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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00110
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00110
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 535
        Page 536
        Page 537
        Page 538
        Page 539
        Page 540
    Supplement: Senate debates for 28th March, 1968
        Page A 373
        Page A 374
        Page A 375
        Page A 376
        Page A 377
        Page A 378
        Page A 379
        Page A 380
        Page A 381
        Page A 382
        Page A 383
        Page A 384
        Page A 385
        Page A 386
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 35; S.I. 90: Declaration of approved enterprise (Husband's Wrought Iron and Engineering Works Ltd. Etc.) order, 1969
        Page B 1
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 35; S.I. 91: Industrial incentives (approved products) (W.C. cisterns of plastic or other materials) order, 1969
        Page B 2
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 35; S.I. 92: Industrial incentives (approved products) (metal cooking ware, metal baking ware, etc.) order, 1969
        Page B 3
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 35; S.I. 93: Industrial incentives (approved products) (flourescent light fixtures etc.) order, 1969
        Page B 4
Full Text














VOL. CIV.


Xy9.


*d al


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 9TH JUNE, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Acting Appointments:
A. A. Brathwaite as Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of External Affairs ....................... 535
Gordon H. Walters as Deputy Social Welfare Officer 535
Applications for Liquor Licences, Dist. "A" ............ 537
Appointment:
Grantley A. Murrell as Statistical Assistant ......... 535
Appointment on Transfer:
L. L. Harding, Auditor to the post of Executive
Officer, National Insurance Office ................. 535
Grant of Leave to Senator F. L. Walcott ................ 536
Licensing of Air Services (2) .......................... 539, 540
Patent: "Benzodiazepine derivatives and process
for the manufacture thereof" ........................... 536
Register of Persons Naturalised as Citizens of
Barbados and Registration Oaths of Allegiance ... 538
Temporary Appointment: Mr. G. L. Challenor ......... 536
Termination of Appointment:
Lawrence A. Oxley, Public Health Inspector ...... 536
Senate Debates for 28th March, 1968.
Legal Supplement
S.I. 1969 No. 90: Declaration of Approved Enterprise (Hus-
bands' Wrought Iron and Engineering Works Ltd. etc.)
Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 91: Industrial Incentives (Approved Products)
(W.C. Cisterns of Plastic or other Material) Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 92: Industrial Incentives (Approved Products)
(Metal Cooking Ware, Metal Baking Ware, etc.)Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 93: Industrial Incentives (Approved Products)
(Flourescent Light Fixtures etc.) Order, 1969.

NOTICE NO. 393

GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Appointment

Grantley A. Murrell, has been appointed
to the post of Statistical Assistant, Depart-
ment of Statistical Services with effect from
1st May, 1969.


(M. P. 8812/4)


Appointment on Transfer

L. L. Harding, Auditor, Auditor General's
Department, has been appointed on transfer
to the post of Executive Officer, National
Insurance Office with effect from 1st June,
1969.

(M. P. 7664/5)


Acting Appointments

Gordon H. Walters, Senior Community
Welfare Officer, has been appointed to act as
Deputy Social Welfare Officer, with effectfrom
1st May to 6th July, 1969.

(M.P. 6640/7)


A. A. Brathwaite, Assistant Secretary
has been appointed to act as' Permanent Sec-
retary, Ministry of External Affairs, with
effect from 5th April, 1969 until further no-
tice.

(M. P. 1515/39/22/10) ,
**an~..


NO. 46


Zte








OFICA GAET Jun 9,16


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Grant of Leave to Senator,

Senator F. L. Walcott has been granted
leave of absence from his duty as a Senator
during the period 1st June to 15th Au-
gust, 1969.

(M.P. 0028)


Termination of Appointment

Lawrence A. Oxley's appointment as
Public Health Inspector, Ministry of Health
and Community Development, has been ter -
minated with effect from 30th January, 1969.

(M. P. P. 7344)


Temporary Appointment

In exercise of the powers conferred on
him by Section 3 (3) of the National Insur-
ance and Social Security Act, 1966, as amen-
ded by the Existing Laws Amendment Order
No. 2, 1967, the Minister has appointed Mr.
G. L. Challenor as a member of the National
Insurance Board established in accordance
with the provisions of the said National In-
surance and Social Security Act, 1966, to act
temporarily during the absence on leave of
Mr. D. N. Lewis.


(M. P. NIS. 18/2)


NOTICE NO. 394


PUBLIC NOTICE

Patents Act, 1903 7, Sec. 10

NOTICE is hereby given that F.
HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE & CO. AKTIEN-
GESELLSCHAFT, a Swiss company, chemical
manufacturers, of 124-184 Grenzacher-
strasse, Basle, Switzerland, lodged in this
Office an application and Complete specifica-
tion for a patent under the Patent Act 1903
(1903-7), for an invention for "Benzodiaze-
pine derivatives and process for the manufac-
ture thereof."

The said Specification has been accepted
and is open to public inspection at this Office.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


Resignations

Quita M. Walcott, Stenographer, Gener-
al Post Office, resigned from the Public Ser-
vice with effect from 3rd June, 1969.

(M.P. P. 5242)

Neza L. Foster, Machine Operator, Sta-
tistical Department, resigned from the Pub-
lic Service with effect from 1st June, 1969.

(M.P. P. 7378)


June 9, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








June 9, 196 OFICA GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 395
LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES

(Act 1957 40)


APPLICANT: THERESA CHASE
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS: Hill Road, Bank Hall
PREMISES: Wall building situated
at Bank Hall St. Michael.

Dated this 21st day of May 1969

Signed: T. CHASE
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail Licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A' on Thursday
the 26th day of June 1969 at 9 o'clock a.m.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.

APPLICANT: WYATT W. ALLEYNE
OCCUPATION: Merchant
ADDRESS: President Kennedy


PREMISES:


Drive.
One storied board wall
and galvanize building
situated at President
Kennedy Drive.


Dated this 23rd day of May 1969.

Signed: W. W. ALLEYNE
Applicant.

This Application for a Restaurant Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A' on
Thursday the 26th day of June 1969 at 9
o'clock a.m.


GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


Gap.

Dated this 29th day of April 1969.

Signed: C. HOWELL
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A'on
Thursday the 26th day of June 1969 at 9
o'clock a.m.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.

APPLICANT: DAVID M. F. HARRIS
OCCUPATION: Sales Representative
ADDRESS: Enterprise Rd. Ch. Ch.
PREMISES: One Retail Liquor Shop
in a wall building at
Worthing Near Sandy
Beach Ch. Ch.

Dated this 4th day of June 1969.

Signed: D. M. F, HARRIS
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A' on
Thursday the 26th day of June at 9
o'clock a.m.


GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


NOTICE NO.396
LIQUOR LICENCES NOTICES
(Act 1957 40)
APPLICANT: CONRAD HOWELL
OCCUPATION: Shopkeeper
ADDRESS: Richmond Gap
PREMISES: Wall & wooden building
situated at Richmond


June 9, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







THE BARBADOS CITIZENSHIP ACT, 1967


REGISTER OF PERSONS NATURALISED AS CITIZENS OF BARBADOS AND REGISTRATION OATHS OF ALLEGIANCE

October, 1968 April, 1969


DATE OF TAKING
NAME PLACE OF BIRTH ADDRESS DATE OF NATURALI- OATH OF
STATION ALLEGIANCE


George Gustave Augustin


FPverley Yolande Wilson
Souheil Youseph Arnouk

Alice Maude Gumbs


Hubert Vanterpool Simmons


Arno Otta Wilhelm Trieloff

Joseph Benjamin Hassell
Adib Abraham Akkary
Mary George
Rafik Jabra Khoury
Jouhana Abraham Akkary
Robert Benjamin Fode
Elias Lattouf Habre


Fort-de-France,
Martinique

Colon, Panama

Matan Arnouk, Syria
St. Martin's, Dutch
Netherlands

Saba, Netherlands,
Antilles

Essen, Germany
Aruba


Beirut, Syria

Safita, Syria
Tartous, Syria
Nickerie, Suriname

Santiago, Cuba


Black Rock, St. Michael.

Oistin's Town, Christ Church
Black Rock, St. Michael
5 Parkinson Field, St. Michael



Bay Street, St. Michael

Bay Street, St. Michael
Greenland Plantation, St. Andrew
Speightstown, St. Peter

Bay Street, St. Michael
Speightstown, St. Peter
Speightstown, St. Peter
Country Road, St. Michael
Golf Club Road, Christ Church


13. 7.1968

18. 7.1968

4. 7.1968
2. 8.1968



30. 8.1968

10. 9.1968
11.10.1968
11.10.1968
15.10.1968

5.11.1968
11.11.1968

19.11.1968

14.12.1968


11. 7.1968


7.1968
7.1968
8.1968


31. 8.1968
10. 9.1968
11.10.1968
14.10.1968
30.10.1968
6.11.1968
11.11.1968
22.11.1968
3. 1.1969


--







oflAO t O FCL E


Government Notice



LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES



The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received the
under-mentioned application to operate a Scheduled Air Service:


1. Name and Address of
Applicant:


2. Places between which
passengers and goods are
to be carried:

3. Places at which inter-
mediate landings are to
be made and the purposes
for which made:




4. Times or frequency of
the service:

5. Period for which the
Licence is applied for:

6. Latest date for making
representations or
objections:


Compagnie Nationale AIR FRANCE
1, Square Max Hymans PARIS 15 'eme.


