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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00100
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00100
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
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    Supplement: Senate debates for 28th February, 1968
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        Page A 307
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        Page A 322
        Page A 323
    Supplement: Senate debates for 15th March, 1968
        Page A 324
        Page A 325
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        Page A 327
        Page A 328
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    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 28; S.I. 75: Export industry (industrial gloves) order, 1969
        Page B 1
    Supplement: Acts: 1969-20: The Land Valuation Act, 1969
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    Supplement: Acts: 1969-21: Election Offences and Controversies Act, 1969
        Page D i
        Page D ii
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        Page D v
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    Supplement: Acts: 1969-22: The Supreme Court of Judicature (amend.) Act, 1969
        Page E 1
        Page E 2
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    Supplement: Acts: 1969-23: The Racing Service Business (registration of premises) (amend.) Act, 1969
        Page F i
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    Supplement: Acts: 1969-24: Legal Aid in Criminal Cases (amend.) Act, 1969
        Page G i
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    Supplement: Acts: 1969-25: The Professions (miscellaneous) Provisions Act, 1969
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Full Text











VOL. CIV.


*JffiiaI


mazwttt


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 12TH MAY, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Application for Liquor Licence, District "A"........ 444
Appointments:
V. C. Carter as Assistant Secretary, Ministry
of External Affairs........................... 422
Malcolm L. Nurse as Senior Customs Guard 421
T. C. M. C. Phillips as Assistant Secretary,
Ministry of Finance........................ 422
G. C. Redman as Assistant Secretary, Ministry
of Education.....................,... 422
V. DaC. Reece as Assistant Secretary, Ministry
of Finance...................... .. .......... 422
H. Richards asAsst. Secretary, Ministry of
Agriculture, Labour & National Insurance 422
Appointments to the Board of Dental Assessors...... 444
Appointments to the posts of Electrical Assistant 421
Appointments to the posts of Highways Supt., M.C.W. 421
Appointments to the posts of Teacher................. 441, 442
Dismissal:


Thelma D. Stuart, Teacher.............. .....
Fireman No. 130 F. Byer........................
Grant of Leave to Senator: Maurice A. King.........
Industrial Incentives re Prefabricated Wooden Houses
List of Trade Marks.................................... 43
Resignation:
Erskine Boyce, Junior Laboratory Technician
Termination of Appointment:
George A. Trotman, Statistical Assistant....
Therapeutic Substance Act, 1949..............
Trade Marks: "Ariel", "Century", "Doric", etc. 42
Transfers:
A. F. Daniel to Ministry of Health and Com-
munity Development... ..****................
G. L. Reid to Ministry of Trade, Tourism, Co-
operatives and Fisheries.................
Vacant Posts in the Public Service ..................
--------------------
Senate Debates for 28th February & 15th March, 1968.

Legal Supplement
S.I. 1969 No. 75: Export Industry (Industrial Gloves)
Order, 1969.
Acts:
1969-20: The Land Valuation Act, 1969.


422
422
444
444
0-440

444

422
444
i3-429

422

422
422


1969-21: Election Offences and Controversies Act, 1969.
1969-22: The Supreme Court of Judicature (Amend.)
Act, 1969.
1969-23: Thp Racing Service Business (Registration
of premises) (Amend.) Act, 1969.
1969-24: Legal Aid in Criminal Cases (Amend.) Act, 1969.
1969-25: The Professions (Miscellaneous) Ptovisoins
Act, 1969.


NOTICE NO. 324


GOVERNMENT NOTICES


Appointments


Malcolm L. Nurse, Customs Guard, has
been appointed Senior Customs Guard, Cus-
toms Department, with effect from 1st May,
1969.

(M. P. 2900/11)

The following persons have been appoint-
ed to the posts oC Elqarical Assistant, with
effect from 1st April, 1969 -

Mr. Peter St. C. Jackman
Mr. George O'B Small
Mr. Ronald A. Denny

(M. P. 1703/1/6)

The following persons have been appoint-
ed to the posts of Highways Superintendent,
Ministry of Communications and Works, with
effect from 1st April, 1969:-

Darnley DaC. Phillips
Anthony Nurse
Carl S. Quintyne.


(M.


P. 1515/39/20/20)


A 2dLJ,7ot4f


,, \


NO. 38


(Zrt








OFIILGAET ay1,16


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Appointments

H. Richards, Senior Executive Officer,
Ministry of Agriculture, Labour and National
Insurance has been appointed to the post of
Assistant Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture,
Labour and National Insurance, with effect
from 1st May, 1969.


V. DaC. Reece, Senior Accountant, Na-
tional Insurance Office, has been appointed to
to post of Assistant Secretary, Ministry of

Finance, with effect from 1st May, 1969.


G. C. Redman, Personnel Officer, Ser-
vice Commissions Department, has been ap-
pointed to the post of Assistant Secretary,
Ministry of Education, with effect from 1st
May, 1969.

T. C. M. C. Phillips, Shipping Superin-
tendent, Port Department, has been appointed
to the post of Assistant Secretary, Ministry
of Finance, with effect from 1st May, 1969.

V. C. Carter, Administrative Assistant,
Ministry of Health and Community Develop-
ment, has been appointed to the post of Assis-
tant Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs
with effect from 1st May, 1969.

(M. P. PSC. 4/Vol.II)



Termination of Appointment

George A. Trotman's appointment as
Statistical Assistant, Statistical Service, has
been terminated with effect from 21st Febru-
ary, 1969.


Transfers

A. F. Daniel, Assistant Secretary, Min-
istry of Finance has been transferred to the
post of Assistant Secretary, Ministry, of
Health and Community Development, with
effect from 1st May, 1969.

G. L. Reid, Assistant Secretary, Minis-
try of External Affairs, has been transferred
to the post of Assistant Secretary, Ministry
of Trade, Tourism, Co-operatives and Fish-
eries, with effect from 1st May, 1969.

(M. P. PSC. 4/Vol.II)

Dismissal

Thelma D. Stuart, Teacher, St. Leonard's
Girls' School, has been dismissed from the
Public Service with effect from 8th January,
1968.

(M. P. P. 8354)

Fireman No. 130 F. Byer has been dis-
missed from the Barbados Fire Service with
effect from 9th January, 1969.

(M. P. P. 8012)


Vacant Posts In the Public Service

Nutrition Officer Ministry of Health and
Community Development

Health Education Officer Ministry of Health
and Community Development

Salary Scale: $5,580 9,000 per annum

Further particulars are obtained from Ser-
vice Commissions Department,
"Flodden", Culloden Road.

Closing date for applications: 9th June, 1969.


(M. P. 1515/39/19/11)


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


(M. P. P. 8546)








Ma 1,199 FICALGZET


NOTICE NO. 304 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

SOLAGOL

That Carter-Wallace, Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" in Registrar in re-
spect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parations and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 305 (second publication)
TAKE NOTICE

OVOGOL

That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organised and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of medical and pharmaceutical prepa-
rations and substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from
the 8th day of May 1969 unless some person


shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such re-
gistration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 306 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE


That Richardson-Merrell S.A. de C.V. a
corporation organised and existing under the
laws of Mexico whose trade or business ad-
dress is San Andres Atoto No. 326 Naucalpan
de Juarez, Mexico, trading as Manufacturers,
and Merchants, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Foods, beverages; ingredients
for preparing nutritional supplements and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
Scan be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969








SIay 12, 196


NOTICE NO. 307 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE

ARIEL

That the Procter & Gamble Company, a
corporation of the State of Ohio, United
States of America, whose trade or business
address is Ohio, United States of America,
has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
of soaps, detergents and other cleaningpre-
parations for laundry and household use, and
bleaching preparations and other substances
for laundry use, and will be entitled to regis-
ter the same after one month from the 8th
day of May 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 308 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

CENTURY

That Emco Limited a corporation or-
ganized under the laws of the Province of
Ontario, Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is Dundas Street, London, Ontario,
Canada has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of valves for controlling fluid flow and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless


some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tionof such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 309 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE










That Musson Jamaica Ltd., a Company
incorporated in Jamaica, West Indies, whose
trade or business address is 168 Spanish
Town Road in the Parish of Saint Andrew,
Jamaica, West Indies has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Registrar in respect of meat, fish, poultry and
and game; meat extracts; preserved; dried
and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies,
jams; eggs milk and other dairy products;
edible oils and fats; preserves; pickles,, and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


4241


May 12. 1960


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








May 12. 1969 I G


NOTICE NO. 310 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

PALAFER

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the Laws
of Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
prepatations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 311 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

HI- PALS

That Wellco Shoe (Jamaica) Limited a
Company incorporated under the laws of
Jamaica, whose trade or business address
is P. O. Box 21 MonaPost Office (Kingston 7)
St. Andrew, Jamaica has applied for the reg-
istration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of footwear and will be
entitled to register the same after one month
from the 8th day of May 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my,office of opposition of


such registration. The Trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 312 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE


That Rothmans of Pall Mall Limited, a
company organised and existing under the
laws of Liechtenstein, whose trade or busi-
ness address is Staedtle, 380, Vaduz,
Liechtenstein, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Tobacco, Cigarettes and cigars,
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 8th day of May 1969 un-
less some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate at me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trademark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12 1969


,425








426 OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 12, 1969


NOTICE NO. 313 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

DORIC

That Emico Limited a corporation or-
ganized under the laws of the Province of
Ontario, Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is Dundas Street, London, Ontario,
Canada has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of plumbing fixtures, namely, lavatory
faucets, bath and shower fittings, deck faucets
and parts therefore, and will be entitled to re-
gister the same after one month from the 8th
day of May 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 314 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE


COLDEX


That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the laws
of Canada whose trade or business address
is 115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A' of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register,


the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application atmy
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 315 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE




Sunjet


That British West Indian Airways Lim-
ited, a Company registered in Trinidad &
Tobago, whose trade or business address is
Kent House, Long Circular Road, Maraval,
Trinidad, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of Markings on all aircraft, all ser-
vices, advertising and sales promotional
material and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of May
1969 unless some person shall in the mean-:
time give notice in duplicate to me at my of-
fice of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


426


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969








May 12 99 FIIL AET


NOTICE NO. 316 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE


GASTROL

That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America, whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parations and substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from
the 8th day of May 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on ap-
plication at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 317 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE

UNIVOL

That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose
trade or business address is 767 Fifth
Avenue, New York, New York, UnitedStates
of America has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part "A' of Register in


respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical pre-
parations and substances and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the
8th day of May 1969 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 318 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE


DIOVOGOL


That Carter-Wallace Inc. a corporation
organized and existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America whose.
trade or business address is 767 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part "A" of Registrar
in respect of medicinal and pharmaceutical
preparations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969








OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 12, 1969


NOTICE NO. 319 (second publication)

TAKE NOTICE

HYDRO AQUIL

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpor-

ation organized and existing under the laws of
Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Point Claire,
Quebec Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 8th day of May
1969 unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to my at my of-
fice of opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Register of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 320 (second publication)
TAKE NOTICE

SENILEX

That Mowatt and Moore Limited a cor-
poration organized and existing under the
laws of Canada whose trade or business ad-
dress is 115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe
Claire, Quebec, Canada has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
register in respect of Pharmaceutical and
veterinary preparations and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the


8th day of May 1969 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1069

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 321 (second publication)





TAKE NOTICE


VITAVITES

That Mowatt & Moore Limited a corpo-
ration organized and existing under the laws
of Canada whose trade or business address is
115 Brunswick Boulevard, Pointe Claire,
Quebec, Canada has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of pharmaceutical and veterinary
preparations and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 8th day of
May 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to meat
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks..


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12. 1969








May~~~ ~ ~ ~ 12 99OFCA AET


NOTICE NO. 322 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE


CYCLAX


That Cyclax Limited, a British Company,
whose trade or business address is 65, South
Molton Street, London, W.I. England, trading
as Manufacturers and Merchants of Beauty
Preparations, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of Non-medicated toilet preparations;
soaps, perfumes, cosmetics, essential oils,
preparationsfor the hair, depilatory prepara-
tions; cosmetic powder compacts; Medicated
preparations for the skin and scalp; deodo -
rants; medicated bath preparations; eye lo-
tions, andwillbe entitled to register the same
after one month from the 8th day of May 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 14th day of April 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 323 (second publication)


TAKE NOTICE


AXION


That Colgate Palmolive Limited, aCom-
pany duly incorporated in Canada whose trade
or business address is 64 Colgate Avenue,
Toronto 8, Canada trading as Manufacturers
and Merchants has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part "A" of Register
in respect of Detergents, detergents bars,
laundry soaps, laundry brightener, pre-soak-
ing products, powdered soaps, bleaches -li-
quid and powder, and all washing products and
will be entitled to register the same after one
month from the 8th day of May 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.


Dated this 14th day of April 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12. 1969








OFFCIA GZETE My 2, 96


MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949

List of Trade Marks renewed for fourteen years from date

PART "A"


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2144


2145

2146
2147

2148
2149

2150
2154


2155

2156
2157
2158


2159
2160

2161
2162
2166



2167


2168
2169
2170

2171
2172
2173
2174
2175
2176

2177
2179
2182
2183


Yankee Garments Limited


American Home Products Corporation

Iglo N. V.
Morgan's Pomade Company Limited

Deb Chemical Proprietaries Limited
Deb Chemical Proprietaries Limited

Deb Chemical Proprietaries Limited
N. V. Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zon-
tindustrie


Mullard Limited


January 6th


7th

10th
10th

12th
12th

S 12th
17th


17th

17th
20th
20th


21st
21st

S21st
21st
27th



4th


February 4th
4th

4th

7th
7th
S 7th
7th

7th
S 7th

8th
loth
15th
15th


YANKEE PRODUCT
LABEL
WOOLITE
IGLO
MORGAN'S
BEB
JIZER

SWARFEGA


TOWERSALT

MULLARD & SHIELD
DEVICE
BURLINGTON
OMEGA


NARDIL
EDEN

VENT LOCK

VENT VUE
KOOL VENT


WOODBINE EXPORT
LABEL


HARP LABEL

VERKADE
FIGURE ON HORSEBACK
EPEO

WISDOM
AMAPOLA
RED HAT
COLOSSUS
BUCCANEER
QUEEN QUALITY
WINFIELD
LEXINGTON
KIAERLENE

CASTLE


Riggio Tobacco Corporation Limited
Omega Louis Brandt & Frere S. A.
Warner Lambert Pharmaceutical
Company
Caribbean Metal Products Limited
Jamaica Aluminium Products Limited

Jamaica Alumimium Products Limited
Koolvent (Caribbean) Limited
British-American Tobacco Company
Limited


Arthur Guinness Son & Co (Dublin)
Limited

Koninklijke Verkade Fabrieken N. V.
Koninklijke- Verkade Fabrieken N. V.
N. V. Phillips Gloeilampenfabrieken

Nebraska Consolidated Mills Company
Nebraska Consolidated Mills Company
Nebraska Consolidated Mills Company

Nebraska Consolidated Mills Company
Nebraska. Consolidated Mills Company
Nebraska Consolidated Mills Company

liurmac Tobacco Company N. V.
Rjiggio Tobacco Corporation Limited
English Sewing Limited
I4nglish Sewing Limited


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969










MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


February 15th
S 15th

S 16th

S 20th


20th


20th



22nd

22nd

28th


2184
2185


2186
2188


2189


2190



2191

2192

2194


2195

2196

2197


2199
2200

2201

2204

2205
2206
2207

2208
2209

2210

2211
2212
2213


2214

2215
2214
2217'

2218

2219


15th
S 15th
15th

27th

April 6th
19th
19th

22nd
22nd

22nd

27th
27th
27th


" 27th

" 27th
" 27th
" 26th

" 29th

" 29th


English Sewing Limited
Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical
Company
The Gramophone Co. Ltd.
American-Cigarette Company
(Overseas) Limited

American-Cigarette Company
(Overseas) Limited
American-Cigarette Company
(Overseas) Limited


Federated Pharmaceutical Co. Limitec

Federated Pharmaceutical Company
Limited
The American Tobacco Company


The Wellcome Foundation Limited

John Cotton Limited

Cooper, McDougall & Robertson
Limited

Martini & Rossi, S. P. A.
Martini & Rossi, S. P. A.

Martini & Rossi, S. P. A.
Johnson & Johnson

Nestle s Products Limited
Rosenau Brothers, Inc.
The American Tobacco Company

The Gideons International
Union Carbide Corporation

Noxell Corporation

Alberto-Culver Company
Alberto-Culver Company
Imperial Chemical Industries
Limited
The Coca-Cola Company

The Coca- Cola Company
The Coca-Cola Company
MacDonald Greenlees Limited
The Quaker Oats Company

Reemtsma Cigarettenfabrieken


I. __ __ J


CASTLE DEVICE


SINUTAB
ODEON


IDLEWILD


CARAVELLE


REMBRANDT VAN
RIJN

BELL


VIGORTON
CIGARETTE WHITE
BAND DEVICE
ANCARIS
SKI


COOPERCOTE

MARTINI
MARTINI LABEL

MARTINI & DEVICE

SAFEX
MAGGI

CINDERELLA
RING DEVICE
GIDEON & DEVICE
UNION CARBIDE
COVER GIRL

DERMA- FRESH
TRESEMME


PENTAMATT
HI- C

MI- MA
SPRITE
PRESIDENT
NEW QUAKER HEAD

REEMTSMA


March
I

i


Ist

2nd

7th


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








432

MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2220

2221
2222
2224

2225
2226
2227


2229


2230

2231

2232


2234
2236
2238

2239

2240


2241

2242
2243

2244
2245


2246
2248
2249
2250


2251

2252
2253

2254
2255


July


April 29th

May 4th
S 4th
8th
8th
8th
8th


Slth


1th

lth

15th


30th
18th
June 1st

S 6th

6th


6th

7th
8th

14th
14th


23rd
23rd
16th
28th


22nd

28th
28th

28th


Reemtsma Cigarettenfabrienken

Glaxo Laboratories Limited

Syntex Corporation
Travenol International, Inc
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Pioneer Hi-Bred Corn Company
Maguinas De Coser Alfa, Sociedas
Anonima
The Cement Marketing Company
Limited
The British Drug Houses Limited

British-American Tobacco Company
Limited
American- Cigarette Company
(Overseas) .Limited

Standard Brands Incorporated
Johnson & Johnson
American Home Products Corporation

British American Tobacco Company
Limited
Brown & Williamson, Tobacco
Corporation (Export) Limited

British-American Tobacco Company
Limited
Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

Aspro Nicholas Limited
Carreras Limited
F. W. Woolworth & Co. (Barbados)
Limited
N. V. Philips Duphar
Lawry's Foods Inc.
Tropical Gas Company Inc.
Martini & Rossi Societe per Azioni


The British Bata Shoe Company
Limited
Winthrop Products Inc.

The Singer Company
The Singer Company
Johnson & Johnson


_ _ I


REEMTSMA & DEVICE
BETNESOL

ANAPOLON
CHOLOXIN
DOT
HY-LINE


ALFA & DEVICE


SANDTEX
DILOSYN


GOLD CREST


PAUL REVERE

PLANTERS
ARRESTIN
DRISTAN


CARNIVAL


HILTON


JOCKEY CLUB
TERYLENE
DIP

LINCOLN IMP


WINFIELD
DUPHAR
LAWRYS
TROPIGAS
MARTINI VERMOUTH
LABEL


AMBASSADOR
ALVODINE
S & DEVICE
SINGER
VEE-FORM


May 12, 1969


nFFlrlAI. G~ZETTE








Ma 12 1969


MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


DATE 1968


REGISTERED PROPRIETOR


MARK


4 + 4.


2256
2258
2259

2260
2261

2262
2263
2264
2267
2268
2270

2271
2272

2273

2274


2275

2276


2277

2278
2280
2281


2283

2284
2285


2286


2287


2288


2289

2291


July 11th
17th
17th

19th
25th

27th
28th
28th

August 14th
14th
28th

30th
Sept. 5th

5th

5th


5th

6th


6th

llth
11th
13th


S21st

26th
26th


29th


29th


29th


October 4th


Imperial Chemical Indistries Limited
May & Baker 'L~mited
May & Baker Limited

St. James's Tobacco Company, Limited
Reckitt & Colman (Overseas) Limited

Riggio Tobacco Corporation Limited
Kristinus Kommanditgesellschaft
B. A. T. Cigaretten-Fabriken G. m.b.H

Haw Par Brothers Limited
Philip Morris Incorporated
F. W. Hampshire & Company Limited

Philip Morris Incorporated
Philip Morris Incorporated

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
British-American Tobacco Company
Limited

Milco Export A/S

Vacu-Lug Traction Tyres Limited
Carreras Limited
The Associated Portland Cement
Manufacturers Limited

Weiser Lock Company of Canada
Limited
Castrol Limited

Castrol Limited


British-American Tobacco Company
Limited
British-American Tobacco Company
Limited

British-American Tobacco Company
Limited


Cope & Lloyd (Overseas) Limited


Syntex Corporation


MINTIC
TRESCATYL
TRESCAZIDE
MAX & FIGURE

SNOWFIRE
LAZY RIVER
PEERAGE
H. B. KRONENFILTER
TIGER DEVICE
PHILIP MORRIS LABEL
LOXENE

LIDO
CAPRI


SHELL


SHELL & DEVICE


SHELL DEVICE


BACHELOR LABEL
MILEX LABEL

DIEHARD
PICCADILLY LABEL


WALCRETE


WEISER
BALLRACE SYMBOL

CIRCULAR FLASH
SYMBOL


SNOW FLAKE & DEVICE


CENBERRA LABEL


ANCHOR EXPORT
LABEL
SKIPPER BRAND LABEL


I I I


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12 1969


" 17th


METILAR








OFICA GAET ay1.16


MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2292
2293
2294
2295
2296

2298

2299

2300


2301
2302

2303
2304
2305


2306


2307


2308


2309


2310


2311


2312


2313


2314


2315


2316


2317

2318


October 17th
11th
lith
1th
S 13th

November 1st
S 1st


S 6th


7th
7th

7th
'" 13th
o" 11th


llth


11th


11lth


S 1th


S 11th


S 1th


S 1lth


llth


th


11th


11th


S 1th

S llth


Syntex Corporation
American Cyanamid Company
Winthrop Products Inc.
May & Baker Limited
Companhia De Cigarros Souza Cruz

Carreras Limited
British-American Tobacco Company
Limited
American Home Products Corporation
Limited

P. J. Carroll & Company Limited
P. J. Carroll & Company Limited

Cucirini Cantoni Coats S. p. a.
Rodi & Weinenberger Aktiengesellschaft
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited


I I I 17


SYNALAR
MALATHION
BESEROL
ISO-PLANOTOX

CONTINENTAL LABEL

LINCOLN IMP


JOCKEY CLUB LABEL


DAPTIL

SWEET AFTON

SWEET AFTON LABEL

LERRE MARCA
RO- WI


ALBIDA


ALEXIA


ARGINA


ASPA


AXINUS


BARBATIA


BLAMETA


CARNEA


CALVUS


CORBULA


CYPRINA


DARINA


DILOMA

DOLIUM


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12. 1969





-~:.4'..)


