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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
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General Note: Caption title.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 445
        Page 446
        Page 447
        Page 448
        Page 449
        Page 450
        Page 451
        Page 452
        Page 453
        Page 454
        Page 455
        Page 456
        Page 457
        Page 458
        Page 459
        Page 460
        Page 461
        Page 462
    Supplement: House of assembly debates for 13th August, 1968
        Page A 1982
        Page A 1983
        Page A 1984
        Page A 1985
        Page A 1986
        Page A 1987
        Page A 1988
        Page A 1989
        Page A 1990
        Page A 1991
        Page A 1992
        Page A 1993
        Page A 1994
        Page A 1995
        Page A 1996
        Page A 1997
        Page A 1998
        Page A 1999
        Page A 2000
        Page A 2001
        Page A 2002
        Page A 2003
        Page A 2004
        Page A 2005
        Page A 2006
        Page A 2007
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 29; S.I. 76: The motor vehicles and road traffic (amendment) regulations, 1969
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 29; S.I. 77: The hotel aids (Bowden-on-sea Apartments) notice, 1969
        Page B 3
Full Text












VOL. CIV.


effi #al


A&otk


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 15TH MAY, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices


Acting Appointments:
Sheila Belgrave as Deputy Librarian, Public
Library......................................
Everton H. Bowen as Administrative Assistant,
Ministry of Communications and Works.....
C. Drakes as Berthing Master, Port Dep't.....
R. D. S. Goodridge as Senior Personnel Officer,
Ministry of Communications and Works......
C. Lewis as Senior Berthing Master, Port Dep't
Mrs. M. I. Stuart as Senior Executive Officer,
Queen Elizabeth Hospital......................
Industrial Incentives:
Re Corrugated aluminium galvanised steel coil
Re corrugated galvanized sheets, etc...........
In the Supreme Court:


445

445
446

445
446

445

447
447


Edwards vs. Chase; Edwards vs. Gittens....... 449, 448
Goodridge vs. Bradshaw; Harewood vs. Ifill.... 450, 451
Hewitt vs. Jones; Jules vs. Holder & Holder... 451, 449
Kirton vs. Harrison; Trotman vs. Trotman....... 448, 452
Walcott vs. Walcott.................................... 452
Probate Advertisements dated 9th May, 1969............ 462
Resignations:
Vernon D. Deane and Andrea E. Hinds, Clerical
Officers.............................................. 446
Temporary Appointment:
Mr. D. H. Asgill as a member of the National
Insurance Board.................................. 446
Trade Marks: "Ariel"; "Century"; "Doric", etc..... 453-459
Vacant Posts in the Ministry of Health and Community
Development ................................************ 460


House of Assembly Debates for 13th August, 1968.

Legal Supplement

S.I. 1969 No. 76: The Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic
(Amendment) Regulations, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 77: The Hotel Aids (B( ln rtments)
Notice, 1969. 4 /


NOTICE NO. 327

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Acting Appointments

Mrs. M. I. Stuart, Training Officer, has
been appointed to act as Senior Executive Of-


ficer, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, with effect


from 1st January to 31st March, 1969.

(M.P. 443/63 Vol IV)

Miss Sheila Belgrave, Senior Assistant
Librarian, has been appointed to act as
Deputy Librarian, Public Library, with effect
from 8th to 30th April, 1969.

(M.P, 480/11)

R. D. S. Goodridge, Administrative As-
sistant, has been appointed to act as Senior
Personnel Officer, Ministry of Communica-
tions and Works, with effect from 1st to 30th
April, 1969.

Everton H. Bowen, Assistant Accountant,
has been appointed to act as Administrative
Assistant, Ministry of Communications and
Works, with effect from 1st to 30th April,
1969.

(M.P. 1515/39/2 -


NO. 39


(I #







OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 15, 1969


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Acting Appointments

C. Lewis, Berthing Master, PortDepart-
ment, acted as Senior Berthing Master with
effect from 18th February, 1969 to 24th
March, 1969.

(M.P. 4373/27/2 Vol. II)

C. Drakes, Mate, Port Department, acted
as Berthing Master, with effect from 28th
February, 1969 to 24th March, 1969.

(M.P. 4373/27/2 Vol. II)



Resignations

Miss Andrea E. Hinds, Clerical Officer,
Labour Department, has resigned from the
Public Service, with effect from 14th April,
1969.

(M.P. P. 9063)

Vernon D. Deane, Clerical Officer, Es-
tablishments Division, Prime Minister's Of-
fice, resigned from the -Public Service with
effect from 3rd May, 1969.


(M.P. P. 4972)


Temporary Appointment


In exercise of the powers conferred on
him by Section 3 Subsection (3) of the National
Insurance and Social Security Act, 1966, as
amended by the Existing Laws Amendment
Order No. 2, 1967, the Minister has appointed
Mr. D. H. Asgill as a member of the National
Insurance Board establishment in accordance
with the provisions of the said National In-
surance and Social Security Act, 1966 to act
temporarily in the place of Mr. L. V. H.
Lewis until 31st July, 1969.

(M.P. NIS. 18/2)



Dismissal

Thelma D. Stuart, Teacher, St. Leonard's
Girls' School, has been dismissed from the
Public Service with effect from 8th January,
1968.

(M. P. P. 8354)

Fireman No. 130 F. Byer has been dis-
missed from the Barbados Fire Service with
effect from 9th January, 1969.

(M. P. P. 8012)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969








iy 15, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


O4TICE NO. 328


THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963


(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purposes of the abovementioned Act,
the following products should be an approved
product and whether the following company
should be an approved enterprise in respect
of the relevant product.


Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of the product who objects to
its being declared an approved product or the
company being declared an approved enter-
prise for the purposes of the Industrial Incen-
tives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Development Board, to reach
them on or before Monday, May 19th, 1969, a
statement in writing setting forth the grounds
of his objection.


Company:
B'dos Metal
Industries
Ltd.


Relevant Product:
(1) Corrugated
sheets from
aluminum &
galvanized
steel coil.


NOTICE NO. 329


THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963

(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purposes of the abovementioned Act,
the following products should be approved
products and whether the following compan-
ies should be approved enterprises in respect
of the relevant proudcts.

Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of these products who objects
to their being declared approved products or
the companies being declared approved enter-
prises for the purposes of the Industrial In-
centives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana-
ger, Barbados Development Board, to reach
them on or before Friday, May 16th, 1969 a *
statement in writing setting forth the grounds
of his objection.


Company:
1. Mora's B'dos
Metal Works
Ltd.




2. Ready-Mix Limitec


Relevant Products:
(a) Corrugated
galvanized
sheets.
(b) Corrugated
aluminium
sheets.
d (a) Ready-Mix
Concrete
(b) Monolithic
Concrete
Floors.


ty 15, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







448 OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 15, I


NOTICE NO. 330


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 131 of 1969

LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS: Plaintiff

HUGH THEOPHILUS GITTENS: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day.
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at near Rices in the
parish of Saint Philip and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement Two Roods or
thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands of
the estate of S. Fields deceased on lands of
H. Gittens on lands of C. McCollin and on the
Public Road or however else the same may
abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,500.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 331


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High C curt

No. 137 of 1969

DACOSTA KIRTON: Plaintiff

DAISY HARRISON: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at The Ivy in the par-
ish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid con-
taining by admeasurement 3,015 square feet
or thereabouts ABUTTING AND BOUNDING
on two sides on lands of R. Walters and on the
other two sides on the Public Road or how-
ever else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $500.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.







May 15, 1969


NOTICE NO. 332



IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE


High Caurt


No. 130 of 1969

LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS: Plaintiff

EDWARD AUGUSTUS CHASE: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
,or parcel of land situate at Upper Mount
Standfast in the parish of Saint James and Is-
land aforesaid containing by admeasurement
One Rood Thirty nine and nine tenths perches
or thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands
now or late of T. Holder on lands now or late
of Belfield Skinner on lands now or late of
Theressa Williams on a road formerly a road
in common but now a Public Road or however
else the same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,500.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 333

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No, 142 of 1969

ASQUITH PHILIP ALPHEGE JULES:
Plaintiff

FREDERICK HOLDER and ENID HOLDER:
Defendants

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of
Bridgecot Plantation) situate in the parish of
Saint George in this Island containing by ad-
measurement Two Roods or thereabouts
Abutting and bounding on lands now or late of
John H. Arthur on lands of Grove's Plantation
on lands formerly of W. H. Elcock but now of
one Selina Bailey and one Bell and on a road in
common or however else the same may abut
and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $2,000.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE 449








I


NOTICE NO. 334


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 138 of 1969.

GRETA PALMYRA GOODRIDGE: Plaintiff

MARY VIOLA BRADSHAW: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT cer-
tainpiece orparcel of land situate at Carter's
Gap in the parish of Christ Church in this
Island containing by estimation One Rood or
thereabouts be the same more or less Abutt-
ing and Bounding on lands of the estate of
Felix Nurse deceased and Egbert Lovell on
lands of the estate of James Simpson de-
ceased on lands of the estate of Robert Ashby
deceased and on lands of Egbert Lovell To-
gether with the Chattel dwellinghouse thereon
and all other buildings and erections on the said
land erected and built standing and being with
the appurtenances SECONDLY ALL THAT cer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at
Carter's Gap in the Parish of Christ Church
in this Island containing by admeasurement
One Rood twenty seven perches or thereabouts


(inclusive of eleven perches in the area of
three roads hereinafter mentioned) Abutting
and Bounding towards the North on lands for-
merly of David Atkins but now of Albert
Lovell towards the East on the Public Road
called Carter's Gap and towards the South on
the said Public Road called Carter's Gap
aforesaid and towards the West on a Jury
Road or however else the same may abut and
bound together with the Messuage or dwell-
inghouse thereon and all other buildings and
erections on the said land erected and built
standing and being with the appurtenances, and
THIRDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel
of land situate at Enterprise in the Parish of
Christ Churchin this Island containing by ad-
measurement Two Roods nine Perches or
thereabouts (inclusive of nine perches in the
area of a roadway nine feet wide hereinafter
mentioned) Abutting and Bounding towards

the South on lands of Joseph Hamlyn
onlands ofJ. Lovell, G. Bourne, and L. Keizer
towards the South on lands of S. Ashby towards
the North on lands of J. Hamlyn and on a road
or however else the same may abut and bound.


VALUE OF PROPERTIES: $ 800.00
$10,000.00
$1,500.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


May 15, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







May 15, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 335

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 147 of 1969

KENNETH ANTHONY HAREWOOD:
Plaintiff

GWENDOLYN IFILL: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Jackson in the
parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement Five thousand
eight hundred and fifty square feet or there-
abouts Abutting and Bounding on lands now or
late of Adinah Brathwaite on lands now or late
of R. C. Tull on lands now or late of
Beatrice Seale on lands now or late of one
Husbands and on the public road or however
else the same may abut and-bound Together
with the chattel dwellinghouse thereon and all
and singular other the buildings and erections
on the said land erected and built standing and
being with the appurtenances.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $2,000.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 336

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 143 of 1969

MITCHINSON EDWARD SYLVESTER
HEWITT: Plaintiff

JOSEPH MILTON JONES: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Marley Vale in the
parish of Saint Philip and Island aforesaid
formerly supposed to contain One rood
thirty-seven perches but found by survey
made on the 31st day of October, 1968 to con-
tain One rood thirty-seven point two perches
Abutting and bounding on lands formerly of
Angelina King et al but now of W. P. King on
lands now or late of L. Harewood on lands
formerly of Mrs. A. Barnett but now of
C. Walker on lands formerly of Mary Jordan
but now of G. D. Maloney and on a road six
feet wide or however else the same may abut
and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $2,000.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969







OFICA GAET ay1,16


NOTICE NO. 337

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court


No. 148 of 1969

FITZ WILLOUGHBY WALCOTT: Plaintiff

SEIFERT WALCOTT:, Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Chapel Gap No. 2,
Paynes Bay in the parish of Saint James in
this Island containing by admeasurement 38
perches or thereabouts (in which area
are included 6 perches in the water-
course and 1 perch in the footpath and
public road hereinafter mentioned) BUTTING
AND BOUNDING towards the West on lands of
Helena Alleyne deceased towards the North
on other portions of the said watercourse to-
wards the East on lands of one Seale and to-
wards the South on the said footpath and on the
said public road called Chapel Gap No. 2 or
however else the same may abut and bound
Together with the dwellinghouse and all and
singular other the erections and buildings
thereon erected and built standing and being
with the appurtenaces.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $6,000.00

Dated this 15th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 338

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 135 of 1969

GLADSTONE TROTMAN: Plaintiff

HYACINTH TROTMAN: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 3rd day
of July 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Rogers Road, The
Ivy, in the parish of Saint Michael and Island
abovesaid, containing by admeasurement
3,200 square feet or thereabouts (made upof
two areas of 1,610 square feet and 1,590
square feet) abutting and bounding as a whole
on lands of John Forde, of G. Walkes, on
Second Avenue, The Ivy, on lands of C. Moore,
of the said G. Walkes, and on the public road
or however else the same may abut and bound
with the appurtenances. ALL THAT certain
piece or parcel of Jand also situate at Rogers
Road, The Ivy, in the parish of Saint Michael
and Island aforesaid, containing by admeas-
urement 1,600 square feet or thereabouts
abutting and bounding on lands of H. Trotman
on two sides on lands of C. Moore, on lands
of Leon Haynes, and on the public road or
however else the same may abut and bound
together with the appurtenances.
VALUE OF PROPERTIES: $1,000.00
$ 500.00
Dated this 15th day of April 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969







May 15, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 304 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE

SOLAGOL

That Carter-Wallace, Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
trade mark in Part "A" in Registrar in re-
spect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parations and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 305 (third publication)
TAKE NOTICE

OVOGOL

That .Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organised and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of medical and pharmaceutical prepa-
rations and substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from
the 8th day of May 1969 unless some person


shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such re-
gistration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 306 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE


That Richardson-Merrell S.A. de C.V. a
corporation organised and existing under the
laws of Mexico whose trade or business ad-
dress is San Andres Atoto No. 326 Naucalpan
de Juarez, Mexico, trading as Manufacturers,
and Merchants, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Foods, beverages; ingredients
for preparing nutritional supplements and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969







44 OI LA T


NOTICE NO. 307 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE

ARIEL

That the Procter & Gamble Company, a
corporation of the State of Ohio, United
States of America, whose trade or business
address is Ohio, United States of America,
has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
of soaps, detergents and other cleaningpre-
parations for laundry and household use, and
bleaching preparations and other substances
for laundry use, and will be entitled to regis-
ter the same after one month from the 8th
day of May 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 308 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE


CENTURY

That Emco Limited a corporation or-
ganized under the laws of the Province of
Ontario, Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is Dundas Street, London, Ontario,
Canada has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of valves for controlling fluid flow and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless


some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 309 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE










That Musson Jamaica Ltd., a Company
incorporated in Jamaica, West Indies,whose
trade or business address is 168 Spanish
Town Road in the Parish of Saint Andrew,
Jamaica, West Indies has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Registrar in respect of meat, fish, poultry and
and game; meat extracts; preserved; dried
and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies,
jams; eggs milk and other dairy products;
edible oils and fats; preserves; pickles,. and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


454


UaS


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969







May 5, 969OFFCIA GAETT


NOTICE NO. 310 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE

PALAFER

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the Laws
of Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
prepatations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 311 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE

HI- PALS

That Wellco Shoe (Jamaica) Limited a
Company incorporated under the laws of
Jamaica, whose trade or business address
is P. O. Box 21 Mona Post Office (Kingston 7)
St. Andrew, Jamaica has applied for the reg-
istration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of footwear and will be
entitled to register the same after one month
from the 8th day of May 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposition of


such registration. The Trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 312 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE


That Rothmans of Pall Mall Limited, a
company organised and existing under the
laws of Liechtenstein, whose trade or busi-
ness address is Staedtle, 380, Vaduz,
Liechtenstein, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Tobacco, Cigarettes and cigars,
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 8th day of May 1969 un-
less some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate at me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A, ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


May 15, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







OFICA GAET Ma 5.16


NOTICE NO. 313 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE

DORIC

That Emco Limited a corporation or-
ganized under the laws of the Province of
Ontario, Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is Dundas Street, London, Ontario,
Canada has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of plumbing fixtures, namely, lavatory
faucets, bath and shower fittings, deck faucets
and parts therefore, and will be entitled to re-
gister the same after one month from the 8th
day of May 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 314 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE


COLDEX


That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the laws
of Canada whose trade or business address
is 115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A' of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register


the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 315 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE




Sunjet


That British West Indian Airways Lim-
ited, a Company registered in Trinidad &
Tobago, whose trade or business address is
Kent House, Long Circular Road, Maraval,
Trinidad, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Registerin
respect of Markings on all aircraft, all ser-
vices, advertising and sales promotional
material and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of May
1969 unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at my of-
fice of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


May 15, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







May15,19Q OFICALGAZTT


NOTICE NO. 316 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE


GASTROL

That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America, whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parations and substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one monthfrom
the 8th day of May 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 317 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE

UNIVOL


That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth
Avenue, New York, New York, United States
of America has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part "A' of Register in


respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parationsand substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one monthfrom the
8th day of May 1969 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
atmy office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 318 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE


DIOVOGOL


That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Registrar
in respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical
preparations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


May 15, 196Q


OFFICIAL GAZETTE







OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 15, 1969


NOTICE NO. 319 (third publication)

TAKE NOTICE


HYDRO AQUIL

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpor-

ation organized and existing under the laws of
Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Point Claire,
Quebec Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of May
1969 unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to my at my of-
fice of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Register of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 320 (third publication)
TAKE NOTICE

SENILEX

That Mowatt and Moore Limited a cor-
poration organized and existing under the
laws of Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is 115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe
Claire, Quebec, Canada has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
register in respect of Pharmaceutical and
veterinary preparations and will be entitled
to register the same after one monthfrom the


8th day of May 1969 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1069

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 321 (third publication)





TAKE NOTICE


VITAVITES

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the laws
of Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to meat
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks..