Pointe a Pitre/Barbados



(a) For traffic purposes Fort de France


(b) Weather alternates Fort de France,
St. Martin, Bridgetown, Pointe a Pitre,
Bridgetown, Antigua, Fort de France,
Port-of-Spain, Pointe a Pitre.



One flight weekly



5 years


23rd June, 1969.


This Application will be considered by the Air Transport Licensing Authority in
accordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation (Licensing of Air Services) Regula-
tions, 1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this application mustbe made
in writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are based and any condition which
it may be desired shall be attached to the licence, if granted. They shouldbe addressed
to the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing Authority, C/o Prime Minister's Office, Gov-
ernment Headquarters, Bay Street, and a copy sent to the applicant at the same time.
Further details of the application may be obtained from the Secretary.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


e nu 9 1969







JU


Government Notice



LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES

The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received the
under-mentioned application to operate a Scheduled Air Service:


1. Name and Address of
Applicant:

2. Places between which
passengers and goods are
to be carried:

3. Places at which inter-
mediate landings are to
be made and the purposes
for which made:


4. Times or frequency of
the service:

5. Period for which the
Licence is applied for:

6. Latest date for making
representations or
objections:


Compagnie Nationale AIR FRANCE
1, Square Max Hymans PARIS 15 'eme





Barbados/Cayenne

(a) For traffic purposes Trinidad,
Georgetown, Paramaribo
(b) Weather alternates Forte de
France, Port of Spain, Pointe a
Pitre, Bridgetown, Fort de
France, Georgetown, Paramaribo,
Cayenne, Georgetown, Port of Spain,
Paramaribo, Georgetown, Belem.


One flight weekly



5 years



23rd June, 1969.


This Application will be consideredby the Air Transport Licensing Authority in
accordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation (Licensing of Air Services) Regula-
tions, 1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this application mustbe
made in writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are based and any conditions
which it may be desired shall be attached to the Licence, if granted. They should be address--
ed to the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing Authority, C/o Prime Minister's Office, Gov-
ernment Headquarters, Bay Street, and a copy sent to the applicant at the same time.
Further details of the application may be obtained from the Secretary.


Government Printing Office.


June 9, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











THE


SENATE


DEBATES


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE
Thursday, March 28, 1968.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.
(President); His Honour Senator C.Asquith PHILLIPS,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable
P.M.GREAVES, B.A., (Minister of Home Affairs);
Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q.C. (Attor-
ney General); Senator the Honourable L. E.
SANDIFORD, M. A. (Minister of Education);
Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliament-
ary Secretary); Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator
F. C. H. Carew; Senator S. V. ASHBY; Senator Dr. R.
B.CADDLE,B.Sc., M.B.B.S; Senator F.L.WALCOTT,
O.B.E.;SenatorM.A. KING; Senator E. Lisle WARD;
Senator W. W.BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator S.A.
BLANCHETTE; Senator Erma V. ROCK; and
Senator N. A. BARROW, B.A.

ABSENT

Senator P. G. MORGAN; Senator H. F. ALKINS;
Senator D. A. WILES,. C.M.G., O.B.E.; Senator R. G.
MAPP.

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer excuses for the absence of Senator
H. F. Alkins, Senator D. A. Wiles and Senator
R. G. Mapp from the day's meeting.

The Clerk also read the text of a letter by Senator
P.-G.: Morgan addressed to His Honour the President
asking to be excused from his duties as a Senator
during the period 27th March to 5th April, 1968.


PAPERS

Senator the Honourable P.M.Greaves. Minister
of Home Affairs and Leader of the Senate, laid the
following papers:


1. The Barbados (Overseas Officers Retirement
and Compensation) Regulations, 1968.
2. The Barbados (Constitution) (Retirement of
Entitled Officers) (Amendment) Regulations,
1968.
3. The Pensions (Amendment) Regulations,1968.
4. The Civil Establishment (General) (Amend-
ment) (No.2) Order, 1968.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.65

The President called the first Order A
Resolution to place the sum of $23,406 at the disposal
of the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-
68 Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 65 which form the Schedule to
the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P.M.GREAVES:
Mr. President, The Commissioner of Police is
entitled to housing quarters. The former Com-
missioner of Police used to occupy "Eric Park"
which has now been allocated to the Royal Barbados
Police Band, and the quarters are no longer available
for use as the residence of the Commissioner of
Police.


Since the Comin.ssioner of Police is entitled to
quarters as a condition of service, it is thought that
in lieu of quarters it will be necessary to provide him
with a housing allowance. The allowance is at the rate
of $72 a month, but no provision was made for this in
this financial year's estimates, arid it is proposed that
the sum of $864 be provided under Item 95 of Head 25.
This is a new Item in order to make good this sum of
money for the Commissioner of Police.

Under Head 28A Meteorological Service there
are Items 66, 12 and 12A for which supplementary
provision is required. The amount of $25,668 is pro-
vided under Item 66 to meet the cost in respect of
meteorological data obtained by means of facsimile
and radio teleprinter equipment. The cost of the main-
tenance of this equipment is in fact $780 (Canadian)
a month which in terms of Eastern Caribbean
Currency before devaluation was $1,272.

Now, Sir, as a result of devaluation the cost to
Barbados will rise to $1,506 in Eastern Caribbean










Currency, although the quotation in Canadian dollars
remains the same. For maintainance an additional
$1,170 was required for the period from November
1967 to March 1968. Rental of the equipmenthas also
been affected by devaluation. The amount charged is
at the rate of $490 (Canadian) which before devalua-
tion in Eastern Caribbean Currency was $767. Now,
by virtue of devaluation it is $908 Eastern Caribbean
Currency. This makes it necessary to have an addi-
tional amount of $735 to meet commitments in respect
of the period from November 1967 to March 1968. The
total for the facsimile and radio teleprinter equipment
amounts to $1,875.
As regards the other Item, Item 12, the amount of
$56,610 was included in this year's estimates as a
contribution to the Caribbean Meteorological Service.
There is a radiosonde station in Jamaica and one in
Barbados and the Meteorological Institute in Bar-
bados. No provision was made in this year's estimates
for the contribution by Barbados to the Caribbean
Meteorological Service Headquarters Unit for the
period January to June 1968 which amounts to $10,464.

No provision was made either for the counter-
part contribution to the Caribbean Meteorological
Institute's recurrent costs for 1968 which account now
stands at $33,168.

Previous to devaluation it was $28,193. The posi-
tion, Sir, is that the amount for the Headquarters Unit
and the amount by way of contribution to the Institute
makes a total of $43,632 and that is the amount now
required under this Item. However, there is an amount
of $23,700 standing to the credit of the Caribbean
Meteorological Service in the Suspense Account and it
is proposed to utilise this amount towards makingthe
contribution that I spoke of just now so that the amount
now required is $43,632 less $23,700 which leaves
$19,333 which is the amount now required to supple-
ment the Item.

Again, under Item 12A, the cost of renting of
equipment was hit by devaluation. Under this Item,
$9,850 was provided to met the cost of the rental
and maintainance of the Automatic Picture
Transmission equipment.

The amount charged for this in Canadian dollars
was $490 which now stands at $907 in Eastern Carib-
bean Currency. Before devaluation it was $810 and so
the additional amount of $735 is required in respect of
Ithe five months from November to the end of this
financial year.

I beg to move that this Resolution for $23,406 be
concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate andagreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.68

The President called the second Order A
Resolution to place the sum of $6,240 at the disposal
of the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-


68 Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 68 which form the Schedule to
the Resolution.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
I Mr. President, The amount which is to be appro-
priatedunderthis Item is to pay fees to copyists for
recording deeds, making copies of documents,
making examination of documents etc. Consequent on
the new rates of pay the average amount for this work
has increased but no provision was made for the
increase in this year's estimates.

It is now estimated, Sir, that $6,240 will be
needed to meet commitments to the end of the
financial year. I should state Sir, that this amount is
fully recoverable as far as Registrars fees are con-
cerned.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.
RESOLUTION TO AMEND NOTE TO ITEM 42 OF
HEAD 43 APPROVED ESTIMATES

The President called the third Order Resolu-
tion that the note to Item 42 of Head 43 Ministry
of Health and Community Development of the
Approved Estimates for 1967-1968 be varied.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, I must say that members can almost
read the Addendum and understand it. As the
Addendum says in the first paragraph, under the Item
42 of Head 43, Ministry of Health and Community
Development of the 1967-68 Estimates there is
provision for seven (7) posts of Car Driver and five
(5) posts of Driver/Supervisor. With the recent
acquisition of an additional vehicle at Enmore Health
Centre and one at Speightstown Health Centre there is
need for two (2) additional posts of Car Driver. There
are only three (3) persons employed in the posts of
Driver/Supervisor and there appears to be no
immediate need for more than three. It is therefore
proposed that the note to Item 42 of Head 43 be
amended to provide for nine (9) posts of Car Driver
and three (3) posts of Driver/Supervisor. This
proposal will result in a saving under the item.