J&

MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2319

2320

2321

2322

2323

2324


2325


2326

2327


2328


2329


2330


2331


2332


2333


2334


2335


2336


2337


2338


2339


2340

2341


_ .1 -


Noverrter llth

"'' llth

l 1lth
i ith

S1th


llth

llth

11th



'' iith
llth


11th


S llth



llth


1th


llth

lth


11th


lith


1th


1th


1th


'," 11th
llth


lth

11th


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12 1969


7-


Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited

Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited


DONAX


DROMUS

FAUNUS

FENELLA

FUSUS


GENOTA


IRUS


LIMEA


LIVONA


LUCINA


MACOMA


MACRON


MALLEUS


MEXPHALTE


MYRINA


MYTILUS

NAUTILUS


NERITA


OMALA


ONDINA


RHODINA


RIMULA

RISELLA







OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969


MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


November 11th

1th


S 11th


11th


th


Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited
Shell International Petroleum Com-
pany Limited


ROTELLA


SHELL DIALA


SHELL GLEBA


SIMNIA


STROMBUS


2342

2343


2344


2345


2346











MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. Date 1968 Registered Proprietor MARK


2347


2348


2349


2350


2351


2352


2353


2354


2355


2356


2357


2358


2359


2360


2361


2362


2363


2364


2365


2366


2367


2368


__ __ __ L _ __ _ _


Nov. llth


" llth


" 11th


" llth


" llth


" 11th


" llth


" 11th


" 11th


" llth


" llth








" llth


" 11th


" llth


" 1lth


" llth


" 11th


" 11th


" llth


" 11th


Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell Internatoinal
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited


TALONA


TEGULA


TELLS


TIVELA


TROCHUS


VERENA


VEXILLA


VITREA


VOLVULA


AEROSHELL


DENTAX


RETINAX


SHELL ON WINGS


SHELL POINTED FLAME


SHELLANE


SHELLANE


SHELL BELA


SHELL BOLMA


SHELL CALMA


SHELL CARDIUM


SHELL ENSIS


SHELL FIONA


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2369


2370


2371


2372


2373


2374


2375


2376


2377


2378


2379


2380


2381


2382
2383

2384

2385

23 36

2388

2389

2390

2391
2392


2393

2394
2395

2396


_I -


Nov. llth


llth


11th


llth


llth


llth


llth


llth


llth


llth


11th


11th


11th


16th

17th
21st

20th

30th

Dec. 4th
" 4th

" 4th
" 4th
" 6th


" llth

12th
12th

12th


Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited
Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Etepha Aktiengesellschaft

The Coca-Cola Company
Carreras Limited

Rembrandt Tobacco (Overseas) Limited

The Procter & Gamble Company

British-American Tobacco Company Ltd.

British -American Tobacco Company Ltd.

Berlei (U.K.) Limited

Eli Lilly & Company

Yardley & Company Limited


The Procter & Gamble Company

Mobil Oil Corporation

Mobil Oil Corporation

Carreras Limited


SHELL MYSELLA


SHELL OTINA


SHELL PEBLUM


SHELL PELLA


SHELL TONNA


SHELMAC


SHELLUBRICATION


SPIRAX


SPRAMEX


VALVATA


VOLUTA


X 100


RAZOR BALDE DEVICE

OMNISEDAN

SPRITE BOTTLE

PICCADILLY

BRANDON

STARDUST

GOLD LEAF LABEL

SOLENT & DEVICE

GAY SLANT
DIMELOR

BOTTLE DEVICE
(LAVENDER PERFUME)

DOWNY

SOCONY
WINGED HORSE DEVICE

SPORTSMAN


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969


43











MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949


No. DATE 1968 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


Nov. 12th
March 28th


Dec. 18th

" 18th

" 18th

" 20th
" 27th

" 20th


_ _I _ .1 _ _ _


TIGER MALT LABEL

TIGER HEAD DEVICE

TIGER MALT BOTTLE

BMC & ROSETTE DEVICE

PLAY UP

DEVICE OF A LION
GLOBE & CROWN

M:D WAY LABEL


DOBANE

VALIUM

PERTOFRAN

LAUREL WREATH DEVICE


PREFIX


PREFIX


2398

2399

2400

2401

2402

2729


2757

2844


3167

3171

3271

3622


3623


Banks Barbados Breweries Limited

Banks Barbados Breweries Limited

Banks Barbados Breweries Limited

The British Motor Corporation Limited

Clarks Overseas Shoe Limited

The Royal Bank of Canada


British American Tobacco Co. Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Roche Products Limited

J. R. Gergy A. G. (J. R. Geigy S. A. )

Fred Perry Sportswear Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

PART "B"

Richard Thomas & Balwins Limited

Foremost-Mckesson Inc.

Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited

Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited
Shell International
Petroleum Company Limited
Shell International Petroleum Co. Ltd.
Lesney Products & Company Limited

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
(Export) Limited
Oldham & Son Limited

Boots Pure Drug Company Limited


ALVANIA


CASSIS


GADINIA


GARIA


MELINA


NASSA


NORTHIA

TALPHA
UNEDO
MATCHBOX


BREEZE LABEL

FLASH DEVICE
NUDERM


RAVEN &

LIQUOR

PEL


Feb.

Nov.


21st

22nd


Oct. 25th

Sept. 22nd

March 8th

Oct. 23rd


Oct. 23rd


DEVICE

GALLIANO LABE


B 62

63

64

66


67


68


69


70


71


72

73

74
75

89 A


B 103
B 105


June
Aug.

Sept.

Nov.


7th

14th

20th

11th


Nov. 11th


Nov. 11th


Nov. 11th


Nov. 1lth


Nov. 11th


Nov. 11th


Nov.

Nov.
Dec.

May


11th

llth
12th

1st


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12. 1969










'MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, 1949
PART "A" List of Trade Marks not renewed or allowed to lapse.

No. DATE 1961 REGISTERED PROPRIETOR MARK


2151
2152

2153


2163

2164

2165
2178


2180

2181
2193

2202
2203

2228

2233

2235

2237
2247
2257


2265


2266 August 14th


2269 August 16th
2279 September 11th

2290 October 11th

2297 October 18th

2387 December 6th

2397 December 12th






B 65 October 26th


January 13th
16th

17th

S 27th
27th

27th

February 10th


15th

15th
15th
March 16th
21st

May 10th

S 24th
30th

June 1st

" 19th

July 14th


July 29th


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Graceline Footwear Limited
N. V. Koninklyke Nederlandsche
Zonlindustrie
Smith Kline & French, Laboratories Ltd.

Smith Kline & French, Laboratories Ltd.

Smith Kine & French Laboratories Ltd.
Arthur Guinness Son & Company (Dublin)
Limited

Charles E. Frost & Company

H. Kiaer & Company Limited

The Tunnel Portland Cement Co. Limited
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

Vine Products, Limited

Smith Kline & French Laboratories Ltd.

International Fibre Board
William Fogarty (Trinidad & Tobago) Ltd.

American Home Products Company
Caribbean Detergents (Barbados) Limited
International Tobacco (Overseas) Limited


County Laboratories Ltd.,

American Cyanamid Company


Berlei (U.K.) Limited
Vacu-Lug Traction Limited
Continental Oil Company

Gounod McDonald Cox

Syntex Corporation
Helene Curtis Industries, Inc.



PART "B"


Hovercraft Development Limited


REYNO

GRACELINE


KNZ

STELADEX

PARSTELIN

PARNATE


JET
BLEVIDON

REALTEX

TUNNEL
CARTER HALL

FOUR SPIRES LABEL

AMYLOZINE

TEN TEST

BOOKERS

SPARTASE
ROCKET

MACGILLAVRY'S
EXPORT LABEL

AMAMI

TREPIDONE


SARABANDA

DURASOLID

ANOTROL

SNAP BEVERAGE
MASTERIL

EVER-PERM


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969


HOVERCRAFT










GOVERNMENT NOTICE

APPOINTMENTS

The following persons have been appointed to the posts of Teacher,
with effect from 1st April, 1969:

Name School


Mrs. E. E. Bascombe
Miss E. N. Batson
Mrs. V. E. Bayley
Miss U. A. Blackman
Miss S. Blackman
Miss A. D. Belgrave
Miss H. I. Bostic
Miss V. Branch
Mrs. A. Brathwaite
Miss V. Bynoe
Miss A. Carrington
Miss I. Chase
Miss O. A. Cole
Miss V. Cozier
Mrs. U. E. Craigg
Mrs. V. D. Cummins
Miss M. M. Daniel
Mrs. D. Dottin
Miss O. 0. Drakes
Miss J. M. Evelyn
Miss L. Y. Forte
Miss B. Goodridge
Miss W. Grandison
Miss M. E. Greenidge
Miss V. B. Griffith
Miss B. A. Harris
Miss J. A. Harvey
Miss M. C. Horton
Miss J. R. Hoyte
Miss D. James
Miss P. E. Jones
Miss M. A. Jones
Miss G. C. Kellman
Miss B. E. Lewis
Miss J. W. Lovell


St. Catherine's Mixed
Bay Primary
Carrington's Primary

St. Stephen's Junior
Belmont Primary
St. Matthias Girls'
St. Lukes Primary
St. George's Girls'
Ebenezer Primary
Stow Primary
St. Paul's Girls'
Christ Church Girls'
St. Paul's Primary
St. Luke's Senior
Montgomery Boys'
Mount Tabor Mixed
St. George's Girls'
Deacons Primary
St. John Baptist Infants'
Erdiston Model Mixed
St. Lucy's Junior
Edghill Memorial
St. Mary's Junior
St. Philip's Boys'
St. Martin's Primary
New Pine Primary
St. Stephen's Junior
St. Elizabeth's Primary
Hindsbury Primary
St. Lawrence Girls'
Turner's Hall Primary
Pine Primary
St. George's Girls'
Deacons Primary
Christ Church Girls'


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 12, 1969








64
OFCIA GAET Ma 12 196


Name

Miss M. Mahon
Miss J. M. Marshall
Mrs. L. C. Mason
Miss H. O. Mayers
Miss M. I. Mayers

Miss J. J. E. Odle
Mrs. Marlene O'Neale
Miss C. Ottley
Mrs. D. D. Pollard
Miss H. Roberts
Mrs. M. Scantlebury
Miss B. Sealy
Miss S. E. Sealy
Miss M. Small

Mr. P. O. Aimey
Mr. R. McD. Barker
Mr. D. A. Barton
Mr. S. H. Bayne
Mr. R. A. Beckles
Mr. J. E. Bend
Mr. V. O. Boyce
Mr. O. H. Branch
Mr. W. B. Butcher
Mr. G. M. Callender
Mr. M. DeC. Cox
Mr. W. S. Cozier
Mr. O. C. Douglas
Mr. T. W. Douglas
Mr. S. B. Forde
Mr. C. C. Greaves
Mr. M. DeC. Jones
Mr. W. McK. Knight
Mr. M. L. Lovell
Mr. D. Maloney
Mr. A. E. Parris
Mr. E. C. Ramsay
Mr. K. D. Reid
Mr. G. G. Stewart
Mr. R. M. Trotman
Mr. C. E. J. Yearwood

(M. P. 2540/1 Vol. XIV)


School

St. Clement's Junior
Christ Church Girls'
Roebuck Primary
Westbury Junior
Wesley Hall Infants
St. John Baptist Mixed
St. Giles Girls'
Mount Tabor Mixed
St. Martins Primary
Montgomery Boys'
St. Clement's Junior
St. Albans Junior
Bayley's Girls'
Grace Hill Primary

St. Lukes Boys'
Welches Mixed
St. Judes Mixed
St. Mark's Junior
St. George's Boys'
Selah Primary
Black Bess Mixed
St. Bernard's Primary
St. Mark's Junior
St. Catherine's Mixed
Hothersal Primary
St. Lucy's Senior
St. Matthias Boys'
Christ Church Boys'
Providence Boys'
St. James Mixed
Shrewsbury Primary
Hillaby Mixed
Southborough Senior
Christ Church Boys'
Society Mixed
Speightstown Boys'
Buxton Primary
Wesley Hall Primary
St. Giles Boys'
St. Joseph's Boys'


AAI


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








May-- 12 199OFIILGAET


Government Notice

APPOINTMENTS

The following persons have been appointed to the posts of Clerical
Officer, in the General Service, with effect from 1st April, 1969:-


Mr. Luther J. Brathwaite
Mr. Audley R. Williams
Mr. Graham DeL. Austin
Mr. Seibert A. Brathwaite
Mr. David A. L. Bynoe
Mr. Haskell M. Carter
Mr. George P. M. Cobham
Mr. Harvey A. Brathwaite
Mr. Frederick A. Forde
Mr. Keith McP. Franklyn
Mr. Valence McD. Jordan
Mr. Richard S. Grannum
Mr. Edwin C. G. Cobham
Mr. Ernest A. Gibson
Mr. Hugh St. Clair Roach
Mr. Geoffrey A. D. Waithe
Mr. Tyrone S. Clarke
Mr. Maurice DeC. Kellman
Mr. Ralph H. Hinkson
Mr. Bentley H. Skeete
Mr. Michael E. Archer
Mr. Stanley W. Nicholls

Miss Jennifer K. Griffith
Miss Antoinette A. Forte
Miss Gladwin J. A. Sargeant
Miss Oriel Eudora Cummins
Miss Elza N. Thorne
Mrs. Jeanette R. Clarke
Miss Annette L. Ishmael
Miss Rosalind K. Thompson
Miss Laurel M. Young
Miss Amanda E. Sealy
Miss Jose B. R. Bourne
Miss Shirley O. Browne


Mr. Rudolph A. Parris
Mr. Stanton S. Archer
Mr. Emmerson J. Bellamy
Mr. Michael H. Browne
Mr. Virtus S. M. Hinds
Mr. John A. Chandler
Mr. Cecil A. Collymore
Mr. David R. Daisley
Mr. Silbert H. Cadogan
Mr. St. Leonard Steele
Mr. Sylvan A. Hunte
Mr. Carlos R. Mason
Mr. Stephen V. Johnson
Mr. Kenneth St. C. Parris
Mr. Ambrose A. Larrier
Mr. Kenrick DaC. Belgrave
Mr. Donville L. Johnson
Mr. Erskine A. B. Callender
Mr. Weston McA. L. Downes
Mr. St. Clair McV. A. Jones
Mr. Francis Pounder
Mr. Jeffrey C. Shepherd

Miss Betty Y. Holder
Miss Marva A. Rudder
Miss Delphine A. Thorpe
Miss Marva M. Greenidge
Miss Barbara C. Springer
Miss Evelyn V. Johnson
Miss Judith A. Hinds
Miss Annette S. Connell
Miss Daphne I. Bourne
Miss Petrona R. Alleyne
Miss Lorna D. Edwards


(M. P. 1310/39 Vol. XVI)


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








May 1, 196 OFFIIAGZET


GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Resignation
Erskine Boyce, Junior Laboratory Tech-
nician, Ministry of Health and Community

Development, has resigned from the Public
Service with effect from 20th April, 1969.

(M. P. P. 8788)

Grant of Leave to Senator
Senator Maurice A. King has been grant-
ed leave of absence from his duty as a Senator
during the period 18th April to 31st May, 1969.

(M. P. 0028)

Therapeutic Substance Act, 1949
The following firm has been added to the
list of manufacturing firms approved for the
importation of any drug therapeutic substance
into Barbados:-

Harris Pharmaceuticals,
81, Upper Clapton Road,
London, E. 5,
ENGLAND.
(M.P. 23B2).

NOTICE NO. 325

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE
(Act 1957 40)
APPLICANT: CHARLES DOLCEY
OCCUPATION: Insurance Salesman
ADDRESS: 1st Ave. Beckles Rd.
PREMISES: Wall building situated at
upper Westbury Road
opposite Kings Funeral


Dated this 25th


Home.
day of April 1969.


Signed: CHARLES DOLCEY.
Applicant.
This Application for a Restaurant Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'A' on
Thursday the 15th day of May 1969 at 9
o'clock a.m.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


Appointments to the Board of Dental
Assessors
Pursuant to the provisions of section 2
of the Dental Registration Act, 1923, as amend-
ed, the following persons have been appointed
to comprise, along with the Chief Medical Of-
ficer, the Board of Dental Assessors for a
period of one year with effect from 1st April,
1969.

Dr. Louis K. Nicholls, D.D.S.
Dr. Trevor E. Talma, D.D.S.
Dr. A. S. Cato, M.B. Ch. B.

(M. P. 26 B 2)

NOTICE NO. 326
THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963

(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minisrer and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice that
he is about to be asked to consider whether
for the purposes of the abovementioned Act,
the following product should be an approved
product and whether the following companies
should be an approved enterprise in respect
of the relevant product.

Any person interested in the manufac -
ture or importation of the product who objects
to its being declared an approved product or
the companies being declared an approved en-
terprise for the purposes of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and a copy to the Mana -
ger, Barbados Development Board, to reach
them on or before Tuesday, 20th May, 1969, a
statement in writing setting forth the grounds
of his objection.


Company Revelant Product:
D. & C Develop- Pre-Fabricated Wood-
ments Ltd. en Houses


Government Printing Office.


May 12, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











THE


SENATE


DEBATES


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE
Wednesday, February 28th, 1968.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E.S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith
PHILLIPS, B. A., (Deputy President); Senator the
Honourable P.M. GREAVES, B. A. (Minister of
Home Affairs); Senator the Honourable F. G.
SMITH, Q. C., (Attorney Geueral); Senator the
Honourable L. E. SANDIFORD, M. A. (Minister of
Education); Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H.
(Parliamentary Secretary); Senator C. L.
BRATHWAITE; Senator F. C. H. CAREW; Senator
S. V. ASHBY; Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE, B. Sc.,
Senator P. G. MORGAN; Senator F. L. WALCOTT,
O.B.E.; Senator M. A. KING; Senator H. F. ALKINS;
Senator D. A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E.; Senator
W. W. BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator Erma V.
ROCK; Senator N. A. BARROW, B.A.; Senator
R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

senator E. Lisle Ward

Prayers were said.

EXCUSE FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer an excuse for the absence of Senator
E. Lisle Ward from the day's meeting.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves, Minister
of Home Affairs and Leader of the Senate, laid the
following papers:-

1. The Customs Duties (Materials for Use
in the Manufacture of Paper-Bags and
Exercise Books) Order, 1968.

2. Statement showing Net Customs and Ex-
cise Receipts for ten months ended 31st
January, 1968.


3. The eleventh Annual Report of the Hous-
ing Authority for the period 1st April,
1966 31st March, 1967.

QUESTIONS

Question No. 13 Asked by Senator C. Asquith
Phillips on 21st December, 1967.

To enquirer of the appropriate Minister;-

In view of the disclosure in the Senate on the
14th December, 1967 then confirmed by the Honour-
able Attorney General that on the 12th August, 1967,
copies of the newspaper, 'The Beacon' the organ
of the Barbados Labour Party were conveyed by
mail van to the St. Thomas Post Office without
postage having been paid on the said newspapers,
will the appropriate Minister please state:

1. How many newspapers were so conveyed?

2. Whether or not this was an isolated case,
or whether mail vans have been habitually used for
conveying issues of the said newspaper without
payment of postage, to country Post Offices?

3. Whether or not the Ministry considers the
conveying of mail in the abovementioned manner
to be a defrauding of the revenue of this Island or
not?

4. Has any investigation been made by the
Ministry with a view to bringing disciplinary action
against any culpable employee or employees of the
Post Office, if not, why not?

5. Has the Editor of 'The Beacon' or the
Chairman or any other officer of the Barbados La-
bour Party preferred any explanation of this matter
to the Ministry or the Police and if not, does the
Ministry not consider that some explanation is called
for?

REPLY

1. Twenty newspapers were conveyed.

2. From an investigation carried out it
would seem that this is not an isolated case.










3. Yes, Sirl

4. Yes, Sirl

5. A statement has been given by the Mes-
senger attached to the Beacon newspaper who de-
livered the newspapers.


LEAVE TO PROCEED WITH ITEM NOTONAGENDA



SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, I am seeking leave to proceed with
a matter which is not on the Order Paper, but which
is one of extreme urgency. I am referring to a Bill
which has been circulated to members and which is
to prescribe minimum wages and guarantee employ-
ment for workers employed in the Sugar Industry.


I need not go into the details of its urgency or
of its public importance which are well known, and
I now ask leave to proceed with this matter forth-
with.


There being no objection, leave was granted.

Before we proceed any further on this matter I
would like to draw attention to Standing Order 45
(3) which provides that no Bill should be read a
second time which has not been printed and circula-
ted to Senators. I do not know the legal interpreta-
tion of the word "Printed" and I cannot say whether
it provides for a document which has been cyclo-
styled. Out of an abundance of caution, I move that
Standing Order 45 (3) be suspended.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion. The question was put and agreed to.

BILL TO PROVIDE FOR MINIMUM WAGES AND
GUARANTEED EMPLOYMENT

The President called the First Order A Bill
to provide for the prescribing of minimum wages
and guaranteed employment for workers employed
in the Sugar Industry and for matters incidental
thereto and connected therewith.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, The purpose of this piece of Leg-
islation is well known to those who have been taking
an interest in the public life of Barbados.

The first thing I should say about this piece of
legislation is that it is regrettable that it has got
to be passed at all. As the Minister of Labour has
said on another occasion, we in Barbados believe
in collective bargaining and we are convinced
that the representatives of employers and workers
have the capacity to reach agreements without the
intervention of the Government.

I would like to say that this Government in any
matter in which it considers that industrial peace


306


or harmony and the welfare of the majority of the
citizens are involved will not hesitate to pass legis-
lation. Another thing I would like to say is that there
is in our community there always has been persons
who are prepared to make political capital out of the
working class people. They will seize any opportun-
ity either for causing mischief or trying to destroy
those whom they consider their enemies and;spread
propaganda which is totally unnecessary.

Now, Sir, this Bill has been criticised as being
hurriedly drafted. That springs from the fact that
the Honourable Prime Minister did say that he had
something to do with it. There are certain difficulties
once the Prime Minister says that he has done some-
thing. It must be badly done. They say it was badly
drafted and yet the Opposition with all their legal
ability could only correct typographical errors. When
that happens we will see the stage we have reached.
You will remember how recently they said that
he was in Jamacia watching cricket.