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 15, 1969








15, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


>TICE NO. 322 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE


CYCLAX


That Cyclax Limited, a British Company,
whose trade or business address is 65, South
Molton Street, London, W.I. England, trading
as Manufacturers and Merchants of Beauty
Preparations, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of Non-medicated toilet preparations;
soaps, perfumes, cosmetics, essential oils,
preparations for the hair, depilatory prepara-
tions; cosmetic powder compacts; Medicated
preparations for the skin and scalp; deodo -
rants; medicated bath preparations; eye lo-
tions, and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 8th day of May 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 323 (third publication)


TAKE NOTICE


AXION


That Colgate Palmolive Limited, a Com-
pany duly incorporated in Canada whose trade
or business address is 64 Colgate Avenue,
Toronto 8, Canada trading as Manufacturers
and Merchants has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Detergents, detergents bars,
laundry soaps, laundry brightener, pre-soak-
ing products, powdered soaps, bleaches li-
quid and powder, and all washing products and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.


Dated this 14th day of April 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


15, 1969







46 0 OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 15



Government Notice



VACANT POSTS IN THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT



(1) NUTRITION OFFICER

(2) HEALTH EDUCATION OFFICER

Salary Scale: $5,580 x 240 7,020 x 300 7,920 x 360 9,000

1. Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the above posts.

2. Qualifications:-

(a) NUTRITION OFFICER
Applicants for this post must possess a B.Sc. in Nutrition (U.K. or the equi-
valent, e.g. Master's Degree from approved American University with
Nutrition as the major subject.

(b) HEALTH EDUCATION OFFICER
Applicants must possess an Honours Degree in Arts or Science and must
either have qualifications in Health Education or be prepared to undergo a
Course of Training.

3. The appointment may be either permanent and pensionable or on contract and is
subject to medical fitness.

4. Application forms (S.C. 21) and full details of the post may be obtained from the
Service Commissions Department, "Flodden" Culloden Road, St. Michael.

5. Application forms should reach the Chief Personnel Officer, Service Commis-
sions Department, "Flodden", Culloden Road, St. Michael not later than 9th June,
1969.

SERVICE COMMISSIONS DEPARTMENT,
2nd, May, 1969.








i~~~~ ~ Ma 15 196 OFICA GAET 461


I


May 15, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


1461


GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Resignation
Erskine Boyce, Junior Laboratory Tech-
nician, Ministry of Health and Community

Development, has resigned from the Public
Service with effect from 20th April, 1969.

(M. P. P. 8788)

Grant of Leave to Senator
Senator Maurice A. King has been grant-
ed leave of absence from his duty as a Senator
during the period 18th April to 31st May, 1969.

(M. P. 0028)

Therapeutic Substance Act, 1949
The following firm has been added to the
list of manufacturing firms approved for the
importation of any drug therapeutic substance
into Barbados:-

Harris Pharmaceuticals,
81, Upper Clapton Road,
London, E. 5,
ENGLAND.
(M.P. 23B2).

NOTICE NO. 325
LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE
(Act 1957 40)
APPLICANT: CHARLES DOLCEY
OCCUPATION: Insurance Salesman
ADDRESS: 1st Ave. Beckles Rd.
PREMISES: Wall building situated at
upper Westbury Road
opposite Kings Funeral
Home.
Dated this 25th day of April 1969.

Signed: CHARLES DOLCEY.
Applicant.
This Application for a Restaurant Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A' on
Thursday the 15th day of May 1969 at 9
o'clock am.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


Appointments to the Board of Dental
Assessors
Pursuant to the provisions of section 2
of the Dental Registration Act, 1923, as amend-
ed, the following persons have been appointed
to comprise, along with the Chief Medical Of-
ficer, the Board of Dental Assessors for a
period of one year with effect from 1st April,
1969.

Dr. Louis K. Nicholls, D.D.S.
Dr. Trevor E. Talma, D.D.S.
Dr. A. S. Cato, M.B. Ch. B.

(M. P. 26 B 2)

NOTICE NO. 326
THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963

(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purposes of the abovementioned Act,
the following product should be an approved
product and whether the following company
should be an approved enterprise in respect
of the relevant product.

Any person interested in the manufac -
ture or importation of the product who objects
to its being declared an approved product or
the companies being declared an approved en-
terprise for the purposes of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana -
ger, Barbados Development Board, to reach
them on or before Tuesday, 20th May, 1969, a
statement in writing setting forth the grounds
of his objection.

Company Revelant Product:
D. & C Develop- Pre-Fabricated Wood-
ments Ltd. en Houses







462, OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 15, 196



PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-


PROBATE of the Will dated the 23rd day of December, 1965, of ALICE MINVILLE
HOWELL, late of Holyrood, Hastings in the parish of Christ Church in this Island
who died on the 4th day of November, 1968, by LINDSAY ERCELL RYEBURN GILL
and JOSEPH COLERIDGE ARMSTRONG, two of the Executors named in the Will of
the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of ELOISE NORAH YEARWOOD also known
as ELSIE NORAH YEARWOOD late of New York in the United States of America who
died at Elmhurst Hospital, New York on the 22nd day of January, 1968, by WILMA
FORDE, daughter of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Advertise-
ment with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications
have been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 9th day of May, 1969

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


























Government Printing Office.
Government Printing Office.











THE





House of Assembly Debates




(OFFICIAL REPORT)



SECOND SESSION OF 1966- 71


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
Tuesday, 13th August, 1968
Pursuant to the adjournment, the House of As-
sembly met at 12.00 o'clock (noon) today.

PRESENT
His Honour J. E. T. BRANCKER, Q.C., F.Z.S.,
(Speaker); Mr. L. E. SMITH, J.P.; Hon. C. E. TALMA,
(Minister of Health and Community Development); Hon.
J. C. TUDOR, M.A., (Leader of the House); Mr. J. W. CORBIN,
J.P.; Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, (Minister of Trade, Tourism,
Co-operatives and Fisheries); Mr. R. ST. C. WEEKES, J.P.;
Mr. W. R. LOWE, J.P.; Mr. L. A. LYNCH, J.P.; Hon. N. W.
BOXILL, (Minister of Communications and Works); Mr. J. B.
YEARWOOD, J.P., (Chairman of Committees);Sir G.H. ADAMS,
C.M.G., Q.C., B.A., D.C.L.(Hon,), (Leader of the Opposition)
and Mr. W. C. B. HINDS.


Prayers were read.


MINUTES


Mr. SPEAKER: The Minutes of the Meeting of
Tuesday 30th April, 1968, have, I am informed, been
circulated, and unless there is any objection, they
may be confirmed. (After a pause) There being no
objection, I declare those Minutes duly to be con-
firmed.

PAPERS LAID

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the
Hon. and Learned Prime Minister, Minister of
Finance and Minister of External Affairs, I am com-
manded to lay the Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) (No. 4) Order, 1968.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, onbehalfof the
Hon. and Learned Prime Minister, Minister of Finance
and Minister of External Affairs, I beg togive notice
of a Resolution to approve the Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) (No.4) Order, 1968;

Also, A Resolution to place the sum of $6,704 at
the disposal of the Government to supplement the Es-
timates 1968-69, Part 11 Capital, as shown in the
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No.21, whichform
the Schedule to the Resolution.


Mr. HOPPIN and Mr. CRAIG entered the House and took
their seats.

REPLIES LAID

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice that the Oral Reply to Pa.rliamentaryQuestion
No. 194, asked by the hon. junior member for St.
Peter, is ready.

On behalf of the Hon. Minister of Agriculture,
Labour and National Insurance, I beg to give notice
that the Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question No.
202, asked by the hon. senior memberforSt. James,
is ready.

On .behalf of the Hon.Minister of Health and Com -
munity Development, I beg to give notice that the
Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 203, also
asked by the hon. senior member for St. James, is
ready.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice that the Oral Reply to Parliamentary question
No. 42, asked by the hon. senior member for St.
Thomas, is ready.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' NOTICE

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I beg to
give notice of the following Resolution:-

This House having in mind its many dictatorial
acts and its contemptuous treatment of the Opposition
has no confidence in the Government.

QUESTION DEFERRED

Mr. SPEAKER: Question standing in the name of
the hon. and learned senior member for St. Thomas.
(A pause) I am afraidthat the hon. member is not now
in his place.


COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Mr. SPEAKER: The first Orderof the Day stands
in the name of the Hon. Leader of the House:- To
move the House into Committee of Supplyto consider
the grant of sums of money for the service of the
Island.







1983


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I beg to move that Your Hon-
our do now leave the Chair, and the House go into
Committee of Supply.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.


Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair, and the House went into
Committee of Supply, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES 1968-69 No. 20

A Resolution for the sum of $18,448 was called.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, this is a re-
quest for additional Staff for the Office of the High
Commissioner in the United Kingdom. The request
is that urgent approval should be given to the employ-
ment of two additional Clerical Officers to be recruited
in the United Kingdom and be attached to the Non-
Established Staff of the Commission. It appears, Mr.
Chairman, that recently there has been an increased
volume of work in the Passport Division of the Mis-
sion, and this has required re-assigningorassigning
two of the people already employed to that section.
That has caused, quite naturally, an additional dis-
location by assigning people, whose duties ordinarily
lie elsewhere, to do this work. The result has been,
of course, that a large portion of the time of diplo-
matic officers is being spent on routine clerical work.
It seems to us that the reasons given appear to justify
the staff increases as requested, although of course,
the volume of work in connection with the issuing of
passports should not, we think, normally remain at
its high level, but should taper off after the initial
demands have been satisfied.

There is also, in connection with Item 45, a re-
quest for a sum .f money for a Security Officer/Driver
for the Consulate-General in New York. This Officer
has duties other than driving. He has the responsi-
bility for the general security of the offices of the
Consulate-General and of the Permanent Mission to
the United Nations, and he is also responsible, as
hon. members will see from the Addendum to the Re-
solution, for the protection of Barbadian officials and
dignitaries whenever they visit the United States of
America. I beg to move that this Resolution do now
pass.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Chairman, I should
like to ask the Hon. Leader of the House whether the
Government contemplates the issuing of passports to
people who already have passports of another country.
In short,does the Government contemplate the creation
of dual nationality? Does it have in mind the fact that
the work of the Passport Sectionwouldinc:-r:-ase con-
siderably if persons apply for Barbadian nationality
although they may have other nationality, Briftish or
otherwise.
Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Chairman, I have
some familiarity with the problems which this Reso-


lution seeks to meet as, two months ago, I was in
London and I visited the High Commission. I would
like to say at this stage for the record that I was
entertained most hospitably by the High Com-
missioner and by the Assistant High Commissioner,
and I know exactly what the situation is with regard to
the Passport Division of the Barbados High Com-
mission in London. Indeed, I also have been made
aware, I am very glad to say that I was made aware,
without any of the personalities involved being com-
municated to me, that the entire staffing position of
the London High Commission is causing distress to
existing members of the Staff; so that there are two
quite separate problems, Mr. Chairman, which I would
like to deal with today. I hope that the Hon. Leader
of the House, if he is not familiar with them, will be
able to give them his attention.
12.25 p.m.

Now, first of all, the question of passports. The
reason why, in my view, there is this pressure on the
Passport Department of the West Indies High Com-
mission is that there is hostility in the British Home
Office to the idea of registering, although the law in
the United Kingdom provides for it, Black Common-
wealth immigrants as citizens. I say this quite defi-
nitely and advisedly. I have investigated this both with
the Barbados High Commission and with members of
Parliament in the House of Commons. When immi-
grants go to the Home Office to apply for British pass-
ports, I believe I can only say this as belief, because
I have not seen it that there is a directive to the
Passport Officers in the Home Office to direct all
coloured immigrants to the High Commission of the
country from which they originally came. They do
not draw to the attention of the immigrants the fact
that if they had been in Britain for five years they
are entitled to be registered as citizens of the United
Kingdom itself as Metropolitan citizens, and are en-
titled to the issue of a British passport.

I do not see why our High Commission should be
issuing Barbados passports at this rate to all those
Barbadians who are in Britain and are entitled to the
issue of a British passport. The first suggestion I
would make to the Minister is that he gives a firm
and positive instruction to the officers concerned
that before any passport is issued to a Barbadian in
London, the person be asked if he has been in England
for five years, and be referred back to the British
Home Office for the issue of a British passport.

My reason for suggesting it is this: if you were
born in Barbados, you remain a Barbados citizen
whether or iot you have a British passport. Dual na-
tionality I do notwant to presume on the privileges
of the Leader of the House in answering the question
of the hon. member who spoke before me is a great
convenience for any citizen to have, and it exists in
the constitution of Barbados, as I understand it. I
remember we were quite definite about that at the
Independence Conference in London.

The example of those West Indian territories
which forbid dual nationality such as Trinidad has now
been proved to be mistaken, because the Trinidadians







1984


themselves are regretting that they insisted on the
renunciation of all other citizenship for citizens of
Trinidad, and they are now introducing aBillto alter
it.

To return to the Barbados issue,whenthose Bar-
badians have renounced the privilege of having a Bri-
tish passport, if they have to come home on holiday,
it is my view that since the Commonwealth Immigrants
Act refers only to holders of United Kingdom pass-
ports it does not say 'citizens of other countries'
and so on. Theoretically, if an Englishman turns up
with a Barbados passport in England, theoretically
he has to subject himself to the provisions of the
Commonwealth Immigrants Act. This is in the Act,
and I remember it.

It is not even every holder of a United Kingdom
passport who is admitted to England automatically; so
those Barbadians who take Barbados passports to come
home here on holidays are depriving themselves un-
necessarily of some of the privileges of the residence
which they may have put in in the United Kingdom.
They will be doing that quite unnecessarily, and the
Government of Barbados has a duty to its citizens,
I maintain, to inform them of their rights and pri-
vileges under the laws of the United Kingdom, and at
the same time to relieve the Barbados Mission in
London from the unnecessary burden of issuing pass-
ports unnecessarily.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I- just want to ask a question
for my own clarification, because I regard it as an.
important issue. Do I understand that a person, who
is entitled to a United Kingdom passport and can get
one after five years' residence, need not press for a
Barbados passport? Is that the point?

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: That is exactly the point
which I am making, Mr. Chairman. A Barbadianwith
a United Kingdom passport can enter Barbados and
walk through the Customs at Seawell. Mr. Chair-
man, I have held more than one United Kingdom pass-
port, and I have never had the slightest difficulty, nor
indeed mywife who still holds one, in walking through
the Customs at Seawell. The only trouble I have ever
had with my United Kingdom passport is right here
in Bridgetown when it was taken to the High Commis-
sioner and confiscated. I do not knowforwhat reason
but that is not a quarrelwhichI have with the Govern-
ment of Barbados. That is by the way. I now hold a
Barbados passport, even though I did recover my
United Kingdom passport from the High Commissioner,
after making sufficient of afuss; but that is purely by
the way.

Mr. Chairman, there are no disadvantages to a
Barbadian born in Barbados of having a British pass-
port. All the advantages are the other way, if he has
a United Kingdom passport. It is nonsense that the
members of the staff I have seen them at work; I
have : seen the pile of passports on the desk and the
application forms being processed should do all
of this work when it is unnecessary.
If the United Kingdom's law remains the same,
and at the moment there is nothing to change the


law, Barbadians should be advised by their High
Commission that they live in England, they are
qualified as citizens of the United Kingdom and
Colonies by reason of their residence, and they
must go and apply for United Kingdompassports.
Do not let us forget, Mr. Chairman, that when a
Barbadian gets into trouble in England Trinidad-
ians have got into trouble in England; the High
Commissioners Sir Learie Constantine had this
experience more thanonce are told that when
Commonwealth immigrants come to this country
they cease to be citizens from the country from
which they have come, and they cannot be repre-
sented in London by their High Commissioners.
That was a view which was forced on Sir Learie
Constantine during the Bristol Bus dispute; it was
a view accepted by Dr. Williams, and it led to a rift
between Dr. Williams and Sir Learie Constantine;
so I am not talking about anything that is fanciful
or may happen.