Now, sir, of the five posts of Driver/Supervisor
only three such posts have been filled, and the
Ministry has been advised that there is no immediate
need to fill the two other posts. It is therefore pro-
posed to make use of these two unfilled posts in order
to make an increase in the number of drivers, so that
the real purpose of amending the note to the Item is
to reduce the number of driver/supervisor and in-
crease the number of drivers by that number. So,
there will be three driver/supervisors and three
posts of car drivers.

This will result in a saving because the post of
driver/supervisor carries more remuneration than
that of a car driver.


~~













With regard to the next Item, the number of
general workers was reduced from 44 to 43 when
additional posts of Laboratory Attendant was estab-
lished at Enmore Health Centre under the Civil
Establishment ( General ) ( Amendment ) Order,
1967, of 19th January 1967. However, it is erroneously
stated in the Note to Item 42 that the number of posts
is 44. It is therefore proposed that the Note should
be further amended to correct the error. This
amendment to the Note will reflect the number of
posts accurately.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate and "greed to.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE THE CIVIL ESTAB-
LISHMENT (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT) ORDER, 1968

His Honour the President called the fourth Order
of the day..A Resolution to approve the Civil Es-
tablishment ( General ) (Amendment) Order, 1968.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, this Order was made by the Prime
Minister on the 16th February, 1968 and affects the
establishment in a number of departments; in some
cases an increase in the number of officers, and re-
ducing or replacing posts in others. According to the
rules of the Supreme Court, officers of Senior Clerk
status should attend the sittings of that Court: for the
purpose of administering oaths and discharging other
functions and responsibilities. Since Independence, the
number of judges is : now four instead of three, but
the number of Senior Clerks has not been increased.
It is now proposed to increase this number because
itwill cast an additional burden on the number of Senior
Clerks at the Registry, as there are instances where
all four courts of the Supreme Court sit simtl-
taneously, and each one should be provided with a
Senior Clerk. It has therefore been found absolutely
necessary to increase the number of Senior Clerks
by one in order to cope with the responsibility of that
office, and in increasing the number of Senior Clerks
by one, it is now proposed to reduce the number of
Clerical Officers by that same number.
With regard to the Fire Service, the duty system
that operates at the Fire Service at the moment is
known as the 48/24 hour system. This system
requires firemen to be on duty for 48 consecutive
hours, followed by 24 hours off-duty; the weekly
average number of hours on duty stands at 112 hours
and the number of hours off-duty stands at 56 hours.
For a long time, both the Chief Fire Officer and the
Fire Service Association have been making repre-
sentations for a replacement of this system because
it was felt that their duties and conditions of service
were not conducive to efficient results, because they
spend long periods two thirds of their working life -
away from their families. It is thereforeproposedto
re-organise this. system and introduce the 96-hour


system; that would consist of an average of 96 hours
on duty per week and 72 hours off-duty per week.
There will be three shifts, each of 35 hours; this will
mean that the number of hours on duty will be reduced
by 16 and the number of hours off duty will be increase -
ed by that number, 16.

I am sure that Honourable Members would not
want to begrudge these officers this additional allow-
ance of time off duty, especially coming at the time when
they are very hard -pressed by the number of fires that
we seem to be getting these days. In this connection
I take this opportunity to condemn this senseless act
which seems to be a "sport" among persons who are
either unaware of the amount of damage that it has
caused to this island, or those persons who are mad.

With regard to the Sports Section of the Ministry
of Health and Community Development, this Order
proposes a complete re-organisation of the Sports
Section of this Ministry. Experience has shown that
this re-organisation is absolutely necessary. From
time to time the Ministry has had to engage the ser-
vices of additional staff on a temporary basis, while
schools and other organizations have been inade-
quately served. It is accordingly felt that the es-
tablishment, to be an affective one, rather than have a
Cricket Coach or an Athletic Coach, there should
simply be the post of Coach to enable the optimum
use to be made of his services whether in the field
of Cricket or Football or even Athletics. So that now
the proposal is for two Coaches and two Assistant
Coaches, one Sports Officer, one Assistant Sports
Officer and one Sports Assistant, making a total
of seven. You will see that the number, on the present
system, is seven, so there is no increase in the es-
tablishment, there is only a re-organisation to give
greater flexibility of whatever resources there are in
that Ministry.

With regard to the Probation Service, it has been
pointed out that there has been no increase in the es-
tablishment of that department since 1953. In the
meantime, the duties and responsibilities of officers
of that department have increased considerably by the
establishment of a court in Belleplaine since that
time, and also by the increase in the number of sit-
tings of the Assizes. It is noted that both the Chief
Probation Officer and the Senior Probation Officer
have to do a considerable amount of field work on
cases amounting to 50 or 60 per month. Moreover,
there is on the staff only one female Probation Offi-
cer who has to supervise all women and girls through-
out the island and attend all sittings of the courts when-
ever females are involved. It is proposedthento in-
crease the establishment by three Probation Officers,
one of whom will be female Officer, and one will be
assigned to the Prisons as a Prison Welfare Officer.
This has been a recent decision.

It is also proposed to create the post of Tele-
phone Operator who would serve the Treasury Build-
ing. It is proposed to place this officer under the
control of the Accountant General, and I am certain
members will quite agree that this is a clear case.












This, in effect, is what the Civil Establishment
Order proposes and I move that the Resolution be
approved.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: In
seconding this Resolution, I should like, on behalf of
the Government, to pay tribute to that hard-working
group of men for whom their fellow citizens at
least certain sections of them have no thought, that
is by their having to be called out to fires at all hours
of the day and night. I shouldlike to join with the Hon-
ourable Leader of this Senate in condemning the
necessity for calling out the Fire Service officers un-
necessarily, and I would like to give some idea of the
obvious increase in fires, the cause of which may be
attributed to several reasons.

In 1966 there was a total of 511 cane fires some
3,925 1/4 acres of canes. Any idiot must know that he
is damaging the economy of this country by this
senseless and wanton waste of this country's re-
sources. When taxes are increased they grumble yet
some sections of this community are wickedly caus -
ing the Fire Service to work overtime. In 1967, 937
cane fires, something like 7,036 1/2 acres of canes.
If you work that out in tons of sugar you will see the
damage that is being done to this country by sense-
less idiotic persons for some reasons best known to
themselves. They are the ones to suffer, and the soon-
er they get this into theirheads the better for every-
body. In 1968, up to 4.00 p.m. on 27th March, 1968
there were 600 cane fires consuming a total of
6,945 acres of cane, so that from January when we
had 22 cane fires, February 203, and up to the 27th
March, we had 375 cane fires upto 4.00 p.m., some-
thing like 5,500 acres, a total up to now of 6,945 acres.
The Fire Service have got to attend to most of them
in the interest of not completely destroying this coun-
try. How can any persons with any sense, whether he
went to Harrison College, Combermere, Lodge, ele-
mentary school, whether he has been to school or not,
how can he deliberately set about destroyinghis own
country, either to destroy a Government, orforrea-
sons know to himself. More pay when the week comes,
the difference between cutting canes with trash and
cutting canes without trash is not so much, and there
is the tendency to cut canes without trash for the penny
or so more or less or whatever it is.


This is something the Union has got to tackle,
and I am sure it has entered the mind of the Honour-
able Senator Walcott, he has appealed to them, the
Government has appealed to them and they
deliberately, wantonly continue to do this. Only last
night I was taking my family through St. George to St.
Philip; as I passed I saw a fire just started on the
hedge row. I stopped my car andbroke a piece of the
cane and stamped it out. This is a serious problem; I
am not involved like you, Mr. President or like the
Honourable Senator Ward. We can only conjecture the
reasons for this deliberate act I must apoligise to
Senator Rock, she has so many interests, at times I
forget what they are. However, this is senseless; what
can we do except to tell them next year when they start


suffering they will want to kill the Government, the
plantation owners, everybody except their own col-
leagues or whoever they are who are starting this
senseless and wanton waste of this country's limited
resources. I cannot say any more, and lam sure the
Government cannot say any more.

I would like these figures to be published, because
it is high time the community realise the Fire Service
demands and notes in terms of statistics there were
511 fires from January to June in 1966; 600 for a
three-month period up to 27th March,,the total acre-
age was 6,945. These figures are quite alarming,
and these wanton inhuman acts are not doing the
Government any harm, they are not spiting the Prime
Minister, they are not spiting the Cabinet, these people
are spiting themselves, and I would like to hear Sena-
tor Walcott's views on this. It is for him, not so much
from the Government's point of view but from the
workers' own welfare and benefit. He has got to join
with the Government in devising some means to stop
this, because the workers he represents are involved,
they are destroying the very thing that he is trying to
create.


Mr. President, I thank you for the latitude you
have given me, but I think you will appreciate that this
Senate is an important body and must take every op-
portunity to shoulder its responsibility by expressing
to people how strongly we feel on this wanton and in-
human waste of this country's resources.

SENATOR F.L.WALCOTT:.Mr. President, I am
going to deal with some of the things the Attorney
General spoke about, but my approach is completely
different from his. I think I am grown and big enough
not to care about what anybody says. Ihave past that
stage. However, I will start from the beginning of this
Resolution.

