to
the Accountant General by the Commis-
sioner of Police during the quarter ended
31st December, 1967.

(x) Statement showing Net Customs and Ex-
cise Receipts for one month ended 30th
April, 1968.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF PRIVILEGES

His Honour the President presented the report
of a meeting of the Committee of Privileges on
Tuesday, 28th May, 1968 to consider a motion by
:;Senator P. G. Morgan in regard to an alleged breach
of the privileges of the Senate on the part of the Lead-
er of the Opposition in the House of Assembly and
directed that the report be printed and circulated to
members of the Senate.

MOTIONS

Senator C. Asquith Phillips gave notice of the
following motion:

"BE IT RESOLVED that this Honourable House
approve the recommendations contained in the Report
dated 28th May, 1968 of the Committee of Privileges
which met for the purpose of considering a motion by
Senator P. G. Morgan in regard to an alleged breach
of the privileges of the Senate on the part of the Lead-
er of the Opposition in the Other Place"

TRIBUTE TO SENATOR ROBERT F. KENNEDY

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: Honourable
senators, before we proceed with the Business Paper
of the Senate I am sure that senators, and in fact the
whole island of Barbados, have been shocked at the
assassination of Senator Robert Kennedy.

I would ask that senators stand for a minute in
silence as a mark of respect of the late senator.

Members stood in silence.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT)
No. 2

The President called the first Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $5,500 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1968-69
Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary Es-
timates 1968-69 No. 2 which forms the Schedule to
-te Resolution.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, This Resolution calls for supple-
mentary expenditure to the order of $5,500 for the
purchase of 12 stenographic machines. These ma-
chines enable stenographers to record speeches in
shorthand at a rate of 180 words a minute. There is
also the advantage that anyone familiar with the system
can transcribe another person's notes. This in itself
has an advantage over the manual system of taking
notes in shorthand.

Sir, it is necessary that the accessories to these
machines which are known as Palantype machines,
should be acquired. As far as the Public Service is
concerned, the machines will be limited to the Re-
portorial Staff of the Courts and will also be used to
supply verbatim reports at conferences.

This does not mean that the machines will be out
of use between conferences held in Barbados. Those
who have been trained in the use of the machines, will
have to use them daily so as to keep in touch, other-
wise, as one will appreciate, one would easily lose
touch.

Sir, I think that it will be agreed that this is a
step in the right direction. The purchase of 12 ma-
chines, compared with the number of stenographers
in the Government Service and the return in the
matter of efficiency which one will get from the use
of the machines, will, I think, commend itself to this
Chamber.

I would add that the time may well come when
this Chamber may consider ituseful to have machines
for reporting its debates. There is not much more
that I can say except that the Government has to move
with the times and one has to progress towards
greater efficiency, and the Government is attempting
to do this.

I have no hesitation in movingthat this Resolution
do now pass.

Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith seconded the mo-
tion.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: Mr. President, I will
support this Resolution whole-heartedly. I am certain
that the scarcity of competent stenographers in
Bridgetown is a very serious matter.

I think that we have nearly 2,000 young girls
seeking jobs every year who perhaps should be train-
ed. What I would like to say is that nowadays of the girls
who find themselves ending up as stenographers, very
few left school with the intention of becoming steno-
graphers. Most of them left school with no idea of
what they would do.

It is only after they discover that the only job
available is that of a stenographer and they start to
learn shorthand. I think that this training should be
given in school. I myself was engaged some time ago
in a programme and I realized that if children in
school were confronted with the responsible posi-


I _








401


'tion of the various professions to which they might
aspire, certainly they would begin earlier training
in these professions. I hope that the Minister of
Education has some scheme like this in mind.

I personally think that if a girl is to be a steno-
grapher she should makeup her mind before she
leaves school and not start shorthand after she leaves
school. Stenographers are usually people who endup
as stenographers. They are thrown on the open mar-
ket and the only job they can get is that of a steno-
grapher.

I hope that the Minister of Education will give
serious consideration to a programme of vocational
guidance to these young girls leaving school where
they can decide early that they want to be stenograph -
ers and begin training in English and Shorthand.

I think that business firms should become in-
volved in this exercise because when girls leave
school they have no idea of the responsibility of a
business office. I think that business firms should be -
come involved on a voluntary basis.