The purpose of this Bill is not to regulate or
do away with any agreements that may have been
reached in the past between the Sugar Producers'
Federation and the Barbados Workers' Union or
any union. This Bill deals with two matters firstly
with the question of a minimum wage for out of
crop workers in the Sugar Industry, and I think
it would be accepted that that was the main bone of
contention between the two parties involved. One I
gather, was saying that the industry could not pay
and the other that the industry could pay.

Intimations of the desire for negotiations we re
mentioned in July, and during the subsequent months
there were meetings between the Sugar Producers
Federation and the Union at which arguments were
raised, and then in October there was another
meeting. The Chief Labour Officer was brought in
and then the Minister himself in December to use
his good offices to get the parties to be a bit more
pliable.

The matter was referred back to the Chief La-
bour Officer who again attempted to get the parties
to reach a settlement, and it was on the 14th Feb-
ruary this year that for the first time the matter
was referred officially to the Minister of Labour
on the ground that a deadlock had been reached. It
depends on which way you look at it. A deadlock is
not reached until all avenues' for compromise have
been exhausted.

When the Minister using his good offices in a
sense brought the parties back together it seems
that there was still a possibility of a solution in
the industry; but as history again shows people are
always prepared to make political capital out of the
sugar workers and out of the working class people.

This Government has been accused of not
shouldering responsibility and running away from
discussing the matter which at that time had not
been officially reported to have reached a deadlock.
So while the Government avoided arguments and












talks which might very well had worsened the
situation, we are accused of shirking our respon-
sibility.

If there is one thing that this Government in-
tends to do, it is to shoulder the responsibility
which the people placed on it in November 1960.
However a deadlock was reached and the Govern-
ment had to find a solution because there was
definitely a murmering unrest among the workers.
You found mischievous people telling the workers
to go back to work, that they would starve.

Then you got this spate of cane-fires a most
stupid thing. I take this opportunity to say that this
senseless burning of canes is something of regret
to all thinking people.

To get back to the Bill, when the Prime Minis-
ter made a broadcast on the radio he intimated the
Government's intention to introduce the minimum
wage legislation and it was passed by the Other
Place yesterday and is now before this House. I say
that the Bill is not controversial. Minimum wage
regulations for workers in other fields is a common-
place saving. There are certain industries which
lend themselves easily to Minimum Wage Regula-
tions.

Whereas the employers were asking for a Com-
mission of Inquiry, the Union was saying that it was
only a waste of time once the labourers had gone
back to work, and if this inquiry lasted indefinitely
findings would be no longer binding.

As the Minister said, any Union worth its
salt would choose the best bargaining time. Thiswas
the time of the starting of the crop. This was the
best bargaining at the moment. In this hard world
members of the public must suffer if certain other
sections are to gain their legitimate rights. I am
sure that all countries have to accept this fact. It is
a hard industrial fact.

England is passing through a difficult economic
phase and yet the workers do not hesitate to strike
on the basis that the public will suffer. In America
and all over the world you will findthat that situation
exists.

The Government has come down with a Bill
which sets out in section 3 Minimum Wages and
Guaranteed Employment Orders. However, Sir, the
urgency of this matter did not enable Regulations
to be drawn up. The law gives power to make Reg-
ulations under Section 18 which Regulations will
be made in due course.

In order to get the industry moving ahead and
to find a compromise somewhere between the Sugar
Producers' Federation and the Barbados Workers
Union, the Government laid down these rates in the
first Schedule which are set out here. I think that
it can fairly be said that the compromise which the
Government has made is desirable both to thework-
ers and the employers.


Let me say that in this community one is ap-
preciative of the difficulites in the :Sugar Industry.
I want to say on behalf of the Government that,
with the cost of living what it is, the compromise
of $4.48 cannot be considered to be a princely sum.
It may be what the Industry can spend; but the Gov-
ernment is not saying that it is a handsome rate by
any standard. All that the Government is saying is
that it is made onthe basis that it meets the demands
somewhere between the Employers' Confederation
and those of the Union and that the Government con-
siders it a reasonable compromise which from re-
cent happenings clearly indicate that both sides are
satisfied.

As a matter of fact, it looks to me as if both
sides were hoping that the Government would do
something like this. The employers can say that it
is something which they have to do by law, and the
Union can argue in future for more money for the
employees. We have left the door wide open for the
purpose of future negotiations when the atmosphere
of this period has cooled off.

Section 19 clearly states that"Nothing in this
Act shall prevent organizations of sugar workers
to whom a minimum wages order or a guaranteed
employment order applies and organizations of em-
ployers of such workers from settling by agreement
in respect of those workers wages higher than the
minimum wages prescribed by such minimum wages
order or specified in the First Schedule or a num-
ber of hours or days of employment in excess of
that prescribed by such guaranteed employment
order or specified in the Second Schedule."

The Government is satisfied that the minimum
wage aspect is a reasonable compromise.

As regards to second object of the Bill, the
Schedule lays down that the worker must get in a
seven-day week a period of three days work. There
again there seems to be a lot of criticism of the
Government for not ordering seven days work. Any-
one who can talk like that is either an idiot or is not
aware of what happens in Barbados today.

What the Government is aware of is that on
certain plantations some workers get no work at all,
one day, two days or three days, and the best
workers might get four or five days, but there is
never enough work on the plantations during the
off season. The Government is saying in this sche-
dule that each worker in the sugar industry, pro-
vided he has qualified himself by having done 480
hours in each employment period over a three-year
period, he is entitled to three days per week which
would give him an income, depending on the class
of work! he is doing, at least sufficient to get a
reasonable wage.

The Government feels, Mr. President, that if
this Bill is operated in the spirit in which it has
been brought down, and it is carried out in a spirit
of creating goodwill in the industry, of getting the
crop started, providing the workers with subsistence


~








i 308


and a standard of living in the months when things.
are hard; and the employers need not fear because
During the crop season there is a lot of immigrant
labour that goes off that would not fall within the
three-year period, and there is a lot of other labour
which is employed by Government in the Department
of Highways and Transport.

The other provisions of this Bill, Mr. President,
are purely incidental. Take a look at section 3, you
have got to prevent the employers from deducting
more than- the legitimate deduction, you have got
to see that if wages are due there are methods of
the worker collecting the money, you must see that
proper records are kept andpropernotices are given
to the Chief Labour Officer which will enable him
to see that the Act is being carefully observed, you
have to impose a penalty on persons who obstruct
him in the carrying out of his duty. You have got
to give a time limit, you have got to pay expenses
of the Chief Labour Officer in case he brings a
case.

Section 9. We are trying to preserve the collec-
tive bargaining which fortunately has existed in the
sugar industry for quite a few years and which the
Government hopes, from this particular Bill, will move
on to better things in the sugar industry. This Gov-
ernment, Mr. President, is concerned with the
welfare of the country, and in view of the fact that
it is a serious Government, it has got to keep its
record clear. This Government is interested in the
workers. The Government feels, in this case of the
sugar workers, to make the sugar industry to create
an atmosphere in which both parties cangettogether
be honest and frank with each other and come up
with something which can result in the industry
growing from strength to strength.

It is interesting to see that the Sugar Producers
should try to avoid the reputation which I heard
given the other day by a very prominent professor.
He said that one of the things that the West Indies
suffer from is that it ever grew a cane blade be-
cause it seems to create an attitude in the social
structure, in the life of the community which is
particularly harmful. I was looking at the Gleaner
today where I saw that the professor's suggestion
to the Jamaica manufacturers is that they should
stop growing sugar cane altogether.

I should just like to clear up an impression
which seems to have got around and which has been
used against this Government, and it is obvious
that it springs from the fact that there are people
who do not understand life or the world around them.
There are hundreds of countries in the world whose
economies are viable, but they do not grow sugar, so
that a country can exist without growing sugar, pro-
vided that there are enough other industries or
enough natural resources or enough export from
what it produces other than sugar which can keep
its economy.

If someone says that he would like to see the.
day when Barbados does not grow sugar, it may be


easy in the distant future, but it is not as speedy
as people seem to think. If this country could be-
come so industrialized and we could get in the type
of industries which could absorb the labour force
in sugar, then we can leave out sugar. Apart from
the fact that if it will take you 200 acres of land and
you employ about 50 to 60 people or even 100, a
factory on it could employ 20,000, so what is wrong
in saying that your country would become so indus-
trialised that you could absorb the entire labour
force?

Mr. President, I do not want to toil on this Bill
because it is a piece of legislation which we regret
we have to introduce. It is introduced in a spirit
of compromise, to leave the door open to the Union
and the employers to get back around the table, and
the Government hopes that both the employers and
the Union will continue to honour those aspects of
their existing agreement which are not printed in
this Bill. This Bill deals with things like a guaran-
teed three-day week for workers, a guaranteed min-
imum wage, and of course I am sure there are
several other fringe benefits and several otherwork-
ing agreements which the Union has with the employ-
ers. The Government has only left the door open
to both parties to continue to honour all that has been
honoured in the past.

Mr. President, I beg to move that this Bill be
read a second time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I beg to second that.

SENATOR Dr. R. B. CADDLE: Mr. President,
with your permission I would like to say that there
is no need for the Government to apologise for in-
troducing this Bill. If the Government must apolo-
gise, then the apology must be for such a long wait
in the introduction of this Bill.

As far back as 1961 the Partynow in power did
promise to introduce the minimum wage bill for
agricultural workers; what has taken them so long
to do this? For one who is aware of the conditions
under which sugar workers in Barbados work and
exist I can only applaud this Bill; I myself having
worked among sugar workers for four years in the
parish of St. Lucy, see the way that these people
live and one wonders how these people can manage.
During the crop season a man may make $40 a week
and when the crop is over, what is he left with? Many
of these people have large families; they have to
buy food and clothing at the same prices as the other
people, they have to educate their children, and they
also have other commitments like medical expenses.
Every one must realise that there is great amount
of hardship among a large section of Barbados'
workers, and although there may be some truth in
the argument that the cost of production of sugar
in Barbados is high, when one looks at the wages
which these people receive I have to askwhat caused
the sugar production to be so high. I believe when
we look at it, that the sugar industry in Barbados is
very much top heavy; there are people who are








309


drawing very good salaries but when one tries to-
relate the importance of their job to the production
of sugar as a whole,lone finds that it is very very
low and we cannot really appreciate that if people
must draw very high salaries they must also do the
work.

About thirty years or so ago a very prominent
member of this society, when campaigning for ag-
ricultural workers, made an interesting assumption
that the workers should be paid not less than $1.00
per day. At that time rice was 2'per pint; today rice
is 144 per pint. If you go along some of the sugar
areas in Barbados you will come across people
who suffer from malnutrition. I do not mean that
they are showing their bones, even obesity is con-
sidered a form of malnutrition. They suffer from
diseases much more than a person who is able to
provide themselves with a balanced meal. This is
true of adults and very much true of children. If
you go among the sugar workers in Barbados,where
they live, you will see that the conditions under which
some of them exist leave much to be desired.

Another interesting thing is this. Many children
go to secondary schools, but that is soon ended be-
cause their parents cannot afford to pay the fees at
some of these private schools and there are not
enough places at the Government-aided secondary
schools. Apart from that, we live in a community
with different people of different colours and with
different interests and we do not seem to tackle the
situation with the correct attitude. IIt only takes a
Stokely Carmichael or a Rap Brown to come for-
ward, and I do not think that we should sit back and
wait for such people to come on the scene before we
tackle the situation.

Sweden and Norway have minimum wages laid
down and these wages are revised every two years
because the cost of living just keeps on going up and
up. If this is not done, you will find that people can
be pressurised into accepting very often a lot less
than what they are due. It is only a matter of time
before a worker may find himself pressurised. The
Government has brought forward this Bill and I
believe that it is for many reasons. There is another
reason which I think we must not overlook; how long
could the sugarworkers afford to do without working?
If this state of affairs had been allowed to continue
many of them might have been forced or encouraged
to work biy by bit, because we have to realise that
they are not drawing any wages which would give
them enough to sit by and waituntil a settlement was
reached. They would just have to work or starve;
this was a case of survival. From this point of
view I very much welcome the Government coming
forward because it has saved embarrassment to the
workers themselves.

There are some of us who may feel that this
Bill does not contain everything, but I do realise
that the circumstances in which the Bill has been
brought forward may not permit that everything
that should be included in a Bill of this nature could
.have been. I for one would like to see a Bill em-
bracing all the workers in Barbados. There are


other industries where people are not given what
is their due because the industry is top heavy
and very often the people who are drawing these very
very high salaries are not Barbadians and the Barba-
dians are drawing very low salaries, and from that
point of view Iwould very much have liked to see a1Bill
which would have taken into consideration as many cat-
egories of workers as possible. Circumstances alter
cases, and I cannot for one moment see anything in
this Bill which one would argue against, but it is
not quite fair to criticise the Government for com-
'ing forward with it. I do not want the Government to
go to extremes, leave it for the workers and the
;employers to get together and decide. A lot more
has to be done than guaranteed wages and employ-
ment, the sugar caneworker is exposed to injury,
and serious injury can be caused by sugar cane to
the worker in the field as well as to the worker who
is exposed to a lot of heat in the factory. Some of
these conditions can be looked into; it is not only
the matter of giving these people wages, even that
wage cannot afford them to buy all the necessities
for themselves.


There is absolutely no need for the Government
to apologise for introducing this Bill and I am await-
ing the day when there will be laid down minimum
wages and proper working conditions for all the
categories of workers in this island.

SENATOR M. A. KING: Mr. President, I agree
with the Hon. Senator who spoke before me that Gov-
ernment has had no need to apologise for the intro-
duction of this Bill, because if one looks at the de-
velopment of industrial law, it is clear that the
introduction of minimum wage legislation and leg-
islation which deals with the general provisions for
workers in industry is no new aspect in law, and we
find that from time to time even those countries
where the trade union is accepted as an integral
part in the whole process of collective bargaining
we find that countries have used legislation to reach
agreement between trade unions and employers
organizations, so that from that point of view there
is no need foranyone concernedwith this to apologise.

From an academic point of view, some people
may ask how it is possible for Governmentto deter-
mine a just wage or a just price to be fixed on a
commodity, but when one looks at the Bill which
comes before the House it is obvious that Government
is not in any way seeking to establish what is the
wage which should be fixed in the industry, but what
it is doing is merely saying that this is the minimum
wage which should exist in the industry. Already we
are hearing that the contents of the Bill are not as
far-reaching as they should be, and they say that the:
Bill has been brought forward in a spirit of compro-
mise, and we hear those voices of protest which
sometimes call for the abolition of the plantation
system; they comment on the evils which result
from that system.

This Bill which has been brought forward should
be a warning to the plantation owners, to those who











control the sugar industry in this island, that devel-
opments could get worse, and we hear right through
this island that there is a threat to democracy, that
the democratic Government of this country is attemp-
ting to override the rule of law in this community,
and we find that those same people who comment on
the attempts, or the alleged attempts by this Gov-
ernment to interfere with people's constitutional
freedoms, it is significant that they discuss only the
political freedoms which we know to be freedom of
conscience, freedom of speech, right of assessment,
and things like that, but strangelyenough, those same
people who seek to criticise this Government for
alleged interference with the rule of law, do not when
crises of this nature arise, seek to make known to
people that a rule of law does exist; it does not only
exist as far as political freedoms are concerned.
What they must understand is that the rule of law
demands that every person in the community, ir-
respective of whether he is high or low, is entitled
to fundamental economic freedom and it is one of the
things which must be driven home to the people in
this community, that we must not always think of
what one's political rights are, but we must think of
what are the rights of people from an an economic
point of view.

The question has been asked, and we should ask
it all the time, what good would our political free-
doms be to us if our economic conditions did not
permit us to enjoy them? What good is freedom of
speech if you are starving? What good is freedom of
association if the moment after you enjoy it sanctions
are placed on youbecause of youreconomic situation?

I would like to say, Mr. President, to those people
who complain about alleged attempts of this Govern-
ment to subvert the rule of law to political interests
should divert their energies towards consideringthe
economic plight of the vast majority of the people in
this island. This is an exercise in which they could
be usefully engaged.

Now, Mr. President, one way of seeing this Bill
is that it is the development of the challenge to the
plantation system as it existed during-the ages, and
that it is incumbent on the plantation owners and
the directors of the Sugar Industry to make sure
that the transition from the old system to the new
concept is as smooth as possible, and that it is
accompanied by as little disruption and dislocation
as possible.

It is incumbent on the directors of the Industry
to turn their attention to new avenues and new methods
of developing agriculutral production. It will be in-
cumbent on them to realise that the more labour
avenues they can develop, the better it is for the
community; because sugar canes themselves, do not
take much labour after they have started to grow.

That is why I say that they could usefully turn
their minds to other forms of production and create
a situation in this island where it will not be nec-
essary to rely so much on imports. There axe many
-things which can be grown in this island. It is' a


challenge to the plantation system to develop new
techniques, to spend time and money in research
and develop the whole system in such away that they
can come to terms with the political and economic
life of this country in 1968.

They must realise that this measure is only a
stop gap arising from the present crisis. As the
Learned Attorney General said, the cost of living
is going up day after day, and in the long run wages
will continually have to be increased. One sector of
industry cannot sit by and talk about prices without
any association with increases to workers.

Sir, just as controls are going to be necessary
when it comes to the creation of a wage structure,
controls will be necessary when it comes to the
question of fixing prices. This is a questionto which
the Government will have to give consideration at
some stage.

The fact that legislation of this nature has been
brought down is no new concept; but it is certain that
all those engaged in the industry, employers and
workers alike, will have to sit down and think
seriously about the industry; and the Government
will also have to sit in because the Government is
concerned with people, and has to do something for
the people of this community.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -
In a general way I would not speak on this Bill at
all; but I speak on it because I am aware that there
are matters on which members of the Senate are
as ignorant as anyone else where things affecting
the community are concerned.

When there is a crisis every Barbadian is
extremely knowledgeable. They know everything
about the matter. If I were to ask many members of
this Senate how many sugar factories there are in
Barbados they would not know; but all of them now
know everything about the Sugar Industry from A
to Z. What they do not know is that people were
asking for 49 cents an hour. Tell them that and they
are surprised.

However, Sir, I am not going into all that. You
are operating an economy that was born in circum-
stances completely different from those of today.
There would be no plantation system if you did not
have slavery. As a result of that you still have the
same system and as long as you preserve that sys-
tem you will have trouble no matter who is in Gov-
ernment.

You cannot perpetuate an economic system that
was born in slavery in a free society. Professor
Marshall recently made some very pertinent re-
marks that would apply to this situation. He wrote
that "one of the most inhuman exhibitions of the
enslavement of one race by another is responsible
for a lot of our problems.

Professor Marshall is not a firebrand. This
enslavement of white people and black made up the











Sugar Industry. That is why today you can pay 49
cents an hour. That is why there is all this non-
sense being talked and written by people who are
the descendants of slaves themselves.

Mr. President, we will have no rest as long as
this system continues. Do not believe that Barbados
will stand isolated from the whole system of inter-
national progress.

Prior to 1951 you would not have been debating
this in the Legislature at all. He had no vote. The
vote that he has is nothing to do with labour per se
but he has power to determine who should rule him.
This is the political Mecca that the worker has been
able to achieve. .If the worker did not have a voice
no Government would feel that they had to do anything
about the situation. But now, what Government could
sit down and watch such a situation going chaotic?
Do they want another Vietnam or Koeran civil war?

The U.S.A., one of the best democracies, had
their period of civil war when they broke away from
the British. You will find that in any colonial state
there are some who are trying to conserve and some
who are trying to throw off the old system.

There are some in this communitywho feel that
it is by divine decree that some people should get
49 cents an hour in order to preserve them in the
position in which they are in. Some people seek
political power by the cheap road.

Mr. President, it is one of the basic principles.
In any society like ours, unless you are giving an
increase of purchasing power to the last person in
the country so that they can purchase some of the
things that you are producing what can you except
but a chaotic condition?

Do you want to see a situation continuing where
a few people pay income tax and many do not? When
I see a situation like that Ifeel that the Government
should come in and help the worker all over the
country.

Do you believe that we would keep people out
for four weeks merely to show their strength? It
is a pure economic fact that people were not going
to continue any longer at these rates. Can you, Mr.
President, go home feeling well that you are getting
$1,000 more within the same economy and then you
want to justify 49 cents an hour on the basis of the
production of sugar?

Mr. PRESIDENT: I hope that the Senator will
not reiterate the arguments between the Sugar Pro-
ducers Federation and the Barbados Workers Union.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: This is a different
matter. I am dealing with the matter central to the
Bill. All that I am asking is if in a country where
sugar is central to the -'i economy, where 90 per
cent of your export trade comes from sugar, where
everybody's wages and salaries are based on it this
wide range should exist?


This 'is nothing to do with the sugar producers.
They do not pay the Ministers or the whole of the
community. The community gets its income from
the reserve on sugar. If sugar is central to the
economy you cannot reconcile. it with 49 cents an
hour for sugar workers.
I am not making out a case for the Bill or for the
workers. I am making out a case for commonsense.
Senator King appealed to people to think of the fu-
ture. The Sugar Industry is extremely powerful
within the context of our economy. It is an industry
so owned that it lacks the entrepreneurship that an
industry should have and has become a multiplicity
of little family businesses controlling a source of
economy that is central to the life of the country.

There is no question of persuading them thatyou
cannot continue with this dispensation of economic
power and property to your heirs and your relatives
as though you are handing down something that you
can put into a will. That is where the Government
comes in. In the context of our society the planta-
tion system, organised as it is, is inimical to the
economic growth and progress in the 20th Century.
You cannot make progress on the basis of a planta-
tion owned by a father and passed on to a son and
you only need people as labourers; that you can
find a reservoir of cheap and ignorant labour to
cut your canes. Then you have a national crisis.
It is the Union today. It may be the Minister
of Home Affairs in the next few years if he can-
not bring cheap labour from St. Vincent and St.
Lucia.

The producers canalways invoke the aid of the
Opposition. The people of this island are becoming
very rapacious today. In an island like this you can
get the Leader of the Opposition, a party that prof-
fesses to be a Socilist party, requesting delay and
postponement, thinking that the Leader of the work-
ers movement would fail.

Too many people in this country like to see you
in an organisation which is so weak that they can
step over you. When you can stand up and let your
voice be heard they will call you a dictator and all
sorts of bad things.

That is where some planters made a mistake.
They had the idea that they were dealing with an in-
dividual. I am not asking for 49 cents an hour for
myself. I am not involved. In 1964 you had this same
problem. You also had it in 1958. Whenever there
was a demand for the workers the sugar planters
have made it their business to create an issue. A
delay took place in 1957 and an adhoc bonus was
paid.