I am wondering to know what four Supreme Court
Judges have to do in Barbados? The lawyers do not
like me sometimes when I say something about their
work.The Parkinson law is if you have another Supreme
judge you must have another Senior Clerk. I believe
it is legally necessary to have a fourth judge because
you have a Supreme Court, but I would like to really
know if little Barbados needs all this. When you talk
about productivity, you ask a man who works in the
road to produce so much per hour; where do the
judges meet in Barbados? A small place like this, four
Supreme Judges. Why is it that the legal people can
never find a wide area of agreement? They can only
find a narrow area of agreement, they do not allow any -
body else to enter into the legal profession based on
justice; it is not basedon justice, you have to qualify
for entry, and they even qualify on different sources
and still they find it so difficult to reach an agreement,
which shows that even in the profession you will find
this difficulty.

The Fire Service. For some unknown reason they
have worked this out so that you have to think that
when a fireman is working a 24-hour shift he will not


N













.sleep, even during the day a man shall not sleep, so
they calculate this on the basis of 7 days a week 112,
+v56 .168 hours. 96/72. Iamglad to see that it has
been introduced, but this is the analysis; when a man
is working on a shift system it does not mean that you
have to operate the system on the basis that his eyes
are open for 24 hours, but that his service is available
for 24 hours, and for his service to be available for
24 hours you have to keep people on the spot; and why
I say that is because we know that it is not or it could
not be accepted that a 24-hourworking system should
be operated when it comes specifically to the Fire
Service. I am glad to see that they have reached a
stage of working a man four days on and three days
off, that is what it should be. But what I would like
to draw to the Minister's attention is that for men like
those in the Fire Service conditions of employment
should include other facilities to compensate forthese
things. Firemen, Policemen, Nurses and people who work
in 24 -hour shifts should be given conditions of employ-
ments so far as leave is concerned, generous leave
arrangements to compensate, and it would not cost
the Government any money because you are running on
a permanent service. If you are employing 100 peo-
ple per month it does not make any difference you give
that permanent service 3, 4, 5, or 6 cents because you
are not required to bring any additional people, you
can rotate the staff; and I am sure this will be of
great assistance to all.

We are still in the backwash of slavery and for
that reason, people working everyday, every night and
every Sunday is not strange. Iamverypleased to see
that changes have been made for the Fire Service, but
I am sure Mr. President that it takes too long to get
these things moving in the right direction.

Let us take cane-fires. I do not think that I have
any greater duty in this matter than anyone else in
Barbados because I am a citizen and I do not occupy
anymore space in the community than any other man.
What I do know is that the Attorney General made a
statement about the frequency of cane-fires.

I have been saying already that you have nearly
two communities with the criminal community on the
periphery. Sometimes the criminal element gets into
the centre and Barbados is becoming a community of
embellished criminals. You can find criminals being
embellished in high places. You only have to look around
to see that this community has reached a stage where
you are asking the blind to lead the blind.

The reason for so many cane-fires is that there is
a subversive element at large and too many people
are afraid to say so. Do not make the cane-cutter a
scape-goat. The cane-cutter is interested in cutting
canes. There are people going around the country and
some are telling people not to go to work.

I know that there are some people who do not
care what they destroy as long as they come to power.
last night when we were keeping a meeting there was
fire to the East and one to the West. It is our duty to
keep meetings. If we did not go around and talk about


cane-fires there would be more. I do not have to be
afraid to talk in Barbados.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: On
a point of Order. My reference to holding meetings
was not directed to the Trade Union whose duty it is
to hold meetings during the crop season.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: I did not regardthe
reference as being possible. We hold meetings for the
purpose of meeting the people and explaining our pro-
gramme. It is necessary for us to do this. When it
comes to this wanton destruction I am not a believer
in fooling myself. It cannot be regarded as an accident,
but there are apologists in the country who will tell us
that we have been always having cane-fires. What I
would say is that we have never been having them in
these large numbers.

What the Attorney General says is true. There
are some people who are thirsty for power. They want
power so much that they cannot wait. Some would
like everyone else in the world to withdraw and leave
them in the world alone. They feel that the world is
waiting for them to come and put it right.

Do not think that these people will not take advan-
tage of Independence? Some people are willing to
abuse Democracy. Look back a year ago or 18 months
ago and remember the speeches you got. If you con-
tinually say that the community is governed by the
people who are dictators who want to take away your
rights under Independence so that you will not be able
to do this or that thing, there must be a generating of
this dissatisfaction.

How do you expect simple people if they read
everyday in the newspaper that this place is going
down, and down and down to think otherwise? The
newspapers are always writing about Democracy and
the newspapers in Barbados accuse the Government
of the country of all sorts of iniquities. When you ex-
amine the people who write these things some of them
could be well placed behind prison bars.

I am not worrying about that aspect of it because
those are the people we have in every community.
They are citizens. You cannot deport them to the U.S.
or Australia. You have to keep them here.

My view is that you should not wait until the sit-
uation becomes so dangerous that you cannot handle
it. I say that the danger is that we have people in this
community who are vicious, and they make no bones
about it. They made no bones about what they would
do to destroy. A manwho was deported from Dominica
is here in this island. I went andheard where he was
telling people not to go to work if an agreement was
not made. People are walking around trying to play
that they are friendly with the people. You have got
to keep your ears to the ground.

What you want to do is to get the motorized units
of the Police going into the country frequently and
fast. There is a spate of lawlessness in Barbados.


-C--


i












When you have land you become unpopular. You see
people parking motorcars all around the street. You
have no policemen now like Cyrus whom people did
not like. People give you open defiance.
Only a couple of Saturdays ago I sawa crowd by
my office and they were therefrom 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
It was in Nelson Street in the City of Bridgetown, a
stone's throw from Central Police Station. Hundreds
of people congregated in the street and not a solitary
policeman came even from the bus stand. These are
the sort. of things that people make excuses for.

Mr. President, the employers in the Sugar Indus -
try are lazy too. I have never owned two blades of
canes in my life. I was never so fortunate. There is
no use our talking because they are not listening to
us.

I am not making any excuses for the workers, the
employers or the Government. I am saying that the
spate of cane fires is destroying the economy of Bar-
bados, and anything which destroys the economy must
of necessity destroy the people.

The Union has taken a positive attitude on this
matter. We have members on the Cane Fire Board.
Some people say that the managers burn the canes
because they know that they can get insurance money.
If you burn them for that reason, why plant them?

Of course, there are occasional accidental fires
and some which are caught to destroy cow itch; but it
is a different thing when a fire starts here and two or
three hundred yards away another one starts. That is
why I say that it is something beyond accident.

Motorcars are moving around the country by
night, and police cars should be moving too. If they
want secret information from me I can tell them whose
cars to follow. Fires are concentrated between the
south and eastern sides of the island. See how many
there are in Christ Church, St. Philip and St. John. You
can examine where some people live. Go and check
the residences of some people and see how m-any cane
fires you get within the radius. Check how often some
people will be at home at night.

I now come to Sports. Barbados has become
very much alive to sports and to the organisation of
sport. The Addendum explains that one of the pro-
posals is the replacement of the non-established con-
tract post of Specialist Coach in the scale (G.4 2)
$5,400 7,320 by a permanent pensionable post of
Coach on the salary scale (G.3 2) $6,120 7,320.

What I would like to draw to the attention of the
Minister in a general way is that I believe that in your
national life you have to make provision for all as-
pects of sport as one of the things that will apply to
the youth of your community. It is necessary to make
physical provision for it. There are certain aspects
of sport in which training is essential.

We know that Barbadians like cricket very much,
but Ithink the Government has to be very careful when
they are talking about making a Coach into a Civil


Servant. You require a Coach because you want to
be modern andupto date. ACoach does not necessar-
ily mean that. A Coach means that you want the best
available now. We have Cricket Coaches now who were
international figures with set standards and it
became a matter of national pride more than the ques-
tion of coaching per se.

Let us examine coaching at the Government Aided
Secondary Schools in Barbados. In my life-time there
have been specialists in coaching at high salaries; but
if you make a critical analysis of these schools you
will find that other schools were sometimes producing
better cricketer s and footballers. You will find that
your cricketers are coming from clubs like Beverly
Hills, people that only pass by these schools.

These schools produce people who run a cross-
country race once a year. When it comes to Athletics,
as far as Barbados is concerned it seems as if our
young people are running slower and slower every
year. More people used to go to see athletic sports
at Kensington Oval than to see a cricket match. I have
never had the experience of seeing Kensington closed
for cricket but I have seen Kensington closed when
Douglas was in bicycle racing. There were no coaches,
and now we have coaches and no athletics.

I have a soft spot for athletics. I am worried
about the method of appointing coaches as such. The
appointment of coaches should be an open thing. You
should not be required to take one or two or three
people and tell them that they are coaches for the
balance of their lives by establishing the post of coach.
Techniques change.

It is not like other departments of the Service
where a man enters a jobandlooks forward to it as a
career with security. A coach does not need that se-
curity. A good coach can charge you a fee for the time
he wants to work with you.