When it suits the Home Office not to have the
Trinidad, or the Jamaica, or the Barbados High
Commission represent the interest of a Trini-
dadian or Jamacian or Barbadian, the Home Office
will say that these people are citizens of the
United Kingdom. But when there is an anti-colour
feeling running at the depth that it is in England
at this time, the Home Office will say: "Go and
get a Barbados passport: you are a Barbadian."
They reject with one hand, and accept with the
other.

I very much hope that the Leader of the House
who, it is wellknown is Foreign Minister in all
but name, and is carrying the entire burden of the
Foreign Ministry; he confirms all of the decisions,
perhaps I should say, that the permanent officials
recommend, and is really I do not know for what
reason deprived of the title of Minister of Ex-
ternal Affairs. It is well known that we have with
us today, Mr. Chairman, a person who can put
these things right in the Leader of the House
himself.

Mr. Chairman, the second part of the burden
of my speech really deals with the staff and the
High Com:iission. There are certain questions on
the Order Paper wh'ch will, perhaps, indicate the
nature of the complaints which are being voiced
by some members of the staff of the High Com-
mission in London.

First of all, Mr. Chairman, there is a question
of employment policy. We have been told that it is
necessary to employ additional officers. I will be
quite frank and open and say what complaints I have
heard. One I have heard is that too many temporary
staff are employed. The wives of Barbadian Civil
Servants who are doing courses in England are em-
ployed in the High Commission for the period of
their husbands' courses, and thengo home afterwards
It is suggested that they have little interest in the
work, because they are only expected to be there for a
few months.
12.35 p.m.







1985


It is further suggested that they are depriving
Barbadians who are resident in the United Kingdom
of the opportunity of a permanent job in our Mission
in London. I repeat the complaint as I have heard it,
Mr. Chairman. I daresay the Minister will examine
the merits of the arguments for and against, and will
in due course reply to members of the House as to
whetherhe thinks that the number of temporary staff
is too great or otherwise.

I am told, Mr. Chairman, that there are 40,000
Barbadians in England. It seems to me a very large
number indeed, but that is the figure estimated by
the High Commission. I believe, Mr. Chairman, that
of those 40,000 there must be qualified typists and
qualified secretaries who would be only too glad to
assist their country by working in their country's
diplomatic Mission. Provision is made in the Esti-
mates for recruitment of persons in the country
where the Mission is established, and I take it that if
these temporary persons are being recruited, they
are being recruited under that section because I
hardly imagine they were recruited in Barbados to
workforayear in London. It would seem, on the face
of it, Mr. Chairman, that this accommodation of the
females of visiting Civil Servants, if the complaints
are found to be justified, may not be in the best in-
terests of the Mission, and certainly could not be in
the best interests of the large Barbadian community
in London.

The second complaint which I have heardvoiced
relates to the employment of non-Barbadians and in
particular to a non-Barbadian in a very confidential
position in the Registry of the High Commission in
London. I must say that when the complaint was first
reported to me, it was reported without any indica-
tion of the names of the parties who may have been
involved, and so really I am entirelywithout any per-
sonal knowledge even of what intricacies there may be
relating to this complaint; but again, Mr. Chairman, it
seems to me that if there are 40,000 Barbadians in the
United Kingdom, it may very well be against the sense
of the employment policy generally pursued by this
Government as, after all, they cannot come to Bar-
bados and work, or so it is said, if they are
Barbadians qualified to do the job to employ non-
Barbadians on a permanent basis, especiallyinmost
confidential parts of the High Commission in London,
because Registry clerks are the persons dealingwith
security files and so on I hope there are no security
files in London as such andwith the private business
of the Embassy. This is another Complaint, Mr.
Chairman, which it may well be found there is some
basis for, and on the otherhandthe Minister may in-
vestigate it and offer reasons to the House why the
state of affairs should continue. I cannot imagine that
of the 40,000 Barbadians in England, no one can be
found to carry out the duties of Registry clerk or
whatever the matter may be.

One point I would make, Mr. Chairman, on the
questionof the clerical officers at -L 18 a week. It is
not for members of the Opposition to say that sala-
ries shouldbehigher or anything like that, but I hope
it is borne in mind when filling these positions that


tf 18 a week: will not in general buy you a good cle-
rical officer in London of the sort referred to. But
that is only by the way.

There is one last point which I would make, Mr.
Chairman. I see here concerning the Students Divi-
sion that "no clerical officer is available to assist
in the Students Division with the large volume of its
work." I am going to say this, Mr. Chairman: the
Barbados High Commission in London would work a
good deal better if it.did not have to deal not only
with its own Students Division but also with the Stu-
dents and Nurses Division of the Guyana High Com-
mission. We are told that we are getting a bargain
when we get Mr. Luckhoo,butthe biggest sign to be
found in Kensington High Street over a High Com-
mission is the Students and Nurses Division, Guyana
High Commission. I understand that the Students and
Nurses Division of the Guyana High Commission
rents offices from our Government. I daresay that
included in the rent is the use of the telephone and
the use of its Switchboard Operator and Receptionist.
I am also going to say, Mr. Chairman, that I have
not had the slightest complaint from the Receptionist,
but other persons have taken up cudgels on the Re-
ceptionist's behalf to my knowledge, and it is sug-
gestedthat the Guyana Nurses and Students occupy a
disproportionate amount of the telephone, the recep-
tionist's time,and her time on the telephone switch-
board, and that perhaps the majority of visitors at
certain times to that High Commission are the
Guyana Nurses and Students, I wonder, Mr. Chair-
man, if this is considered a desirable thing.

Sir Lionel, I understand, goes to the High Com-
mission once a week. I do not think that he quite
goes 40 per cent of the time even though we pay 40
per cent of the salary. He goes once a week, but the
Guyana Students and Nurses are there all the time.
Sir Lionel goes presumably for the benefit of the
High Commission; the Students and Nurses, as I un-
derstand it, go principally to be a burden on the Bar-
bados High Commission staff and the Minister
will confirm this there is no exchange of staff. The
Guyana High Commission does nothing at all for us.
It is situated at a great distance. If you go there to
see Sir Lionel Luckhoo, you would be referred to his
visiting day next Friday at the High Commission if
you are a Barbadian. The work of the Guyana High
Commission, of course, in the last year has been
canvassing votes for Mr. Burnham; but again that is
by the way. I understand that has taken up a lot of
their time. I am very glad at least that they are not
canvassing for votes for the Democratic Labour
Party in Barbados. We are at least spared that, but
they do nothing for the Barbados High Commission.
Why should we, especially if we are charging less
than an economic rent to them for the use of our
premises, be doing anything for them?

Mr. Chairman, I have no doubt that Part I of the
Addendum is at the present moment justified; but
before I sit down, I am going to ask the Minister to
give the assurance that what he referred to in his
speech and also what the hon. junior member for St.
Joseph, the Leader of the Opposition referred to in







1986


his speech the fact that the volume of passport
work will not continue at the present level that
whenthat happens, some of the clerical officers will
be laid off. Let us hope that will be the case. Par-
kinson's Law of the natural increase of Civil Ser-
vants Professor Parkinson says, if it has a basis,
that at some stage if a particular Department had
more work to do and they took on more staff to do the
work and the staff entrenched themselves, the peo-
ple who are over-worked when there is a staff of
three in fact continue to be over-worked when there
is a staff of five, and people who want more staff when
it is five will want more when it is seven. So let us
hope a stop can be put to Parkinsonism in this re-
spect, because even if all the Barbadians in England
got passports, it will at leastbe five years before
they can all be asking for them again, because the
passports run for five years and there is bound to
be a diminution in the amount of work.

I call on the Leader of the House to give the as -
surance that this work will not expand so as to fill
the time available for its completion by the increased
staff, and I hope the Minister will assure us that if
the work is ended by next March, these jobs will not
appear in the Estimates for 1969-70. This is one
sphere, one field of activity, where the Minister
could really try to cut down the growing burden of
the administration of this Island. He would be en-
titled to the gratitude of all Barbadians, because I
am not one who believes that you can measure a
country's progress by the amount of money the Gov-
ernment is spending. You can measure it by the
amount of development the Government is carrying
on, not by the amount of salaries it is paying to Civil
Servants. Most countries like to aim and have the
highesthope of reducing the burden of the Civil Ser-
vants, and when the Prime Minister made his speech
about the Civil Service being an army of occupation
feeding upon our fair land or whatever the metaphor
was, I thought for one moment that he was recog-
nising this. But nol Mr. Chairman, two years later
in a Budget Speech he has measured Barbados' pro-
gress by the fact that due to an increase in Civil
Service salaries, the Government's share of the na-
tional expenditure has risen to 23 per cent or what-
ever it is. Let the Minister strike the blow here for
reduction of the cost of Government and spend the
taxpayers' money in development where it is really
needed.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Chairman, I had
not intended speaking on this security Bill until the
Leader of the House answered the first part about
dual nationality. I did not know anything about what
the hon. senior member for St. Thomas said. He has
not told me about this experience of his in London,
nor does he know what I am going to say. Only yes-
terday this question of representation by Sir Lionel
an admirable official in himself, came up, and it is
only fair to him that what the hon. member has just
said and what I am going to say now should be brought
this notice. I for one never agreed and could never
see Barbados being represented by the same Com-
missioner as Guyana is being represented by.
12.45 p.m.


There is bound to be a conflict of interests. It is
all very well for us to have an Ambassador we will
not ever reach that stage, I hope, but it is possible -
or some Consular representative of, say, Chile and
Paraguay or anything like that. The number of Bar-
badians who are likely to be in Chile and Paraguay
are going to be so few that it does not matter if you
have one man representing half a dozen South Ameri-
can countries; but when it comes to the number of
Barbadians and Guyanese whose interests may con-
flict one of my informants yesterday was a Security
man himself, and I will come to that part of it which
the hon. member who has just sat down has mentioned.
When it comes to the number of Guyanese and Bar-
badians, I repeat, whose interests may conflict, it is
wrong to have one and the same representative, how-
ever admirable, undoubtedly Sir Lionel Luckhoo,
both in his profession and as a man, is. One of my
informants yesterday was himself a Security man
for a time and saw, at any rate, the workings of Se-
curity in the old Federation and saw conflicts arising
whenone Security man was a Guyanese and he had to
decide between conflicting interests of a Trinidadian
and a Guyanese. I just swallowed what this Security
man saidbecause he obviously knew his stuff; he had
been himself in Security and he emphasised how keen
and how experienced he thought the British were to
have British only in any Security. Have Englishmen
or Scotmen or even the sometimes laughed-at Welsh
in Security rather than have some people who be-
come naturalised, but they retain all their Germanic
affinities and prejudices.

I would be glad to be confirmed in what has been,
all along, my opinion that you should not put a man
in a position where human nature is such that a
Guyanese by birth should have to decide between the
possible rivalclaims of a Barbadian and a Guyanese.
Not even Solomon with all his wisdom could ever
have forgotten that he was Solomon by birth and not
a Gentile. I have just risen as I said, I intended to
leave this, and if the hon. member had not raised it,
I would not have raised it, this little bit about Sir
Lionel Luckhoo; it is only fair to him, I cannot speak
for the Government officially now, but I should be
inclined to say that our view would be that it is
better to spend more money on a separate Barbadian
High Commissioner than to continue with the present
arrangement. I say that there may be certain things
where it does not matter having somebody represent-
ing somewhere else, but not Guyanese or Trinida-
dians or other West Indians. Even in our Federation,
the aim of Civil Servants and I must pay tribute to
Civil Servants of the old West Indies Federation,
that although some of them did not know each other
until they met in Trinidad, as Civil Servants they
aimed at being West Indians; but ever so often con-
flicting interests and therefore conflicting duties
would arise.

I have added this bit to what I said before only
in support of what the hon. senior member for St.
Thomas has said; but I do urge and I must say that,
as the hon. member has said, the Hon. Leader of
the House having more time, and it may be, more in-
clination to deal with External Affairs can devote







1987


some of his time to considering with his colleagues.
the present position there as well as consider with
his colleagues the other point which has been raised
by the hon. member about British passports and the
like. It was not very flattering to me as a Barbadian
that the last time I went to Geneva, the Customs
Officer who passed me, not that particular one per-
haps, but the Customs Officer who passed me over
and over again ten or fifteen times on the presenta-
tion of a Barbados Passport,. just stopped me. He
had to try to find out where Barbados was, although
the passport was there and although I had an Ameri-
canvisa and all the rest of it. It is not very flattering:
but if Barbadians living in Great Britain can make
use of British passports as well, that is one of the
reasons why I would urge the Hon. Leader of the
House to consider this question of dual nationality,
because you may not be hurting a Barbadian; you
may actually be helping him.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Chairman, there is not much
which I have to say on this Resolution except with
respect to the Security Officer who is employed, ac-
cording to the Addendum to the Resolution at that
rate,his total emoluments being therefore $610 U.S.
per annum, (A MEMBER: $6,120 per annum). Yes,
Sir, $6,120 per annum. The Addendum to the Reso-
lution says "that in addition to driving the official
car, this officer is responsible for the security of
the offices and equipment of the Consulate-General
and of the Permanent Mission to the United Nations.
He is also responsible for the protection of Barba-
dian officials and dignitaries during their visits to
the United States of America. Now, Sir, I do not want
to say that I have vast experience in Security work,
but I have been engaged in Security work in this
island, and one must wonder, looking at this Adden-
dum, and try to find out exactly what are the func-
tions, in truth and in fact, of this particular officer.


No mention is made that this Security Officer /
Driver, bodyguard, caretaker, whatever you may
wish to call him no mention is made that he has
any staff, any assistance of anything of the kind.
You must ask, Mr. Chairman, this one question and
it is this. If two or more Barbadian officials or dig-
nitaries turn up to the United States of America at
the same time and they are travelling, they have
appointments taking one to the North and one to the
South, how is this Security Officer going to divide his
services? And while you might have these Barbadian
officials, you might also have some dignitaries. What
I am suggesting is this: that this Addendum is a
farce, and that this could not be true at all. The of-
ficer must either be doing Security duties or he
must not be driving this car and be responsible for
the equipment at the Consulate-General and the Per-
manent Mission to the United Nations and what not.
12.55 p.m.

I have a suspicion that this Chauffeur/Security
Officer is really and truly employed in the United
States, I would say, to go into places like the Bowery,
or Greenwich Village, and recruit people from these
places to line routes where some of our Barbadian


officials are going to pass and to pay them undue
compliments on special occasions.

On the other hand, would the Minister tell us
whether this Security Officer has been accorded
diplomatic immunity by the United States Govern-
ment? All of these are matters of importance. You
must remember that he is a chauffeurandhe has
to carry out, as the Minister says, general Security
duties. It is of some importance to be told what is
this Officer's true position in diplomatic circles.

Now, since the Officer is presently receiving
$510 (U.S.) per month, and we are now being asked
to vote the sum of $6,400 (E.C.), Which we can say
is another $3,200 (U.S.) to pay this Officer to the
end of the financial year I would much prefer if
the Minister would explain this to me. When it is
stated, "during the financial year 1968-69" must
we take it to mean to the end of the financial year
1968?

Mr. Chairman, we have to be very, very careful
when we see notations such as this. We understand
from the Minister that this amount of $3,200 (U.S.)
is expected to cover the Officer until the end of
March next year. One just has to see between now
and then what a tidy sum will be paid to this Officer
for carrying out these duties. As I have said earlier
the duties are such as to make it impossible for any
one man to function properly in such a position.

I hope that the Minister will examine the situa-
tion as it really is, and that he will attempt to give
us some sort of explanation as to how this one of-
ficer can be a chauffeur/bodyguard all at the same
time, when you have Barbadian officials and other
dignitaries plus the staff of the Consulate General
as well as the Permanent Mission to the United Na-
tions to look after. I cannot for the life of me, see
how one man can function in so many capacities at
the same time. It needs some sort of explanation,
which I hope the Minister will proffer at this
stage.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: If the Minister says
that the New York Police will be available, does
this Government pay the New York City for addi-
tional police protection? We know how generous they
can be in New York to visiting dignitaries with po-
lice protection.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, this Resolu-
tion is,, undoubtedly, one of the most interesting to
come before this Committee, and certainly not least
because it has evoked important issues and questions
which need careful study and attention. All the points
raised on the other side desire considerable signifi-
cance and attention. Although, quite rightly, I think I
may not be able to answer all of them in the detail
required, I shall certainly try my best. But even with
those about which I shall be very loth to give what I
think the hon. junior member for St. Peter would un-
derstand if I say that I am loth to give an al fresco
opinion to some of them, I think they really deserve
careful attention. Would be prepared to take up those







1988


matters with the appropriate authorities, and return
to the House next week with enlightenment on them.