I know where business firms have allowed girls
from certain schools to come into their offices for
one day to see how they are run, and to get a feeling
of responsibility. This will go a long way in getting
the feel of these jobs which they have had difficulty
in getting applicants for.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President, -
What the Senator has said is very true. We cannot
find any competent stenographers. As he said, over
2,000 girls leave school annually. They did not leave
school to become stenographers; but when they can-
not reach the School Certificate they go in for com-
mercial training.

Then, sir, many of them find that after sitting the
examinations for theory and speed they cannot carry
on except with typing which takes less qualifications.
That is why there is apaucity of stenographers today
because they are not trained. .

The C. S. A. has supported a pilot scheme to
assist stenographers in the Service to become more
efficient. I was struck by the alacrity with the younger
girls came forward. In fact the class was getting too
big. I think that something should be done a training
unit or something like that to assist these girls.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E. SANDIFORD:
The present Government is well aware of the defects
in the educational system which we have inherited and
of our responsibility to remedy those defects, and
that is a responsibility which this present Government
quite willingly has shouldered.

As far as the training of stenographers is con-
cerned, there is provision for training to be obtained
in these fields for those who have left school. It is
public knowledge that this Government proposes to
introduce two new institutions later this year the


trades Training Centre and the Community College,
and in both of these institutions at different levels
secretarial science will be among the subjects on the
curriculum.
As far as the provision of vocational guidance is
concerned my ministry also has under consideration
the acquisition of the services of such an officer. Our
proposal is that this officer should be attached to the
Ministry of Education, and will be available for giv-
ing vocational guidance to pupils in our educational
system.

I thought, Sir, that I would just mention these
points so that senators may realise that this Govern-
ment is, as in all other fields, aware that there-is
need for the national reserves to be channelled in
such a way as will improve the qualityof our econo-
mic and social life and that this Government is fully
aware of its responsibility and is willing to take
the measures which are necessary to improve the
present conditions.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, Ireally
did not intend to speak on this. Resolution; but after
the remarks of the hon. Minister of Education I de-
cided to rise, because I find certain things rather
baffling. When he said that he would remedy diffi-
culties inherited I was glad to hear it because I
believe that he might have inherited them from his
predecessor.

SENATOR THE _ONOURIA3LE L. E. SANDIFORD.
On a point of order, I said that this Government had
inherited those difficulties.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: He said that this Govern-
ment will remedy all the difficulties that they have
inherited. I am asking if the difficulties came from
his predecessor as well as from before. There is no
need to cast aspersions.

We know of the problem of this scarcityof tech-
nical material. In Britain now there is this brain
drain. Scientists, technical people and skilledpeople
are leaving Britain; and if that is a country much
bigger than ours, with much more experience and
with a far bigger industrial reservoir than ours, you
can judge what the situation in Barbados will be.

I would like to add this to what Senator Ashby
talked about: even if you carry out some such pro-
gramme as he has in mind it will fall down because
one of the principal difficulite s in Barbados is the poor
standard of English, It is not only a question of writing
shorthand.Any employer, including the Government,
knows that some of their secretaries are efficient if
their standard of English is good. The opposite is the
case if the standard of English is poor. That is the
main problem, not only in Barbados, but throughout
the West Indies,


This new age today is concentrating on quantity
and not on quality, and Isay, Sir, the Minister has no
need whatsoever to throw reflections on anybody. It












has been said that the Minister is getting on with the
job and giving more attention to practical work than
was given before he took up office. If those are the
defects that he is referring to, I agree with him and
I am glad to knowthat the defects are being remedied
but do not pounce upon a Resolution of this order to
develop it into any political by-play, because I could
talk for 35 minutes and say nothing also, and I can
engage in the same type of political by-play too.

As I was saying, this is a big problem. I am not
going to throw It in the lap of Government or anybody..
It is a world-wide problem and you may train a lot
more Stenographers and you will find that many more
will leave because we cannot afford the salaries to
keep them here, and they are attracted to Canada or
the other places they are going. I would like to en-
quire about another point, Sir, it is the matter about
debates in the Legislature. I really hope that the po-
sition will improve. It must be the concern of mem-
bers of the Senate as a whole......