Another point. Make no bones about it, the West
Indian Cricket Board of Control has money invested.
It is not an impecunious organisation. This is
the business of that organisation. They should remem-
ber that cricket is so vital that they should put money
into the trainingof potential personnel.The same thing
is true of private enterprise, but I find that they do not
like to spend their money in that manner. The Govern-
ment is being taken for an unnecessary ride. On every
occasion that a famous cricketer is available as a
coach he must be available to the Government. The
Government will soon become a kind of fairy-god-
mother or a horse than anyone can ride. If a man fails
in anyway in life the only place he can find rescue is
in the Government. If he has not passed his Solicitor's
examinations the Government must find room for a
half-baked solicitor.
I am saying this very seriously because if Bill
Robinson was in Barbados the Government will have to
employ him as a coach.
I have no objection to taking some of your national
figures and redeeming them so as not to allow them to
walk the streets in a way that is not fitting to the sort













of service they rendered. I do not feel that it is right
to create all of these permanent coachingpositions,
you should leave coaching in a wide area. If some of
your greatest cricketers suppose Mr. Gary Sobers
is available to you,let him be available for a fee that
he will charge, and when his time comes his suc-
cessor will be available. If you make John Brown the
permanent coach, it means that all the brighter ones
that will come along will not have the opportunity to be
a coach.

I do not feel that the Government should become
the area for this, some of the sporting organizations
- the Football Association, the Cricket Association -
these organizations must make provision for some of
these things and let the Government give them a sub-
vention so that the Government would not have to do
these things. These Associations should try to raise
funds for dealing with these things; if not these things
can go too far, they will soon want the Government to
provide the price of a dance Barbadians like mu-
sic and keeping dances at night, but when the dances
fail you can say to the Government,well I must get a
rebate.

Cricket is one of the games in Barbados that is
very popular, thousands of boys are going to play
cricket, some of them do not go anywhere near a
school where there is a Coach. The Attorney General
had the distinction of representing Barbados not in
cricket, but in football. I believe it was one of these
strange things that we find somebody from St. An-
drew to play football, but he was one of the island's
outstanding right wingers, but he must have started
to play football before he reached Harrison College.
You do not start to play footballwhenyou are in sixth
form. I am not rejecting the whole idea of coaching,
but I am a little bit wary about the method of coach-
ing in its broad sense.
The Probation Officer. I would like to say that I
am in agreement with this, and I would like, if I had
my way I would even use some of these cricket
coaches in the Probation Service because it is very
important in Barbados that this large surplus
of young children we have are going astray. What I
am experiencing is that there is aproblemhere, and
the problem is in this After-Care group. I find that
not enough is being done. Only yesterday and I was
very angry about this an employer dismissed a
man because he found out that the man had a prison
record, and I told the employer letus be quite frank,
this is not a reasonwhyyou shoulddismiss this man,
what is the idea? If a man goes to prison, he serves
time in prison and is likely to be rehabilitated. Are
you going to say that his prison term will stop him
from making a contribution to the community? Wait
and see if he will do something, but not because he
has a record dismiss him, it is not fair. I hope these
Probation Officers will take some care of this man,
because it is a very awkward situation for a man who
makes a mistake and goes to prison. I do not feel that
he should be branded forever.

I hope the Minister will be aware that I am not
opposed to the Resolution, but I think I must express


my view on these aspects of the Resolution that
strike me as something that the Government could
give consideration to.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

BILL TO PROVIDE FOR POSTPONEMENT OF
COMING INTO FORCE OF THIRD
VALUATION LISTS


His Honour the President called the fifth order of
the day. A Bill to make provision for the postponement
of the coming into force of the third valuation lists un-
der section 147(3) of the Local Government Act, 1958
in respect of the rating areas of the City of Bridgetown
and the Southern District.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, the Objects and Reasons of this piece of
legislation have been set out quite clearly and in ac-
cordance with section 147(3) of the Local Government
Act 1958-55 the third valuation list of the Southern
District Council should be enforced on 1st April,1968.
The second valuation list of this rating area was en-
forced on 1st April, 1963 and is deemedto expire on
the 31st March, 1968; that for the City of Bridgetown
was enforced on 1st April, 1964 and is due to expire
on the 31st March, 1969 and the third valuation list
should come into force on the 1st April, 1968. In view
of the fact that training in land valuation is being con-
ducted with the assistance of a United Nations ex-
pert, and it commenced on the 22nd January, 1968
and is expected to last approximately 8 to 10 months,
it would not be possible for this valuation section of
the Inland Revenue department to carry out the
necessary investigations to make up the thirdvalua-
tion lists of the Southern District Council and the
City of Bridgetown so that these lists could come into
force on the day specified. Consequently, in order to
avoid any legal difficulty, it is proposed that the date
for the coming into force of these valuation lists
should be postponed until such day as the Minister of
Finance should by order direct, and I therefore com-
mend the Bill, which is a very short Bill, and I beg
to move that it be read a second time.

SENATOR F. C. H. CAREW: Ibegto second that.

The question was put to the Senate andagreed to.

Clauses 1 and 2 of the Bill were called and
passed.


The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.


His Honour the President resumed the Chairand
the passing of the Bill was reported accordingly.


On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.













A BILL TO AMEND THE WORKMEN'S
COMPENSATION ACT, 1964

His Honour the President called the sixth order
of the day, A Bill to amend the Workmen's Com-
pensation Act, 1964.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, this Bill seeks to amend section 20 of the
Workmen's Compensation Act, 1964-3 in order to re -
move the two recognized Specialists in diseases of
the lung who by subsection (3) have to form part of the
panel of registered medical practitioners appointed
by the Minister from which a Special Medical Board
may be selected, and to replace them by the Senior
Physician Specialist and a Physician Specialist on the
staff of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital either of whom
will be one of the three members of a Special Medical
Board under subsection (4).
Subsection (3) says: "The Minister shall appoint
a panel of registered medical practitioners, contain-
ing at least two persons who are recognized special -
ists in diseases of the lung from which the members
of any such Board (other than the Chairman) may be
selected." It is on this particular aspect of lung
diseases that the section ran into trouble, and quite
a bit of correspondence passed between the University
of the West Indies and the local authorities as to what
could be done in order to implement this particular
part of the Act. The University gave as its opinion
that they had no. specialist physician on the full time
staff on the diseases of the lung.
It is very important, and the Ministry of Health -
although it had certain reservations came around
eventually to the conclusion that a physician specialist
who was properly trained could fit the requirements of
the law and that for lung diseases as such there are
no specialist physicians in this field -you have a sur-
geon or a specialistof occupational diseases and a
competent physician should be able to diagnose and
carry out the necessary tests and treat the occupa-
tional disease from which the worker is suffering.
And so all this Act attempts to do is to put in here
instead of "two recognized Specialists in diseases of
the lung," to substitute in its place "persons for the
time being holding or acting in the office of Senior
Physician Specialist onthe staff of the Queen
Elizabeth Hospital.."

I am very pleased to say that at the moment we
have on the staff of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital com-
petent members who, if this Bill is amended to suit the
requirements of the hospital, will satisfy the present
needs of our community. I therefore move that this
Bill be read a second time.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
I beg to second that.
Clauses 1 and 2of the Bill were called and
passed.
The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill was reportedaccordingly.


On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.

PRIVATE MEMBER'S BUSINESS

MR. PRESIDENT: The next order is under Pri-
vate Members' Business and stands in the name of
the Honourable Senator Morgan who is not in his place.

MATTERS NOT ON THE ORDER PAPER

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, we would like to have some matters
dealt with today which are not on the Agenda. These
are very important, one dealing with the amendment
to the Solicitors Bill. There are two persons here
whom this will affect who are hoping to take the exam -
ination in May and their applications have to be made
to the Supreme Court. Matters affecting operations
of the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation one Re-
solution is seeking approval for the loan of over $2
million which is absolutely vital for the operation and
running of this body.
Sir, I crave the indulgenceofthe Senate to pro-
ceed with these matters at this stage, andif such in-
dulgence is given, Ishall move the suspension of
Standing Order 6 (6).

MR. PRESIDENT: The Honourable Leader of the
Senate is seeking to deal with the Bill to amend the
Solicitors Act and with a Resolution to provide a sum
of money for the Caribbean Broadcasting Corpora-
tion. If there is no objection......

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President,
this Bill and these Resolutions were only placed on the
table this afternoon, and in dealing with the business
of this Chamber this afternoon, one didn't have time
enough to study them carefully. The one for $2
million needs careful study and I do not think that in
such a short time we should be asked to discuss this
matter this afternoon.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P.M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, the Senator is well aware that at last
week's meeting of the Senate a paper was laid and I
gave instructions to the Clerk that the accounts should
be made available to the Senators, and I took it upon
myself to inform a number of Senators that at this
time we would be hoping if it were passed in the
Other Place during their sitting of this week, we would
deal with it this week. I do not think that he should
dwell on the fact that it was not issued in the number
of days stipulated. I urge members very strongly to
consider this when they are being called upon to
decide that it should be dealt with today.
The Solicitors Bill. It was placed before the pro-
fessional body, it was placed before the law society,
the Governing body to the Association for the Soli-
citors, and they are both in complete agreement. I
have stated the reason why I want it done today,
because of the fact that certain applications have to
be made to the Supreme Court for two persons who
want to take the examination in May. If permission is
granted I shall have a lot to say about ......