Meanwhile, let me deal with the majority of
them. First, as to the question of dual nationality.
appreciated everything the hon. and learned senior
member for St. Thomas has said. It struck me, giv-
ingapurely layman's opinion, which is not only chal-
lengable but may even be wrong it strikes me that
the Constitution does seem to envisage the possi-
bility of dual citizenship. It says here in section 8:
"Every person who under this Constitution, or any
Act of Parliament is a citizen of Barbados, or under
any enactment for the time being in force, in any
country to which this section applies is a citizen of
that country shall, by virtue of that citizenship, have
the status of a Commonwealth citizen."

Of course, I do not know whether it also im-
plies the converse, but I would think, speaking purely
as a layman, that this is envisaged and that you will
probably need special legislation to bring it into
force. However, this is one of the points on which
I would like to seek further enlightenment not only
for myself, but for the benefit of the House as to the
intrinsic importance of the question, and give a defi-
nite answer to the House on the next occasion.

In connection with this, the hon. senior member
for St. Thomas also pointed out that the reason for
the large increase in applications for Barbadian
passports lies not so much in the desire to have
Barbadian passports, but from pressures and in-
conveniences, possibly, experienced by Barbadians
in the United Kingdom and a certain amount of in-
transigence and even skullduggery on the part of the
British Home Office authorities in dealing with Com -
monwealth Nationals.
1.05 p.m.

I think that this is true, but I should also like
to point out another aspect of the matter. I think it
is true that their difficulties in their dealing with
the British Home Office drives them to apply for
Barbadian passports when they need not have them,
but it could also be, I think, that they regard a Bar-
badian passport as something which they ought
not to be without in case they need final pro-
tection, support and all those things in the United
Kingdom. It may not only be because they are under
pressure; they might genuinely think that if they
have this, this is the sort of last and final insurance
they can have. This will have to be investigated. It
could also be, I think, that they may feel that the
possession of a Barbadian passport enables them to
escape the rigours of going into the British Army
and doing National Service. There may be mixed
motives, but I am at one with the hon. member that
it seems absurd that an office or a department in a
High Commission should be inundated with these re-
quests which need not come to it and which, if the
people knew their rights, would not be made. It seems
a pity that this should be happening to increase un-
necessary expenditure, and perhaps to disorganise
the work of a whole office or part of an office for


somethingthatneednotbe, and I readily give the as-
surance that this will be immediately investigated.

We have been told, of course, that between now
and March this flood of requests for passports should
taper off, but I shall certainly have it drawn to the
attention of the appropriate authorities that this need
not happen at all, and that far from tapering it off
by the end of March, if we can get it tapered off by
the end of the calendar year, in the next three or
four months, we should try to do this. I think this is
a very important point, ;and the sooner we get to
work on it, the better.

I also take his point that our own people ought
to be instructed to inform our nationals that they
are entitled after five years' residence to United
Kingdompassports. Very often people do not always
know their rights in this respect and it would do no
harm to make them aware. As I said, that is a point
which I readily take, because if that were done, that
also would cause a reduction in the number of ap-
plications for Barbadian passports.

With respect to the employment policy, the hon.
member sought an assurance from me that Parkin-
son's law would not apply in these administrative
arrangements in our High Commission, and indeed
I believe he meant generally speaking in our over-
seas Missions and offices abroad. I could not ob-
viously give the assurance that Parkinson's law
would not apply. I think the hon. and learned mem-
ber is perhaps even more aware than I am of this
tendency within the public service of any country to
multiply ad infinitum. You have no sooner perhaps
re-organised one office, rationalised its work, giv-
ingit a working force which it said it required, than
within six months you are told that a horrible mis-
calculation was made, and they need more staff to
pull together what the rationalisation was designed
to pull together. It seems to me that in every coun-
try in all aspects of the public service, the pressure
for more and more hands and brains to do the same
amount or even less work is the same, and this is
probably because in any public service they tend to
make work for each other. So I could not give the
assurance that Parkinson's law would not apply.

I can, however,give the assurance that instruc-
tions would go out that first of all they should hasten
the issue of these outstanding passports; they should
at the same time inform applicants of their entitle-
ment to United Kingdom passports, and so cut off the
flow of applications, and that as soon as all this is
done, those who are not required should either be
put to other work, or, if their services are not needed
be dispensed with. This is the most I can give an
assurance about, but I cannot say that the situation
would not become worse, because these things have
a habit of snow-balling on you.

The hon. member also raised the point about
the tendency which has been evident In the recent
past to give employment to the wives of Civil Ser-
vants on leave for the duration of their husbands'







1989


leaves. This is a case where the hon. and learned
member is better informed than I am. I myself was
not aware of this, but I am perfectly willing to take
his word for it, because I could scarcely imagine
him to visit the High Commission, be lavishly enter-
tainedby the number one and number two and not be
told everything that he wished to know; so that if he
tells me this, I am perfectly willing to accept it and
to have it investigated. It would seem to me to be
something wrong. I do not say this in criticism of
individuals, but I would think, Mr. Chairman, that
it should be obvious without having to be spoken; but
if it needs to be spoken, the appropriate directions
would be given. I would think, however, it would be
obvious to the people responsible for taking on tem-
porary staff in our overseas Missions and offices
abroad that a certain amount of fair-mindedness
ought to apply, and that if you have Barbadian na-
tionals in the United Kingdom who live there and who
are qualified for the kind of work you have to give,
it would seem to me to be a fair-minded thing to of-
fer them the temporary employment, provided they
are otherwise suitable, rather than take up people
who are just up on holiday or only for short periods
and give them employment. As I say, this should be a
policy without its being directed to be; but if a di-
rective is needed in this respect, I am perfectly pre -
pared to give it, because it is a fair and decent thing
to do. If qualified Barbadians live in the United
Kingdom and have made their homes there, they are
as much entitled to employment in Barbadian of-
fices and Missions abroad as anybody who is sent
from here, and provided they are suitably qualified,
it would be my feeling that they should have every
opportunity to work in our Missions and offices
abroad and not be shunted aside for people who are
only going up there at most for six months or, in
most cases, even for a lesser time than this.

The hon. junior member for St. Peter as well
as the Hon. Leader of the Opposition both raised
questions about the second part of the Resolution
which deals with the supplementary provision to
augment the salary of the Security Officer/Driver
at the Consulate General.
1.15 p.m.

I wish to give the hon. junior member for St.
Peter the assurance that the facts are as sent down
here. Briefly, the position is this. This Officer him-
self is principally attached to the Consulate-General
as driver, but perhaps on the same principle which
has been enunciated here earlier, it has been pos-
sible to combine that with other duties of a different
nature. The hon. member's point is well taken, be-
cause, from an experience which I myself had, the
opportunity which I had to observe the kind of work
which has to be done by this officer, it may well be
that in a year's time or so, we may have to consider
splitting these duties entirely because the officer, it
would seem to me, has no regular sleeping or off-
duty hours. The nature of his work is such that when
the Consulate-General is called out, for instance, to
New York at any time, he naturally has to go with
him. He accompanies him occasionally on Govern-
ment business to Canada or wherever our nationals


,have to be attended to, or other parts of the United
States of America, and at the same time, he is
charged, when present, because he could not do this
other kind of work when absent, with the responsi-
bility for Security within the offices while he is
there. It is not true I know that the hon. junior
member for St. Peter likes to be a little fanciful at
times, but I think this is a bit too fanciful to sup-
pose that this officer is sent down to the Bowery to
pick up a stack of enthusiasts to line the streets
when Caesar passes by. I do not think he would find
that kind of person in the Bowery unless he was in-
terested in, perhaps, gathering together as many
Hippies and Psychadelic enthusiasts as he could
master, and even so, I do notthinktheywouldlike
Fifth Avenue unless it was for a love-in. The duties
are as set out here; but I can see that there will be
increasing problems. Because of the nature of the
work and for the number of times he has a span of
duty of 18 hours, 20 hours or 24 hours a day some-
times well, not 24 hours a day but, say, 18 hours
a day two or three times a week, the increased al-
lowance is well justified.

As I said, and I wish to repeat, I myself would
think that the time is soon coming when the whole
position will have to be revised, and the Consulate-
General may well have to employ a driver as driver,
and allow the Permanent Mission and his office to use
the services of a Security person full time. It is
going to be increasingly difficult to maintain within
a single person the responsibility for both jobs;
up to the moment, it is being well done, yet I can
see that the strain may well sometime in the future
become impossible.

If the Hon. Leader of the Opposition will again
refresh my memory on the point which he raised
about the Security Officer, I will do my best to an-
swer it. I did not really make a note of his point, but
he did raise the point.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Chairman, it is
obviously manifestly impossible for one man to be a
driver and see after Security, anyhow, of a single
person. In my experience, at any rate, they were
very generous in New York City. Dr. Cummins and I
stayed in a hotel for two weeks and had two private
detectives in an adjoining bedroom day and night and
wherever we went. I mentioned to one of them once
that I would like to go to Macy's to buy a few ties
or something like that, and I say that we could not
have been treated more generously than we were
treated. Does this Government have to pay some of
that? We were very generously treated in New York;
it could not have been more generous. We could not
have been seen after and safeguarded more than we
were. Does this Government now have to pay some
of that? (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No. )

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Chairman, it is after hearing
the Hon. Minister that I have got to ask if this Se-
curity Officer has had any special training in Se-
curity work. My reason for asking that question is
this; we have our local Security staff here, and when
one looks at the salary which is being paid to this







1990


Security Officer/Driver in the United States, one
might well ask: would it not have been better if you
had offered promotion to one of our local men here
to serve in the United States where he would feel that
his service and training here are now worth him
something, to be stationed abroad and be attached to
a Mission or something of the sort, rather than to go
about, as I understand it, just like a "gauling" in
the United States and put your hands on some strong
arm man who has, from my information, no special
aptitude or anything for this Security Officer's job.
It is well worth the Minister telling us, if he does
not feel that the time is ripe, when he should make
an investigation so as to find out whether or not the
salary is sufficiently attractive that one of our local
men here could be offered the opportunity to work
for $500 or $600 U.S., a month in the United States
of America. I feel that that would be some encour-
agement at least to the other people to serve.

One other point is this. Can the Minister tell us
if this Security Officer is regarded as a Security Of-
ficer by the United States authorities, or is it a
case where he drives the Consulate-General say, to
a conference, or wherever he has to go, and he has
to remain outside sitting in the car and cannot tres-
pass on the portals of the building or what? This is
a Security Officer and we want to know. (Hon. J. C.
TUDOR: He has the opportunity.) If the Minister is
tellingus that this Officer is entitled to have that op-
portunity, I sincerely hope that that is the case, and
that he is regarded by us in this Assembly as a Se-
curity Officer and not just as some knock-out in the
United States of America.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, the hon.
member's point is well taken. As a matter of fact,
this is what I was hinting, although I did not put it in
quite that way, when I said that, in my view, the mat-
ter would have to be reviewed certainly within a year.
I could not give the assurance that it would be re-
viewed now because, obviously, what arrangements
are in force would have to be in force until the end of
this financial year. I said that it seemed to me from
what little opportunity I have had to observe it, that
the workload would become increasingly heavier on
both sides, and that a bifurcation or splitting up of
the duties sometime in the future would have to be
contemplated.

There is one other point I would like to make
before I sit down. I just want to say this: I know that
members on the other side have expressed some
anxiety about the arrangement which we have which
enabledus to share a High Commission with the Gov-
ernment of Guyana. I should like to say that this has
not been a problem with us and no difficulties have
arisen. As we have said during the Estimates, we
are quite satisfied and this has been attested to by
people outside of Government and who were not
speaking on behalf of the Government with the high
level of achievement which Sir Lionel Luckhoo has
demonstrated in his job. I want to say that the ar-
rangement couldeasily have been in the other way. It
could easily have happened if, for instance, in point
of time, we had come to Independence before Guyana,
I believe that the Government of Guyana would have


askedus, having been there first, to share with them
this particular service, so that this is purely a his-
torical accident (Mr. HINDS: Why did you not ask
Trinidad?) We cannot ask everybody that this ar-
rangement is as it is.
1.25 p.m.

I want to make it perfectly clear that we are
satisfied with the performance of Sir Lionel Luckhoo,
and any anxieties or inconveniences which our own
nationals experience from time to time arise not
from the arrangement as such, and certainly not
from anything which happens or does not happen at
the top of the High Commission, but from certain
administrative and other difficulties which we are at
the moment resolving. Ido not want hon. members
to go away with the thinking that because our High
Commissioner is a national of another country;
therefore the complaints of our own Nurses and Stu-
dents that they cannot use certain facilities are
necessarily consequent on that. We would have these
complaints anyhow so long as imaginative treatment,
or imaginative attitudes are not brought to bear on a
particular job.

I wish to make it quite clear that while I think
that this arrangement could not last forever, a time
certainly may come when a Government of Barbados
whether this one or a succeeding one, will decide to
change this arrangement. When that time comes, and
that arrangement is changed, the Government of
Guyana or some other Caribbean Government may
still be proposing to us to share representation, if
not in London, in some other part of the globe.

Arrangements and agreements for the sharing
of external representation are things which countries
do and have with one another from time to time. If
they do not work smoothly somewhere down the line,
this is not because of the decision to share repre-
sentation, but it can easily be because subordinates
and others do not always apply fair-mindedness and
imagination to their tasks and create friction where
none should exist.

I will bear in mind the comments made by the
hon. andlearned senior member for St. Thomas, be-
cause any difficulties which our nationals experience
in an office that we contribute money to, have to be
remedied immediately. It certainly could never be
an excuse for not remedying them that we are afraid
to offend the Guyanese Government. This could not
arise at all. Instructions will go out that a full and
thorough investigation will be made into any griev-
ance complained of, and the appropriate remedies
set in hand. I just want to give hon. members that
assurance.

The question that the Resolution for $18,448 do now pass
was put and resolved in the affirmative without division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, I beg to move
that Your Honour do now report the passing of one
Resolution in Committee of Supply.


Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.







1991


The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division, and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordingly.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this Resolution be now read the first time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this Resolution be now read a second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was putand resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that the Resolution be now agreed to.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day stands
in the name of the Hon. Leader of the House, and it
is to move the second reading of a Bill to amend the
Police Act, 1961.
1.35 p.m.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, recently the
Hon. and Learned Attorney General drew to the at-
tention of the Ministry of Home Affairs and the Gov-
ernment generally that in a recent examination of
the Police Act of 1961, there had been discovered
two matters which were in need of urgent rectification.
The first one has to do with Section 29(2). It appears
that Section 29(2) of that Act purports to continue to
vest inthe Commissioner of Police power to suspend
Officers of the Force of and below the rank of In -
spector. This is seriously in conflict with Section 96
of the Country's Constitution which vests all disci-
plinary control over such officers in the Governor-
General, and which therefore supercedes the provision
of Section 29(2) of the Act of 1961.

An attempt was made in Legal Notice 168 of
1967 to bring this into conformity, but by a typogra-
phical error, intended reference to section 29(2) of
the Police Act, 1961 appeared as a reference to sec-
tion 29(1).

The second thing which appeared to be in need
of rectification, Mr. Speaker, was this: it appears
that in section 60 of the Act of 1961, there is an
omission which, it is felt, can cause serious incon-
venience to the Police Force in the disposition of
property which comes into the possession of the
Police in connection with a criminal charge where
there are conflicting claims to such property even
after the charge has been disposed of. As it now
reads, the section applies only to property which
comes into the possession of the Force in connection
with "any criminal charge under section 31 of the


Pawnbrokers Act of 1885". It appears that it was
originally intended that that section should apply to
any property coming into the possession of the Po-
lice Force in connection with any criminal charge,
or under section 31 of the Pawnbrokers Act, 1885;
so that this Bill has accordingly been prepared in
order to bring the provisions first of section 29(2) of
the Police Act into conformity with section 96 of the
Constitution, making it clear that disciplinary pow-
ers are vested not in the Commissioner of Police
but in the Governor-General, and secondly for the
sake of tidiness, opportunity has also been taken to
amend section 60 by the insertion of the word "or"
which had been omitted due to the oversight which I
just outlined.

I beg to move that this Bill be now read a se-
cond time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.


The question that this Bill be now read a second time was
put and resolved in the affirmative without division.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into
Committee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.

Clauses 1, 2 and 3 were called and passed.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the passing of one Bill in
Committee, and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported.
accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. J. C, TUDOR, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill was read a third time and passed.


SUSPENSION OF SITTING

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, if it is all the
same to the hon. members opposite and if the hon.
and learned member opposite does not mind, I would
suggest that we could take the luncheon suspension
now.

Ibeg to move that this sitting be now suspended
until 2.30 p.m.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Mr. SMITH: Before you put the question, Mr.
Speaker, I am appealing to the Government side,
since there is no more Government Business, to
come back in, because on the last occasion when the
sitting was suspended the Ministers kept straight
home or went somewhere else; but they did not
come back.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on a point of
order, the hon. member misunderstood me. I never
said I had come to the end of Government Business
for today's sitting. I merely said it did not seem to







1992


*me worthwhile starting a new item within ten minutes'
of the suspension; so that if the other side did not
mind, I would move the suspension now which I
have done.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, it is very kind of the
hon. member, but Iprefer him to carry on until time
expires. I was thinking that he had finished Govern-
ment Business,and we could take the break and then
come back; but if the Hon. Minister has more Gov-
ernment Business, he should do it until the hour for
suspension.