Mr. PRESIDENT: This is really nothing to do
with this Resolution.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I was hoping that this
would have something to do with it. That is my point.
Mr. PRESIDENT: You know Parliamentarypro-
cedure and you may ask a question on this score. I
would be very glad if you would do so.
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I was hoping, Sir, that the
purpose of these machines would be to facilitate the
work of Parliament. I think that it would be very
welcome indeed, and all support should be given to
a Resolution of this sort and try to speed up the work
of Parliament in getting the debates out.
The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.
RESOLUTION TO APPROVE CIVIL ESTABLISH-
MENT (TEACHERS)-(AMENDMENT) ORDER.

His Honour the President called the second Order
of the days A Resolutionto approve the Civil Establish-
ment (Teachers) (Amendment) Order, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E. SANDIFORD:
Mr. President, I am certain that this Resolution will
lend itself to acceptance by this Honourable Cham-
ber and in the 20th century it is accepted that those
who are handicapped in any way should not unduly
suffer as a result of that handicap in terms of edu-
cation. We believe that whatever deficiencies there
may be, could, as far as possible, be remedied in
the educational system, and that those who are handi-
capped whether through loss of hearingor loss of sight,
thatthose persons should as far as possible receive
a normal education.

It has not always been so, Mr. President. In the
second century B.C. the deaf were considered very
verypuerile in their attitudes and outlook; in the sixth
century A.D. you get in the Justinian code the deaf
being lumped with the incompetent. We have come a
long way from that situation. We believe today that


those who are either hard of hearing or are deaf
should be given the educational facilities which would
enable them to as far as possible live a normal life.
The purpose of this Resolution is to make available
one Head Teacher and two Teachers who would be
assigned to the school for the deaf which is to be sited
on the grounds of the new Pine Primary School. This
school is being constructed and financed by the Lions'
Club of Barbados, and it is the responsibility of this
Government to provide teachers for this particular
school. I would like to take this opportunity to thank
both the Association forthe Blind andDeaf in Barba-
dos, as well as the Lions' Club of Barbados for the
very valuable contribution which they are making in
a field which has been for too long neglected in this
country. (Cheers).

The fact that the Government is providing the
services of teachers for this school is an indication
that we accept as a Government responsibility for
providing educational facilities for those persons not
only who can be termed as normal, but also for those
persons who through no fault of their own have been
handicapped in some way or another.

Mr. President, I need hardly say anything else on
this non-controversial Resolution, and I commend it
to this Honourable Chamber.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
beg to second that.
The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.
RESOLUTION TO APPROVE DRAFT PENSIONS
(AMENDMENT) (NO. 2) REGULATIONS

His Honour the President called the thirdOrder
of the day: A Resolution to approve the draft Pensions
(Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, there are two classes of pensioners.
There are those who retire under the 1947 Pension
Act, and then there is the casual employee who a
few years ago was also make pensionable, provided in
each case that the officer qualifies. This Resolution
seeks to make pensionable the services of a public
servant as a casual employee after he has been ap-
pointed to a fixed post on the establishment. In other
words, if an officer had served for some years as a
casual employee and then had been appointed in the
service in a fixed post which fell under the provisions
of the 1947 Act, when the time comes for that officer
to retire, the service he rendered as a casual em-
ployee would also be counted as pensionable service.
It is quite simple, it seeks to bring about that regula-
tion, and I move that this Resolution be concurred in.
SENATOR F. C. H. CAREW: Ibegto second that.
The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE MOTOR VEHICLES AND
ROAD TRAFFIC (AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS.

His Honour the President called the fourth Order
of the day: A Resolution to approve the Motor Vehicles
and Road Traffic (Amendment) Regulations, 1968.


_ _











SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:.
Again Mr. President, we have before us a Resolution
which members would hardly find difficult. In fact, I
think it is generally agreed that this Resolution could
have been brought some time ago, except at that time
Government was not ready for it.

This Resolution seeks to regulate the boarding
of buses by passengers. As we all know and we are
aware of the many hazards that would-be travellers
are exposed to when there is a mad rush at peak hours
to get on a bus. We are also aware of the risks in-
volved; we are also painfully aware of the tragedy.
Not so long ago there was a school child who was
killed. And so this Resolution seeks to inject some
order into a disorderly action of an otherwise order -
ly country, and it also gives power to the police to
enforce queuing. I move that this Resolution be con-
curred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E. SANDIFORD:
I beg to second that.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: Mr. President, as the
Honourable Minister has said, surely this Resolution
is a little overdue and is most welcome by all sections
of the community. As welcome as it is, we are anxious
to see it work and work well.