The Government did not ask for an increase in
the wages of sugar workers generally speaking. The
Government as an employer itself does not come out
easily and give anyone money. The Union had to ask
for money for the sugar workers. Some people are
talking as if the Government would stick its neck
out to get a Minimum Wage Bill. The idea of the
Bill is to get a settlement.










People who know about Labour Legislationwould
know that this Bill was created out of the prevailing
circumstances. You do not start off in the abstract.
The whole basis of Labour Legislation is circum-
stances for which the old Common Law cannot pro-
vide.

In the U.S.A.they had the National Labour Re-
lations Act as the result of the situation between
unions and employers. You had that Act for the plain
purpose of controlling the relationships between
employers and workers in the U.S.A. in the 30s
when they were killing people, when thugs were
beating up people. Now in the U.S.A. the employers
have to give workers the authority to contract in.

I hear people ignorantly talking about factory
workers. There have been reductions in labour
costs and an increase in labour productivity. That
is what people must understand. You cannot have
higher productivity and expect these workers to
stand still.

What is this nonsense that people are talking
about costs? In the sugar industry wages are not
keeping pace with those in any other sector of the
community generally speaking. In 1962 a Commission
of Inquiry came to Barbados. I challenge you to ask
all the wiseacres who went before the commission
who presented a memorandum. It was the Sugar
Producers' Federation and the Barbados Workers
Union who went forward. The Labour Opposition
Party did not present a memorandum.

What are these things you hear them talk about
now? They only wait until something arise now to
say these things, to say what the Barbados Workers'
Union did, and a memorandum is there for anybody
to read. The Barbados Workers' Union has to wait
for six years for a Commissioner of Enquiry; we
said so six years ago, we are not going to repeat
what we said. What we will repeat is this, that if
the sugar owners and manufacturers are thinking
about the industry as the workers' representatives
are doing, they will realise that long ago they should
be sitting down with a plan for the future of some-
thing that they are controlling, and not waiting for
the ad hoc arrangements which are devised.

I think it is their business to sit down with a
plan. You have 19 sugar factories in Barbados. We
did not wait until they came and told us about mech-
anisation, which is something-that they know nothing
about. Do you want the Union to close down the fac-
tories and the workers to say that it is the Union that
put them out of employment? In any business you ask
yourself what is your future. You have 19 factories,
what is the future? There is money from the Reha-
bilitation Fund; what do you intend to do from now on?
Are you going to wait till something comes along and
say you can have no more fund? What do you intend
to do from here on? Doyou regard it as a serious
matter? Are you going to wait until the very moment
something happens then to say that you did not know
this or that would happen?


These are the things that take place today.
Nothing is done until a crisis arises andthen every-
one says well let us look and see what the Govern-
ment or the Union is doing; let us look and see what
the Prime Minister is doing, and nowadays it is very
fashionable to say either the Prime Minister has
done this, or otherwise that the Secretary of the Union
and the Prime Minister have done this. There was a
time when the Prime Minister and the Secretary of
the Union were going to get together and they were
going to make some arrangement that there would
be no more strikes in Barbados. Now, there was
not a strike, but the workers did not start work..
There is little distinction between a strike and not
commencing work, but those who do not know they
just do not know. They felt that. by telling the
workers to go back to work it would be some blow
to the Secretary of the Union, but they are working
for $100 a day andthe Leaderofthe Union is working
for $200 a day. The workers were working for 490
a day. For the last time Iwouldlike to make it clear
that if they do not know what the relationship between
the factory and the field is, it is better that they
should not go on repeating some things that they are
not clear about.

The number of factory workers have been so
high, if you take all the money that is earned in
factories and give to the people working in the field
it is $800,000 at the maximum that they paid out to
factory workers and if you take that and give it to
the people that you have to pay $7,000,000 then you
know how much money you will be giving them.

But the Government is pressurised, because in
politics Senator Rock is from St. Andrew, and she
knows that Senator Mapp and his colleagues forced
the Government to buy a factory in St. Andrew that
should never have been bought, and some of the mem-
bers of their own political party forced them to buy
the factory. Although we represent workers at Hag-
gatts Factorywe never sent aletterto the Government
asking them to buy Bruce Vale, OldburynorGibbons,
but if you choose to listen to these people and buy
antiquated machinery to operate in the 20th century
for the purpose of getting a vote, that is the price
you must pay. The price you must pay for democracy,
you must be able to have the inconvenience of a strike
at times.

Mr. PRESIDENT: I do not want to interrupt the
honourable Senator, but this Bill deals with minimum
wage and guaranteed employment, and I would be very
glad if you would stick to the Bill.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
will cease if you feel that I am not dealing with the
matter.

(Senator Walcott left the Chamber at this point).

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I think
some member spoke on the introduction of this Bill
and used the phrase "this Billis simply a stop gap."
I am very sorry that the Honourable Senatorwho has
just spoken has left because I have .......


1








313


Mr. PRESIDENT: Does the Honourable Senator
wish to deal with the Order Paper of the Senate?



SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Oh yes, Mr. President.!
Some member used the words "stop gap" and really
and truly I think that is how this Bill must be regard-
ed today. In other words, it is really imposing a
settlement that ordinarily should be arrived atinthe
voluntary or by the ordinary usual voluntarynegotia-
tions that go on between capital and labour.

We have heard so much today about political
terms, we have heard so much about the history of
sugar, we have heard of the enslavement of black
people by the white people, we have heard a remark-
able speech by the member who just spoke, but one
really does not know that we are coming to if people
who are in a responsible position go on with that
kind of nonsense they are getting on with.

I feel it is time that people in certain positions
stop this nonsense about slaves and realise that we
have got very far away from it, and the sooner we
get away from it the better it is for people themselves
and the people whom they represent. We have come
far; let us be proud of it and do not let us keep look-
ing back. I look on this, Sir, as a pure capital and
labour issue, the usual issue that goes onthroughout
countries in which you have private enterprise. When
you have! private ownership in this country, look
at it in these fundamental terms.

I wonder where we are going, because the last
Honourable Member who just spoke would ask "do
you want this to be a Cuba?" Do like Castro, elim-
inate them. Or do you want a co-operative, or do you
want individual ownership of business? Buyupallthe
plantations? Exactly what does the Honourable Mem-
ber want? He is not here to clearit up, but what does
he want? I must ask because it must go down in the
records so that people will know that there is some
challenge to this kind of stupidity that has been going
on, especially coming from ordinary responsible
leadership.

People seem very afraid to talk. I had expected
that at least one sugar plantation owner who is not
white would be here today to at least say something,
but I regret to say thay if you go on like this the
people will not respect this body. No publicity is
given to a lot of good speeches given in here, and
you have certain industries represented and they do
not say one word. It does not make sense. If you have
institutions that are regarded as useful thenwe must
make the fullest use of them. Ifeelthat we can stand
up here and do our part and if one member can put
one point of view, then there is another person.
who should be able to put another point of view. It
is all going on record. We had a Minister of Gov-
ernment saying the industry cannot afford to pay
more, the Trade Union saying no, so we reach a
deadlock. Surely, Sir, we are asking for the facts.
what better than to get the facts?


Mr. PRESIDENT: I think I should remind the
Honourable Member this is not a court of law.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am verygladit is not,
because if the Honourable Members are like this
Honourable Member who just spoke, the court of
law would have to be adjourned for a whole year. It
is customer for speakers who give their first
speeches in a Chamber of this sort to be congrat-
ulated by the other speakers, and, Sir, I formally
congratulate Honourable Senator King. I think this is
the first time he has spoken in this Chamber and
I congratulate him for his able speech on this Bill.
At times it sounded as if we were at a lecture, but
nevertheless it contained some wisdom.

There are one or two things that cannot be al-
lowed to go unchallenged. He asked the employers
to see that they introduce more labour in a more
intensive scheme. So far as we are concerned, what
we are doing we have less labour. This is only the
beginning; there is a way out, but I think, Sir, even
the Prime Minister said that the Government regret-
ted to have to do it although we think they stepped
in rather late. They should have stepped in in a
different way, but to step ininthe way they have only
means this, that you will have this thing in the future.
This Government if I may elaborate on that
clause this Government was advised by a Commis-
sion that they set up; the Opposition did not ask for
it. Let it be known that we were not going to set up
a Commission, but this Government, aided and abet-;
ted by the last speaker, went ahead and set up a
Commission headed by Dr. Farley. Those of us who
know Dr. Farley know that he is not enslaved; if his
forebeares were enslaved, it is all the more credit
to him that he is not enslaved. There was also on
the Commission a Mr. Ifill from Trinidad. For a
man who is not enslaved, he has long past the stage
when he can look back and say those days are gone
forever; they go on and what my forebears did not
enjoy I will. I do not know the other members per-
sonally, but those two members we know by repu-
tation and we have to be labour minded. The members
foresaw that just what has happened would have hap-
pened at any time in the sugar industry, and if you
had an industrial court that would have the facts
placed before it, you could avoid the same situation
that has come up now and which nearly wrecked the
economy of this island at least set it back consider-
ably if not wreck it.
Now, Sir, it was not our fault that the industrial
board was set up, or that the recommendations of the
Farley Commission were not carried out. The Hon-
ourable Attorney General does not know about that,
he arrived late.
Mr. PRESIDENT: I take it that he read the report.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Ihope so, Sir. The other
members probably never read it. We got a report
that was called the Farley Report, but this was a
piece of it, he might have read the Farley Report,
one of these days I hope to read it myself. Now, Sir,
in the absence of machinery such as recommended











by Dr. Farley, the only thing that we can fall back-
on in a matter of this sort, andin order that you may
base your decision on some practical figures, expert
figures, to set up an arbitration, or the employers
had asked for a Commission of Enquiry, but to my
mind this would take longerthan arbitration. I repeat,
I have been asked what we recommend in the way
of what machinery we had recommended than this
method of arriving at a settlement.

Mr. PRESIDENT: I must remind the Honourable
Senator that we are now dealing with a Bill which
does not deal with such subjects.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mind you, all this has
a bearing; let us face facts. All that I am saying has
a bearing on this Bill and I feel, Sir, that unless
these things are brought out in the open and dis-
cussed at this level, the future is very bleak.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Proceed.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Thank you, Sir. We:
must be able to state our views, though I canpromise
you I would not go into any rambling history like
the former speaker. The last Honourable member
said that sugar is central to the economy; how then
can you justify 494 an hour? On that basis, how can
you justify even what this Bill contains? This is not
in fact a minimum wage, because if anybody today
tells you that three days work per week at the rates
set out in this Bill would be adequate even as a min-
imum wage, is asking you to go back 20 years, so
in fact this is no minimum wage, this is not anything
to turn the world upside down. The Government
reaslied that I do not think that they are asking
for this other than to attempt to impose something
near to the Trade Union figure and to the Sugar
Producers in order to get the wheels of industry
turning; that is all to it. If this was brought in as a
minimum wage it would be so minimum that those
of us on this side would have to fight against it. -

I have argued, not publicly so far, I will say it
now that unless the Government follow this upwith a
real examination of the industry, taking into account
not only what is being paid out of crop but taking
into account expenditure in the industry as a whole
as against what the industry is receiving, what it is
likely to receive, what is happening with the British
and what is likely to happen internationally to affect
the price of sugar, unless Government does that, we
are getting nowhere fast.

All that we are doing is saying that any politi-
cian can come along, especially at electiontime, and
introduce a Bill to increase the wages by 74 an hour
and it is plain sailing from then on for him. I can
only express the hope, I repeat, that Insteadof having
one Commission set up, the report of which you
never hear about, Icanonlyhope, Sir, that we would
get down to it and see that things are put on a pro-
per footing, because whether we like it or not, our
principal export is sugar. Tourism is a close rival,
but I would firmly hope that the day be far off when
we have to place all our eggs in one basket Tour-


ism or that we do anything to destroy the sugar
industry; we must turn to other forms of production.
There is a lot of good theory around; but it is
the duty of the Government to see the problems, face
up to the realities of today and not live in the past.

As I was saying, Sir, if sugar survives I can
see that it will still be our mainstayfor a long time,
although I agree that we should not lay back and do
no research to see what else can be done on as
large a scale as possible to take advantage of all
that science can offer.

Sir, as far as I can see, within the next decade
we are going to be faced with growing expenditures
consequent on the facts of life our growing pop-
ulation, and consequent on having become independ -
and we will need every cent that we can sell abroad.

Even though Tourism is going to grow, no one
knows what the future will be. No one knows what
America is going to do. In the next few years they
may clamp down on travel to the Caribbean as well.
Sugar is still our essential money-earning commod-
ity.

This Bill is temporary stopgap, but in another
two years we will be placed in the same predicament.
I speak as a member of this body and not as one
running for popular politics. Some other members
may not be in that category. I feel that one who
cannot speak freely and frankly should not be in
this Senate. No one should be afraid to get up here
and speak or be prevented from answering the ful-
minations that we heard from Senator Walcott.

I have never heard such political nonsense com-
ing form the leader of any other Trades Union in
the whole area of the West Indies. All of us are de-
pendent on Sugar. We may not all agree with Sir
Alexander Bustamante's politics, but he is free today.
He is the sort of man that even Mr. Manley pays
tribute to. It seems to me that political life is such
that some people have to play a role and continue
playing it.

I heard the Senator talk about money flying about
and the Opposition backing up the Sugar Producers
Federation and the only newspaper that didn't carry
the advertisement and draw money from the Sugar
Producers Federation was the Beacon. One weekly
paper got $300. We refused it, and we will continue
to make the sacrifice.

Senator Walcott got up here and talked about the
Opposition doing this and that. In 1958 the then Prem-
ier Dr. Cummins was known as a mandoing the best
for his country. He got a commission set up and ap-
pealed to the workers to go back to work. Perhaps
he made a mistake, but the whole point remains that
he did it in good faith. There is no doubt about his
honesty.

If this country is to prosper, Sir, if we are to
save this country from catastrophe, we must hope
that in an important industry like the Sugar Industry











we will get proper relationships between capital and
labour, and then in spite of what happened hope that
negotiations will be continued in the proper spirit in
the future.

I am really pessimistic after listening to Senator
Walcott if he is really serious. I do not know why he
should be vexed, because the Government saved him
and saved the workers and the economy of the island,
even though we were pressurising the Government to
do something because the situation was becoming
difficult and nothing was being done. We do not
apologise for that.

We were pressurised in 1958 by the party now
in power. They and the Trade Union leader joined
forces in 1958 and said all kinds of things about the
Government when we were trying to arrive at a
settlement.

Sir, I wanted to go on record as answering
some of the remarks made by the Senator. While
I appreciate the rush, I cannot see, even though the
Test Match starts tomorrow, why we should not be
given a longer time on this Bill. From all that I
have heard, this Bill has been drafted badly and that
there are certain things that need amending.

Mr. PRESIDENT: I thinkthatwhen the Bill comes
to committee stage it would be a proper time for
the Senator to raise his suggestions.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I was just giving the
reasons why I was sorry that the Government had
to rush the Bill. I do not like to see important things
done in a hurry. If you have a Bill that is going to
settle the rates of wages for workers you should
make sure that everything in it is watertight. I
understand that it was said in the Other Place when
certain points were raised that amendments would
be brought down. I really hope so.

The Government may riot have had time to go
into the proposed amendments thoroughly. Theymay
be in a quandary. I am sorry that there is this rush
about it. I hope that on future occasions Bills will
be circulated as required.

SENATOR P. G. MORGAN: Mr. President, I
am the first to plead guilty of Senator Walcott's
charge that some of us may be ignorant of the Sugar
Industry. But this Bill before us is a matter of
great importance. It is of importance not only to
the people of the industry or the Government. It is
a matter of national importance.

I would say now that there have been many pro-
nouncements by some worthy gentlemen which tend
to confuse the ordinary ignorant person more than
he is ordinarily confused. We had Sir Robert
Kirkwood saying to you and then Lord Campbell
saying that the prospects for sugar are very good.

Perhaps I was more astounded when I read in
the Schedule what is now proposed to be the minimum
wage for an able bodied 'A Class man $13.44


a week. We have heard a lot of history going back
for generations. We have been told that this is a
basis for negotiations and that in another three years
there will have to be an increase in rates again.

Senator Mapp comes out with things and hopes
to get away with them. This question of marketing is
irrelevant. One of the things that has to be done Sir,
- I hope that the agricultural people concerned with
the plantations will be brought to their senses and
see by the situation that has arisen that the first
order is obviously mechanisation. I hope that it will
not be long before something is done bythe Industry.
If there is to be mechanisation, the only way in which
work can be found for those displaced is by diversi-
fication of agriculture.

That is where I disagree with Senator Mapp. He
said that it was impossible.

Mr. PRESIDENT: I understand Senator Mapp to
say that the Government owned sugar estates but
they did not set a lead in diversification.

SENATOR P. G. MORGAN: There is averygood
deal of research going on in diversification both in
the private and public sector. Take one single item,
onions. We import three million pounds of onions
a year. Here we found that we could grow them on
two or three acres of land. Certain sectors of the
community and of the Government must be aware
that these things can be done.

As one associated with the Tourist Industry, I
regard the agricultural sector as being the No. 1
sector of the economy and it will be always, but we
have to take a look at it and make proper plans for
the future with the least possible delay.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President, -
I am sure that everyone will agree that all of us
welcome this Bill, whether it is a stop gap or not,
if we love this country of ours. One cannot say that
wages in this country are high. The sugar worker
is fortunate in this respect that because if his im-
portance to the economy he has his case pin-pointed.

I have said in this Chamber already that I
cannot reconcile salaries of $1,000 a month and the
payment to some people of $40 a month on which
they are expected to live. Now that the Government
has taken the opportunity to do something, I hope
that they will instruct their Labour Officers to go
to some of the industries and see that labour staff
is not exploited.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, --
I think that much has been said although after hear-
ing the last few speakers and hearing the comments
of the last two speakers on speeches thatwere made
earlier I am sorry that I was not here. I must make
a few comments because it seems to me that a very
important issue has been raised by the necessity
to introduce this Bill, a Bill with which we agree in
principle.












What occurred to me as rather important is the
fact that it had to be introduced because of an almost
completebreakdown in existing industrial relations.
That I am sorry about. I do not think that we will
have industrial peace when we will have to depend
not on hard bargaining, but Government intervening
to find a solution.

It is unfortunate, I think, Mr. President, that on
one side there seemed to be the belief that if we hold
out long enough we can destroy the Union, and on
the other side there seemed to be the belief that if
we hold out long enough we will be able to bring about
political confusion. Then we had the ridiculous
business of a Minister getting into direct conflict
with the Union and its negotiations.

I do not think that it is wise for anyone sitting
in the position of the Minister of Labour to come out
at a time when negotiations are taking place and
make statements prejudicial to the outcome of the
negotiations.

If the Government had not intervened at this
point Heaven knows what would have happened. I am
quite sure that it would be the workers who would
suffer. I do not think that we can afford to allow
people to continue this business of grandstanding
from the platform instead of coming to the table for
discussion.


In some instances one or two planters were of
the opinion that if they did not give the people
any work they would soon have to go out and
start the crop. In other words the question was put
in another direction.

Sugar is central to the whole economy of this
country, and therefore what happens with sugar
happens with the whole country and I do not think
that the people who have been conducting these
negotiations were fully aware of the fact that if a
man has insurance policies to cover loss through
fire or to cover loss of revenue, when the canes
go up in smoke, it is the person who looses the
wages that suffer.

This is a very serious business and I do not
think that we ought to just sit down and do nothing
about it. When Government decides that we should
have minimum wage legislation in the interest of
all workers that is one thing when Government
decides that in order to get the sugar crop, on which
we all depend, we have to have legislationis another
thing. I am wondering, Mr. President, tomorrow
morning when the Union finds it necessary to try
and settle what matters there may be outstanding
and to have the period for a new agreement, what
will be the outcome of these negotiations? Unfortun-
ately the Union has played its trump card already.

There has been a lot of talk about diversifi-
cation, but I have not heard either from the Govern-
ment side or from private interest anything yet to
indicate that we have found a use of the soil by


any means as efficient as sugar. I have not heard
this either from Government or from the private
side; until we get this kind of information, then
diversification is somethingwhich has to be proceeded
with on an experimental level, and we cannot just
shut our eyes to facts as they are and run off and
say something else. We have to think in terms of
money, people we are going to employ and what you
are going to pay them.
I do not want to say anything more, Mr. Presi-
dent, because if I had been hear earlier I am sure
that I would have heard a great deal which might
have shed some further light on why certain tactics
were employed in these negotiations. I was not here
then and I am still at a loss to know why two parties
should have to fight like this; I do not mind them
fighting, I mind them fightingwhen the economy of the
country is at stake. That is all I want to say, Mr.
President.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I did not
intend speaking but there are just afew short obser-
vations I would like to make. It seems to me that
much of the contention on this Bill seems to stem
from the fact that it is not quite clear whether it is
what has been referred to here as stop gap legisla-
tion or whether it is in reality a minimum wage Bill.
All the circumstances would point to the fact that it
is more the former than the latter. The Honourable
Attorney General himself has said it is an attempt
to combine both.

Speaking as one without any particular know-
ledge of the pros and cons of either side, I would say
that the Government has done what seems to be a
reasonably good job in bridging that little gap, and
of course it was with a certain degree of relief that
all private citizens heard the decision of the Gov-
ernment. The wheels of industry have started to
turn, and in spite of what has been said here this
evening, there will be many a year before the sugar
industry ceases to be a very important part of our
economy.

I would regard it more as stop gap legislation
to get the wheels of industry turning, and I would
have preferred in that case that this should have
been temporary legislation; in other words, that it
should have expired when the needfor it ceases to
exist. Unfortunately it has been tied to the wider
issue of minimum wage legislation. Now it is gen-
erally accepted in industrial relations circles that
the Government only steps in to impose a minimum
wage on any particular industry when it is satisfied
that the workers in that particular industry are not
sufficiently well organised, but where workers are
well organised Governments usually steer clear of
imposing minimum wages. I would have preferred
that they should have fixed temporary legislation
which would expire when things start getting on, and
having negotiations in the meantime to keep things
on a smooth road again. Then, if the Government
still felt in its wisdom that it was necessary to im-
pose a minimum wage, then they could bring down a
minimum wage Bill.










I accordingly support this Bill, Sir, and I think.
that under the circumstances the Government had
no other alternative than to do what it has done.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, this has been quite a long session
and there are one or two things!I wish to reply to.
I am glad to see that one Honourable Senator has
confessed his ignorance of what is happening in the
sugar industry; he is the General Secretary of a
Sugar Workers Union which is quite new and which
should be concerned with ......

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: I have never at any
point confessed any ignorance of the sugar industry.
I said I had a certain amount of information.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, all I am saying is that he is a Sec-
retary of a Union and one would expect him to be
interested in what is happening to sugar workers.
Mr. President, I would like to congratulate Senator
King for a very sensible and well-delivered maiden
speech in the Chamber. I think he has brought the
dignity of this Chamber in keeping with its tradition
and I think that other members of this Senate could
do well to emulate him.