The question that this sitting be now suspended until
2.30 p.m. was put and resolved in the affirmative without divi-
sion, and Mr. SPEAKER suspended the sitting accordingly.

1.45 p.m.

On Resumption:

QUESTION TIME

Mr. SPEAKER: It is now Question Time. I have
been informed that the Reply has been laid to Ques-
tion No. 194, standing in the name of the hon. junior
member for St. Peter. That is on page 13, left-hand
column.

BEDSTEADS AND MATTRESSES FOR MEMBERS
OF THE ROYAL BARBADOS POLICE FORCE

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the ap-
priate Minister: -

Is it the intention of the Government to furnish
bedsteads and mattresses to members of the Royal
Police Force to be used in place of the wooden-
framed and canvas cots?

2. If the answer to the above is in the affirma-
tive,when does Government intend to implement the
plan?

3. Is Government aware that the knowledge that
members of the Fire Services have been furnished
with bedsteads is giving cause for uneasiness amongst
some members of the Royal Barbados Police Force?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I must apo-
logise to the hon. member. I did state that the Reply
to Question No. 194 was ready, and so it is written
here, but the Replies have no relevance at all, as
far as I can see, to the Question. The Replies which
I have here have to do with the appointment to the
post of Education Officer. There must be a mistake
somewhere. If the hon. member can find that Ques-
tion, notice of it was given on the 14th May, 1968.
The Question should have been No. 174.


GOVERNMENT'S POLICY re APPOINTMENT
TO POST OF EDUCATION OFFICER

Mr. SPEAKER: QuestionNo. 174, standing in the
name of the hon. junior member for St. Peter. That
is to be found on page 9, left hand column.


Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the ap-
priate Minister:-

What is Government's policy with respect to
making appointments to the Post of Education Of-
ficer in the Ministry of Education?

2. What is the Government's policy with
respect to seconding officers or teachers to such
posts in the Ministry of Education?

3. Was a Mr. L. S. Wellington of the Staff
of Harrison College due for secondment to the Min-
istry of Education to serve as an Education Officer?

4. Has the post of Education Officer ever
been advertised as vacant or has there been an ad-
vertisement or advertisements calling for appli-
cants to fill the post?

5. When was such an advertisement published
and where?

6. How many applications were received
as a result of such advertisements?

7. Were applications received from suitably
qualified teachers with experience?

8. Was Mr. L. S. Wellington one of the ap-
plicants for the post?

9. If the answer to No. 3 above is in the af-
firmative, was the secondment a recommendation
of the Public Service Commission?

10. If the answer to No. 9 is in the negative,
will the Minister state who made the recommenda-
tion for secondment?

11. Were the powers of the Public service
Commission in anyway usurped in the matter of se-
conding Mr. Wellington to this post?

12. If the answer to No. 11 above is in the af-
firmative, will the Minister state who is guilty of
such conduct?

13. Has Mr. L. S. Wellington taken up the post?

14. If not, why not?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, the Reply to
the hon. member's question is as follows:-

1. The policy respecting the making of ap-
pointments to the post of Education Officer in the
Ministry of Education is that Education Officers
concerned with Secondary Schools must hold a Uni-
versity degree while those concerned with Primary
Schools may be non-graduates. In every case, pro-
fessional training and teaching experience are es-
sential pre-requisites.

The procedure is that the Ministry may
either recommend to the Public Service Commission







1993


that the vacancy be advertised, or submit a nomina-
tion for the appointment, with supporting reasons.

2. With regard to the seconding of officers
or teachers to the posts of Education Officer, the
same policy outlined at (1) above is observed. The
normal procedure is that the Ministry submits nomi-
nations for confirmation by the Public Service Com-
mission.

3. The Ministry of Education nominated Mr.
Wellington for secondment to act as Education Of-
ficer until a permanent appointment would be made.

4. The post had not been advertised at the
time.


5. Does not arise.

6. Does not arise.

7. Does not arise.

8. Does not arise.

9. No, Sir.

10. The recommendation was made in ac-
dance with the procedure stated in paragraph 2 above.

11. No, Sir.

12. Does not arise.

13. No, Sir.

14. When the appropriate form was submitted
to the Public Service Commission, they did not ap-
prove the proposal to appoint Mr. L. S. Wellington
on secondment from Harrison College.
2.40 p.m.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I would like to hear
from the Minister if seconding an officer, as was
the case of Mr. Wellington, before the post was ad-
vertised was in keeping with Government's policy?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Will the hon. member re-
peat the question?

Mr. HINDS: I ask if the Minister would tell us
if, in seconding Mr. Wellington for the post of Edu-
cation Officer before the post was advertised, it was
in keeping with Government's policy?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I would say that this is what
has been done before, and can be done according to
the exigencies of the Service within a particular
Ministry. The point is not whether the secondment
can be done or is done before the advertisement.
The point is to get the secondment approved by the
Public Service Commission.
Mr. HINDS: Does the Minister feel that the Pub-
lic Service Commission ought to be familiar with
the exigencies in the Service to which the Minister
just referred?


1993


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, as a general but not
necessarily an absolute rule, because emergencies
may occur in a Ministry over the week-end, and
P.S.C. would only know about them when so informed.
Generally speaking, they are entitled to be kept in-
formed of these matters, but they cannot know every-
thing until told.

Mr. HINDS: Does the Minister agree that in se-
conding Mr. Wellington to this post before it was
advertised was prejudicing the chances of applicants
after the post was advertised when the time came
for the post to be filled?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: It is not necessarily so, Mr.
Speaker. I can well think of a case in which you can
second an officer to the post, and then you advertise
the post and he takes his chance with everybody else
and can lose that chance. This is the luck of the
draw.

Mr. HINDS: I think the Minister, Sir, in reply
to No. 8, said that it does not arise. Has the post
been advertised since the tabling of the questions?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I must have notice of that
question, Mr. Speaker, I have nothing here to indi-
cate that that is either so or not so.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, has the post been
filled since the tabling of these questions?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am afraid I must return
the same sort of answer, although I believe that the
post of Education Officer has recently been filled and
that Mr. Best has been appointed; but, whether that
post is this one, I am unable to say.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Does the Minister
prepare the answers for himself, or is it something
handed to him? Imagine him saying what he has just
said!

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, the questions have
been somewhat lengthy. At No. 13, Sir, I have the
Minister's reply, regarding Mr. Wellington taking
upthe post, as "No". Is the Minister telling me now
that Mr. Wellington did not go in the Ministry and
carry out the duties as Education Officer for a pe-
riod before these Questions were tabled?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am not telling the hon.
member that, nor am I telling the hon. member that
he did. I just do not know.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, does the Minister feel
it is fair to us on this side of the House to have him
to speak for education? He does not know this, and
he is not familiar with this. That is what I am say-
ing. Does he think it is fair to us to have him an-
answering matters regarding education?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I would think, Mr. Speaker,
that this would depend upon the Questions asked. If
the hon. member can be astute enough to ask me
Questions the answers to which I know, I will answer







1994


them. But if he asks me Questions the answers to
which I do not know, I cannot answer them.

Mr. HINDS: Will the Minister tell us who will
be in a better position to know, than he is?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I would think, from the way
this is going, the hon. member himself. (Laughter)

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, is the Minister still
saying that Mr. Wellington was not seconded?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, I am saying he was not
seconded, because I have already said if I have not
said it before, I say it now that, when the particu-
lar form conveying the request was submitted to the
Public Service Commission for approval, they did
not approve the proposal. Therefore not having ap-
proved the proposal, I cannot say that Mr. Welling-
ton was seconded.

Mr. HINDS: Can the Minister say what date that
form was submitted to the Public Service Commis -
sion for approval?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am afraid I cannot answer
that, because I see nothing on the file to guide me in
that respect.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS rose.....

Mr. SPEAKER: Has the hon.junior member for
St. Peter given way?

Mr. HINDS: Yes, Sir.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The Hon. Leader of
the House, I presume, can speak only for himself,
but are we to understand that is the way Questions
are answered? A file is handed to a Minister; he reads
certain parts of it, and then he says: "I cannot tell
you; it is not here "!

Mr. Speaker, we on this side of the House will
have to make very strong representation to Your
Honour as to whether answers are in order when the
Minister gets up to answer and merely says:"From
what I have before me, so-and-so I can tell you." Is
this his habit? Is this the rule? We cannot ask him
to speak for his colleagues,because they see what
the questions are and see the answers for themselves
and get the information. Anybody can get up and just
look at the file and hope to read something, if that
is the way Questions are going to be answered. I
would ask the Hon. Leader of the House to answer
whether he gives us answers merely from reading
from a file handed to him?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I would have thought, Mr.
Speaker, that the answer to that was obvious. I have
to take the answers from the file; that is how Gov-
ernment operates.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Can anything be more
preposterous than that? They take a year sometimes


to answer Questions, and they can only answer by
having the files put in their hands. It is absolutely
contemptuous of the Opposition. That is the whole
essence of Parliamentary procedure.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member may not make
a speech now. He may continue.
2.50 p.m.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Is not the hon. mem-
ber aware that the whole essence of having Questions
and answers is that the Opposition may be able to
dig out of the Government information as regards
things that have to come to their knowledge, but of
which they have no full or official notice? Does the
hon. member say that when a Question is put speci-
fically to him, because sometimes the Opposition
just says "the appropriate Minister" but you know to
whom you put the Question, he does not then see for
himself, examine the files for himself, get answers
prepared and then read out the answers? I am wait-
ing for an answer. This sitting down silently despis-
ing the Opposition and not caring whether they answer
or not is absolutely below any dignity in a democra-
tic Assembly.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member is not entitled
to make any speech at that stage. He may make his
point in another way, as he very well knows.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: May Isuggest that Your
Honour should ask the Minister whether he is dis-
posed to answer?

Mr. SPEAKER: A Question is put which accor-
ding to our Standing Orders, as yetunamended, the
Minister may answer or may not.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: He may give a reason
for not answering. After all, this is not the only As-
sembly that hon. members know of and have seen the
working of parliamentary procedure. You give a rea-
son for not answering.

Mr. SPEAKER: Iam afraidI do not detect a sup-
plementary question there.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I think I noted cor-
rectly that the Minister said in reply to Question 3
that the Ministry nominated Mr. Wellington or words
to that effect. The Ministry nominated Mr. Welling-
ton to do what?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, the additional
portion of the reply to question 3 was "nominated Mr.
Wellington for secondment to act as Education Of-
ficer until a permanent appointment would be made",

Mr. HINDS: Sir, did he act?
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Well the answer to that is
"no". The proposal was not approved lby the Public.
Service Commission.

Mr. HINDS: How much time elapsed between his
nomination and the forwarding of the form to the
Public Service Commission?







1995


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: This I do not know, Mr.
Speaker.

Mr. HINDS: What did Mr. Wellington do between
the time he was nominated by the Ministry and until
word was received that the Public Service Commis-
sion did not approve of this recommendation?

Mr. SPEAKER: As to the question "what did Mr.
Wellington do", I am afraid that is too wide. Would
the hon. member make it more specific?

Mr. HINDS: I mean with respect to his being
nominated to act.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: This I do not know.

Mr. HINDS: Has the Ministry of Education paid
Mr. Wellington any sum at all in respect of services
performed for the Ministry of Education upto the
date of the tabling of this question?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am unable to say, Mr.
Speaker. If they had not employed him, I cannot see
how they could pay him.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, is the Minister aware
that Mr. L. S. Wellington is a Master attached to the
staff of Harrison College, and he was so at the time
of the tabling of this question?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes. This is in reply to the
Question itself. I am aware of this. This being the
case, he could only have been paid by the Governing
Body of Harrison College who was then at the ma-
terial time employing him.

Mr. HINDS: Could the Minister tell us if Mr.
Wellington's nomination for secondment was com-
municated by the Ministry of Education to the Gov-
erning Body of Harrison College at any time?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am unable to say.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, can the Minister tell
us at all how Mr. Wellington got inside the Ministry
of Education?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I am afraid not, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. HINDS: Who in the Ministry of Education
nominated Mr. Wellington for secondment?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I would think that this kind
of nomination would be done by the Permanent Secre-
tary to the Ministry, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. HINDS: Would he be acting on instructions
received from the Minister if he carried out such
action?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No. The Minister has no ju-
risdiction in personnel matters.

Mr. HINDS: Sir, I understand the Minister to
say that the Minister has no jurisdiction in perspn-


nel matters. Does the Minister know that Mr.
Wellington is a personal friend of the Minister?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: If the hon. member wishes
to tell me that, I have no objection to hearing it.

Mr. HINDS: Does the Minister think it was fair
to Mr. Wellington to have nominated him under such
circumstances?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: The hon. member would
have to say the circumstances in which he deems it
unfair. The question is too wide. I really could not
answer that one.

Mr. HINDS: Well, Sir, the Minister has asked
me to state the circumstances. I am only permitted
to aska supplementary, but in reply to the Minister,
leading up to a supplementary and with your per-
mission, I am willing to state that from the Minis-
ter's reply......

Mr. SPEAKER: Perhaps the hon. member may
put it this way: "Is the Minister not aware......?"

Mr. HINDS: I am grateful to Your Honour. Is
the Minister not aware that Mr. Wellington was given
a sort of fare -well at Harrison College immediately
before the tabling of this Question?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No. Sir.

Mr. HINDS: Are you saying he did not have the
party or you are not aware of it?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: The question was whether I
was aware, and I said "no".

Mr. HINDS: Not aware of what? Of the holding
of the party?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, no. I was not aware of
what was asked.

Mr. HINDS: Is the Minister in possession of any
knowledge at all that Mr. Wellington served within
the compound of the Ministry of Education for a
period nearing two weeks on secondment?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No, Sir. I was not aware of
that.

Mr. HINDS: Did it happen?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I do not know, Sir.

Mr. HINDS: As a result of the tabling of this
Question, did the Minister not try to find out any of
these things, and was none of these things brought
to light for the Minister?


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: The answer to that would be
"yes". If things had not been brought to light, I
would not have been able to answer the hon.-rmem-
ber's questions. It is the supplementaries which he
finds difficulty in getting answered, but this is be-







1996


cause he is asking these things of which I personally
am not aware.

Mr. HINDS: Sir, is the Minister speaking for
himself or for the Ministry of Education?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, if you ask me
whether I know that a farewell party was held, you
are not asking me anything about the Ministry of Edu -
cation; you are asking me about myself. If I tell you
Iamnot aware of it, you have to take it that I am not
aware of it. If you ask me things that I know about,
I say that I know, I agree with you or I disagree with
you. It is pretty simple.
3.00 p.m.

GOVERNMENT'S POLICY re OPERATION
OF SCOTLAND FACTORY
Mr. SPEAKER: Question No. 202, standing in
the name of the hon. senior member for St. James.
That is on page 14 left-hand column.

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the ap-
propriate Minister:-

Will the Minister state Government's policy with
respect to the operation of the Scotland Factory, St.
Andrew?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, on behalf
of the Hon. Minister of Agriculture, Labour and Na-
tional Insurance, the Reply to the hon. member's
Question is as follows:-
As a result of an insufficient supply of canes
duringthis year's reaping season, the Scotland Fac-
tory which was being operated uneconomically was
forced to close down. Since it is unlikely that the
situation will improve in future years, the Agricul-
tural Development Corporation has been authorised
to dispose of the machinery.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, is the Scotland Fac-
tory the only concern of Government that has been
operating uneconomically during the past year?

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid that I do not regard
that as a reasonable supplementary.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, is there
any Government institution which has been operating
economically within the last year?

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid that I do not regard
that Question as being any different from the former
in-so-far as coming somewhat outside the scope of
this Question.

Mr. CRAIG: Will the Minister be able to tell us
if this factory was closed down during the harvesting
of the peasants' canes during the middle of the har-
vesting season or when all of the canes were har-
vested by the peasants in St. Andrew and its
surrounding areas?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: It was closed during
the reaping season and the factory had made a cer-
tain amount of sugar, or molasses or syrup, and


then due to the lack of peasants sending their canes;
I think it required 4,000 tons of canes per day to op-
erate economically, and the maximum amount which
it was receiving was within the vicinity of 2,400 tons
rather than 4,000 tons. It was uneconomicalto run it,
as the peasants were sending their canes to other
factories over the hills. Due to that, it was more than
uneconomical. In other words, the financial position
of it became worse than it was previously, due to its
not receiving sufficient canes. That was the reason
for the closing down.