SENATOR N. A. BARROW: I take it, Sir, that the
Standing Orders make provision for notice to be given,
for a good reason to be given to members who ought
to have adequate time to study the things before us.
Unless there is some matter or emergency, I am un-
able to understand why this CBC matter should be
brought today and dealt with today. I cannot understand
why they held it back this long and then bring it along
this afternoon and say that we must have it done today.

The other matter is a lawyer's bill,butIwould
have preferred to have time to study that. I believe
that one can view that in a rather different way to the
one with which one can view the CBC Resolution. To
the best of my knowledge there has been no disagree -
ment with the Bill, and therefore Iamunlikely to be
advised that there is some disagreement here, but
with regards to the CBC matters, I think if Govern-
ment really wanted to get through by the 31st March
they could have brought it before. I am objecting, Sir.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
I would like to state by the way of one final reply to
Senator Barrow that the Statement of Accounts has no -
thing to do with the Resolution before the Chamber to -
day. The Resolution could have come before this
Chamber without even a statement of Accounts being
laid. The fact that the statement of Accounts was in
the possession of the Government for one year, two
years, six months or six weeks is irrelevant because
it was not necessary for the statements of Accounts
to be laid before you. It was only laid so that in deal -
ing with this matter members would have a picture of
the state of affairs, the financial state of affairs of
the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation. It would
help them to arrive at a decision as to whether they
felt that two million dollars more was necessary for
the operation of the corporation.

The statement of Accounts was in the possession
of senators for some days now, and if they had not
studied it, it is not my fault.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: On point of Order.
What was in the possession of senators for some time
time? If he is talking about the Resolution that is not
true.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: Mr. President, I
feel that with an important Resolution of $2 million
such short notice is veryundesirable. I do not feel
that anyone came with the expectation to deal with the
Resolution today. No one is preparedto make any cri-
ticisms one way or the other at the present moment,
and unless for some specific reasonthe Government
wants to push it through right away I feel that they
should postpone it. I will be willing to deal with the
Solicitor's Act.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, -As you know the responsibility for
the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation falls under a
minister who is present in this Chamber. Iknow that
I am right In saying that all matters that are dealt
with in the House are circulated to members in this


1 Chamber at the time when the House Papers go out.
Senators have had it in their possession for at least
the same length of time that members of the House
had it in their possession.

Therefore, the question of haste in dealing with
this matter is no excuse. If the ministerwho is res-
ponsibile for it agrees to postpone it we will be pre-
pared to do so.

MR. PRESIDENT: The Leader of the Senate is
asking leave to proceed with a Bill to amend the Soli-
citor's Act. Unless there is any objection, leave will
be granted.

There being no objection, leave was granted.

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER NO. 6(6)

On the motion of Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, Standing Order No. 6(6) was suspended during
consideration of matters not on the Order Paper.

BILL TO AMEND THE SOLICITORS ACT

The President called the next Order A Bill to
amend the Solicitors Act, 1896.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, The purpose of this Bill is to amend
the Solicitors Act so as to permit persons who
qualified with exemption in England from Part 1 of the
qualifying examination to be granted a similar exemp-
tion here and to permit those who are exempted to
proceed immediately to the final examination for
Solicitors taken locally.

Until recently, Sir, the position with Solicitors
has remained the same as it was since1896, the date
of the Solicitors Act. In 1956 some representations
were made and a Bill was passed which amended the
Act and provided that a person who had already satis -
fied the qualifications of our law would be exempted
from serving the full period which was reduced from
five years to three years.

In 1963 the Solicitors Act was further amended to
exempt graduates of certain universities specified in
the provisions of the Act of 1963, to reduce the period
of articles. Among those universities -was the: Uni-
versity of the West Indies.

Sir, such graduates were permitted to sit the in-
termediate examination after one year of clerkship
and the final examination after two years. Before the
amendment the interval between the intermediate and
the final was three years.

In the amendment before us opportunity is being
taken to amend the periods required for persons who
wish to enter articles and who have obtained degrees
in law or who have been members of the Bar in Eng-
land. It is now proposed to provide period of service
under articles for a person who has become disbarred
with a view to becoming a solicitor.













Barristers of five years standing whose employ-'
ment is that of a non-practising barrister for five
years will be exempt from articles. Barristers of less
than five years standing will be required to serve
clerkship for a period of 18 months. Other persons
who hold degrees in law will be required to serve a
clerkship of two years and persons who hold a degree
other than in law, and who have been wholly exempted
from Part 1 of the qualifying examination will serve a
clerkship of three years. Other persons will continue
to serve the clerkship period of five years.

Opportunity is also being taken, Mr, President, to
enable persons who have passed Part 1 or have been
exempted from Part1 of the examination to immedi-
ately proceed to take the final of that examination.
There was an interval of three years before the final
examination could be taken.

This is what this Bill is all about, Sir, and I want
to state that it is intended, in fact now being drafted is
a comprehensive Solicitors Bill. This will take some
time because it will have to be referred to the various
professional bodies and we will have to come to some
settlement on various issues. .Until such time I think
that the Bill before us provides up to date require-
ments for those persons who want to become
Solicitors.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

-SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, In seconding the motion for the second
reading of the Bill, I would like to assure Senator
Walcott that there is a similar Bill for discipline of
barristers and other matters of complaint. Barristers
will also be dealt with in a Bill which is to come be-
fore Parliament.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -I
am very glad to hear that. What I want to say is that
I could never understand the two-tier system of the
Legal Profession. It has puzzled me howall along the
years you could have one man studying law for four or
five years but who is inferior to the other man who did
it for more. Who is the doctor and who is the nurse?
I could never understand what is the distinction in
learning law between a solicitor and a barrister. I am
wondering if lawyers do not think that it is time for
them to abolish the system, I do not know if barristers
read different law books from the solicitors.

I think that with our rising standards there can
be no justification in maintaining the two-tier system.
Have one system making it easier for everybody.

SENATOR M. A. KING: Mr. President, -Like the
Senator who spoke before me, I cannot see the necees -
ity for retaining for any length of time what can be
called the two-tier system in the Legal Profession.
In my view the time has gone for perpetuating that
system.

I do not know if the Governments of the Caribbean
can get together and work out some system so that no
great stumbling block can be erected for the old


'system of inequality. If this is established, the suc-
ceeding steps for the abolition of the distinction be-
tween members of the Profession will not be too far
off.

The Government should arrive at some standard
system of qualification. The question of the future of
the Profession has been brought before the Bar Asso-
ciation from time to time. I know that difficulties have
been encountered by both branches of the Profession.
I think that we all realise that whatever was the rea-
son for the distinction in the past, it no longer applies.
The sooner that both sides can get together and submit
recommendations for the abolition of the distinction,
the better it will be for both sides of the Profession.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, As a
layman, I have for a long time myself wondered what
was the reason for the distinction.

It seems fairly certain that with the establish-
ment of a Faculty of Law there will be an abolition of
this distinction.

As far as I am aware the proposals are to estab-
lish a Facultyof Law at one campus having two con-
cils, one inthe Eastern and one in the Western Carib-
bean, but the future of the Legal Profession does not
seem to have been dealt with. I wonder if one can as -
sume that when these people are planning the estab-
lishment of the Faculty of Law they are also envis -
aging the future of the Profession. I do not really think
so.


In talking to people trying to find out I get the im -
pression there is not unanimity on this point. While
from all accounts in the Windward and Leeward Islands
it seems to work quite well, in Jamaica there is a
strong prejudice. I would really like to hear quite
frankly whether the Government has any views on this
subject. If so, it should be translated into some sort
of information to interested people.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Pre-
sident, I share the sentiments expressed by Senator
King and Senator Walcott. I think there is no doubt that
the interest of the community would be better served
by fusion. It would certainly mean less cost to the liti-
gant.

What I want to say with respect to the comment
by the Honourable Attorney General that the Govern-
ment intends to bring down legislation dealing with
barristers is that it should be made abundantly clear
that the proposed legislation is not being imposed
from without, but that the barristers themselves got
together in our Association and we practically drafted
the Bill, J We discussed the terms and sent forward our
draft for the perusal of the Learned Attorney General.


I mention this not to take credit for myself and
my fellow barristers for consideringthis type of leg-
islation, but to suggest that otherprofessional bodies
should do likewise. Because we as barristers have sat


~












down and considered proposals for disciplining our-
selves does not mean that we feel that there are any
members in our midst who need to be disciplined or
that there have been any transgressions; but any body
of professional men must maintain certain standards,
and one way is to have rules explicitly drawn up so
that you know what is expected of you. If the Legal
Profession can do this, I see no reason why the
Medical Profession cannot do it. From comments by
Senator Caddie it is abundantly clear that doctors
could turn their attention to this aspect of their
affairs.
The same is true of Journalists, Mr. President.
I am convinced that the intelligent Journalists -I am
sure that there are intelligent journalists in our
midst must be dissatisfied with the standards of
Journalism as exhibited by the Local Press. I feel that
if they can take their own affairs in hand the ordinary
members of the public would perhaps be more
disposed to accept the gratuitous advice from the
Press on how the affairs of the state should be run.
That would be so if Journalists themselves can run
their own affairs with some semblance of order.