I thank Senator Alkins for his suggestion that
this Bill should be temporary, but in the circum-
stances the Government has given its word, through
the Prime Minister, to the sugar workers that this
Bill would be introduced in this way and the Govern-
ment will stick to it. The question of an industrial
court has been considered by the Government, but
Barbados has been very fortunate in having very few
industrial disputes to justify even a High Court Judge
just sitting there waiting for people to come to him.

A lot of play has been made of the fact that this
Bill is not well drafted, but I just want to clear the
record because not only is it a reflection onme,it
is a reflection on a hard working officerwho has had
a lot more experience than any of the persons who
have criticised it.

Mr. President, I am not going to indulge in any
political gymnastics such as I have heard today and
therefore I move that this Billbe read a second time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I beg to second that.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P.M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, in the absence of the Deputy Presi-
dent, I move that' Senator Brathwaite be appointed
Deputy Presiden' for the balance of the day's sitting.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I beg to second that.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.
Senator Brathwaite assumed the chair.


Clause 1 of the Bill was called and passed.

Clause 2 was called.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. Deputy President,
unlike the Attorney General I have not been in any
other Chamber to know what points were raised,
but I see that certain interpretations are given in
this Interpretation clause, but......

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
if the Honourable Senator would give way I can
give him the assurance that if there is any validi-
ty in the points raised which the Hon. Member said
he would draw to this Government's attention, the
necessary amendments will be made in keeping with
the suggestions of the Opposition.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am very glad to hear
that.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I have not had an opportunity to discuss with the
Honourable Minister the details of the suggestions,
but I will take the necessary steps as soon as possi-
ble.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am very pleased to
get that assurance from the Honourable Member,
Sir. I may assure you, Sir, that what I am about
to raise now from my little knowledge is just a
little amendment, and the Honourable Member knows
that I am not a lawyer so he can get up and punch
legal holes in me, but in the Schedule reference is
made to A class and Bclassworkers.I have search-
ed everywhere and I cannot find A class or B class
defined. I am not a sugar planter and we have to
get these things explained; what is the difference
between A class and B class. I am dealing with clause
2 and I want something defined that comes in the
Schedule.

Mr. DEPUTY PRESIDENT: Are you making
amendment to section 27

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am just asking the
Government, for the purpose of this clause, for the
difference ......

Mr. DEPUTY PRESIDENT: We are not here for
time-wasting exercises. I hope you would get onwith
the Bill.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am explaining to you
why I am in order. I repeat I am in order because
although the schedule is not mentioned in clause 2,
section 3 is mentioned and section 3 includes the
first schedule, so all I am saying is just as minimum
wages order is defined so also Class A Worker can be
defined. I hope that that is clear to you, Sir, and
you would not accuse me of time wasting. I am
not going outside my scope at all.

Mr. DEPUTY PRESIDENT: I did not say you
were outside your scope, I want you to be as brief
as possible.











SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I hope the Honourable
Attorney General would enlighten us as to what A
class means and what B class means, or as to why
they were not defined in section 2 like these other
things here.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. Deputy President, there is no need to define
everything in a Bill. The plantation owners already
know if they have A class and B class men what they
have. Everybody in the plantations know that an A
class man is.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Sir, I believe that there
are some people who understand all the sugar indus-
try means, but if I know nothing about the lot, you
have to be very precise and define things so that
there can be absolutely no doubt as to what is intended
by a particular section. That is the whole point. Some
of us are not lawyers, but we have common sense.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I accept in good faith
the assurance given by the Hon. Attorney General,
but I do not see why I should be told that the Opposi-
tion is wasting time. That is making fun of people
who take their work seriously. You are not talking
to a Fifth Form schoolboy.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I must support the
remarks of the last speaker. This needs definition.
It is not for me to question the Attorney General
on a point of law. When one sees the expressions
"A Class"and "B Class" you do not define the
type and category. If even you refer to an existing
agreement in which they are defined some effort
should be made to define them here.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: I am glad that Sen-
ator Alkins saw fit to intervene on our behalf. I
have been noticing the fulminations of the Attorney
General unless the approach is made by one of the
Governor's nominees to the Senate. Unless sugges-
tions are made by one of these he is not prepared
to treat them with the seriousness that they deserve.

I just want to make sure that anyone who has as
little information on the industry as I have should
know what is an A Class worker.

SENATOR W.W. BLACKMAN: Mr. Deputy Chair-
man, I too think that the terms should be defined.
A man may say that he is an A Class man and he
may not be. The Term should be defined.

SENATOR M. A. KING: Mr. Deputy Chairman, -
I think that the difficulty is that in the drafting of
Bills for presentation it is not always necessary
to include every specific detail. We know that the
Common Law system which we operate depends to
a large extent on customs, usages and conventions
fordefinitions inmany of the circumstances that arise..

When it comes to A Class worker, there must
be a custom in the plantation system by which an A
Class and B Class worker is defined. Evidence can
easily be led by those who are knowledgeable about


the plantation system to show who is an A Class
and who is a B Class worker. I do not think that
there is any need to prolong the argument any fur-
ther.

The question that Clause 2 stand part was put
and agreed to.

Clauses 3 to 17 were called and passed without
debate.

Clause 18 was called.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: Perhaps the Learned
Attorney General can tell us when exactly the Reg-
ulations will be deemed to have come into effect. I
think that it is sometimes the custom to place in a
Bill that the Regulations will be laid before the Leg-
islature and published in the Official Gazette.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Under the
Intrepretation Act Regulations in subsidiary legis-
lation come into effect the moment that they are
published in the Official Gazette in the absence of
anything in the Bill saying otherwise ..

The question that Cluase 18 stand part of the
Bill was put and agreed to.

Clause 19 was called and passed without debate.

The Schedules were called.

SENATOR THE HON. P. M. GREAVES: I move
that the Schedules stand part of the Bill.

Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: The second Schedule is
one that is very important. It says in Paragraph 4 :

For the purposes of this Schedule the man-
agement of every sugar plantation and of every
sugar factory or cane syrup plant shall, as soon as
may be after being requiredto do so bythe Chief La-
bour Officer, forward to the Chief Labour Officer
the names of all persons who are employed as
sugar workers in such plantation or in or about
such sugar factory or cane syrup plant and the dates
on which the employment of such persons commenced.

Does this mean that management can make this
return and then get rid of some of them? There is
nothing in this Act to prevent this. The Objects and
Reasons say that the employer should provide work-
ers with guaranteed employment to the 31st of Jan-
uary the following year.

We know that many plantations carry a regular
batch of workers who have been with them for a long
time. It looks to me as if the Government may be
faced with a situation where you have a lot of out of
crop workers. The Government gets a list of those
ordinarily employed at a plantation; but there is
nothing to prevent the employer from returning a
list of the persons generally employed and the next
-day firing or laying off three quarters of them.








319'


What I am asking is how can this Bill in relation
to other Minimum Wage Bills, affect the layn off
of workers? All that you will get is registration of
names. How effective in this Schedule?'


SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Section 3
says that it is for the Cabinet to make a comprehen-
sive Order under that section. These Schedules will
hold for the moment. The Order will set out the de-
tails. This is a stop gap.


SENATOR Dr. R. B. CADDLE: It is generally
accepted that it is the constitutional right of an employ-
er to employ whom he so desires. You cannot make
an employer employ someone that he does not
want to.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: After July
1st and a worker has worked 480 dayswith a planta-
tion he presents himself and he has to get employment.
If you have an average of 480 days you are entitled
to three days aweekemployment. If you got in your
480 days before April this year and you were dis-
missed in April you are entitled from July.

SENATOR Dr. R. B. CADDLE: Are you saying
that the employer must employ the particular person?

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: Yes.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Am I to take it that the
Government is bringing down an Order which will
tell an employer who may say I want only 20 men
that he has to employ 40 or 50 for so much time and
he must employ them?

SENATOR P. G. MORGAN: It would seem to me
that the intention here is that a person employed in
the crop for 480 days is guaranteed employment in
the out of crop period.
The question that the Schedules stand part of
the Bill was put and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumedthe Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith
seconded by Senator the Hon. L. E. Sandiford the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.40

The President called the first item on the
Agenda A Resolution to place the sum of $3,000
at the disposal of the Government to supplement
the Estimates 1967 -68 Part 1 Current as shown
in the Supplementary Estimates 1967 68 No. 40

SENATOR THE HON. P. M. GREAVES: Mr.
President, There are a number of officers of the


House of Assembly who have been granted leave
including the Clerk, Deputy Clerk and one Reporter.
The renumeration for these officers on leave is
exhausted. It is estimated that supplementary pro-
vision of $3,000 is required to the remainder of the
financial year.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred
in.
Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith seconded the'
motion.

The question was put and agreed to.
His Honour the President called the second
Order of the day A Resolution to place the sum of
$22,041 at the disposal of the Government to sup-
plement the Estimates 1967 68 Part 1 Current
as shown in the Supplementary Estimates 1967 68
No. 45 which form the Schedule to the Resolution.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P.M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, under Item 32, Head 35, Honourable
Senators will see that the amount provided was
$287,690. Out of this vote, the amount of $50,325
was allocated for the maintenance of Government
buildings, including Government lettings. At the 31st
December, 1967 the amount of $44,949 was spent and
a further amount $1,426 was also expended.
Expenditure has been heavier than had been antici-
pated mainly because of certain emergency repairs
carried out to prepare the Drill Hall for the Heads
of Governments Conference last year.
Under Item 33 of the same Head there is the sum
of $7,791 required for the payment of wages to casual
employees who will be required to work -especially
the Caretaker and Watchman employed at Clarendon,
Roseneath and Farley Hill. There were also about
10 workers who were employed in clearing the storage
compound of the Ministry of Communications and
Works. I move that the Resolution be concurred in.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I beg to second that.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: I wonderif the Minister
could outline for us verybrieflywhat plans there are
for the Farley Hill National Park.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
We have received, as the Honourable Senatorknows,
recommendations from the National Trust, andthese
are receiving consideration and I hope that the
report will soon be available to all concerned.
The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put to the Senate and agreed to.

His Honour the President called the third order
of the day. A Resolution to place the sum of $6,485
at the disposal of the Government to supplement the
Estimates 1967 68 Part 1 Current as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates 1967 -68 No. 50 which
form the Schedule to the Resolution.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, back pay for Reporters forthe period
31st April, 1966 to March 1967 has been paid out of
this year's vote. The amount paid out in respect of
Reporters and Typists is over $2,000. This was not
provided for in this year's estimates, and the intention








i320


to supplement this year's vote is mainly to replace
the amount which was expanded from it. I move that
the Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE L. E.
SANDIFORD: I beg to second that.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: I wonder if our repre-
sentative on the Debates Committee could give us
a resume of the present position of the Debates.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, asyou
know, the responsibility for the reporting and the
publication of the debates of both Houses rests with
the Debates Committee which comprises about six
or seven members of the Other Place and myself as
representative of this Senate. For some years now
the reporting of these debates has not been satis-
factory. The services of a part-time Reporter have
been allocated to the Senate; he reports, prepares
the script, hands it to the Clerk to the Senate for
editing and he in turn, after editing it, passes it
to the Government Printery for printing. The last
meeting of the Debates Committee was held on the
15th January; at that date the situation with regard
to the debates of the Senate was as follows:

There were 18 debates, reports of which have
not yet been received from the Reporter cov-
ering the period from 2nd February, 1967 on-
wards. At that date there were six reports in
the hands of the Clerk for editing, and four in
the hands of the printers, making a total of 28
which have not yet appeared.

The part-time Reporter of the Senate was called
before the Debates Committee, he was told that the
Debates Committee considered his performance ex-
tremely unsatisfactory, but he was given until
March 31st to bring all his arrears up to date. The
position at today's date is that there are 17 debates
not yet received, 6 are in the hands of the Clerk now
for editing, and 6 are in the hands of the printers,
making a total of 29 outstanding at today's date.

In the decision of the Debates Committee, the
Reporter was told that he had until March 31st to
bring his reports up to date, and that these would
have to be brought up to date at a minimum of 2 per
week. I can only say at this stage that I sincerely
hope that when the 31st March comes I shall be able
to report to this Senate that the Dabates have been
brought upto date; failing that, the Debates Committee
has decided to take strong disciplinary action.

Just to complete the picture, I would like to say
that proposals for the improvement of the reporting
and the editing of the debates of both Houses have
been submitted by the Debates Committee to the Gov-
ernment. They were submitted under cover of a letter
dated 14th February, 1967, as far as I know, no de-
cision has yet been made in regard to these proposals.

Mr. PRESIDENT: I should just like to remind
Honourable Senators that I as President of the Sen-
ate have on several occasions drawn it to the atten-


tion of the Chairman of the Debates Committee and
also Senator Alkins, our representative, the very
bad way inwhich the reporting of the debates of this
Senate have been conducted;, I have also drawn it to
the attention of various Clerks to this Senate from
time to time, and I only trust that the action which the
Debates Committee intends to take would bring forth
some good results. I also regret to saythat Govern-
ment has not yet seen fit to employ the suggestions
that have been forwarded to them by the Debates
Committee in order to get better performance with
respect to the reporting of the debates of this
Chamber.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I should like to explain
that when the Resolution providing for an increase
in emoluments for the Reporters was brought down,
our part-time Reporter was not included. These re-
commendations, as you can appreciate, were submit-
ted well over a year ago. I was a bit surprised of
this, but I was told at ameetingof the Debates Com-
mittee that -

(a) he was not included in the increased
emoluments because his work was not up
to date; and
(b) he was part-time and the Resolution only
applied to fulltime employees.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

His Honour the President calledthe fourth Order
of the day a Resolution to place the sum of $7,910
at the disposal of the Government to supplement the
Estimates 1967 68 Part 1 Current as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates 1967 68 No. 51 which
form the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, not enough is done in Barbados for
our national heroes. Sir Frank Worrell was truly a
son of the soil by his words and by his deeds, and it
is only fitting that we in Barbados should prepetuate
his name and all that he stood for.

It will be recalled that in March last year the
late Sir Frank Worrell was accorded a State Funeral
Also, a Memorial Service in his honour was held as
Westminster Abbey, London in April last.


This Resolution seeks the provision of funds for
settling the expenses incurred for the two ceremon-
ies, and for meeting the cost of beautifying the site
of the late Sir Frank's grave at the Cave Hill Campus
of the University of the West Indies, including the
erection of a simple memorial the design of which
has been agreed to by Sir Frank's Attorney, the Un-
versity authorities and the Barbados Government.


The Treasury Building was opened in November
of last year and additional Cleaners had to be taken on.
The sum of $1,085 is required to pay for these ser-
vices. I move that the Resolution be concurred in.











SENATOR THE HONOURABLE
SANDIFORD: I beg to Second that.


L. E.


The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

His Honour the President called the fifth order
of the day a Resolution to place the sum of $3,250
at the disposal of the Government to supplement the
Estimates 1967 68 Part 1 Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates 1967 68 No. 52
which form the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, since the maintenance of electrical
installations is now the responsibility of the Govern-
ment Electrical Engineer, there has been an increase
of travelling by this Department. The average amount
of expenditure on this item is around $70 and on this
a further sum of $250 is required. Under item 15, the
Electrical Engineerhas advised that several Govern-
ment buildings are in urgent needof re-wiring; these
are listed in the Addendum to the Resolution. I move
that the Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I beg to second that.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I
never quite agree with shifting responsibility for
electrical wiring to the Government Electrical
Inspector. Formerly this used to be done bythe Pub-
lic Works Department, andthe Electrical Inspector's
job is, as I see it, to go around and inspect instal-
lations and to see that the law is complied with as
far as those installations are concerned. Ifyoumake
him the officer now responsible for wiring flats
and post offices and things like that, he has got to
give himself permission. It seems to me to be wrong
in principle and I am wondering if this aspect has been
overlooked?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, this work is put out to contractors
and to other people; he is not going to do the work
at all, this is going to be a very specific contract.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I am very glad to
hear that, but I understand that he has himself to
ask all inspectors to go around. ......

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
This is only for maintenance purposes.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: The point I am getting
at is that he is inspecting his own work.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
All he is doing is standardising the work.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I am not for a moment
saying that he is not living up to the standards, but
I am only saying that it seems to me wrong in prin-
ciple.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Yes, I agree it is.


i321


The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put to the Senate and agreed to.

His Honour the President called the sixth order
of the day A Resolution to approve the leasing of
land situated between Prescod Boulevard and the
rear boundaries of properties on the West of Fon-
tabelle Road as described in the Schedule to the Reso-
lution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, resulting from the construction of
the Deep Water Harbour, Government now owns the
area of land between Fontabelle and the harbour. A
number of businessmen in particular have approached
the Government to lease this land; there are at least
seven companies that have expressed such an in-
terest. The area is about 8 acres as shown in the
schedule and it is proposed to lease this land in lots
The period of the lease would be between a year,
10, 15 or 25 in the first instance. I beg to move that
this Resolution be approved.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G; SMITH:
I beg to second that.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, earlier
today an honourable member who spoke in connection
with the sugar industry spoke about intensified pro-
duction. I think this is one instance where such
remarks are particularly relevent. I feel that not
enough is being done to see to it that we have labour
intensified industries set up; in consequence, people
of this island are paying a terrific price for certain
industries for the sake of certain industries which
would benefit -very few people. In other words you
give Pioneer licences to people and the community
is being held to ransom, and I think Government
should be very watchful and very careful in granting
these licences to an industry which would benefit by
extracting the most from the Government facilities.
We have to determine what benefits the island will
derive and also that there is enough employment for
our citizens.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: Mr. President, I do not
think that Senator Mapp could be honest or serious
to say that Government is doing nothing to encourage ..

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order, is
the honourable member questioning my honesty?

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: I refer to honesty of
opinion. However, Sir, I do not think anybody who
has followed the industrial development of the island
at the present time could honestly say the Govern-
ment is doing nothing to encourage labour industry...


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Sir, on apointof order.
I have never said I accuse the Government of doing
nothing to encourage labour industry.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: I just wanted to make the
point that the Government is in fact encouraging
intensified labour. One factory alone standing on












S9,000 sq. ft. is employing 40 inside and 600 outside,
If that is not intensified labourI do not know what is.

The question that the Resolution be approved was I
put to the Senate and agreed to.


BILL TO AMEND THE PENSIONS ACT, 1947

The President called the seventh Order A
Bill to amend the Pensions Act 1947.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, On the attainment of Independence
by Barbados there were certain officers working
overseas to whom compensation will certainly have
to be paid. There was a scheme by which Barbados
would agree to compensate these officers who may
or would be affected by the constitution.

The Pension Act of 1947 was amended in 1961
but there is a necessity for a further amendment to
the section. Discussions about this amendment were
begun during last year even before Independence
but we have been negotiating with the British Min-
istry Overseas Development on certain legal aspects
on which we were not satisfied. I recommend this
Bill which is purely formal.

I move Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford, the Senate went into Committee on the
Bill, Senator C. L. Brathwaite in the Chair.
Clauses 1 to 3 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.
The question that the passing of the Bill be
reported to the Senate was put and agreed to.
His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was re-
ported accordingly.
On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford, the Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE DIPLOMATIC IMMUNITIES
AND PRIVILEGES ACT1967

The President called the eighth Order A Bill
to amend the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges
Act, 1967.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, Some time in 1967 there was
passed the Diplomatic and Immunities Act. At the
time that it was passed it appears that no notice
was taken of the numerous errors that occurred re-
lating mainly to some of the terms. This Bill merely
seeks to correct those terms.

I move Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.


The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator the Honourable L. E.
Sandiford, the Senate went into Committee onthe Bill,
Senator C. L. Brathwaite in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 of the Bill were called and
passed without debate.

The Schedule was called.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of the
Bill was put and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill be
reported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE RECOMMENDATION
OF HOUSE COMMITTEE

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, Early
this month a Committee was appointed under Stand-
ing Order 63 to go into the question of renovations
and the re-decoration of the Senate Chamberandits
precincts. The Committee submitted a report dated
the 15th February. The report and the minutesof
the Committee are both printed, but unfortunately
not as separate papers but as an appendix to the
Minutes of the Senate.

It is hardly necessary for me to dilate at any
length on the Report because every-thing has been
set out very clearly. There are suggestions about
lighting, about having twochandiliers. We understand
that such are available, and we understand that ef-
forts will be made to acquire them. We are also
suggesting that there should be an additional light
at the bottom of the staircase. It was also noted that
wash-rooms and lavatories are very inadequate.
Now that we have lady Senators we think that there
should be accommodation for them as well.

In this connection it is my own belief that oppor-
tunity should be taken to get a sanitary block for
both the Other Place and this Chamber. It may be
cheaper. That is my own suggestion. The walls of
the Chamber should be cleaned and re-painted. In-
stead of the present circular table there shouldbe one
in the form of a horse-shoe. That would enable
senators to hear each other more clearly, and will
also help the reporters to whom sympathy must be


~








3231


-expressed. It must be difficult for them to hear,

We are also asking that the air-conditioning be
extended' and that various documents such as May's
Parliamentary Procedure etc. should be purchased
and left here for the convenience of Senators. I beg
to move that this Report be approved and if it is
approved that the recommendations contained therein
forwarded to the Government for speedy implementa-
tion.


Senator D. A. Wiles seconded the motion.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, -Ithink
that we all agree with the Report. I personally wel-
come many of the suggestions that have been made,
and I think that they are long overdue.


What has been troubling me for a long time is
the lack of imagination as far as lunch is concerned.
I know that we do not have a Wine Committee, but
this Senate has a distinguished member who is an
M. R. S. H. and I have no doubt that she will be of
invaluable help in suggesting an improvement in the
standard. What I feel is that she herself will have to
head a committee to go into this problem and advise
the Government. At long meetings of this Senate when
I go into the lunch room I find a little cold tea. I am
sure that any M. R. S. H. would tell us that that is
not good for the health. I am serious about that.


As regards the table I do not thinkthere is much
hardship. The chamber is air-conditioned and I do
not see why it should not be easy for the reporters
to follow what we are saying. In this Senate you do
not have much opposition and I do not think that my
voice is difficult to hear. I do not recommend any-
thing on that, because I do not feel that it is fully
necessary to incur this expenditure. If we raise our
voices the reporters will get along.

I do not know how much this will improve the
situation but I feel that more members of the Op-
position are really necessary to get a more virile
Senate.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: It was intended to
make a change purely for the reporters or to in-
crease the virility of the Senate. This table is very
old and on occasions this Chamber has to be used
for other purposes and the table has to be removed,
and there are difficulties. The leaves of the table
have to be taken out, each time that this is done, the
table becomes weaker. We intended to kill several
birds with one stone.