There are one or two things which occurred to me.
Are we sure that our police force, considering their
complement, would indeed be able to spare the num-
ber of men that will be required to see that the re-
gulation does indeed work? It is possible that the
Minister responsible would wish to see how it turns
out before bringing down some amendment so as to
empower other authorised persons to enforce the law,
but it has occurred to me and I make the suggestion
because I know that the Honourable Minister of Edu-
cation is particularly receptive to suggestions, and
indeed he may have already anticipated me and I
was wondering whether the Minister would consider
having lecturers given in the schools. lam think-
ing mainly of the Government maintained schools, but
I think he might wish to suggest to the approved
schools that these things be put into operation, not
because it is a regulation but rather because it is
essential and reasonable.

Another thing, Sir, the Minister has under his
control the television camera. I think that we have
now about 12,000 sets in homes and that will make
an impact on the public. If the Minister agrees with
me, he will no doubt wish to see how it could be done
and that it is reasonable and sensible; that it should
be done not merely because it is the law. This, of
course, is the law. I know the Minister of Education
is particularly receptive to suggestions.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: Mr. President, I
would just like to mention one or two points. I wonder
if the Minister has started from the right end. My
point is that there is a rush for buses at peak hours
because the public is not confident that there is enough
transportation available to them. I personally feel that
-you will be able to obviate some of this pushing and
pulling if more buses are put on the routes.


In the Addendum it is stated "The Regulations
provide for the control of persons waiting to enter
a motor omnibus at any stopping place or terminus
by a system of queuing." I think it is a very diffi-
cult thing to have people hanging around at every bus
stop, but I presume you mean the central point, and
because they live far from town, and they have not
got the confidence that they will get another bus to
enable them to reach home at a particular time.


I think the Government should see if they are
providing enough transport to accommodate these
people at peak hours, so that they can be assured
that they can get a bus every 15 or 20 minutes. A
child living in St. Joseph, if he is in a queue still
miss the bus; then he might not get home before
6 or 7, because there may not be another bus and
that child might be left stranded in town, but if you
have the transport available to follow on with an-
other bus or two up to a certain time, I think the
fear will be overcome.



I agree that it is a first -class thing because it
will save people from getting hurt. It looks as if
people still belong to the age of the bush. These
are modern days when people are educated, andthey
have to learn that one must take precedence over the
other at some time or another. I think the Government
will then realise that they should give the people as -
surance so that they may have confidence that they are
getting all available transport, not if you miss one at
4 o'clock you do not get another before 10 o'clock.

:SENATOR Dr. R. B. SADDLE: Mr. President, I
do agree that something has to be done about this
situation. When one looks at the social behaviour in
Barbados, one of the things that struck me on my re-
turn to the island is the manner in which people rush
to get into a bus, places like the theatre, and so forth.
The average Barbadian seems to enjoy it, but I would
like to refer a couple points for the consideration of
the Minister responsible.

I do not see any particular advantage to be gained
in bringing this regulation where six or more persons
- because the ordinary person at a bus stop is in-
terested in getting in a bus first, and if you have more
than one person at a bus stop, the attitude is to get in
first. You will still get difficulties arising if you
have less than six persons waiting for a bus.

The other problem which I see occurring is this.
How can we expect the police to cope with this pro-
blem of enforcing queuing? At peak hours there are
thousands of people trying to board buses, not only at
the terminus but all along the routes. Are we going to
have policemen put at these points throughout the
island? Iam wondering if there is some other means
to be employed to ensure that people queue. One of
the things that has occurred to me and I have seen
it operated outside is that the bus conductor is re-
sponsible in a way to ensure that people queue and if
people are not forming a proper queue he is given the
authority to enforce the law. There are some others
which might be considered; you cannot leave every-