Sir, barristers may in this way have set some
sort of example that could be followed by other bodies.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F.G.SMITH: Mr.
President, Barristers in Barbados operate under an
Act that is the shortest in any part of the world. It was
through my suggestion that the barristers discipline
themselves that what Senator Phillips mentioned
came about. Do not let barristers pat themselves on
the back that they suddenly woke up in1968 and sent a
law to me.

I made it clear from the time that I took up the
post of Attorney General that I got complaints from
litigants. My first speech as Attorney General made
it quite clear. Do not let us pat ourselves on the back.
A lot of discipline is needed in the Bar.

I say so as Attorney General even if I have to go
back into private practice and it is spoken against me.


The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.
On the motion of Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.
Clauses 1 to 5 of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.
The question that the passing of the Bill be
reported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported ac -
cordingly.
On the motion of Senator the Honourable P.M.
Greaves, seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite,
the Bill was read a third time and passed.


LEAVE TO DEAL WITH RESOLUTION FOR C.B.C.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, I am seeking to recommit a matter
on which I yeilded only a few minutes ago. I am now
seeking leave to deal with the Resolution to approve
the loan to the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation.
Not so long ago I statedthat if members were pre-
pared I would adjourn discussion of this matteruntil
Tuesday; but Tuesday runs over into anotheryearas
far as the finances of this country are concerned, and
this is a supplementary Resolution for the current
year's Estimates.

That being so, Mr. President, I can only appeal to
Senators. It is a matter of choice. Would rather do it
this evening or I will adjourn the Senate until some
time tomorrow to deal with this matter. I am there-
fore seeking leave to deal with this and another matter
both of which hinge on the other.

Mr. PRESIDENT: The Leader of the Senate is
asking leave to deal with these two matters. I think
chat it is quite correct that these supplementary Re-
solutions must be passed before the endof March. If
there is no objection leave will be granted.

There being no objection leave was granted.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President....
Mr. PRESIDENT: I have already given my ruling.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE LOAN TO CARIB-
BEAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

The President called the nextOrder A Resolu-
tion to approve the loan by Government to the Carib-
bean Broadcasting Corporation of the sum of
$2,100,000 to be borrowed from the Bank of Nova
Scotia.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L.E.SANDIFORD:
Mr. President, the purpose of this Resolution is to
seek approval for the sum of $2,100,000 to be borrow-
ed from the Bank of Nova Scotia and loaned to the
Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation. The terms of
the proposed loan it is overaperiod of ten years,
the rate of interest is to be the prime lending rate,
repayments of the loan are to be by quarterly instal-
ments with effect from the 31st March, 1970.

Mr. President, when CBC was set up in
December, 1963 the intention was that this country
should be provided with a radio broadcasting system
to supplement the facilities forbroadcasting which
were then existing in the country. The radio station
began operations in December 1963, and I think one
year later the television service became operational.
Since that time the Caribbean Broadcasting Corpora-
tion has established itself in the minds and the con-
sciences of the people of this country as an important
public institution, providing foreducation, entertain-
ment and information.


L


-1












The Corporation was charged with the functions.
of providing services in the field of broadcasting of
high quality, both in terms of transmission and in
terms of the matter to be transmitted. In particular,
the Corporation was.empowered to erect, maintain;
and operate broadcasting, transmitting, relay and re-
ceiving stations and to provide and equip studios and
to make arrangements for the distribution of
programmes broadcast by the Corporation andto re-
ceive programmes to be broadcast by the Corporation,
and to do such things as are necessary or expedient for
the purpose of running such a Corporation.

Mr. President, I have indicated that since these
two services have been operational they have become
an integral part of the public life of this community,
as has been attested by the popularity of a number of
programmes which come over both radio and televi-
sion services, so much so that this Government and I
am certain no other Government will even contem-
plate the closure of these two services, andit is pre-
cisely in order to see that these two services continue
to provide the services which the people of this coun-
try expect as part of their normal course of living in
the country that this Resolution is before this Hon-
ourable Chamber. The financial position of the Cor-
poration at the present moment is not as rosy as the
Government and the Corporation would have wished,
and it is precisely because of this, because of the need
for additional capital in order to provide much needed
funds for this Corporation to carry out the important
functions which have been assignedto itthatthe sum
of $2,100,000 is being sought. Towards the endof 1966
it became obvious that the liquidated position of the
Corporation had deteriorated to such an extent that a
revision of its financial structure was necessary. As
a result, the consultants of the Corporation, Messrs.
Thomson Television International Ltd. carried out an
investigation of the Corporation's financial position
and submitted their report. The report showed that at
the 31st December, 1966 CBC had a working capital
deficiency of $597,000 and that an additional $326,000
was required for it to be refinanced during 1967, mak-
ing a total of $923,000whichwas required if the Cor-
poration was to remain solvent.

The fixed capital requirements of the Corpora-
tion have been provided by longterm loans to the am-
ount of $1,150,000 made by the Bank of Nova Scotia and
guaranteed by the Government. The Corporation has
so far been unable to meet any of the repayments of
the principal sum which have been falling due since
November, 1966. This state of affairs is due largely to
the fact that all the capital of the Corporation has been
borrowed and this has imposed a heavy interest bur-
den on the Corporation from the commencement of op-
eration. In 1965 Bank interest charges amounted to
$68,492 and in 1966 $98,741.

Mr. President, the report by the consultants in-
dicated that the outlook forthe Corporation is favour-
able and they therefore recommended that the whole
financial structure of the operations of CBC shouldbe
refinanced, and it is in carrying out this proposal that


this Resolution is now before this Honourable
Chamber. .Mr. President, I beg to move that the Re-
solution be approved.

SENATOR H. ODESSA GITTENS: I begto second
that.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, the
Minister has told us that the present financial state
of CBC is due to the fact that it was financed entirely
from loan capital and that it had very high interest
payments to meet. I believe it is true to say that when
the Corporation was established the people establish-
ing it knew that they were using loan capital and they
should have taken into consideration the fact that they
had high interest charges to meet. I am therefore un-
able to accept that as a reasonable explanation of the
failure of the Corporation to be in abetter financial
state of health. I go further; initially when CBC was
set up itwas a consortium whichnot only included the
two present members, but also the National Broad-
casting Corporation of the United States of America.
I remember very well when NBC decided to pull out
of the consortium the President or the Chairmanwent
to the trouble to fly to Barbados to put new proposals,
and as far as I know, these proposals were not even
seriously considered.


There was a proposal at the time that CBC could
have gone into television by using supplied program-
mes at $147,000 and I believe that this is why NBC
withdrew and I think also atthattime Thomson told
them to go to the Pine and put the new studios there
for the same money. What Iwouldlike to know is whe-
ther the new building atthe Pine cost only $147,000.
It is my information that it cost rather more than that,
and I believe itis forthat kindof reason that CBC has
been unable to keep up in any properfinancial health.
There is one other thing, I believe it is also true to
say that during the first year that the Corporation ex-
ceeded its expectations in advertising revenue.

It is my view that the whole arrangementwith the
Thomson people is one that only the Thomson people
will benefit, and I think that having made a mistake, it
is time for the Government to get rid of Thomson and
set the business off on a different footing. I have been
looking through this report this afternoon, and I
notice how many people went abroad on training cour-
ses, and I notice who sponsored the training courses
and I have not seen the Thomson Group sponsoring
any of the courses. What they have done is to run the
Corporation in arrears. I am not satisfied person-
ally that Thomson is the best management, and I
am less satisfied that the station is doing the job
that the public excepts it to do.
I think the public very oftenhas to endure certain
programmes rather than enjoy them. If we are at home
during the day and hear Mr. Brewster's programme
we cannot be particularly impressed by it; Clever
Trevor and all sorts of nonsense which I really do not
think a Government Broadcasting Station owned by the
people of this country should aim at. I think the


1












.standards are altogether too low. There are people.
who read news items on that station, I think the least
said about them the better. I remember when the
Minister used to quote samples of the news that they
broadcast on the radio and they never amounted to
anything.