Mr. CRAIG: Will the Minister tell us what is re-
sponsible for the peasants sending their canes to
other factories, and not to the Scotland District fac-
tory which is Government-owned?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: In the Scotland area the
peasants have always received a lower price for canes
at the Scotland factory than they received over the
hills due to the recovery rate. The price that they
can receive, say, at Andrews or at any of the other
factories has always been more than they have been
receiving at the Scotland factory. I suppose that that
is one of the reasons why they have transferred their
canes to other factories, although the transportation
per ton would run into the vicinity of $1 to $1.50 per
ton more.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker is it not
a fact that the Government made available to the
peasants the trucks paid for by the Agricultural De-
velopment Corporation, so as to deprive Scotland
Factory of the canes in order to give them an excuse
for shutting it down for the same transportation of
which the Hon. Minister has just spoken?


Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, will the
hon. member repeat the Question? I have not heard
the hon. member's Question; my attention was de-
flected for a bit. Will the hon. member please state
his Question again?

Mr. SPEAKER: Will the hon. member be good
enough to repeat his Question?

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Is it not a fact that the
Government made available to peasants in the Scot-
land area trucks owned by the Agricultural Develop-
ment Corporation for the purpose of carrying their
canes away from Haggatts so as to give them an ex-
cuse for shutting down Haggatts?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I could not say that. I
have heard absolutely nothing about that. There is
no report as to that on the file, but it would be rather
peculiar that the Agricultural Development Corpora-
tion, whose interest it is to operate Scotland Factory,
would have provided transportation to take canes
away from the factory.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Is the Minister say-
ing that the trucks from the Agricultural Develop-
ment Corporation did not carry away canes from
the Scotland area to Vaucluse and indeed, I believe,








1997


that on one occasion they carried them to St. Philip
as well? Is the Minister saying that the A.D.C.'s
trucks did not carry away peasants' canes from the
Scotland area?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I did not say that trucks
did not carry away canes from the Scotland area; I
said that it would be very peculiar to me that the
Agricultural Development Corporation should furn-
ishtrucks to take away canes from a business which
theywere operatingwhen they needed the very canes.
I cannot say whether that is true or not, but there
might have been canes carried away from the area
due to a few peasants still having canes at the close -
ing down of the factory. That might have been a mat-
ter of finance, but even this I cannot say.

Mr. CRAIG: In view of the fact that Scotland
factory is Government-owned, does the Government
think it desirable to pay a lower wage at Scotland
factory than what private enterprise would pay?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, Scotland
factory has not always been Government-owned.The
price which has always been paid in. the Scotland
area for canes by factories, due to production the
machinery might not have been up to the standard of,
say,modern factories, and the production rate has
been lower and they pay practically on that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, did it not
occur to the Government that if the factory which they
themselves were running was not getting canes be -
cause somebody other than their factory was paying
more money, it was the duty of the Government to
pay more and keep these canes and keep the factory
alive?

I put it again to the hon. member. Here is a
Government factory, and the Government presum-
ably wanted to let the people know that they are doing
something for them. Knowing that a rival next door
was paying more, did it not occur to the Government
that they should pay at least what its rival was pay-
ing in order to keep the peasants, to whon they are
looking for votes, from sending their canes to Hag-
gatts,so that Haggatts would still be open for work?
Did that not occur to the Government or did not the
Government deliberately seize a method of shutting
down Haggatts because they had pressure from cer-
tain quarters? I hope that the Hon. Minister under-
stands the two questions.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, in the first
place, the acquisition of Haggatts factory back down
in 1963 or whenever it was acquired, was merely
an expedient in the first instance. It was then well
known to the Government that Haggatts factory was
uneconomical to run, dilapidated and needed new
machinery and equipment. It took the peasants in the
area about three crop seasons to realise that they
would have been more beneficially served if they had
accepted the offer which was made by the Govern-
ment then, to assist them in the transportation of
their canes to factories which produce more effici-
ently, which had the modern machinery and which


could afford to pay the best possible price for
canes.
3.10 p.m.

It took them about three years to learn that we
still have to do that. They are now doing that on their
own. The Government are not doing that any more.
The Government tried to serve them, knowing fully
well that the factory would have to be closed sooner
or later. It was an old dilapidated factory. I would
not worry to call it "old iron", as it was referred
to some years ago. I would not worry to call it scrap
iron, but it has turned out to be more or less that.
The position is that it took about three years for
the peasants themselves and the farmers in the area
to be convinced and to realise what was told to them
in 1963 at the time when I happened to be Minister
of Agriculture and Fisheries.


Sir, I speak with intimate knowledge of these
matters, and I had to persuade my colleagues, when
we were more or less trapped in Belleplaine, to at
least amend, waive, or vary to some extent, a de-
cision that was taken not to purchase, and we had
to purchase to get back home safely.



Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid that Question Time
has expired, it now being 3.15 o'clock.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: If this is Private Mem-
bers' Time and we say: "let us go on......"

Mr. SPEAKER: If it is agreeable to both sides
not nowto proceed with Private Members' Business,
it is entirely agreeable to me. May I have an indica-
tion of the feeling of the House?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I formally beg to
move that we continue the discussion on Question
Time.

Mr. CRAIG: I beg to second that.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I do not understand
the Motion. The hon. member did not state an exten-
sion for how long. If we are going to do this every
Tuesday, then next June or July will find two Budget
Speeches here to be replied to.

Mr. SPEAKER: In my view Standing Order 14
would have had to be suspended. May I just ask for
the general feeling of the House whether it is in fa-
vour of suspending Standing Order 14 for the pur-
pose mentioned by the hon. Leader of the Opposition?

Hon. MEMBERS: No.

Mr.J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, Question
42on the Order Paper. I believe notice was given of
it in April. If the answer to this Question is ready, I
should like the hon. junior member for St. Thomas,
Minister of Communications and Works, to give it.
I should say, as senior representative for St. Thomas,
I get a great number of requests from persons who







1998


live in Porey's Spring, Barker's Corner, Content
Tenantry and so on as to what is happening to their
petition relating to street lights. The Question was
asked more than a year ago, and I would like the
Minister to answer it.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member has made his
point, but I am afraid that, as this proposal has been
made after 3.15 p.m., automatically, we must now
decide ...... (ASIDES) Igather that there is no ques-
tion being agreed upon.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, you are
there to see that there is no infringement of the
rights of the Opposition. How can it affect the Gov-
ernment if we say that we wish to go on, except be-
cause of a spirit of nasty controversy?

Mr. SPEAKER: It is also the duty of the Speaker
to see that there is no infringement of Standing Or-
ders, and it is my Ruling that, in respect of this
present time,we resume Private Members' Business.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: In that case, I beg to
move that Standing Order 14 be now suspended.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: I beg to second that.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Standing Orders 5, 14, 16, 18, 19, 40 and 45 be
suspended for the remainder of today's sitting.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS:That is the only way to
bringhome to the feeling of the Leader of the House
if he has any that we have to play the game, and
that the Opposition are entitled to treat their own
time in their own way.

When I gave notice this morning of my Reso-
lutionabout having no confidence in the Government,
the hon. member proceeded again to show his con-
tempt for the Opposition.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid the hon. member
cannot even give a purview of his address on the
Motion censuring the Government at this stage. It
has not yet even been printed or circulated.

The question that Standing Orders 5, 14, 16, 18, 19,40 and
45 be now suspended was put and resolved in the affirmative,the
House dividing as follows:-

AYES: Mr. YEARWOOD; Hon. J. C. TUDOR;
Hon. C. E. TALMA; Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON; Hon.
N. W. BOXILL; Mr. LOWE; Mr. CORBIN; Mr.
WEEKS; Mr. HOPPIN and Mr. LYNCH 10.

NOES: Mr. HINDS; Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS;
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS; Mr. CRAIG and Mr. SMITH
-5.

Mr. SPEAKER: Accordingly I declare the
Standing Orders duly suspended as from now.
3.20 p.m.


PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Private Members' Business be now taken until
4.30 p.m.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

RESUMPTION OF DEBATE ON
BUDGETARY PROPOSALS

Mr. SPEAKER: This is now the time when Pri-
vate Members' Business shall be taken, andthe first
item therein stands in the name of the Hon. and
Learned Leader of the Opposition to resume debate
on the passing of a Resolution condemning the Gov-
ernment's financial proposals for the fiscal year
1968-69 as contained in the Financial Statement and
Budgetary Proposals made on 2nd July, by the Hon.
Minister of Finance, and when the debate on this
matter was adjourned on 6th August, 1968, the hon.
senior member for St. Joseph was addressing the
Chair. He may resume if he cares now.

Mr. SMITH. Mr. Speaker, after all something
will have to be done as far as the replies to the Bud-
getary Proposals are concerned. You will remem-
ber, Sir, that debate on last year's Budgetary
Proposals has not yet been concluded, and this
year's is going on in the same way. Now Budgetary
Proposals are very important. They are responsi-
ble for running the country and also for pulling money
out of people's pocket by way of taxation. After the
Prime Minister delivers his Budgetary Proposals,
I feel that immediately after the replies should be
made rather than having something crop up every
meeting day and having this matter pushed further
and further back. It does not help the people and
things become stale. Now I have to reply and I am
going to do so.


I feel that we in the Opposition should fight hard
for a day to be set aside, even if it is the day after
the Prime Minister delivers his speech, for replies
to be made rather than having the matter debated
for ten minutes, half an hour and sometimes not at
all at subsequent sittings. It is notgoodenough if we
are serious about the people's business, and just as
I had to fight for a little time on the air, I will have to
fight for a day to be set aside for the replies.

Sir, one man can get up on the floor of this House
according to the Constitution, and tax me and you
as he thinks fit, and that is the end of it. The Op-
position does not have a chance soon after to let the
people know if the proposals are fair or not. The
people do not want to hear anything now; in fact,
they cannot hear it because it is not being broadcast
any more and the Advocate newspaper is finished
with that, although it is the only paper in this coun-
try through which people should be able to know
something.







1999


Mr. SPEAKER: I would point out that there are
other newspapers.

Mr. SMITH: There are other newspapers, Sir,
but...... We in the Opposition are not taking this se-
riously and we have to fight to get things our way. I
have nearly forgotten what I have to say, and if I
stand up here for another five minutes, I may be-
come dumb because there is the possibility that,
having to fiddle with this all the time, I will forget
what I want to say. I have a note here on the same
Advocate drawing to the public's attention how im-
portant Budget Day is, and there is an article under
the caption "The enquiring reporter asks what are
your impressions of the 1968-69 Budget."

Mr. SPEAKER: May I take it that the hon. mem-
ber proposes to read extractsfrom books or papers
other than newspapers in support of his argument?

Mr. SMITH: Sir, I do not understand it. Put it to
me more clearly. That is a little bit too tall and may-
be you may throw me down before you finish.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member may refer to
notes.

Mr. SMITH: I am referring to my notes; but when
I say the Advocate I am so much out for them for not
letting the people know what is happening that I will
continue to answer them. These are some of the views
of people in this country relative to the Budgetary
Proposals, and I am entitled to let this House know
these views. Now when you are budgeting, Mr.
Speaker, you are budgeting not for dead people, but
for living human beings, and they are entitled to their
views; so these form part of my notes.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member may read from
his notes, but may not of course read extracts from
newspapers.

Mr. SMITH: These are my documents, and fol-
lowing are the views of one of the taxpayers of this
country. I will not call his name yet, but he is Pre-
sident of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and a
Company Director. These are his views: "Generally
I think that everyone realises that the Government
requires additional revenue to cover the cost of ex-
panded service. The Budget that is presented is
probably the least painful way of providing the ad-
ditional revenue which is required."
3.30 p.m.

Sir, I underline those words. "The Budget that
is presented is probably the least painful." It is no
pain for him. "However, nobody likes to pay addi-
tional taxation. I hope that the new income tax which
is promised would provide some relief by increasing
the allowance and having the personal rates less
steeply graduated. I am pleased to see that there is
no increase of personal income tax at this stage. The
method used to increase taxation in what is con-
sidered as luxury items and by increasing certain
licences and fees......"


Now, Sir, this gentleman says that it is not pain-
ful and its intention is to tax luxury items. In the
Budgetary Proposals here, you will note that in re-
lation to Falernum Sir, I beganto make my speech
on the Budget, but I did not have any time, as you
know; but this gentleman says that the tax is on luxury
goods. You should not, or you would never classify
Falernum as a luxury. Falernum is a little sugar
boiled up and flavoured to suit, with some water, and
yet this Company Director, Mr. John Stanley Goddard,
is telling us that the Government taxed luxury items.
He knows more about Falernum than I do, I am sure
about that, and still he pleased to say that the taxes
are on luxury items. I have the honourto go all over
these big hotels, not merely to look, but also to par-
take, and sometimes I make full use of that, and I do
not see one drop of Falernum being served. Sir, even
if I were to come to your home and you offered me
Falernum, I would leave immediately.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am very grateful for that in-
formation; I will not offer it. (Laughter)

Mr. SMITH: That is the drinkforthevery poor-
est people and do you know what they call a local
champagne? Falernum and soda. That is the only
drink that the working-class people of this country -
I do not mean the ones who "fire" alcohol; I mean
the other people. In other words, when they are
going "soft", they have Falernum and soda, and yet
it is being taxed so highly by the Prime Minister of
this country. I suppose that because it is drunk so
freely and so much of it is being consumed, that he
takes it upon himself to tax it and put it along in the
company of the luxury items. It is the drink for the
very poorest people of this country; yet this gentle-
man is saying that the Government has only taxed
luxury items. He is happy and very glad to see that
hands are being taken off the personal income tax.
This Budget will suit him; this Budget is in his fa-
vour; therefore he must compliment it and he must
give it his blessing because, taking it from what he
has said, nothing has been done to his income, but to
the poor man's Falernum, alocalproductwhichyou
see on the screen, which you see all over. They are
asking us to 'buy local', and now that you are making
an effort to make the local product a success, down
comes the hammer from the Prime Minister. That is
only because he may have found out, orit might have
been recommended to him, that he will get a nice
slice by hitting Falernum, forgetting completely that
it is made from our local sugar cane, and forgetting
that it is being manufactured in this island. But it is
put alongside the imported high-class drinks The
only way in which some of the people of this island
can get something out of these high class bottles, is
after they have been emptied by the big shots and
they go to the standpipe and put a little water in the
empty bottles and partake of what was in the bottles
with the label on them. They would not know what
are high-class wines, high-class whisky and high-
class brandy.

Sir, you may think that I am making jokes. At
one Christmas I offered one of my supporters some







2000


'of my drinks. He said: "Skipper, Ihave never tasted,
this, what is it?" I said: "It is something which will
do you good." You must know how some people would
be able to buy a little whisky or a little brandy or a
little champagne. Well, you can tax them; but as to
this man, if I had offered him Falernum, he would
not have asked what it is.

We come back to the local gin. This gin which
is being classed as white rum with a little gin es-
sence, is not "Gordon" or "Gilbeys" or anything
like that; it is the same rum that you are drinking.
The brewers or stillers or whatever you care to
call them, just buy a little essence and put in the
white rum and it is called gin, andwe drink it as gin.
But, in truth and in fact, comparatively speaking, it
is not gin.
3.40 p.m.
Yet an increase of $5 and over per gallon? Do you
know, Sir, that the tax on those two items I see
the hon. senior member for St. George shaking his
head. I do not know what he means by shaking his
head; I suppose he may put something else in white
rum other than essence.

Mr. LOWE: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order.
With all due respect to the hon. senior member for
St. Joseph, as a shopkeeper, I cannot allow him to
say things which are detrimental to the community.
Neither local gin nor Falernum has gone up.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member has made a
point, but I must say that I am doubtful whether it is
a point of order.

Mr. SMITH: I wanted him to get up, Sir. This is
the first time I was able to get him up since I have
been in this House. I want the hon. member to un-
derstand that when I was a shopkeeper he was not
one. He may think that local gin is not made with
gin essence. He may be out to believe everything that
is being told to him. I would not doubt that if they
told him it was Gordon's Gin, he would believe it is.
He is speaking from his experience, andIam speak-
ing from mine. He is saying that local gin is not
made up of white rum.

Mr. LOWE: On a point of order. I never said
that.

Mr. SMITH: I raised the point in here and the
Prime Minister did not deny it. Now the hon. mem-
ber says that gin has not gone up. If it has not gone
up, then he took it off. The hon. member should be
honest enough to get up here and say that it has not
gone up because the Prime Minister had been in-
terviewed by merchants in Bridgetown; they recom-
mended it, and he took it off. That is what he should
have done instead of standing here and saying it has
not gone up. I have my facts here.

A lot of us can read things upside down. On one
occasion an old lady told her husband: "yourhead is
too big to have sense." I am looking for the page,
Sir, because I did not mark it off.It is here: "Wine,
Whisky, Brandy, Gin not exceeding strength of


'proof." Gin is $4 per gallon, Sir; gin not exceeding
strength of proof is $4 per gallon; gin exceeding
strength of proof is $4 per proof gallon. Now this is
gin here, Sir, and the hon. senior member for St.
George is telling this hon. Chamber that gin has not
gone up. (Mr. LOWE: Gin Essence has not gone up.)

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order,
Mr. Speaker. Is the hon. member in order when he
makes remarks like that?