__ ~











$,ing to the police, because the police may not get
away from their regular duties.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, I am rather astonished to hear some of the ar-
guments put forward on this Resolution. Certainly at
this level persons are aware that the functions of the
police include the maintenance of law and the behavi-
our of people, and in the final analysis the police are
only there as a special body to see that any breach of
law Is punished. All that the reference to the police
in this Resolution is to say what it has said, that
where a policeman in uniform gives a direction
whether that people should remain in a queue or that
they should come out of a queue, that it has to be
complied with, and this is a provision which one finds
in the Traffic Act and all the regulations dealing with
traffic. It is such a simple matter that it really
baffles me that Senator Wiles with his years of
experience as an Administrator should fall into the
error which seems to be made by others. It does not
ifean that there will be a policeman stationed at
each bus stop to see that people get into the queue;
it will depend on the good sense of Barbadians and
and I have no doubt that it will soon become a habit
for them to queue, so there is no problem of police
ensuring that people queue.

SENATOR M. A. KING: Mr. President, there is
one point I want to raise. I myself am aware of the
situation as it stands, but any member of the com-
munity can inform the police just as in the case of any
other offence; the police prosecutes right enough,
but in many criminal cases the informer is not the
police, so it seems to me that any citizen who is at
a bus stop is in a position to relay information and
have the offenders prosecuted. It is not really a
question of the police having to supervise every bus
stop, and this should create no difficulty.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: Mr. President, one
small point. My office is right opposite the bus stand;
I have a ringside seat and Iam a little disturbed as to
whether or not the Government intends to provide
adequate shelters for these crowded bus stands,
especially when it is raining, and also in the midday
sun. People of all ages are expected to stand up in
the hot sun; this is not very becoming, and I would
like to hear that Government has got in motion some
provision for adequate shelter in the bus stand.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I think
that we all welcome this measure even if we regret
that it is necessary. Senator Phillips spoke about
our people lending themselves to the habit of queuing.
up, to the discipline of queuing up. I would like to
say that the habit of not queuing up has been with us
for a long time and it is because of that that this
measure is necessary.

It is a matter of habit and that is why people in
Britain and other countries appreciate this form of
discipline. It has been instilled in them fora number
of years and it has become a habit to queue. For our
people it has become a habit to rush. They cannot
wait.


Now, Sir, there has been discussion about the
carrying out of the regulations. I feel that this mea-
sure is really intended to tie in with the bus terminus
in Fairchild Street because that is where the problem
really exists. You cannot physically enforce it at
every bus stop and I do not think that there is any
need to do that.

Where other bus stops are concerned I think that
what is needed is shelter from the rain and other ele-
ments. There is the question of making arrangements
for such things as these because the majority of
buses, especially the open buses so not allow for
queuing up. They carry running boards and people
can jump on all at one time. To say queue for those
buses is, I think, preposterous although there should
be some order.

Even with the buses that are enclosed people try
to get out at the sides. There is one exit and one en-
trance and that causes difficulty. The Police will de-
finitely help in seeing that the Regulations are carried
out if there is some physical rearrangement in the
bus stand so as to keeppeople inline so that they can-
not physically do otherwise.

I agree with Senator Ashby that something should
be done about bus shelters. There is also the question
of the shortage of buses. If you are to queue and there
is a shortage of buses you might get large numbers
of people being left andespecially inthe rainy season
you will find matters being worse.

What Senator Ward said about school children is
interesting but they are the most difficult. Very often
if does not matter to them if they get a bus. Some of
them-they stay around town and wait until the last
minute to get their bus.I knowthat on mornings a lot
of children leave home early and get to school late
and give the headmaster some excuse.

I think that if you had the last bus at twelve
o'clock at night you will get the same situation. I also
think that if the Government made certain that there
are not too many buses even at the last moment it
would help the children and the parents.

We hope that this measure will be carried out in
the spirit in which it is intended and that it will not
require much police action to see that it is enforced
because things have reached a sorry pass already. We
have already had serious physical injury and death
from rushing buses.

Now, sir, I hope that the Government can make
arrangements for more inspectors for buses. We have
complaints from visitors about conduct on the buses
and I think that this is a sadthing. The Minister could
well bring it to the attention of the Government that
some members of the Senate feel that it is a reflec-
tion on the island when visitors can talk about the bad
behaviour on buses not only by passengers, but by
certain of the employees who should know better.

I am notonlylooking at it from the point of view of
visitors, but from the point of view of our standards.