The question that the Resolution be approved
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Senate adjourned at 7.15 p.m. sine die.











THE


SEN


ATE


DEBATE


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE
Friday, 15th March, 1968
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Publid
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith PHILLIPS,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable
P. M. GREAVES, B.A. (Minister of Home Affairs);
Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q.C. (Attorney
General); Senator the Honourable L. E. SANDIFORD,
M.A., (Minister of Education); Senator H. Odessa
GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliamentary Secretary);
Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator F. C. H.
CAREW; Senator S. V. ASHBY; Senator P. G.
MORGAN; Senator F. L. WALCOTT, O.B.E.; Senator
M. A. KING; Senator E. Lisle Ward; Senator W. W.
BLACKMAN, M.B.E.; Senator S. A. BLANCHETTE;
Senator Erma V. ROCK and Senator R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator Dr. R.B.CADDLE, B.Sc., M.B.B.S.; Sena-
tor H. F. ALKINS; Senator D.A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E.;
Senator N. A. BARROW, B.A.

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer excuses for the absence of Senator
H. F. Alkins and Senator N. A. Barrow from the day's
meeting.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves, Minister
of Home Affairs and Leaderof the Senate, laid the fol-
lowing papers:-
1. Statement showing the Net Customs and
Excise Receipts for eleven months ended29thFebr-
uary, 1968.
2. Statement of sums of money paid over to
the Accountant General by the Commissioner of
Police during the quarter eqnded 30th September, 1967.


3. Report of the Registrar of Trade Unions
for the year 1966-67.

4. Report of the Ministry of External Affairs
for the year 1967.

5. Annual Report of the Director of Medical
Services for the year 1964-65.

6. The Draft Estimates for the Financial
Year 1968-69.

7. The Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) Order, 1968.

REPORTS

His Honour the President presented the Report
of a meeting of the Committee of Privileges to con-
sider a letter addressed to the President from the
Leader of the House of Assembly requesting per-
mission on behalf of the majority Party in that Cham-
ber to use the ante-room of the Senate Chamberfor
meetings and refreshment until the end of March.

His Honour the President directed that the Re-
port be printed and circulated to members.

MOTIONS

Senator C. Asquith Phillips gave notice of the fol-
lowing Resolution:

"RESOLVED that the Senate approve of the recom-
mendations as contained in the Report dated 12th
March, 1968 of the Committee of Privileges and, if
approved,

RESOLVED that a copy of the said recommenda-
tions be forwarded to the Honourable Leader of the
House of Assembly for his information"

Senator P. G. Morgan gave notice of the follow-
ing Resolution:

"WHEREAS notice of a resolutionwas given in the
other place on the 27th day of February, 1968 by Sir
Grantley Adams Leader of the Opposition

AND WHEREAS the said resolution states -











RESOLVED that this House takes note of the,
report of a letter recently sent by the Ministry of
External Affairs, purporting to act on behalf of
the Government Party in this Honourable House,
to His Honour the President of the Senate seeking
permission for the use of the anteroom of the
Senate by members of that Party;

This House further notes that the Leaderof
the House in forwarding this request to His Hon-
our the President of the Senate declaredthatfor
some time it had been considered necessary to
review the accommodation now used by Parlia-
ment with a view to making better provision for
the comfort and convenience of both Chambers;

This House, being unaware of any Resolution
of the House on the above matter or of any re-
view of the necessity for considering the state
of its accommodation, considers it a gross
breach of its privileges on the partof the Leader
of the House in purporting to act onbehalf of the
whole House and calls on Mr. Speaker at least to
admonish him for this unwarranted and contemp-
tuous conduct;

This House, moreover, will view with grave
displeasure any action by the Honourable Senate
which by entertaining or approving of the afore-
said request purports to make arrangements for
the accommodation of certain of the members of
this Honourable House."

RESOLVED that this Honourable House take note
of the said Resolution and in particular paragraph 4
thereof and deem the said Resolution agross breach
of its privileges on the part of the said Sir Grantley
Adams, Leader of the Opposition in as much as the
said Resolution is intended to intimidate this Hon-
ourable Senate and is calculated to obstruct mem-
bers of this Honourable Senate in the discharge of
their public duties.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.49

The President called the first Order -A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $19,380 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-
68 Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 49 which form the Schedule to
the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President Computing Devices of Canada
Limited and the Government of Barbados were to in-
stal at Seawell Airport Visual Omni-Range Equip-
ment at an annual rental to the Government of (Can.)
/ $2,269 a month. As the Senate will note the quotation
is in Canadian Currency, and since the devaluation
of the sterling in November last year the amount
that has been voted by Parliament for this financial
year has proved inadequate. The amount of $3,260
is now required to supplement this Item under Head
20, Civil Aviation.
Under Head 26, Fire Service, because of the un-
usually large number of cane-fires that occurred in


,the middle part of the financial year, Items 12, 14,
16 and 17 have to be supplemented. Where Item 12 is
concerned, apart from the fact that there were a large
numbers of fires, there is an outstanding claim of
over $12,000 which has now been submitted in re-
spect of expenditure incurred in the last financial
year.

As far as .Item 19 is concerned, early in this
financial year two fire appliances ordered through
the Crown Agents were received and payment of
$44,542.80 was made. Since then an additional claim
of $4,776.36 has been made by the Crown Agents in
respect of freight charges. There is now in hand about
$700 so that a supplementary vote of $4,700 is re-
quired.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded
the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.53

The President called the secondOrder-AReso-
lution to place the sum of $72,465 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part I Current as shown inthe Supplementary Esti-
mates 1967-68, No. 53 which form the Schedule to the
Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President The appropriation of $1,703,520
represents the amount budgeted for an estimated
ten thousand eight hundred and twenty pensioners.
At the end of December the number of pensioners
stood at 11,400 persons. There has been an increase
of approximately forty persons per monthwho quali-
fied for old Age Pension and it is anticipated that the
amount of $72,400 will be required to supplement
this item.

Under Item 9 of the same Head, expenditure un-
der this Item has been approximately $24 a month.
Calculated on this basis, it would seem that $65
would be required to supplement this Item.

I beg to move that the Resolution be concurred
in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith secondedthe
motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, This
amount is only one of a number of supplementaries
totaling $1,253,373 to come before this Senate. This
is a most extraordinary thing because the estimates
are upon us and very soon we will be called upon to
consider them.

I am not opposing the Resolution, obviously, but
I wonder if the Minister responsible can really ex-
plain how it is that these Resolutions can come at this
time in March when we will soon be called upon to











pass the Estimates for the next financial year and
when the present financial year is nearing its end.

We are being asked to vote $72,400 for Old Age
Pensions. You should have seen much earlier that
you will want this. Surely you will have known some
time last year what the increase would be. I just do
not understand it. There is inefficiency somewhere
and that criticism can apply to most of the other
Resolutions that we are being asked to consider today.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
The senator has asked how it is that this large amount
of money has now come before the Senate. There is
only one Resolution before the Senate at this time and
I do not propose to talk on Resolutions that are not
before the Senate.

If the Senator is really and truly against the in-
crease for Old Age Pensioners he should have the
courage to say so. I do know that the amount of money
which pensioners received when the same senatorwas
a Minister was inadequate.
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order,
Mr. President. Am I hearing correctly, did the
Minister say that I am against the increase in the
Old Age Pensions?
Mr. PRESIDENT: I never heard the Minister say
so.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
I hope that the senator will learn what is a point of
order. I can give him a further explanation. In the
Other Place his party has the Order Paper so clut-
tered with Motions of Censure and Motions of Breach
of Privileges and unnecessary questions in an attempt
to prevent the business of the Government from being
done, that is why these Resolutions are so late.
The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.
SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.56
The President called the third Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $664 at the disposal of the
Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 56 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President The amount of $2,445 provided under
Head 29, Ministry of Agriculture, Labour and Na-
tional Insurance, includes provision for Government's
contribution towards the salaries of the Secretary
and Assistant Secretary to the Sugar Boards. As a
result of the revision of salaries in the Civil Ser-
vice in the year 1966, the salaries payable to these
officers have also been revised and the amount of
$664 is now required to supplement this Item.
I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.
Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion.
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President The
Honourable Minister has just said that he will take
these Resolutions one by one. Therefore, I will take
them one by one too. Until this Government gets into


its mind that part of the process of governing this
island is carried out by a body such as this they will
bark up the wrong tree. They seem to feel that they
are ordained to run this island as they like and no
one can tell them anything. We have just had an an-
swer from the Minister......

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
I have not made any answer on this Resolution. I do
not know what the senator means by giving an answer.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Speakingonthis Reso-
lution I can very well envisage that if I rise and make
some criticism I will be told that the Other Place
did this and that and that the Party did this and that
and therefore that is responsible for the delays.

We are not boys in here. We are grown up men
and it behoves the Minister to give proper reply to
a query coming from a member who has been in the
Government. We have been up against this in those
days. All kinds of questions were asked and we gave
replies; and in some cases where we cannot answer
at the same time we said that we will try to get the
information.

Imagine the Minister replying that if this and that
was not being done in the Other Place the Resolu-
tion would have come down earlier. I cannot accept
that answer at all. I am not opposing the Resolu-
tion, I am trying to help. Apparently my Co-
operation is resented by the Minister responsible for
the. Resolution. I can only conclude that there is in-
efficiency somewhere that he cannot answer andat-
tack is the best part of defence.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
My reply to the Senator is the same as it was a mo-
ment ago.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.57

The President called the fourth Order A
Resolution to place the sum of $10,000 at the dis-
posal of the Government to supplement the Esti-
mates 1967-68 Part I Current as shown in the
Supplementary Estimates 1967-68 No. 57whichform
the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President As a result of certain requests made
during the year for increases in the Establishment it
is found necessary to create certain temporary posts
pending consideration and approval of the proposals.
To give an idea of the kind of temporary posts
created one post is that of the officer responsible
for matters relating to the transfer from Local to
Central Government. There are also four posts of
Administrative Assistant, 17 posts of Stenographers,
40 clerical posts and nine subordinate posts.

The amount voted under this Headwas $165,000.
The average amount of expenditure is $15,005 so that











from January to March the expenditure would be
$45,015. There was a balance of $35,000 atthe end of
December, leaving an estimated balance of $9,000.
This Resolution seeks the provision of $10,000.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.
The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No. 58

His Honour the President called the fifth order of
the day.
A Resolution to place the sum of $53,694 at the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Esti-
mates 1967-68 Part I Current, as shown in the
Supplementary Estimates 1967-68 No. 58whichform
the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, in November last year the Accountant
General's Department was transferred from the Pub-
lic Buildings to the Treasury Building. Incidental
expenses involved in moving the Accountant Gen-
eral's Department over to the Treasury Building -
such services as combination lock, supervision of
the removal of the accounting machines, records and
the purchase of certain items of equipment these
have been charged to this item under this vote. The
cost of electricity and water which is consumed by
the tenants of the whole building is estimated at about
$400 per month, so that about $1,990 is required to
supplement this item.

Under Head25, the amount of $298 is required
immediately to enable the grant of a refund of ex-
penses incurred by four (4) police constables who
were treated at places other than the Queen Eliza-
beth Hospital.

Under Item 42, Head 36, consequent on the de-
cision to grant 21 days' leave to casual and unes-
tablished staff who had completed five years of
service with the Government, a number of these em-
ployees became eligible for vacation leave. When the
amount of $18,000 was approved, this was calculated
on the old basis of two weeks vacation leave. It is
estimated now that under the new figure $12,100
is required to supplement this item.

Mr. President, on the 30th November, 1967
the amount of $27,218 was spent under Item 44 Head 47.
This left balance of $5,132 in the vote. There are un-
paid bills amounting to $12,466.15 which have been
owing over a period of time and it is estimated too
that apart from that $12,466.15 there have been ar-
rears for the year 1966-67 of $5,751, and it is es-
timated that apart from this another $3,000wouldbe
required to supplement the current year's vote under
this item, making a complete total of $21,217 as sup-
plementary to Item 44.

Under Item 45, the process of bringing furniture
and equipment at the Mental Hospital up to the re-


quired standards started about a year ago and is
continuing. The average amount of expenditure is
$1,214 and on this calculation the amount of $3,650
is required. By the end of October 1967 the amount
of $11,012 was left in the vote of the $60,000 which
was provided at the beginning of the financial year.
The expenditure under this item was very heavy be-
cause of the new drug which is being used with very
good results. It was not estimated for in the Esti-
mates. Apart from this, the number of out-patients
who are receiving treatment at the Mental Hospital
is growing and is higher than was anticipated for the
year. At the end of December lastyearthe total was
4,052; up to thattime it had already exceeded fairly
substantially the number of patients who received
treatment from the Mental Hospital for the previous
financial year. The average amount of expenditure
under this item is $6,186, making it necessary for a
supplementary of $14,000 to be required.

Under Item 59, as an employer Government con-
tributes to the Supera.nuation Scheme and contribu-
tions in respect of the Superintendent of the Mental
Hospital were made at the rate of 9 1/2 per cent of
his salary. The amount of $878 wasvotedand repre-
sents Government's contribution based on some pre-

revision salaries, so now that the salaries have been
revised and revised upwards, Goernment's contribu-
tion will also have to be increased. Basedon present
salaries, Government's contribution instead of $878
will be $1,071.60 and an additional provision of $194
is necessary under this item.

The amount required is $53,694 and I beg to move
that the Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I beg to second that.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
would like to draw the Minister's attention to Head
36, Item 42 Leave Pay to Casual Employees, and
to the note on that which states:

"During the current financial year, casual em-
ployees of Government became eligible, with effect
from 17th October, 1966, for 21daysvacationleave
with pay after completing five years of employment."

"A number of these employees have qualified for
vacation leave at the increased rate but inasmuch as
no provision was included in the Estimates to cover
the additional expenditure, supplementary provision
in the sum of $12,100 is required for the purpose."

I would like to draw to the Honourable Minister's
attention that the Government gives a different in-
terpretation to the Holiday with Pay Act from what
the Act itself says, and I do not feel that anyone work-
ing for the Government should have a different in-
terpretation for an Act of Parliament than another
person. I say this because it has been drawn to my
attention and I am aware of it that Government
has decided that if a man works the day immediately
preceding a public holiday and reports for work iu-
mediately after that day he shall be paid for Lie


~ __











_public holiday as if he had .worked. If: he goes on.
holiday, we would like to know why you would read
into this situation that if these holidays occur during
the time he is away that he should not be paid. There
should be more consistency and I hope that the At-
torney General and the department concerned would
rectify it. This is a matter of principle; the Act says
one thing, if you are giving the people more than what
the Act provides for, more than weeks it would not
matter, but if you are giving what the Act provides
for, then the. question of the public holiday has to be
straightened out.

I think that some of these places like the Housing
Authority, for example, I know that an opinion has
been given that the Holidays with Pay Act. as it is on
the Statute Book does not apply to Government ser-
vants because the Act does not make the Government
an employer under this Act, but at the same time I do
not,feel that it would be right to have the Government
employees enjoying less favourable conditions of em-
ployment than what was the intention of the Act, and I
hope that this matter wouldbe rectified so that per-
sons who are entitled to the bank holidays within the
holiday would get it.

The other matter, just like the five years, I think
the Attorney General is aware of it and I hope that he
will amend the present Act dealing with the 21 days
after five years. You cannot account for the inter-
pretation of the intention of the Act because as it now
stands it does not include everybody; the manwho is
working for five years and does not continue to work
another 150 days, the same man who was entitled to
two weeks is not now entitled to three weeks though
he has worked for five years because of the amend-
ment to one of the clauses in the Act. That was not
dealt with when the Act was passed. I hope that that
will be rectified.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President,
I agree entirely with what Senator Walcott says, but
there is another instance. The Government says that
the casual worker must put in 250 days a year to get
the 14 days; in industry it is quite different. If.a la-
bourer is working on a plantation and he is a regular
worker on that plantation, when that man has put in
five years automatically he gets his three weeks with
pay; but a man can be working with the Government
for 10 years continuously and when the time comes
the Officer looks back to see if he puts in 250 days
in that year, with the result that the casual em-
ployee gets less favourable conditions than those
who are working in industry. I do not think that that
should be so, Government is the largest employer
in this country, and Government should set the
standard for employers in industry and commerce.
Just imagine, Government is the largest employer
and their employees are getting less favourable con-
ditions than what obtains in industry and commerce.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
have taken note of what the Honourable Senator
Walcott has said, and he knows, he represents cer-
tain casual employees in the Government, he knows
with whom he must negotiate and the matter will be


.passed on either to Cabinet or to the Attorney Gen-
eral and the necessary amendments will be made to
the legislation.

As far as Senator Blackman is concerned, if the
Act says 250 days and some magnanimous employer
feels like giving an employee 26 weeks and the Gov-
ernment is going to see that the Government employee
is carrying out the law, you are going to hear that the
Government is giving less favourable conditions. Be-
cause an employer may be able to give more benefits,
come up with a suggestion that 250 days is too much
of 365, but do not tell us that the Accounting Officer
who has got to account to the Auditor General and to
Parliament, looks back to see if he is doing what he
is being paid to do, and Honourable Senator Blackman
is going to castigate the Government if we stick to
the law. If Civil Servants carry out the law as they
must, they cannot recommend 249 days when the law
says 250, and if he does he may be put before the
Public Service Commission as you know.

Come up with a suggestion. The Honourable Seia -
tor is connected with Civil Service matters; I do not
like this castigating and giving the impression that
Government is unfair to workers. Since this Gov-
ernment has been in power casual employees get
more consideration than politicians. This Govern-
ment has looked after casual employees and it has
looked after all sections of this community since it
has been in power; the only person it does not look
after is the politician oreventhe Ministers. Be fair
to us, because this is the best Government this coun-
try has ever had in the last 10 years.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: I would like some
information on this Note 4. Formerly itwas 2 weeks
but when one goes on and reads the other section be-
low it says "A number of these employees have
qualified for vacation leave at the increasedrate but
inasmuch as no provision was included in the Esti-
mates to cover the additional expenditure, supple-
mentary provision in the sum of $12,100 is required
for the purpose." In the Estimates you have voted
$18,000 for that particular type of employee to pay
his leave; you increased that by a third and we are
now asking $12,100 to cover the increase. I wonder.
if that is right or some other thing is mixed up with
that.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, no other employees come in other
than those qualified under the law. The fact is that
persons qualify from month to month, maybe from
day to day. Persons who have been serving for 3
years 7 months in October 1966 wouldhave qualified
today March 1968 for three weeks holiday; they have
done the five year service, it is not quite right to look
at what has been provided before and then calculate
it on that basis. In other words, if you are saying that
the vacation period is 14 days, now it is 21, then it
should be another 1/3, this is not the way in which it
can be calculated. This $18,000 also includes those
who do not qualify for three weeks holiday. This
amount is to cover the full period of vacation for all
casual employees, those who qualify for two weeks











*and those who qualify for three weeks. That is the,
answer.
The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.
SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CAPITAL) No. 62

His Honour the President called the sixth order
of the day.

A Resolution to place the sum of $393,226 at the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Esti-
mates, 1967-68 Part II Capital as shown in the
Supplementary Estimates 1967-68 No. 62whichform
the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, the purpose of this Resolution is to
place the sum of $393,226 at the disposalof the Gov-
ernment for payment to the University of the West
Indies in respect of its capital development pro-
gramme. The sum is recoverable for these rea-
sons.

When Barbados became an independent country
in 1966 it was required, under section 6 (2) of
the Colonial Development and Welfare Act, to
bear a reasonable share of the cost of expenditure
in respect of funds paid by the British Government
to the University of the West Indies under Colonial
Development and Welfare Schemes. There are two
categories of payments in this regard; one concerns
allocations to which the British Government contri-
butes 20 per cent, andinthis respect the Government
of Barbados is called upon to bear 7 per cent of the
allocations, and the total under this particular
category is $41,101.40. The second category is in
respect of grants for the Barbados College of Arts
and Science to which the British Government con-
tributes 100 per cent. Upon the attainment of in-
dependence, the contribution of the Government
of Barbados is 36 per cent, which amounts to
$352,124.06. The money is recoverable, precisely
because the British Government has statedthatwhen
this money is paid to the University and an applica-
tion is made to the British Government, that money
would be refunded.

Mr. President, this is a Resolution which I am
sure will meet with the speedy concurrence of this
Senate. As I have said already it is a sum of money
which is recoverable; there willbe no charge on the
funds of this country as a result of it, and I beg to
move that this Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
beg to second that.
The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.47

The President called the seventh Order A
Resolution to place the sum of $242,400 at the dis-
posal of the Government to supplement the Estimates
1967-68 Part I Current, as shown in the Supple-
mentary Estimates 1967-68 No. 47 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.


329


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, Under Head 3, Parliament, I think
that we all know that at present in the U.K. ae two
representatives of the Barbados Branch of the Com-
monwealth Parliamentary Association as guests of the
main parliamentary body in England.

The request for this supplementary vote is made
by the Local Branch and the amount estimated to be
needed is $1,500. The balance in the original vote is
$1,676 and it is estimated that this amount will be
needed to help defray the expenses of this visit.

Under Head 18, Economic Planning Unit, I think
it is quite clear that in any developing country it is
absolutely necessary when you are dealing with in-
ternational organizations that your Economic Plan-
ning Unit should be well staffed.

The amount asked for under this Head is to pro-
vide furniture and office equipment forthe additional
staff provided by Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) (No. 10) Order, 1967.

Under Head 36, I thinkwe all realise that in Bar-
bados we are moving forward to greaterhousingde-
velopment in the near future and an increase in
developed areas both private and governmental.
Naturally there is need for expenditure on water
supplies.
The expenditure in respect of the repair of mains
has been in the lower elevation of Christ Church and
St. Philip where increase pressures are beingexpe-
rienced. Because of this and the need to remedy leaks
detected in the Bridgetown, Castle Grant and Golden
Ridge systems there has also been increased
expenditure.

There has also been heavy expenditure on de-
velopment projects this year and it is anticipated
that this trend will continue.

Since what I am saying is relevant to the Head,
I would like to make a general appeal to all the
people of this island not to wastewater especially at
this time of the yearwhen the factories are working
and the rainfall is not as high as in other years. We
are doing our best to supply water; but the co-
operation of the public in not wasting water is also
very necessary.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurredin.

Senator the Honourable L. E. Sandiford seconded
the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CAPITAL) No.48

The President called the eighth Order-A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $362,000 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part II Capital as shownin the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1967-68 No. 48 which form the Schedule to the
Resolution.











SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:,
Mr. President The approved expenditure forIndus-
trial Estates during the current financial year was
$356,000. So far the Development Board has com-
pleted the following buildings: Husbands Engineering
Works, $60,000, and the industrial workshop at
Pelican Village, $70,000, the new Multi Purpose fac-
tory, $101,000 and the International Scientific Li-
mited factory at $275,000.

There has also been need for repair work and the
amount of $371,000 was provided out of income ac-
cruing to the Board. Due, however, to the success-
ful promotional efforts of the Board, and the desire
to expand on the part of some industries, the demand
for factory space exceeds the amount budgeted for.

I think that anyone who looks around- or who has
just returned to Barbados within the last nine years
as I have done mustbe impressedby the change over
and the desire not only to push Barbados constitution-
ally but to promote the island industrially. This
Government has done both, and we have reached the
stage where there is not much more constitutional
advances to be made.

I think that we are fortunate that the leader of
this Government the Prime Minister- is an econo-
mist in his own right and one can appreciate the im-
portance of economists in the life of a young nation
and indeed of any nation.

As I have said, there are the factory for Allied
Metals Limited, the Industrial Workshop at Pelican
Village, the main Industrial Estate at Seawell, the
Multi Purpose Factory at Grazettes employing 125
people, and the Board has been asked to set up an-
other factory which is expected to employ 277
persons.

Of course, you will see the necessity for setting
up certain types of industry at the Harbour, and this
Government intends to give the Minister responsible
for Lands the power to lease certain parts of Gov-
ernment lands at the Harbour site. The construction
of a workshop at Pelican Village is also proposed and
the purchase of land at the Seawell Estate is intended
to facilitate the construction of additional factories
there.

Meanwhile, I.S.L. has been located at Seawell and
additional expenditure is required to meet certain
modifications of the factory. I think that the need for
this money should commend itself and so shouldthe
encouragement and establishment of industries in this
country.

Whatever may be the criticisms which certain
persons who, for whatever motive, are prepared to
level at the Development Board, it is clearly es-
tablished by facts, by the figures published from time
to time by the Government Statistician and from the
other figures that are available to those who want to
see them, that the Board has in the last few years
brought into this country industries which are from
the point of view of the economic expansion of the


island, and the provision of jobs for those persons
who are unemployed, of the greatest benefit to the
country.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurredin.

Senator S. V. Ashby seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.54

The President called the ninth Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $4,032 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part I Current, as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 54 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President I think that the addendum to this
Resolution is quite clear. The amount inthe original
vote has become inadequate primarily because of un-
foreseen expenditure in bringing and providing for a
witness from overseas.

As I have often said in this Chamber and tried
to explain by lectures and talks on the Constitution
of Barbados, all criminal matters are the respon-
sibility of the Director of Public Prosecutions who is
subject to the control and orders of no one in Bar-
bados.

To return to the Resolution itself, this witness
was absolutely necessary for a particular case. I
would say that if any witness is necessary for a
particular case in the interest of justice it means
that if he has to come from the North Pole or the
South Pole the Government will pay for it. Justice
cannot be measured in terms of pounds, shillings
and pence.

I would also like to take this opportunity of
stating for the information of the public, especially
when it is being represented to them to the contrary,
that in so far as the prosecutionof anyone in Barba-
dos, from the highest to the lowestis concerned, the
Government has no say or control over that prose-
cution.

In spite of the fact that this Constitution has been
in force for over 18 months not one case has been
brought against anyone in such a way that it can be
claimed that he was deprived of his constitutional
rights. I hope that it will be kept that way.

This is a justifiable instance. The Director of
Public Prosecutions felt that it was necessary to
bring back Sir John Stow from Englandto give testi-
mony. Apparently, a man who runs some paperwas
prosecuted and was committed by a Magistrate to
the Assizes, a prima facie case having been made
out. Sir John Stow had to come from Britain to give
evidence.
As regards Jury Expenses, we cannot anticipate
the number of cases there will be at the Assizes. This











year, I understand, there will be sixto seven murder
cases. We cannot calculate the number of house-
breaking, larceny and rape cases. This yearthe pro-
vision of a supplementary $1,500 is necessary..

Of course, it is importantwhen dealing with the
jury that we impress upon them that theirs is an im-
portant civic duty even without money. If they bring
in honest decisions it means that tonight you can
sleep in peace. They have contributed to law and
order and the good government of the country when
they bring in honest decisions based on the facts.

A Jury Act will be coming to the Senate very
soon in which it must be stressed that although it
might be inconvenient, service on the Jury is a duty
which they must discharge fairly and honestly and
without fear, favour or affection.

I am sure that it will be agreed that in the next
item the expenditure of $900 is justified; andwhen it
comes to incidentals, the supplementary vote of $552
is required to meet the costofincreasedwages for a
Cleaner of the public latrine at the District A Court.

I wantto say that this Government is very con-
cerned with the administration of justice in this
island and intends to provide the best conditions in
which justice can be administered in an atmosphere
of comfort and calm. The whole question of whether
we will have to build new courts is receiving due at-
tention.

We are committed to the stability of this country,
because its economic development and the happiness
of its citizens depends on the necessary stability. We
have to see that law and order and justice are ad-
ministered in the proper conditions.

It is in these circumstances, Sir, that I beg to
move that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, -When
I was listening to the Hon. Attorney General, I was
wondering at one stage if he was introducing this
Resolution or replying to someone who had spoken.
His speech was surprising.

I do not think that anyone in his right senses
would want to interfere withthe course of justice or
with any procedure which is in the interest of main-
taining law and order and justice in this country.

It was very interesting to hear the Attorney Gen-
eral laying down the fine distinctions or relationships
between his office and that of the Director of Public
Prosecutions: or rather defining the limits ofhisof-
fice in relation to that of the Director of Public
Prosecutions. It was very interesting.

These things may be above our heads, but I no-
tice that in Britain the other day in a murder case -
a case of a brother and sister who committed mur-
der it was the Attorney General who prosecuted and


not the Director of Public Prosecutions. That set me
to think. If the Attorney General can prosecute in
England and not the Directorof Public Prosecutions,
presumably he can do the same thing here. To a large
extent our legal system is based on that obtaining in
Great Britain.

I am not challenging the Attorney General.; If he
assures us that the Director of Public Prosecutions
is subject to the control of no one we are happy. We
have examples from other places especially the
Mother Country. We do not know of any other sys-
tem as intimately as we know of that of Britain.
Our system has grown up on those lines and when we
see an instance which seems to contradict what we
are being told by the Attorney General we have to
bring it to the attention of body such as this. These
things are not always as inviolate as the Attorney
General pretends that they are.

We have heard a lot of profound remarks about
the Constitution not to be challenged. We know of
other countries where the Constitution is regarded
as a piece of paper which can be thrown away. It
has happened recently in Africa, and it does not get
us very far to say that Constitutions are very invio-
late. Some of us will challenge it if the Government
does anything, against the Constitution or anything
which we consider to be against the Constitution, be-
cause the only safe-guard is public opinion. The only
safeguard is to have pressure coming from the public.

I understand that it was said when this matter
was debated in the Other Place that there was another
case in which the Speaker was involved in the De-
fence. The Speaker applied for a witness to be
brought back from another country and the request
was turned down. That was said in the Other Place
and the Leader of the House said that if it was so it
was very bad. It is all very strange to me.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Has the Senator read the Han-
sard of the debate or a Press report?

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Letus leave outthe ref-
erence to the Other Place. I understand that this hap-
pened to Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, a lawyer who applied
to this Government to have a witness brought back
from another country and the Government refused.
I understand that he was a vitalwitness. I cannot see
how you could bring back one in the interest of justice
and then in the interest of the same justice refuse to
bring back another. That is not good enough and I hope
that it is not true.

We do not want to interfere with the stability of
the country. I can assure the Attorney General that
speaking for myself, that is the last thing I want to do:
but we have to see that not only justice is done, but
that it appears to be done. When I give vent to these
things it is to keep the Government on its toes. I
would be glad to hear the Attorney General deny that
this is so, and so settle the minds of some people.
That would be far better than to allow this rumour
to remain at public level. Iwillnot say anything more
about that although there is a lot more that I could











say. He has not even given us any details. He has
said very little. He has referred to some man who
runs a newspaper and who was prosecuted. Was it
Lord Thomson? I do not know who owns the Daily
News. Surely this man has a name or cannot the
Attorney General remember the name, or is it that
the name is not worthy of mentioning?

It is his duty to supply us with information. Give
us names, tell us who were brought back and who
are involved and what not. I do not see why he should
hush it up. I would not worry with that any more. If
he does not care to say it is a matter for him.

Now, Sir, we turn to the Jury. I am wondering
sir if sufficient care is exercised in choosing jurors.
I have spoken to jurors Sir and I know jurors whom I
could trust. One has told me that during cases jurors
go to sleep. How can they judge anything? I do not
know if the accommodation was so bad and the food
worse. The lawyers can laugh because it may help
them when jurors go to sleep; but this is a serious
thing.

It is true that the accommodation at the Y.M.C.A.
has been complained about. Iwouldnotsay that it is
worse now. I do not know if the Attorney General has
had complaints about the standard of the Jury, but
from what I have heard I am disturbed. I feel that
something should be done about it. I do not know if put-
ting members of the fairer sexonthe Jurywouldhelp.
Some would say God help us if we do that. On the other
hand, it may be a mark of progress because they
exercise the vote like a man and having reached the
stage of absolute equality at least equality in name
- they should be deemed worthy of being able to sit
on Juries and return a just verdict.

As regards the question of jurors going to sleep
it may be that the lawyerswere so tedious and boring
that you might sleep; however, it is not a reflection of
the lawyers but a reflection on the jurors themselves
who were sleeping.

I did not agree at one time that we should follow
some other country and have certain qualifications,
not admitting as jurors anyone who could vote. That
was not agreed to, but we all know that standards
have dropped since then. Even the Chief Justice has
drawn attention to the question of quantity versus
quality.

There is bound to be, as time goes on, a change
in the jury system, because you are drawing from
those same people. I feel that it is time the Govern-
ment should do something.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Unfortunately or-
dinary Senators do not have the same privilege as
Ministers, when you speak once you cannot speak
behind the Minister. I am not going into the same
reason as Senator Mapp, but ,I would only say to the
Attorney General in his legal positionthatwhenI ask
a question, it is in his capacity as Attorney General,
whether or not it is his intention to reply. I ask him
in his capacity as Attorney General onthis matter of


the jury system; the lawyers know that I have no par-
ticular sentiment for their having a better judgment
on these matters than I have I do not have to wait for
the Chief Justice to say something. There are some
people who have to wait till others say something,
before they can make their own judgment. The jury
system has outlived its usefulness if everthere was
usefulness; far from adding to them you should
abolish them. Women are no wiser than men; women
on a jury in rape cases will send a man to jail.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, this is just dealing with expenses in-
curred over a certain period; I am just asking you
not to let us go into something that is not before us at
the moment.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
am not going into anything. It says here "jury ex-
penses", what is the meaning of this?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: All
I am saying at this stage is that as the law stands
there are no women on the jury in Barbados.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: I am not wasting
time on the women, all I am saying is you are asking
for money. I do not believe in what they call admin-
istration of justice, because youhave a jury system
which could be a travesty of justice. I am not taking
the same line as Senator Mapp that the Chief Justice
talks about principles and not standards; if you have
no principles and no standards I am not having any
argument what I am saying is that the jury system
as a system is useless, andI challenge the lawyers.
The jury system has outlived its usefulness and it is a
waste of time and money all overthe world, it is not
only in the Caribbean, because lawyers stick to all
these old-fashioned ideas that you have to be tried
by your peers. You bring a bunch of illiterate men
and put them to sit down, they have not had the op-
portunity of listening to argument, they are not ex-
posed to the sort of things that they are called upon
to do within three weeks, and constitutionally you
turn them into these paragons of virtue so that they
can administer justice in the way in which it should
be administered. That is a joke.


It is known that jury systems are tamperedwith,
and one of the most difficult things for you to get is
the evidence to prove that. I laugh at the idea when
you tell me about justice in relation to a jury system
that is existing in an age like this. It is an open
secret that jurymen are bribed, and it is time, in-
stead of adding to this, it is time it should be
abolished. There is nothing sacrosanct about 12 men
sitting down in a box and coming back with a verdict.
If you: feel that you cannot trust your judges, that they
are no better in their ownbehaviourthanthe 12 men,
say so, but in my view if overthe years you have had
the experience of the courts of the judges, you are
wasting time and I believe that is why there is so
much waiting until some person like the Chief Jus-
tice says something before you will open your mouth
to say it.











The jury system is a waste of time and it does
not enhance justice; it is betterto abolish it than pay
a jury and they do not even know what is right or
wrong. Sleeping is something that is one of these
biological necessities, but these people who are not
accustomed to listening to argument must go to
sleep; people involved in teaching will tellyou if you
have to say something to anyone longer than 45
minutes they do not absorbwhatis being said. Some
of these poor men sitting behind a shop counter, do
you really think they can sit down in a court room
and listen to a three-hour speech?

I have nothing against the Resolution, but I take
this opportunity to say that I hope the lawyers will
have some discussion and they will see the time has
come when the jury system does not serve any use-
ful purpose. It is a relic of a century and an age that we
have passed and it is time to get rid of some of these
relics. The mechanics of justice cannot justify the
retention of a jury system. These simple men,let them
remain and keep industry going and let the ones who
are responsible for the administration of justice do it.
I prefer to see the three judges being paid high sa-
laries and let.the simple mendo simple things. It is
a waste of time, waste of money and it does not en-
hance justice.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, I must say that I envy Senator Walcott his con-
fidence that the jury system is completely useless.
With my little experience I cannot be as confident
as Senator Walcott, there are merits and demerits
of the jury system, and this is neither the time nor
the place to go into them. We are dealing with a
Resolution and one of the items therein is jury ex-
penses, and so long as we have a jury system, then
it is in our interest and it is reasonable that we pay
certain expenses towards the maintenance of the
system.
I was very happy to hear the learned Attorney
General say that this is an important civic duty and
I think, Mr. President, that where the jury system
is concerned that perhaps this principle could be
applied a bit more fully. What I mean is at the mo-
ment the jurors are paid a certain amount per day;
though it is true that the jury service is a civic
service, it Ls my submission that it is no more a
civic service which in the same trial is being per-
formed by a counsel and being performed by the
judge, and it would enhance the whole question of
service on the jury if some regard was paid to pay-
ing a reasonable remuneration. I am not suggesting
that what should be paid should be of the quantum to
encourage people to make a business out of being a
jury officer.
In this day and age when person has to be away
from his livelihood a shopkeeper or a tailor and
he is losing money, it is very difficult for him in
those circumstances to pay the kind of attention to
what is going on in the trial that is necessary.
I do not think that it is so much a question of ignor-
ance in the way the jury system operates at all, they
operate in the realm of criminal law and it is largely
a question of facts, normal experience of everyday


life. He is also in a better position, with respect,
than the judge himself who may not be living in the
same type of atmosphere.

Another point which I would commend to Gov-
ernment is the question of accommodation of jurors.
It is regarded as a necessity that jurors be em-
panelled for murder cases. I have heard from time
to time various complaints about the type of accom-
modation which is provided for jurors; there is no
reason why a person who is put to discomfort in the
first instance to sit on a jury should be put to the
added discomfort of poor accommodation or poor
meals. As regards the selection of the jury, this I
understand is done by the Chief Marshal. I myself
have been puzzled as to why it is that so often jurors
seem to come from only a particular section of the
community, and that we do not see people from the
higher income brackets, even the middle income
brackets. This has always caused me some con-
cern. In these ways the jury system can be improved.

Mr. President, I cannot quite agree with Senator
Walcott with respect to Magistrates. Such a remark
coming from anyone, least of all a person holding
political responsibility, is certainly not conducive
to proper regard given to the administration of jus-
tice. I have sat in this Chamber and heard remarks
being made about lawyers from all sides which caused
me considerable distress, not because I am lawyer
myself, but if we believe in the rule of law, then we
have got to pay the proper respect to those who are
concerned with the administration of justice,whether
that person is the Chief Justice or a Magistrate. I
have never heard anyone talk about a whipper-
snapper Chief Justice nor a whippersnapper judge,
but I have heard the Magistrates referredto in those
terms; not only is a Magistrate a judicial officer, but
they deal vi.T- offences in the first instances, they
come into closer contact with the ordinary citizen in
this island than do the higher judicial officers and they
should hold the respect of every member of the com-
munity.

A lawyer has always been a special figure in the
minds of some people, and what I will say is that in
the same way that we can respect each other's trade
or profession or occupation, whether it is the field
of agriculture or any other particularfield,where a
person acquires a certain expertise which those of
us not so engaged will be ignorant of, I do not think
it is unreasonable to concede that a lawyer, even
from the point of view of ordinary exposure in the
law courts day by day will have little expertise in
other matters.


As regards the question of the jury, I think that
in some ways we should do all we can to give the
jurors a sense of responsibility and give them a
sense of respect, and when I sit in court some-
times and observe the manner in which certain court
officials shout at jurors this disturbs me, because
these are people who are not familiar with court
procedure, and it is in these ways that we can do
something to improve the administration of justice.











I see that under Item 23, Travelling, there is'
$900 being asked for in respect of travelling for the
high court judges. I would certainly like some in-
formation, on this. I would like to know from the
Honourable Minister whether this is in addition to
travelling allowance which may be already allowed
to any of these officers.

With regard to Item 24, Incidentals, the sup-
plementary vote is being required to meet the cost
of increased wages for a Cleaner of the public la-
trine at the District "A" Court. I would like to ask
what part of District "A" there is this latrine be-
cause the conditions at the courts are so poor and
this applies not only to District "A". The learned
Attorney General has said that there are plans fer
dealing with accommodation and so on. IJiave been
hearing this from the time I returned o this island
in 1960 and both the last Government and this Gov-
ernment cannot feel proud on this question of accom-
modation of courts, because as far as allof us know,
the court rooms and the furniture have been there in
the same way for years and years and years. It is a
disgrace, and here again however much lip service
we may pay to the rule oflawwe can never inculcate
the proper respect for the administration of justice
when we have to go and have our cases tried in the
kind of conditions which prevail, and this is some-
thing that needs immediate attention; it needed im-
mediate attention 10, 20, 40 years ago.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
am sorry that Senator Walcott misunderstood my
reference in referring to professions, but I was
pointing out that that type of case is equally impor-
tant as any other anditwas only a general criticism.

I would like to pointout to Senator Mapp that he
must know that the Attorney General's position in
England is the same as it was in Barbados prior to
the establishment of a Director of Public Prosecu-
tions with particular functions.

The Attorney General in those days was a big
"Maguffy" in Barbados. Now he is powerless as far
as criminal cases are concerned. This can lead to
embarrassment to the Government because it would
seem that we cannot find a person of integrity and
honour to be a fully fledged Attorney General as in
England. However, we accept it as part of the Con-
stitution, no matter how irksome it is to the Gov-
ernment or the people who helped to provide it. It
can lead to embarrassment as I have said, because
the Government has no say in prosecuting cases. The
Government cannot prosecute B.W.I.A. however
strongly we feel. It is for the Director of Public
Prosecutions to say that there is something in the
file sent to him.

Politicians can criticise and editors can write
editorials. Let them pay the lawyers and bring cases.
If they want the Government to protect them from
paying increase fares, the lawyers are there; pay
them. It seems that they want us to set up airplane
control inspection. People who can travel by air can
pay lawyers.


In the days of Sir Frederick Clarke the Attorney
General had power over life and death. In my days a
man was prosecuted and up to now no indictment has
been filed. I was in a case in 1955. A man was com-
mitted to stand trial and up to today the Attorney
General did not enter the case. He did not even enter
a nolle prosequi. That shows the powers which the
Attorney General had then.

Under our Constitution the Attorney General has
no power and it may be embarrassing.

The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.55

The President called the tenthOrder-AReso-
lution to place the sum of $73,947 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates 1967-68 No. 55 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, In September of l967whenthe Bar-
bados Police Force Allowance Regulations were
amended various increased allowances were au-
thorised with effect from the 1st April, 1967. As a
result of these increases, Items 14, 27 and 28 have
to be supplemented by the amounts represented
against them.

To give an idea of how this expenditure has
come about no allowance was paid to inspectors en-
gaged on detective duties. Now according to the
amended Regulations these allowances are paid to
inspectors who are employed in these duties. Under
the old rates the amounts of $216 are required for
inspectors, $180 for sergeants and $120 for other
members of the Force as against Item 14, Allowance
to Detectives.

Under Item 27, Plain Clothes Allowance, under
the old rate there were one hundred plain clothes men
at $96 a year. Under the new rate it is $144 a year
making a supplementary necessary.

As regards Item 28, Washing Allowance, In-
spectors got this allowance at the rate of $60 per an-
num, while under the new rate it is $108 per annum
and other ranks are now given the allowance at the
rate of $72 per annum instead of $50 per annum.

Under Item 29, Special Increments, there is a
sum of $1,920 to pay certain increments at the rate
of $120 a year. This is erroneous. It should be $180
per annum. It made a difference of $60 and there are
sixteen such constables making necessary a supple-
mentary expenditure of $960.

Under Item 33, Clothing and Equipment, there
have been increases in the cost of certain items of
clothing and equipment and also in the price for the
manufacture of certain items of uniform. There are
a number of items on which Icould give a detailed











break-down, and if it is considerednecessaryI shall.
be happy to do so.

Items 54, 60 and 79 as well as Item 93 (new) are
all revotes to pay bills for equipment that were or-
dered through the Crown Agents and were provided
for in the last financial year but did not arrive in
time.

Under Item 70, Passports and forms, the rush
for Passports has been much greater than anticipated
and it is now necessary to order a new set of Pass-
ports. The Government proposes to order 50,000
new Passports and the amount needed to supplement
this Item is $23,200.

Under Item 81, Wireless Equipment, $12,612
was voted in the 1966-67 Estimates to purchase
radio-telephone equipment among other things. There
was an increase in price, the actual cost amounting
to $16,792.47. The actual cost was $4,180.42 more
than estimated.

In addition to this, the generating plant as well
as the aerial ordered did not arrive during the last
financial year and as a result $554 lapsed. It is re-
quired to supplement this Item by $4,180.42 as well
as by $554, making a total of $4,736.

Under Item 84, Equipment for C.I.D.,in respect
of items ordered forthe C.I.D. wrong quotations were
given by the Crown Agents. According to what was
given and what is known to be correct, a supplemen-
tary vote of $550 is required.

Sir, the amount required under this Resolution
is $73,947 and I move that the Resolution be con-
curred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President In seconding the motion for con-
currence in this Resolution I want to go on record
as saying that in my humble opinion we have in the
Police Force a vital body of men.