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid I have been hearing
remarks from both sideswhenIwantonlyto hear the-
hon. senior member for St. Joseph at the present
time.

Mr. SMITH: I was making a point. The hon.
member does not know what has gone up from what
has gone down, because he is in the air where the
wind is blowing cool in his wheel chair, and he does
not know what is going on in a little shop. I am chal-
lenging him now that the increase on gin is $4 per
gallon. I can only go by what is in front of me. We
have to go by what the Prime Minister puts here
on this sheet. So far as Falernum is concerned, I
challenge the hon. member to get up here and say
that the dealers in Bridgetown did not have to ap-
proach the authorities concerned because they had
made a mess of gin and Falernum. I would be glad
if you would get up here now and deny that. Trying
to be smart, or to make me look foolish, he says
that gin has not gone up. He talks about Gin Es-
sence, but I have not seen gin essence here. I see
the words "Local gin:" white rum with essence put
into it. I did not say thatginessence has gone up, be-
cause essence is only a little thing you put a few
drops into the rum and it smells like gin, but it is
not gin.

Sir, the Hon. Prime Minister thought it was gin,
too, and it caused him to put up the price. This par-
ticular gentleman is saying that only luxuries were
increased. He says that we must have money to run
the Government. But when you tax the people of this
country, you must spend the money wisely. Sir, I
made my notes because I had expected to make a
2-year matter of these Budget Speeches. I took time
off to make these notes, and as soon as anybody
slips or tries to fool my people when I say my
people, Sir, you know whom I mean: the poorest
class of people in this country. I come from among
them; I do not care where I am today, I will never
forget the conditions down there where I came from;
I will do everything that is possible to bring them up
here. Some of us up here are doing the opposite.
Some of us are out, and some of us do not care who
are in.

I will never forget those people, Sir, and before
I should die and go to Heaven, I am going to write a
book on the poor people of,this country. I am going
to write it in such a way that everybody can under-
stand what is in it. Some people write books that
even themselves cannot understand what is written
in them. One tried and failed completely.
3.50 p.m.







2001


Now, Sir, I will refer to my notes again for an-
other chap. He said: "I think thatthe 1968-69 Budget
is very fair indeed." Now this is what this type of
person calls "fair". When I am saying "unfair" they
are saying "fair". "Naturally the Government needs
money to run the affairs of the country and this is one
of the means by which they can raise money for this
purpose. However, I am very glad to see that itiner-
ant vendors were taxed. I endorse the Prime Minis-
ter's statement that they constitute unfair competi-
tion to the established business houses which have
large staff and high overhead to meet." He is now
talking about "unfair": so you can see where the
wind is blowing. The Tax is fair only because these
itinerant traders are being taxed and because they
mete out unfair competition to those big firms in
Bridgetown which have their staff to pay.

Sir, you would not know, and I am going to tell
you that these itinerant traders take a risk, because
they credit everybody with two eyes and rely on sheer
luck to get it back. These people take years to collect
$20. Just imagine one of them crediting a suit for
$30 or $40, and every Monday morning or every day
in the week he collects 25 cents, and some weeks
he collects nothing at all. Why don't these big busi-
ness places do the same thing? They would not have
to run all over the country, but they could give the
same facilities for owning a decent suit or buying
clothes for one's children at a payment of 25 cents
a week. Not one would ever do that. They would pull
up their stakes, close their doors, and do everything
before they did that; but this person calls it unfair
competition, although these people are buying the
cloth from the same big firms for cash and credit-
ing it in the country. They are so much out to kill
the itinerant trader that I believe they might have
asked the Prime Minister to do it in that way.

Mr. Speaker, you could always believe me. There
was a particular lady living on my land. I do not know
if it is her nature, her blood or what, but something
is very sweet about her and she had so many children,
sometimes two at birth, that she could not send them
to school. She had them running allaroundthe place.
The husband, poor fellow, got weak. He was bound to
get weak because the job he was doingwas too much.
Along came these people and credited her with two
suits of clothes for each child, and they were able
to go to school and be educated. Now, Sir, both the
lady and her husband have stopped working, the chil-
dren are in England and sending back money for
their parents, and they are as happy as I am. If these
people had not done that, these children would have
come up without any education or clothes, and I
daresay, the old man would have passed on and the
children would be knocking about the streets. That is
the meaning of these itinerant traders.

Again, you have a big Company Director, one
Mr. George Challenor, telling this public that he is
pleased with everything the Prime Minister did, and
as far as the taxes are concerned, they are fair,
though it is unfair for the unfair competition. Do you
think poor little Fix-it-Right Garage could compete
against the big garages in the City? It is impossible.


They would only have to sell their goods at cost for
one month and poor Fix-it-Right would go through the
eddoes. These people go into the rural areas with
their goods and are doing this country a service.
I am only replying to this because any person read-
ing it will feel that all is well, but all could not be
well.

Now, Sir, we come to the professionals. This is
what one said: "I think this is a fair budget. It was
well thought out and well presented. The Registra-
tion fee for professional people, this applies inmany
other countries as an additional source of revenue,and
I think that the amount suggested here is quite ac-
ceptable." This is from Dr. Douglas Carter. I am
saying here and now that the Prime Minister has in-
sulted these professionals by imposing such a small
fee, and this is where I have to disagree with the
Prime Minister and Dr. Carter. Sir, I will not call
any name now, but I heard that the home of some
doctor was broken some time ago, and I never ex-
pected that one man would have so much money in
his purse to be carried away. I believe it was only a
day's takings, because the previous day's money
would have been sent to the bank already. He is an
intelligent doctor and he would never keep so much
money in his place in such a way that an ordinary
thief could steal it. He should never have disclosed
how much it was.
4.00 p.m.

This is a doctor, and another doctor is saying
that he is pleased with that and that it is fair. That
is an insult. They would never say: "Increase the
fees by that little thing" because how could they in-
crease it? The biggest mathematician could never
say how much perperson is an increase for this little
"nay nay" thing that the Prime Minister has put on
professionals. He is a professional too and he may
be making way for when the table turns so that he
did not hit them. If I were an adviser in his Cabinet,
if I were one of his Ministers, I would say "Oh, no;
if you are going to hit the itinerant $500, multiply
these boys by $100 because they are making it." I do
not like, and you have heard me say it many times
Sir, to interfere with my doctor and my cook; but
sometimes too far East is West. If I should allow or
make my cook feel that I am afraid of her, I may
have to be putting on what she is to put on, and she
will be putting on what I am to put on. I would still
have to let her know where she is wrong.

As to the professionals, you are one, Sir, and I
am sure that you would not have any grouse. You
would never say that it is too small or that it is too
high; whatever the Prime Minister puts on, you
would 'take it easy'. I know thatyou are of that tem-
perament. You do not want it for yourself and you
must be saying: "I am verygladthathe has not gone
any higher; but if he went higher, Ican still go higher
yet". And what is it? A little "nay-nay" something
like $120 a year or something like that. It is nothing
at all when the takings can be so much for somebody
else. I think the Good Book says, I forget it now, but
some people put their things where thieves can come
in and carry them away. I cannot refer to it but the







2002


Deputy Prime Minister can do that, because he knows
the particular chapter and verse where youwould get
that. Iwouldnot call upon him to refresh my memory.
There is some part in the Holy Book which says I
remember it now "Lay not up treasures on earth
where thieves break in and steal." This particular
doctor did not read that passage; well, he did not
have time to read his Bible, but he laid up and the
thieves broke in and carried it away. Yet, the Prime
Minister held on to my Falernum and my little gin
with a little gin essence in it and hit it by four dol-
lars a gallon more. The doctors just look at you and
charge you five dollars; I understand that it is $8
now and it is a big insult. I think that some lawyers
said that they have no right to hit the lawyers and I
wonder why not? They are not going into the Court
until they draw; they must draw their berry: other-
wise the case will be put off untilnever-ever morn-
ing. They are not appearing until the berry comes
out, and now you are going to hit my Falernum and
my white rum and allowing them to get away! This is
too slight; he has insulted them.

Mr. Speaker, I am coming home with this now: A
Barrister-at-law...... "Behind the facade of taxing
luxury goods, the budget is actually biting deeper
into the living standards of the working-class peo-
ple". He is my brother this time. (ASIDES) I have
never seen a black star yet. (Laughter) As soon as
I see a black star, I am going to make right with my
Almighty and say: "Father, take me into thyhands."
It goes on: "the Budget is actually biting into the
living standards of the working-class people. With-
out price control such increases in taxation as the
Government has placed on those who can pay, will
be passed on to the working-class consumerbyeven
higher prices. Down there at the bottom of society
those who can least afford are being made to pay
for CARIFTA, top-heavy administration, $450,000
for two houses and the failure adequately to tax
foreign business interests operating here. Since this
Budget I am even more concerned as to how the man
and woman who get $13.44 per week or less will
exist."

There you are, Sir, I willtryto compare it: You
have three big shots and I would not say what I call
them, but you know what I call them ends. You get
an "end" bringing up the rear now still remember-
ing his people. Since that, the Prime Minister has to
scrape the bottom of the bucket to look for money
to run this country; I daresay that he could not wait
until everything goes down the hill and then to look
around for it; but you can clearly see that as much
as he has not made any effort to tax the small man
definitely, indefinitely, he is doing it. Apart from the
professionals although I heard a professional man
say that he would have to stop it; I do not believe that,
he was a little bit blue at the time. I do not think
you would get a real professional just because he has
to pay out a little "nay-nay" yearly, saying that he
would pass it on to his people, but as to these other
people, the gin and Falernum and other things, the
itinerant would have to pass it on; and when they
pass it on, the people are supposed to get what I


would call a blow that they did not expect. Since we
are on this word CARIFTA, as it is mentioned here,
CARIFTA sounds very nice on paper.
4.10 p.m.

It sounds very nice on paper; it is a very nice way
of making an effort to bring us together, financially
but I feel that the wrong end of the wedge is being
inserted first, because when are you going to get
goods here in this country duty free? Now I read
some time ago that refrigerators were landed in this
country and they will be sold or can be sold at $100
cheaper. That is due to the fact that the refrigerators
are practically tax free. Suppose the duty on one of
those refrigerators is $100, you do not pay it on the
down-payment on the refrigerator, but it is the con-
sumption tax that will be following you up.

In my opinion I do not know everything like
some people; I am a small businessman, butI do not
know all of the business. But if that refrigerator is
being sold for $100 less, then there is a possibility
that with the consumption tax you may have to pay
$110. Therefore you have done nothing. You talk
about CARIFTA; you preach it; you run all around,
and you are trying to bring it here; but things must
rise yonder, because you stillwant that money to run
your country. If by signing this CARIFTA Agree-
ment the refrigerator would be $100 cheaperandthe
Government are still getting their duty on it, well
then, I would say that the Prime Ministerwent about
the matter in a fair and square way.

That is why I believe, in my opinion, that Ja-
maica was a little bit hard to come in. You are ob-
liged to do that, and it may cost more. If it is going
to hit the other smaller countries, if these countries
feel that they are losing by CARIFTA when it is
stated in the CARIFTA Agreement that you can pull
out, Sir, do you think that these small boys, if they
stand to lose through CARIFTA, would not pull out?
Instead of pulling out, Sir, somebody would have to
drive them out.

I am not going to fool myself; I am not going to
let anybody fool me that the CARIFTA Agreement is
such a nice thing. It sounds good, but the Govern-
ment must have money. If they should lose a few
thousand dollars yearly by CARIFTA, then they will
have to find ways and means to get it back. Sir, you
will find that this nice thing we are in today a new
nation with Independence and so on I am saying
now that Independence is responsible for this addi-
tional taxation and these high prices. We hadto look
for a certain amount of money yearly from the time
that we gained our Independence. We have to look for
more money now than when we were not independent.
We will have to find it. What do we have to benefit
from it? I heard about an O.A.S., and I said on the
floor of this House that the only one I knew was in
the alley down there where we could go and "fire
one". We have also joined the O.A.S.; we have to
pay out a lot of money. The Hon. Leader of this House
went up to America not long ago. I thought that he
would have been able to go and demand his amount







2003


to spend on capital works here, and merely say: "I
have come for my share; my people are suffering;
let me get the money quickly, so that I can go and
relieve them." I listened to his nice speech, and I
came to the conclusion that he was also begging. He
had to beg.

Sir, imagine I am independent and still have to
beg you. If I were an independent man I would not
even beg the Chief Justice if I were in front of him
charged for murder; but if I am not independent I
would take off my blouse, pants and everything and
kneel down and beg. If I am independent, I am in-
pendent. I do not know how they spellthis word "in-
dependent" yet. I cannot see what we are going to
benefit from it yet.

Sir, I know that every little shot has become a
big shot, and when he was working for $1 he was
living in a 10 X 10 house, and he is now living in a
palace. Imagine spending $450,000 on two houses! I
believe that the men who are going to live in these
houses are gold men; they cannot be Barbadianswho
have left ordinary houses here. But if you are an
Ambassador, you are a big shot, and you cannot live
where even your own people can live. Where is this
money to come from? Government do not make
money; Government do not dig money out of the earth;
Government have to dig money out of you and me,
Sir.

When the Income Tax people rushed me a few
mornings ago and they had given me a chance I would
have run away, but the way they rushed me I could
not run away. I had to make wrong things right; I
was not in their good books. They said that they
wanted the money, and I had to pay the money. That
is why I am hurt now, Sir. The blow has struck me
now. I nearly had to ring you up, Sir, but you have
not got off yet. If things do not work out well, I will
have to ring you.

What is causing all of this trouble? This thing
that we call Independence is nothing yet. It is taking
the money from our pockets, and we cannot see any-
thing for it yet. What is forthcoming from the Hon.
Minister who has just been abroad? He has to go and
beg, and we want money. We have just committed
ourselves I did not commit myself, Sir, because
I can remember that I nearly lost my life in talking
to people in this country and showing them the mis-
take that was being made. During the night the police
had to escort me to my car. The people did not know
what was being held over them. They felt that the
word "Independence" meant that theywould not work,
and there would be no more taxation.
4.20 p.m.

Now can this small country bear all these over-
head expenses? It cannot. I am saying that if we try
and get the others to come along with us, we can
share because that would be eight more territories,
and that $450,000 would have to be divided between
nine territories. I am not saying that we are not to
come together; we have to come together sooner or
later. We cannot stay away from each other much


longer; so what is the good of playing that you are a
big shot and not trying to encourage the others to
come with you? What is the use of saying that we
are going to diversify and try to get in as many
industries as we possibly can? It is all right to bring
in industries; but if the people do not have any money
to buy what is being produced, what is going to hap-
pen with the industries? If you stop planting canes
completely, what are you going to do with so many
thousands of workers? Can industrialisation absorb
them in a minute? This diversification is a hundred
year project. We have to face facts and not talk be-
cause we have mouths. The argument that the little
space which a particular industry takes up would
employ more than if the area was planted in cane is
a good argument for a fool, but not for a person like
me. We depend on rain; but if we do not get rain,
what would happen? We have to pray that storms
keep away from us.

Mr. Speaker, I read in the newspaper that the
Ambassador would have been arriving here for pri-
vate talks with the Prime Minister, and Ithought we
were going to get somewhere, but we found out the
following Tuesday that the Ambassador wanted us
to buy a home for him at $450,000. This is a lot of
money to go out of the Treasury. I feel that if he
were drawing up in a trash house, he would have to
continue to do so until I could get the other islands
to share the cost. The Constitution saysthatwe must
have a Prime Minister, and it is no use fighting; but
Constitution or no Constitution I do not think it is fair
that one man can dictate to 250,000 people, and at
least 200,000 cannot dictate to him. I cannot call that
democracy, because after all we are human beings
and we will make mistakes; but I am telling you that
more than half the people in this country is not sa-
tisfied with the way things are going, but they would
have to take five clear years to correct the Govern-
ment's mistake if it made one.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid the hon. memberwill
have to resume if he wishes at the next sitting.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Hon. J. C, TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Government Business be now resumed.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Item under Govern-
ment Business, No. 3, stands in the name of the
hon.......


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, we are not now
proceeding with that Item.

Mr. SPEAKER: Does the hon. member propose
to deal with some other item?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, Mr. Speaker, Item No.4.







2004


THE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES PENSIONS
(AMENDMENT) ACT, 1968

Mr. SPEAKER: Order No. 4 stands in the name
of the Hon. and Learned Prime Minister.

Is the hon. member seeking to take charge of it
in the absence of the Hon. Prime Minister?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR; Yes, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
is seeking leave to take charge of the Order standing
in the name of the Hon. and Learned Prime Minister,
and unless there is any objection, leave will be
granted.