This is a broadcasting service that has been in
existence since December 1963 and we still cannot
have any real discussion programmes. We still can-
not have comments, commentaries. I think that if a
station is going to perform an educational and inform-
ative function, then it shouldbe having very active lo-
cal programmes. I think what that station needs more
than anything else is a complete over-haul and some-
body with a sense of purpose and a sense of direction.
We are not going to have a first-class station unless
we stop having so much Ministerial interference. I do
not think, for instance, it is the business of a Minister
whether or not the stationintends to televise a march
which the Barbados Labour Party was having; I think
that should be left for the station. And I do not think it
is the business of the Minister if the Corporation
wants to hold a cocktail party; I. believe that we can
have less political direction and then we willhave a
radio station we can boast about. CBC is not designed
to be the political organ for the Democratic Labour
Party, as far as I know itwas designed to be a broad-
casting corporation serving the interest of the country
at large. It is not doing that. Think that before we are
asked to spend more money for CBC the Minister
ought to be able to assure us that he is going to stop
interfering, and that he has plans forthe reorganisa-
tion of the service, andthathe andhis colleagues are
going to make an arrangement where it is not Thomson
who makes the money, and that if they come to ask the
Legislature for any money for CBC theywillbe ask-
ing for money for a station that is giving first-class
service.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
think it was when CBC was formed the Honourable
Senator was Personal Assistant to the Prime Minis-
ter and he was chief cook and bottle washer; he
selected the staff, he was right in it on the ground
floor.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: On a point of order,
it is not true to say that I selected the staff; it is true
to say that I advised on the selection of certain
persons.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G.SMITH: It is
no wonder that we are now reaching a stage when we
have to borrow money. A Senator who from the
very beginning had something to do with the selection
of staff andgetsup here and criticises it; and I would
say publicly one of the reasons why he broke with this
Government is that he wanted to be General
Manager.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: It is most untrue. The
Honourable and learned Attorney General might be
annoyed because he wanted to be Director of Public


Prosecutions and did not getthe job, butit is not true
at any time to say that I wanted to be General
Manager.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Again I repeat thathe broke with this Government be-
cause he did not get the post.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: It is not true. He is
deliberately repeating statements which are not true.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I do
not want to repeat it, but Iwant the public to know that
your main contention against CBC, against the Minis-
ter of Education, is because he is not Minister of Edu-
cation, which you are not andneverwouldbe in this
Democratic Labour Party. Let us get the record
straight. I have commented on public morality, how
can a Senator who admits in this public Chamber that
he was responsible for selecting certain people in this
Corporation now criticise the Corporation to this ex-
tent because of its failure. He must be responsible for
some of it.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: On a point of explana-
tion, is the Honourable Attorney General saying that
once you have had any connection with anything you
are not competent to make any comment about it?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
am not saying he not competent, but it shows his
competence in selecting people who make a Corpora-
tion lose money. I think he knows that I have come
back to this country at a sacrifice; he knows I have
given up my pension and everything and leftJamaica
without a pension to come back and serve my country.
The Honourable Senator should be the last person to
talk like this, and he will live to regret it; you can
fool some of the people some of the time, but you can-
not fool all the people all the time.

The question that the Resolution be approved was
put to the Senate and agreed to.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CAPITAL) No. 67


The President called the next Order- A Resolu-
tion to place the sum of $2,100,000 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates, 1967-68


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L.E.SANDIFORD:
Mr. President, The Resolution just concurred in and
the one now before the Senate are kindred Resolutions.
The purpose of this one is to supplement the Estimat-
es 1967-68, Part 2, Capital, and the same reasons
which I gave and the statements which I made in con-
nection with the previous Resolution apply to this.



I would, however, like to say by way of rebuttal
that there is no question of political interference in
the operations of C. B.C. That is entirely unwarranted











We are at a stage where we are now discussing the
the provision of $2.1 million to place at the disposal
of this Corporation. In December last the corporation
proposed to hold a cocktail partyfor clients of the
corporation. That was new and unsualexpenditure at
a time whenthe whole state of the finances of the cor-
poration had been drawn to my attention and the atten-
tion of the Government as beingvery bad indeed. It is
because of that state of the finances thatwe are seek-
ing more money for the corporation.

Sir, it was on the ground that there should be no
unusual expenditure at the time when the state of the
finances were shaky that Itookthe decision, and I am
not afraid to say it. I amgivengeneral powers of di-
rection where the corporation is concerned. I am not
concerned with the day to day administration of the
corporation.
I stated that the party should not be proceeded
with, and that if the goodwill of the clients was to be
gained, it could best be gained through an improved
service, the kind that Senator Barrow is now asking
for. I would like to get the record straight and reject
categorically the suggestion by innuendo that there is
any persona' interference.

As regards the other type of innuendo that news-
casts are distorted because, says Senator Barrow, he
knows the political persuasion of the people who work
at C. B. C.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: On point of order.
I said that I was not accusing the News staff. I said
that it was biased programming.




SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L.E.SANDIFORD:
I want to make it abundantly clear that there is no in-
ference with the news by the Ministers of Government,
and by the Minister responsible for C. B. C. I do not
know who else interfers. There is no interference with
the newscasting or general programming.

I think, Sir, that that was the main point made by
Senator Barrow. I can get the information about the
cost of the new building at the Pine and let him have
it at some future date.


As to the question of standards of presentation on
C. B. C. in this country we are all concerned with
raising our standards, and it is not only in the news-
casts and telecasts which come from that station, but
in some of our newspapers. In the columns of the
Sunday newspapers, we find areas inwhich there is
room for improvement.



I hope that you will agree with me that we are in-
terested in raising standards, whether it is in the field
of broadcasting or in the fieldofJournalism. I would
say that if those who have been fortunate in having
some advantage over other members of the com-
munity, instead of standing onthe sidelines and swip-
ing, if they would make constructive efforts to see that
standards are improved, I think that the whole tone of
the life of this community would be improved.




I would seriously urge that those who see ways
and means by which improvements can come about, it
is in the interest of the community that they should
bring these matters to the attention of those in author-
ity or those responsible so that remedial measures
can be taken: but this type of side swiping is some-
thing destructive. We want more constructive efforts
in this community.



I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator H.Odessa Gittens seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senateand agreed o.






ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable P M.
Greaves seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith the Senate adjourned at 6.10 p.m. .sine die.





Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 35
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 46 dated 9th June, 1969


S.I. 1969 No. 90

The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963 (1963-31)

DECLARATION OF APPROVED ENTERPRISE IUS-
BANDS' WROUGHT IRON AND ENGINEERING
WORKS LTD,.) (WROUGHT IRON FURNITURE,
GATES AND OTHER WROUGHT IRON
ATTACHMENTS TO BUILDINGS)
(AMENDMENT) ORDER, 1969
The Mirrister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 4(5) of the Industrial Incentives Act,
1963 hereby makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Declaration of
Approved Enterprise (Husbands' Wrought Iron and
Engineering Works Ltd.) (Wrought Iron Furniture,
Gates and Other Wrought Iron Attachments to Build-
ings) (Amendment) Order, 1969.

2. Paragraph 2 of the Declaration of Approved
Enterprise (Husbands' Wrought Iron and Engineering
Works Ltd.) (Wrought Iron Furniture, Gates and Other
Wrought Iron Attachments to Buildings) Order, 1967 L.N. 11 of
is hereby amended by deleting the words "Tweedside 1967'
Road" appearing in the fifth line thereof and substi-
tuting therefore the words "The Grazettes Industrial
Estate".

3. The factory in respect of which the benefits
of Part IV of the Act may be enjoyed after the com-
mencement of this Order shall be the factory of the
approved enterprise situated at the Grazettes Indus-
trial Estate in the parish of Saint Michael.
Made by the Minister this 31st day of May, 1969.

ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


(M.P. 701 'T 'kR\







2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 91
The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963 (1963-31)

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES (APPROVED PRO-
DUCTS) (W. C. CISTERNS OF PLASTIC OR OTHER
MATERIAL) ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
upon him by section 3 of the Industrial Incentives
Act, 1963, hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Industrial
Incentives (Approved Products) (W.C. Cisterns of
Plastic or Other Material) Order, 1969.
2. The following products of manufacture are
hereby declared to be approved products for the
purposes of the Industrial Incentives Act, 1963:-

W.C. Cisterns of plastic or other material.

Made by the Minister this 3rd day of June, 1969.

ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


(M.P. 7018/66/165)







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


S.I. 1969 No. 92
The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963 (1963-31)

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES (APPROVED PRO-
DUCTS) (METAL COOKING WARE, METAL BAKING
WARE, METAL PRESSURE COOKERS AND
METAL GIFT WARE) ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 3 of the Industrial Incentives Act,
1963, hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Industrial
Incentives (Approved Products) (Metal Cooking Ware,
Metal Baking Ware, Metal Pressure Cookers and Metal
Gift Ware) Order, 1969.
2. The following products of manufacture are
hereby declared to be approved products for the pur-
poses of the Industrial Incentives Act, 1963:-
Metal cooking ware, metal baking ware, metal
pressure cookers, metal gift ware.
Made by the Minister this 3rd day of June, 1969.
ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


(M.P. 7018/66/175)







4 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 93
The Industrial Incentives Act, 1963 (1963-31)

TIE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES (APPROVED PRO-
DUCTS) (FLOIRESCENT LIGHT FIXTURES,
ELECTRICAL TRACT POWER DISTRIBUTION
SYSTEMS, ELECTRICAL LIGHTING
FITTINGS) ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
upon him by section 3 of the Industrial Incentives Act,
1963, hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Industrial
Incentives (Approved Products) (Flourescent Light
Fixtures,Electrical Tract Power Distribution Systems,
Electrical Lighting Fittings) Order, 1969.
2. The following products of manufacture are
hereby declared to be approved products for the pur-
poses of the Industrial Incentives Act, 1963:-
Flourescent light fixtures, Electrical tract
power distribution systems, Electrical lighting
fittings.
Made by the Minister this 3rd day of June, 1969.

EEROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


M.P. 7018/66/169)




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