I











We want the best possible standards. The behaviour-
and the type of language used is shocking. I think that
we should tighten up more, and employ more staff
because we as an island have had a good reputation
for discipline which has stood us in good stead.

I think, Sir, that it would be a pity if we were to
lose it in this sphere of public transportation, and that
is why I suggest that it would be a good thing if the
Government could get more staff to supervise the
buses as well as to tighten up on behaviour in the bus
stands.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President, -
Some doubt has been expressed about the working of
these Regulations, but I do not envisage too much
trouble. Most of the trouble, as Senator Mapp has
said, is with the children. If you order two buses to
take children to a function you have enough space, but
at the last moment they seem to get excited, and you
have to try to stop them from rushing.

I think that if we educate people in queuing and
show them that they will be punished if they break
the law, people will realise it and the only trouble
you will get will be from the disorderly fellow and
the police can deal with him.

I agree with Senator Ward that you should in-
crease thenumberof units ontheroad so that people
will realise that if one buspasses them another one
is on the way. As it is today, sometimes they may
wait at the pole for an hour before they see another
bus.

Senator Ashby has referred to the bus stand
where people can shelter. At present there is a Re-
gulation that the conductors must collect fares before
the people enter. I have seen rain pouring and people
outside the bus and the conductor inside collecting
fares. In such a circumstance, Sir, as orderly as I
am, the first thing I would think of doing is shoving
the conductor aside and getting into the bus. We want
more bus shelters.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Following on what Senator Phillips and Senator King
have said there is little more that I can say. Citizens
generally have certain powers of arrest under the
Common Law, but the Government would be chary
of extending those powers to people who are not
trained to use them.

The Police have such powers and are trained to
use their powers. I do not thinkthatpersons who are
not trained should be entrusted with such powers. I
think that those powers should be left to the police,
and in fact I am not despondent about the outcome of
the enforcement of these Regulations.

With regard to the question of providing shelters
for persons in the bus stands, I can only say from
experience in a country that is far more developed
than Barbados and far more able, they have to stand
in the rain, the snow, the slush and heat without any
protection by way of shelter.


We are grateful to the Lions Club for the shelters
they have provided. We would be grateful if any pub-
lic spirited individuals could provide more for us.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

BILL TO GRANT ADDITIONAL SUM OUT
OF CONSOLIDATED FUND

The President called the fifth Order A Bill to
grant an additional sum of money out of the Consoli-
dated Fund and appropriate the same for the service
of the island for the year endedon 31st March, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, This Bill is one which is brought down
annually to tidy up financial accounting inthe form of
an Appropriation Bill. It has been happening for a very
long time. As senators will appreciate when the
Government budgets it makes certain estimates, but
for one reason or the other in the course of a year
these estimates go wrong. Either the price of articles
has increased, or devaluation comes or the Public
Works Department finds that they did not put in for
some aspect of a building which must now be put in.

There are reasons that will occur why the
Government will have to come back to the Legislature
with supplementary Resolutions over and abovewhat
the Legislature voted for a specific purpose. Thisis
in accordance with subsection (4) of the Financial
Administration and Audit Act, 1964 which gives the
Minister responsible for Finance power to cause
to be prepared supplementary estimates of expen-
diture which shall be voted on by the House of As-
sembly.
Sub-section (5) provides that with respect to all
supplementary expenditure voted on by the House of
Assembly under Sub-section (4) the Minister of Fi-
nance shall at any time before the end of the Finan-
cial year introduce into the House of Assembly a
Supplementary Appropriation Bill and before the end
of the financial year, in fact as soon as possible be-
fore the end of the financial year introduce a final
Appropriation Bill.

I beg to move that the Bill be read a second time.
Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.




On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator C.
Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 4 of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.

The Schedule was called.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.


_ _











-Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of the
Bill was put and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO AMEND SUGAR AND FANCY MOLASSES
PRODUCTION AND EXPORT CONTROL ACT, 1940

The President called the sixth Order Bill to
amend the Sugar and Fancy Molasses Production
and Export Control Act, 1940.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President this Bill is very simple and quite necessary.
In the Act of 1940 Section 22 says that the expenses
incurred in carrying out the provisions of this Act
shall be paid from the Public Treasury on the
warren of the Governor in- Executive Committee

Under the present ministerial system it obvious -
ly should be under the control of the Minister of
Finance or the Cabinet for any expenditure which may
be charge on the Treasury. Consequently this amend-
ment only seeks to alter those provisions in Section
5 of the principal Act by inserting immediately after
the word "Board" the words "with the prior appro-
val of the Cabinet." It is only in line with the consti-
tutional status of Barbados that it should be under the
control of the Cabinet.