There being no objection, leave is granted the
Hon. Leader of the House to proceed to move the
second reading of a Bill to amend the Public Em-
ployees Pensions Act, 1961.
4.30 p.m.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, this amending
Bill is very short. It arises out of the necessity to
regularise certain procedures in this Act. Section 10
of the Public Employees Pensions Act 1961-47 lays
down that gratuity shall not be assignable or trans-
ferable except for the purpose of satisfying a debt
due to the Crown and for other purposes therein
specified, and outside of those purposes shall not be
levied upon, attached or sequestered in respect of
any debt or claim whatever, unless this debt or
claim is due and owing to the Crown. The purpose of
this Bill therefore is to change Section 10 of the Act
to extend those purposes so that a gratuity payable
to a public employee may be chargeable to and may
include a discharge of any outstanding balance of ac-
count owed by a public employee on his retirement
or at his death for a Housing Loan. I beg to move
that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into
Committee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in the chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 were called and passed.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, Ibeg to move
that you do now report the passing of this Bill in
Committee.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

The CHAIRMAN reported and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the
Chair and reported accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill was read a third time and passed.


PENSIONS (AMENDMENT) BILL

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day also
stands in the name of the Hon. and Learned Prime
Minister.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I am asking
leave to take charge of this Order in the absence of
the Hon. and Learned Prime Minister.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
is asking leave to take charge of this Order in the'
absence of the Hon. and Learned Prime Minister,
and unless there is any objection, leave will be
granted. (A PAUSE) There being no objection, leave
is granted. The Hon. Leader of the House may pro-
ceed to take charge of this Order which is to move
the second reading of a Bill to amend the Pensions
Act, 1947.

I understand that there is a shortage in my am-
plifying equipment. I apologise to hon. members for
that.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Your Honour do now leave the Chair, and the
House go into Committee on this Bill.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.


Mr SPEAKER left the Chair, and the House went into Com-
mittee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.


Clauses 1 and 2 were called and passed.


On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, the CH'-.IRMAN reported the passing of the Bill in
Committee.



Mr SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.


On separate motions of Hon. I, C. TUDOR, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill was read a third time and passed.


MEDICAL REGISTRATION (AMENDMENT) BILL

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day stands
inthe name of the Hon. Minister of Health and Com-
munity Development:- To move the second reading
of a Bill to amend the Medical Registration Act, 1911.







2005


Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, as the "Ob-
jects and Reasons" of the Bill set out, this Bill seeks
to amend the Medical Registration Act, 1911 (1911-6)
in order to provide for temporary special registra-
tion without fee for Medical Practitioners, whether
or not they are entitled to be registered under the
provisions of the Act, who satisfy the Medical As-
sessors (a) that they are qualified to practise in any
country; and (b) that they are engaged in Barbados
(1) in doing special work in Public Health or re-
search which is sponsored by the University of the
West Indies, the World Health Organization, the
Rockefeller Foundation or any such other organiza-
tionapproved by the Minister after consultation with
the Medical Assessors; or (2) in full-time employ-
mentbythe Peace Corps to render Medical services
exclusively and without fee to members of that Or-
ganization; or (3) under full-time employment with
the Crown, in work under the supervision of a Medi-
cal Practitioner under Section 4 of the Act.

This matter comes as a result of an appeal by
the Peace Corps which is rendering very useful work
not only here but throughout the Caribbean, and it
has made an appeal ro 'he Ministry of Health and the
Government in order to facilitate one of their doc-
tors who is qualified to practise in the State of Cali-
fornia, but not in New York, New Brunswick or
England.
4.40 p.m.

At present the present doctor who is here and
who is due to leave shortly has served for two years;
he is duly qualified and he complied with the re-
quirements of our Medical Act. The new one who is
coming is qualified to practise in the State of Cali-
fornia but not in New York, New Brunswick or England,
andthe Chief Medical Officer could not entertain his
application.

As hon. members are fully aware, the require-
ments for registration of Medical Practitioners are
set out in section 4 of the Medical Registration Act,
1911 (6) as follows:

"(a) Everypersonwhoholds a degree, diploma
or licence which would render him eligible for
registration as a medical practitioner in the
United Kingdom, or

(b) Everyperson who possesses satisfactory
evidence of being entitled to practise medicine,
surgery and midwifery in the State of New York,
U.S.A., after a course of study of not less than
five years at any University or College whose
curriculum requires five years' study prece-
dent to graduation, each year's course of study
at such University or College being not less than
eight months, and registration is subject to the
production of a certificate granted by the Board
of Medical Assessors appointed under the Act."

This is being done primarily at the request of the
Peace Corps in order to facilitate their new doctor,
and at the same time opportunity is being taken to
extend it in certain respects.


As I have said already, Sir, as the Act now
stands, the Medical Assessors cannot waive or relax
the requirements, and it should be pointed out also
that these requirements are intended not merely to
protect local practitioners and local physicians, but
to ensure the maintenance of satisfactory standards
of medical skill in a country which lacks the re-
sources to evaluate the various medical qualifications
obtained abroad.

At present the Ministry is not satisfied with the
present form of this statement of the requirements
for a number of reasons, and the whole matter is
being gone into with the Medical Faculty of the Uni-
versity of the West Indies who provides assistance
in this fieldto the Government of Jamaica. This mat-
ter of temporary registration is being gone into very
carefully; but in order to facilitate the Peace Corps'
application, we have brought this here to amend the
Medical Registration Act in certain respects, and he
will be entitled to practise, or any such person will
be entitled to practise for three years in the first
instance.
I think I have explained it briefly, and, if there
are any other questions which hon. members would
like to ask, I will be willing to try and answer them.
I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second
time.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, the Medi-
cal Registration Act was passed in 1911 when Bar-
bados was still a Colony, and when the great trade
union of the medical profession was sufficiently
powerful to exclude from practise in Barbados per-
sons who had received degrees at American Univer-
sities otherthan those who were qualified to pass the
examination at the New York State Board.
Mr. Speaker, many persons in and out of the
medical field may feel that the limitation to Com-
monwealth and New York Doctors is one which is no
longer appropriate to the circumstances of Barbados.
I am not aware that the medical universities of New
Yorkhave any higher status than those, for example,
of California to which the Minister has adverted in
his opening speech. There are countries other than
English-speaking countries where doctors qualify.
The medical profession I do not believe, at this stage,
has the outmoded attitudes that New York alone in
the whole of the United States can provide suitably
qualified doctors, nor do I believe that the medical
profession in Barbados, bearing in mind that among
the number is one who originally qualified, I believe
at Frankfurt I do not think the doctors in Barbados
really believe that German medicine, French medi-
cine and Russian medicine are necessarily inferior
to NewYork medicine, Canadian medicine, or indeed
Indian medicine.
Let us not forget that you can qualify at an In-
dian University in I cannot pronounce the word, Mr.
Speaker, particularly well,but it is, I gather ancient
Aryan medicine which involves, among other speci-
fic, cowdung. You can qualify in an Indian University
in that, and it would be an outrage to commonsense







2006


if a graduate of the University of California were to
be told that his degree was not good enough to prac-
tise in Barbados while graduates from another Uni-
versity in India could practise in Barbados upon
producing the necessary Medical Registration Cer-
tificate from whatever Indian State granted it.
4.50 p.m.

I think that the Minister should have a look at
the entire question of Medical Registration in Bar-
bados. I recommended to the Bar Association some
time ago to reconsider whether it really thought that
barristers qualified in Scotland should from that
reason and no other be qualified to practise in Bar-
bados while barristers from the forty-seven or forty-
eight common law jurisdictions in the United States
who were taught the same sort of law as English
barristers should be excluded from practising in
Barbados, if the situation were the same, I mention
this example,Mr. Speaker, because I am a barrister
as you are, and it is our profession which would be
threatened if it were open unlimitedly to barristers
from all common law jurisdictions. But the same
principle applies in my view to barristers as to
doctors. If we allow New York doctors to practise
here, we should not have to have a temporary Bill to
allow a California doctor to practise here. That is
what the medical faculty should be looking into -
whether this restricted practice unworthy of the
great professions which they are supposed to con-
trol should any longer be allowed to continue.

Our Medical Registration Act is supposed to be
a very tough one. In England, for example, a struck-
off doctor can practise. He must not hold himself
out as a registered medical practitioner, but struck-
off doctors do practise. One of the doctors with the
highest income is aplastic surgeonon Harley Street
who was struck off some years ago and he still main-
tains a flourishing L50,000-a-year surgery alone
although struck-off. In Barbados he could not do it,.
It is said Ihave argued this myself on one occasion
in the Courts that herbalists are entitled to prac -
tise their calling in Barbados by virtue of the Her-
balist Act of 1540, and if that view of the law is
correct, herbalists are the only exceptions who are
not caught by this Act; but again, that, Mr. Speaker,
shows the anomalies which the 1911 Act has. Osteo-
paths are well recognized as practising a type of
treatment which is of value. Indeed chiropractors
are similarly well recognized, but it may well be
that construing the terms of the Medical Registra-
tion Act strictly, many of these persons would find
themselves practising in Barbados what the Courts
might say was medicine, and therefore be caught by
the Act and find themselves subjected to the penal-
ties of the Act.

The Act, in other words, Mr. Speaker, I am
suggesting, is becoming outmoded; and rather than
chip at itpiecemeal, I would recommend to the Min-
ister that the Government place this on the list of
Acts to be subjected to the purview of whatever Law
Reform Committees or persons responsible for ex-
amining out-moded Acts to see if they can be brought
upto date. I do not think it should be necessary, Mr.


Speaker, for example, for us to have to pass a Bill
saying "Medical practitioners employed on a full
time basis by the Crown and working under the su-
pervision of a medical practitioner registered under
section." I do not think it is necessary for us in
1966 to have to come to pass a Bill like that. Let a
comprehensive amendment to this Bill be drawn so
that doctors will know exactly where they are vis-a-
vis the laws of Barbados. If we have a tough Act,
untoughen it a little bit, acknowledge modern ad-
vances in medicine and get right off that belief in
1911 that there was some great virtue in an English
or Canadian University, by virtue of its having been
founded by an Englishman, that American Universi-
ties did not have.

As regards Nobel Prize winners, Mr. Speaker,
I do not know the last time I can remember a Nobel
Prize winner in medicine from the Commonwealth
Universities. They come from the United States,
France, Germany and Russia, and they are the very
countries whose doctors cannot practise in Barbados
today. Mr. Speaker, I should say that we will support
the Bill.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, before you put
the question, I just want to draw the hon. member's
attention to the fact that the Ministry is at present
discussingthis matter with the medical faculty of the
University of the West Indies and other bodies that
are capable of assisting us in this matter; so the
matter is under active review and consideration.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: If the Minister would
be so kind as to give way for a moment, Mr. Speaker,
I think the Minister......

Mr. SPEAKER: Perhaps the hon. member has
risen on a point of explanation.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Yes, Mr. Speaker, I
think the hon. member had related, and in my speech
I tried to explain this, what he has just said to tem-
porary registration. What I was talking about was
permanent registration.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I am afraid the hon. mem-
ber did not allow me to complete what I was about to
say. The Ministry also wishes to seek the views of
other Governments at the next meeting of adminis -
trators of Health Services in the Caribbean on this
particular matter; so we are actively considering it,
and I thank thehon. member for his assistance and
co-operation. We do intend amending the Act in an
up-to-date way and bringing it more in line with the
Medical Registration Acts in other developed coun-
tries.
The question that the Bill be now read a second time was
put and resolved in the affirmative without division.

On motion of Hon. C. E. TALMA, seconded by Hon. G. G.
FERGUSSON, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and theHouse went
into Committee on the Bill, Mr, YEARWOOD in the Chair.
Clauses 1, 2 and 3 were called and passed.


The Schedule was called and passed.








2007


On motion of Hon. C. E. TALMA, seconded by Hon. G. G.
FERGUSSON, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the passing of one Bill
in Committee and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. C. E. TALMA, seconded by
Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, the Bill was read a third time and
passed.
QUESTION
Mr. SPEAKER: I promised the hon. and learned
senior member for St. Thomas who was not here at
the opportune moment today, that unless there was
any objection, I would allow him to put, at this stage,
a questionwhich was not put earlier. The Hon. mem-
ber may now give notice of his question.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I am
very much obliged to Your Honour and to all hon.
members. The question is this:
To enquire of the Minister of Agriculture:

I. Are the activities of rats regarded as a
problem to agriculturalists in Barbados?

2. Is the Minister aware that Professor
James Bond, the eminent ornithologist, has sugges-
ted that introduction and release in Barbados of a
number of Barn Owls from the Windward Islands
would be a boon to the Island's agriculture as these
birds feed largely on rats?

3. Will the Minister consider this sugges-
tion?
THE ADJOURNMENT
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this House do now adjourn until Tuesday, 27th
August, 1968, at 12 o'clock (noon)


Hun. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.




Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, there is
no objection, but the Hon. Leader of the House
should take the Opposition more into his confidence
as regards the adjournment of the House especially.
It is customary to adjourn for some time in what we
would describe as the hurricane season. Does the
Government propose to go through the whole of Au-
gust week after week and adjourn in September or
what? He would do us a favour when some of us are
expecting the Government -it has been sending down
very few things recently to finish its work and ad-
journ for three weeks or a month or so. If he would
just tell us that, we will be very grateful on this
side of the House.



Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, that is exactly
what I had in mind, but I think that the hon. member
will appreciate that I could not give any intimation
of that today because I would have to consult the
other Ministries and Departments in order to see
whether they have any legislative matters which they
want processed within the next week or so. It is for
this reason that Ihave moved the two-week adjourn-
ment in order to bring as much as I can up to date
so that I will be able definitely to say, when next we
meet,whenthe recess will be. I hope it will be from
then.

The question that this House do now adjourn until Tues-
day. 27th August, 1968, at 12 o'clock (noon), was put and re-
solved in the affirmative without division, and Mr. SPEAKER
adjburned the House accordingly.
5.10 p.m.






Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 29
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 39 dated 15th May, 1969.



S.I. 1969 No. 76
The ?Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act, 1937
(1937-16)
THE MOTOR VEHICLES AND ROAD TRAFFIC
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 1969
In exercise of the powers conferred upon him by
section 7 of the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act,
1937, the Chief Technical Director, Ministry of Com-
munications and Works hereby makes the following Regu-
lations:-
1. These Regulations may be cited as the Motor Short title.
Vehicles and Road Traffic (Amendment) Regulations,
1969.
2. Regulation 28(2) of the Motor Vehicles and Amendment of
Road Traffic Regulations, 1952 hereinafter referred to regulation 28 of
principal regu-
as the principal Regulations, is hereby amended by nations.
deleting the word "sixteen" appearing in line 2 there-
of and substituting therefore the word "fifteen".
3. Regulation 35 of the principal regulations is Regulation 35
hereby revoked and the following regulation substi- ofprincipal
regulations
tuted therefore revoked and
"chief Technical 35. Every driver and conductor of a replaced.
Director to ap -
prove uniforms of motor omnibus shall wear such uniform
drivers and con- and shall display his badge thereon in
doctors. such manner as the Chief Technical
Director may with the approval of the
Minister direct."
4. Regulation 36 of the principal regulations is Amendme -t .i
hereby amended as follows regular
(a) by revoking paragraphs (8) and (9) thereof; oref Cp
(b) by renumbering paragraphs (10) (11) and (12) l
thereof as paragraphs (8) (9) and (10) re- c
spectively.


777- -'~








2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


Insertion of new
regulation 86A
into principle
regulations.








Insertion of
new regulation
46A into prin-
ciple regula-
tions.


5. The principal regulations are hereby amended
by inserting immediately after regulation 36 the fol-
lowing regulation as regulation 36A -
"Drivers to 36A. Every driver of a motor omni-
affix route
destination when acting as such shall ensure that
signs and the route destination signs and numbers
numbers on
omnibuses, provided for indicating the destination
of such motor omnibus are clearly and
correctly displayed."
6. The principal regulations are hereby amended
by inserting immediately after regulation 46 the fol-
lowing regulation as regulation 46A -

"Concessionaires 46A. Every concessionaire shall
to provide omni- provide each omnibus with the appro-
buses with desti- r
nationsigns and private destination signs and numbers."
numbers.
Made by the Chief Technical Director this 22nd day
of April, 1969.


A. T. WASON
Chief Technical Director.

Approved and sanctioned by the Minister of Com-
munications and Works this 22nd day of May, 1969.



NEVILLE W. BOXILL
Minister.







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3




S.I. 1969 No. 77

The Hotel Aids Act, 1967

NOTICE GIVEN UNDER SECTION 2(4) OF THE
HOTEL AIDS ACT, 1967

The Cabinet in exercise of the powers conferred
on it by section 2(4) of the Hotel Aids Act, 1967 here-
by gives the following notice:-

1. This Notice may be cited as the Hotel Aids
(Bowden-on-Sea Apartments) Notice, 1969.
2. It is hereby declared that the group of buildings
to be known as "Bowden-on-Sea Apartments" situate
and now in the course of alteration and construction
at Hastings, ,in the parish of Christ Church shall be
deemed to be, an hotel for the purposes of the Hotel
Aids Act,, 1967.
Given by the Cabinet this. 8th day of May, 1969.


F. M. BLACKMAN
Secretary to the Cabinet.




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