The other amendment just rationalises the posi-
tion as regards to the salaries and conditions of
employment of officers and servants fixed by the
Sugar Production and Export Control Board. It means
that those salaries and condition of service shall be
deemed to have been fixed under the principal Act
as amended by section 2 of this Bill.


Mr. President, if you are going to run a minis -
terial system at all and the Ministers are going to
have the responsibility of running that system, it is
necessary to have someone in power. If they are go-


ing to have political responsibility they must have
power in the sense which the Constitution proposes
that the Cabinet and the Ministers are the persons
who are running the country.

I move that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.


On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator C.
Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 3 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

APPOINTMENTS TO JOINT SELECT COMMITTEE

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, In accordance with the Message of
which notice was given by you, a Message from the
Other Place inviting this Chamber to appoint mem-
bers to form a Joint Select Committee with the House
on a Bill passed by this Chamber the Dairy Industry
(Regulation and Control) Bill, 1968, I beg to move
that Senator M. A. King and Senator E. Lisle Ward
be appointed members of the Committee.



Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith secondedthe motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Hon. P. M. Greaves
seconded by Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith the Senate
adjourned sine die at 5.30 p.m.





Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 36
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 47 dated 12th June, 1969.


S.I. 1969 No. 94
The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF THE
CUSTOMS ACT, 1962
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962 here-
by makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(The Barbados Sugar Producers' Association (Inc.))
Order, 1969.
2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962, is hereby amended by adding thereto the
following new item:-


"The Barbados
Sugar Producers'
Association
(Inc.)


-223 All chemicals, apparatus,
materials and equipment im-
ported by or on behalf of the
Barbados Sugar Producers'
Association (Inc.) for use by
the Sugar Technology Research
Unit in the growing and pro-
cessing of sugar cane and other
food crops on the certificate to
that effect by the Director of
the said Unit."


Made by the Director this 31st day of May, 1969.
ERROL W. BA AQA .


>K904 ?-zY/

6Cxao.g
^?c~lo^
5ZAW







2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.1. 1969 No. 95

The Income Tax Act, 1969 (1968-51)

THE INCOME TAX (REGISTERED UNIT TRUSTS)
(AMENDMENT) ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by paragraph (ae) of section 85 (1) of the
Income Tax Act, 1968 hereby makes the following
Order: -

1. This Order may be cited as the Income Tax
(Registered Unit Trusts) (Amendment) Order, 1969.


2. The Schedule to the Income
Unit Trusts) Order, 1969 is hereby
addition thereto of the unit trusts
Schedule hereto.


Tax (Registered
amended by the
specified in the


SCHEDULE


Unit Trust
"2. Barbados Mutual (Bonds) Fund constituted
by Deed of Trust made the 9th April, 1969
by Barbados Mutual Life Assurance So-
ciety.

3. Barbados Mutual (Equity) Fund constituted
by Deed of Trust made the 9th April, 1969
by Barbados Mutual Life Assurance Society.
4. Barbados Unit Trust constituted by Trust
Deed made the 25th April, 1969 between
Barbados Unit Trust Managers Limited
and Barclays Bank D.C.O.


Effective Date




9th April, 1969



9th April, 1969




25th April, 1969."


Made by the Minister this 31st day of May, 1969.
1969.


ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.






STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


S.I. 1969 No. 96
The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963 (1963-31)

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ('APPROVED PRO-
DUCTS) (POLYURETHENE FOAM PRODUCTS)
ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 3 of the Industrial Incentives Act,
1963, hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Industrial
Incentives (Approved Products) (Polyurethene Foam
Products) Order, 1969.
2. The following products of manufacture are
hereby declared to be approved products for the pur-
poses of the Industrial Incentives Act 1963:-
Polyurethene foam products.
Made by the Minister this 5th day of June, 1969.

ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.
(M.P. 7018/66/168)




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