What distresses me about this whole aspect of
the maintenance of law and order is that you will find
a body that claims to be the Fourth Estate of the
Realm which will publish something which can only
have the effect of bringing the Police Force into dis-
repute.

The Police Force is abody of men who possess
a certain standard of education. We are exposed to
all kinds of dangers when we are in our beds. They
have to protect us, and we must pay some kind of
consideration to their feelings. I will appeal to the
Press to have a sense of responsibility and not to
publish things which are not in the interest of law and
order. When people read that two Assistant Commis-
sioners do not speak one to another, that's nobody's
business except the Commissioner's. This kind of
news is salacious and scandalous, and the Press
which should have a sense of responsibility takes
that out of a whole debate and splashes it on the
front page.


We often try to make political capital out of
what we do; but do not let us use the Police on whom
their maintenance of order and the security of the
state must in the final analysis depend. If a policeman
beats a man unfairly, publish it. That type of beha-
viour must stop. Do "not suggest that the standard
of the Force has dropped although it did drop when
he got a job as a member of the Force. I want the
Press to publish things not for my sake but for the
interest of the Force which is the basis of law and
order, and I want all sections of the community to be
responsible.

I think that the Government is committed to mak-
ing policemen as happy as possible. The report of the
Commission of Inquiry has been published and the
recommendations are being implemented. The Gov-
ernment has got to do it piece-meal because it costs
a lot of money.

I am not an alarmist, and in my view crime has
not increased to that alarming extent. It might have
increased but there are a lot of contributing factors.
The Police Force which is the basis of the mainten-
ance of stability must never be denegrated un-
necessarily although I feel that the police must be
punished when they break the regulations.

I repeat that this Government is committed to
improving the lot of the Police Force as far as pos-
sible. The time is coming. We know that policemen
have no right to be sleeping on cots; but to give them
all beds right away would cost a tremendous amount
of money. The Government intends to face up to the
problem and make them as comfortable as possible.

We will provide motor vehicles for some of the
policemen in the country to help them get around.
This Resolution is necessary to meet certain in-
creases in allowances and certain facilities.

The question that the Resolutionbe concurredin
was put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No.59

The President called the eleventh Order A
Resolution to place the sum of $63,901 at the dispo-
sal of the Government to supplement the Estimates
1967-68 Part I Current as shown in the Sup-
plementary Estimates 1967-68 No. 59 which form
the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President All of the items in this Resolution
can be dealt with together as far as Head 11, Pen-
sions, is concerned because the reasons forthe pro-
visions, are the same, that is, that more persons
have qualified for pensions and gratuities than was
estimated, and this involves a greater amount of ex-
penditure.

Expenditure to the end of January this year was
$23,986. Pensions for the months of February and
March were $2,185 leaving a total of $4,210. New
pensions granted between February and March were











estimated at $200 and the amount provided in the,
1967-68 estimates was $686forwhich this money is
required.

As regards Item 15, at the end of January the ex-
penditure was over $8,760 and pensions for February
and March are estimated at $8,614. Gratuities in
February and March totalled $20,000 and new pen-
sions during these same months were estimated at
$700, a total of $176,192; but the provision for this
financial year is shown in the estimates to be only
$130,000 leaving a difference of over $46,000.

Under Item 17, in December 1967 the note to this
Item was amended to permit the payment of ex gratia
gratuities to employees who had been in the service
of the Government for five years or more and did
not qualify for retirement benefits under the Act of
1967 or the Act of 1961. This resulted in increased
expenditure under this Head.

To give an example, at the end of January 1968
an amount of $20,507 was spent ongratuities and for
the months of February and March an amount of
$10,000 making a total of $30,507. There was a pro-
vision of only $15,000 making a difference of $15,507.

Under Head 15, the statistical department rents
certain machines at the monthly rate of (U.S.) $945.
As a result of devaluation of the pound perhaps I
should say that $19,700 was provided in the esti-
mates. Up to the end of December $14,730.70 was
spent leaving a balance of $4,469.30. As a result of
devaluation this amount of money was insufficient
to cover the cost of the monthly rental for the re-
mainder of the period. It is proposed to supplement
the Item by $701 in order to make goodthe loss in-
curred as the result of devaluation of the pound.

I move Sir, that this Resolution for the amount
of $63,901 be concurred in.

Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.
The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No. 60

His Honour the President called the twelfth order
of the day.
A Resolution to place the sum of $3,604 at.the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Esti-
mates 1967-68 Part I Current as shown in the Sup-
plementary Estimates, 1967-68 No. 60 which form
the Schedule to the Resolution.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, there is a clause in the contract be-
tween persons carrying inland mail for the Post Office
and District Post Offices, and the Government of
Barbados which stipulates that the contractor shall
pay the rates of wages and observe hours and con-
ditions of work no less favourable than those obtaining
in trade or industry orpaidby the Government in this
island insimilarwork, and particularly to pay the
drivers of the vans at the rate of $20.46 per week.


As is well known, and has been said even this
afternoon, the salaries and wages paid to all cate-
gories of workers employed by Governmentwere re-
vised in 1966 and as a result of this revision that
category of workers whom these van drivers com-
pare with in the Government Service, receive an
amount of $29.04 per week; I suppose these van
drivers also receive this amount of $29.04.

There is a further stipulation that if at any time
during the contract the rates of wages of the Govern-
ment Service were increased, this Governmentwould
pay all these van drivers the excess increase which
was due to the van drivers. Government pays $18,000
per annum under this contract, and it is out of this
money that Government now proposes to supplement
this Item so that the increase can be paid to those van.
drivers. I move that this Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR C. L. BRATHWAITE: Ibegto second
that.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, I think it is high time that Government review
this system of transporting mail in this country. The
purpose of this Resolution is to ask for a certain
sum of money to pay to the contractor so that the
wages received by the van drivers would be put on
the same basis as those in the Government Service.
I have my doubts about the advantages, if any, which
Government may derive from this kind of scheme.
I believe that some time in the past Government used
to own its ownmail vans and in this scheme where-
by the transportation of mailwas done by contract -
the Honourable Minister would correct me if I am
wrong there are certain considerations which would
arise. One would hope that there are certain benefits
which Government gained by asking a private con-
tractor to make arrangements for the transportation
of mail; there are also certain considerations. Gov-
ernment must be satisfied that the conditions under
which letters and newspapers are being transported
are favourable, that they are properly stamped, that
the conditions underwhich this mail is passed through
the Post Office is such that the mailwill safely reach
and in time the person to whom it is addressed. So
that whenever on the few occasions that it has hap-
pened a particular employee or employees of the
Post Office happens to be charged before the Courts
for tampering with mails, this sort of expenditure
causes some alarm, Mr. President.

It is within the knowledge of this Chamber that in
the middle of last year newspapers were conveyed
by a Post Office van and that those newspapers were
not paid for. These papers happenedto be copies of the
Beacon, the official organ of the Barbados Labour
Party; I make no apology for bringing this matter up
in this Resolution because in the first place it is
relevant and in the second place, despite attempts by
the members to make small of it, it raises issues of
considerable importance. It is clear from the an-
swers which were given to the question I asked by me
in December last year that I am not alone in con-
sidering that this was an attempt if not an actual
defraud of the public revenue. So that Mr. President,


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when we are asked to vote the money in this Reso-
lution which we are asked to vote this afternoon,
questions as to the inanner in whichthe mail is con-
veyed, questions as to how secure the system is, when
it is clear that a Messengerfrom the Beacon can take
copies of the newspaper direct to adriverof a van and
get him to transport them to a country district with-
out the price of one stamp being paid, what are the
advantages then that Government derive from the
present scheme whereby the contractor has the mail
taken from the central post office to the district post
offices. Furthermore, there can be stated that as far
as investigations disclose this is not an isolated case.
Therefore, Mr. President, the question immediately
arises as to how much money Government may be
losing, not only by this particular newspaper being
transported in this way, but by other newspapers,
letters, bills, or by some arrangement between a
person and a driver or drivers of these vans which
the Government has under contract.

Of course, the Honourable Senator Mappwho has
never expressed any shame as being editor of the
paper which I mentioned will reply and I expect him
to reply, but I certainly would be startled if his reply
would say that this sort of thing happened in the past,
so that it is not unusual or unknown to him for per-
sons to put parcels on mail vans and ask that they be
transported to Oistins orSpeightstownorwhereverit
may be. It is high time that the Government review
this whole scheme of handling public mail.

Most western countries with which we are
familiar place strong emphasis on the transportation
of their mail because, as I have said, the public must
have the unshaken confidence that letters, money sent
through the post, packets, etc., that when the normal
postage is paid that they will reach the person to
whom it is addressed. The public must have confi-
dence that the post office is not being developed in a
way that while some have to pay others by devious
means do not have to pay. Furthermore, this is not
a question of any attempt to make political capital
because I would expect that if this Party, at the time
we had our newspaper, The Democrat, had in any
way taken advantage of the situation andused the post
office in a manner in which the Beacon used it that
the Opposition Would properly raise the matter in
Parliament, drawn attention to it, and criticised the
Government Party for such action.

It is not a question of seeking to have anybody
victimised because if any employee, whether of the
Post Office or some other Government department
has aided and abetted, if not actually defrauded, the
public revenue, then this is a matter that calls for
disciplinary action, this is a matter that calls for
police investigation.

When people talk, as they talk so often, about
the rule of law, this is what it means when they
talk about 'a democratic coUntry and feeling con-
fident that their rights are preserved. This is What
it means, and therefore I would like to know when
the Government has an arrangement, Which it ap-
parently has, with a private contractor, to whom is


the employee such\ asthe vandriver responsible?Is
he responsible to the private contractor in the sense
that any questions of discipline would have to be
dealt with by the private contractor, or is he re-
sponsible to Government, so that the administration
can take the proper steps to have him disciplined,
because as I said, this raises importaintissues?

If it is saidthat the employee, the driver ofthe
van and those who are with him as workmen under
such a contract is responsible in their employment to
the private contractor, that he is the person who
hires them and dismisses them and disciplines them,
then it means that whether Government adminis-
tration is effective, that the administration will have
to refer the matter to the private contractor and that
will leave it up to him to take whatever action he may
think fit, if any.

Now it may be suggested that there is some
saving to the Government by not owning the vans
which I understand belong to the private contractor,
and it may be argued that the maintenance, of the
vans, the manner in which they are driven, and any
replacement, that these expenses are saved by the
Government. It may even be said that where Gov-
ernment property is concerned persons who are
employed do not take the best care, and on that basis
we may be invited to agree that it is reasonable and
even in our own interest to have this transportation
done by contract. I do not agree with that line of
argument at all; there are certain spheres of ac-
tivity to which Government is committed; in the same
way you have a statutory board like the Transport
Board which owns buses, even though there has been
criticism, transportation of public mail in my humble
submission is a public matter and the mail vans and
the drivers should be under the full and direct control
of the Post Office administration of Government.

I would like answers to these questions, and I
would ask that they be considered in the light of the
public interest of this country.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
raised this question on many occasions forthe same
reasons that Senator Phillips raised, but I am very
frank on these things, andwe have in Barbados spme
old-fashioned lazy people who believe that because
some things were done longtime ago, they must do
the same foolishness that their great-great-grand-
fathers did. I do not know if the Government has plans
to change the handling of mail by the Post Office, but
this should be the complete control of the Post Office.

St. Lucy is only 13 miles awayfrom Bridgetown,
and this is only part of your mobile equipment, this is
part of what the Post Office will be responsible for,
it is not fot me to go and sit down in the Post Office
and tell the Postmaster General how he should run
his business. Because in 1898 they used to send a
van from St. Lucy at 7 o'clock or 8 o'clock in the
morning and you get to know the van driver, then you
send up breakfast, lunch and dinner by 'the mail van.
Therefore you had a sort of quasi freighitservice, be-
cause this is an old-fashioned idea you are working on.


_L_











The tendency in Barbados is to continue with what
was going on before, you mustnot change, therefore
you do not get anything done unless you get a crisis;
the Post Office must be pulled down, something like
that must take place, that is why you have the finan-
cial building there and all the criticism that was laid
against it, because you were to put a Post Office
there, they had to make some start. We really need a
Post Office, Mr. President, I have said so already.
It is a crying shame to Barbados and I understand
that there are some plans for a Post Office. I hope
that is the case because what we have down here
cannot be adequately described as a Post Office,
this is a memory, this is no Post Office.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I feel
that if I sit in this Chamber long enough today I
might hear something very interesting from an Hon-
ourable Member on this side and so true, it is only
this Resolution which is before us that we have now
heard from Honourable Senator Asquith Phillips. I
understand that he has raised this questionona pre-
vious occasion in here. He raised anumberof ques-
tions askedon the 21st December, replies were made,
and he has raised it again. Now, Sir, I think that on
the last occasion he raised it that the devaluation
was in the air, the island was facing a crisis, but
the Honourable Member got in here and made a big
mountain out of according to the answer- 20 news-
papers going by a mail van to district post offices. He
wanted to know who would be prosecuted if anybody;
I really cannot take the Honourable Member seriously.
I happen to be involved in this case because the news-
paper concerned I am running, so if therefore he
hopes to get anything out of me allhe will get is this.
If he has a case, prosecute; go right ahead. If the
Honourable Member can prosecute, take disciplinary
action of any kind, force the Government to do any-
thing, go right ahead, and they have that right and
duty, whatever they will do to anybody else in this
island, they can do to the paper.

One would think that Senator Phillips having
questioned the Government, having got replies from
his Government, would leave it to the Government
to do whatever they think fit in this matter. He comes
in here today and tries to provoke further discussion,
but it does not take much to get me on my feet, and
one would have thought that he would be satisfied,
having tabled these nonsensical questions$ would
have left it to the Government to take whatever ac-
tion they are pleased to take if they wanted to take
any.
I do not see how you can pick on anything that has
been carried out in the way inwhich Senator Phillips
alleges that this has been done. They will have many
prosecutions coming up. From time immemorial
people have sent parcels including breakfast and
other things and asked the driver of the mail van to
drop them at so and so. No one worries themselves
about any defrauding of the mail. Do youexpect that
anyone will post a lunch container? What nonsense
are we coming to now?

If you are going to pick on every infringement,
however small, or what you consider to be an in-


fringement, and build it up into something, if you
are going to make a mountain out of a mole-hill or
shut your eyes to the beams in your own eye and get
at the mote in the otherfellow's eye you will see how
long you will last.

Members in the Other Place have faced the
electorate and they will have to face it again. I do
not know if Senator Phillips wants a seat. He should.
This is an attempt to play big stick politics in this
island.

This is not an isolated case. It has been going on
for some time. I am not under cross examination. I
am speaking as a member of the Senate and I am ac-
cusing them of every kind of political, wicked, small-
time manoeuvre.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Let us get back to the Reso-
lution.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am right on target.
I do not have to much more to say. I can only hope
that Senator Phillips who asked these questions will
press on. I can only hope that the Government will
act in this matter as in any other matter in this
island where the law has been broken and bring a
case. Senator Phillips may even represent the paper
or anyone else that the Government charges. Who
knows? He may have quite an interest in seeing that a
prosecution is made. But Sir this is so much non-
sense that I really should not pay any serious atten-
tion to it. I know that the Recorder used to do it.
When you post a newspaper it is not the newspaper
that is paying revenue. If the people cannot pay the
postage the newspapers do not go. If you can get them
by any other means you get them out. It is not a ques-
tion of defrauding the revenue.

Imagine talking about forty cents defrauding the
revenue when they send thousands down the drain.
They are making mention of twenty newspapers and
people are wasting money on flights everyday, going
to Expo and coming back. Why is not the contract
produced for the Hilton Hotel? Twenty newspapers!
Why do they not prosecute the people when they break
the law as regards shops closing?

All that I will say is that Senator Phillips, if he
is not contented with the replies given by the Gov-
ernment, is a prominent member of the Party and
he can get them to carry it to the extreme limit. If
that will satisfy him let him do it.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President -
This question was raised in this Chamber some time
ago. I thought that the matter was ended. Questions
were asked and answers were given. One would have
thought that any appropriate action whichwas to have
been taken would have been taken. I do not expect
Senator Phillips to waste the time of the Senate.

This deals with the worst in human nature. We
were told that Beacons were put in avan and sent to
St. Thomas' PostOffice and that a Minister of Gov-
ernment took his Permanent Secretary and a high











,ranking policeman to the Post Office at St. Thomas
to checkonwhatwas happening. If people were break-
ing the Regulations, 'if they were breaking the law,
a policeman was there, and the Permanent Secretary
was there. I did not think that a Minister and his
Permanent Secretary would have wasted a Saturday
afternoon to go and see what was being done. It was
being done from the time that Adam was a lad. It is
only now that action is being taken.

If it was found that Regulations were broken,
the Permanent Secretary should have drawn it to the
Postmaster's attention and should have askedhim to
give instructions to stop. If the law is broken let the
police take action. Let the contractors give di-
rections to the van drivers but to do as Senator
Phillips is doing, trying to get someone dismissed
or put in court,, it is unworthy of a Senator of this
Chamber.

We must rise above ourselves in a matter of this
sort. We should show a better example and not ap-
peal to the worst of human nature. This is too small.
In this Chamber you should not notice piffle. Here
you have a postman fifty sixyears oldwho has never
stolen a cent in his life and you want to put him in
prison for doing what was being done every since. It
is unworthy of us.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
If I did not know the last Senator I would begin to
wonder what sense of integrity he has inculcated.
There has been talk of only twenty newspapers. We
have also heard that this was going on since Adam
was a lad. If it was going on all that time do you
realise how much revenue would have been collected
if stamps had been affixed?

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: On a point of
order. I said that they were carrying parcels of all
description. Let us be rational. The question asked
by Senator Phillips concerned the Party's news-
paper, and not a man's lunch orfood. This is a busi-
ness concern where people pay for the papers they
get.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Do
not tell me that sending somebody's breakfast to St.
Andrew involves the same principle. This is paper
that you are selling. This is paper that is trying to
influence people. Let us be realistic. If the Daily
News sent 20 copies in this way because the Beacon
is sending 20 copies what position would we be in.
We would soon have bundles of papers being sent
out in this manner. Suppose the Advocate sent 20
would they be right? Would the Observer be allowed
to send 20? Would Black Starbe allowed to send 207

Sometimes, Sir, I wonder why I did come back
into public life because people do not seem to have
any sense of integrity. It is the paper of the Barbados
Labour Party which is found going out by mail van in
an unauthorised way. The Editor of the Paper is: here.
He is a member of this Senate, andhe abuses every-
one instead of opening his mouth and apologising for
what was an obvious mistake.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I object.
I have abused no one. I am doing my duty.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
He is the Editor of the newspaper of which 20 are
found in this van. They did not have postage stamps.
The van has a contract with the Government to carry
authorised mail. When you get this kind of attitude
it makes me sick to my stomach. And Senator
Blackman who should know better -

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: On a point of
order. I am sorry if the Attorney General is hitting
at me because of the Beacon. I am not concerned
with the Beacon. I am concerned with the Civil Ser-
vants involved.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I'would like to remind
the honourable member that he once representedthis
party in St. Andrew.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
I never had anything to do with the Beacon or its
finances. To get back to this question of principle.
The Government contracts to have mail transported
for a certain amount. Is it fairthatpapers should be
sent out this way by one Newspaper Company? The
answer to that is no.


It has been happening over a periodof years and
the Senator gets up and admits that it was going on
for years. It represents a sum of 40 cents a week.
Even if we assume that the vans only carry 20 copies
is that not robbing the Government of revenue? I do
not know if there was any intention to defraud or not.
Senator Blackman admits that it was going on since
Adams was a lad.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: On a point of
order. I never said anything aboutwhenAdamswas a
lad. (Laughter) I said from time immemorial. The
Attorney General knows that I said nothing about
when Adams was a lad. He should not misquote me.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No.61

The President called the 13th Order A Reso-
lution to place the sum of $4,000 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates 1967-68
Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary Esti-
mates 1967-68 No. 61 which form the Schedule to the
Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P. M. GREAVES:
Mr. President, The van attached to Government
Headquarters was involved in an accident last year.
The Government has been advised that it would be
uneconomical to repair the van. The Standing In-
surance Committee has accepted this advice and has
paid in $2,769 which represents the insured value of
the motor vehicle.
It is important, in fact it is urgent, that there
should be a replacement of the van, and a quotation











has been given of $4,000. That is the amount of money
which the Government is asking this Senate to vote
or rather to approve, in order that replacement of
the van can take place.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable F. G. Smith seconded
the motion.


The question was put and agreed to.



ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite the
Senate adjourned at 6.25 p.m. sine die.






Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 28
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 38 dated 12th May, 1969


S.I. 1969 No. 75
The Industrial Development (Export Industries
Act 1963 (1963-28)
THE EXPORT INDUSTRY (INDUSTRIAL
GLOVES) ORDER, 1969
The Minister in exercise of powers conferred on
him by section 3 of the Industrial Development (Ex-
port Industries) Act, 1963, hereby makes the following
Order:-
1. ThisOrder may be cited as the Export Industry
(Industrial Gloves) Order, 1969.
2. Industrial Gloves are hereby declared to be an
approved export product for the purposes of the Indus-
trial Development (Export Industries) Act, 1963.
Made by the Minister this 6th day of May, 1969.


ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


(M.P. 7018/46/21)















\3Z. %zs '
/Pz0 P






Supplement to Official Gazette dated 12th May, 1969



THE LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20
Arrangement of Sections
1. Short title.
Part I
General and Administration
2. Interpretation.
3. Commissioner of Valuations and other officers.
4. Power of delegation.
5. Establishment and constitution of Land Valua-
tion Board.
Part II
Valuations
6. Commissioner to make valuations.
7. Date of valuation.
8. Fixing date of first valuation.
9. Effect of valuation.
10. New valuations.
11. Land to be included in one valuation.
12. Separate valuation.
13. Certain returns and information to be furnish
14. Access to lands and buildings, plans /
documents etc.
15. Preparation of valuation roll.




2o.1. 7 fJ'

18o23do











Part III

Notice of Valuations, Objections and Appeals

16. Notice of valuation.

17. Objections to valuations.
18. Right of new owner to carry on objection or
appeal.

19. Consideration of objections.

20. Appeal against decision of Commissioner.
21. Right of appeal to High Court.

22. Right of appeal to Court of Appeal.

23. Rightof appeal to Privy Council on point of law.
24. Extension of time limits for appeals.

25. Objection or appeal not to interfere with col-
lection of rates or taxes.

Part IV

Uses of Valuation

26. Purposes for which valuation to be used.
27. Supply of copies of valuation roll by Com-
missioner.

28. Commissioner to make valuations for Govern-
ment Departments etc.








(iii)


Part V

Miscellaneous.

29. Certified copies of, extracts from, valuation
rolls.

30. Power to obtain evidence.
31. Notice of change of ownership.

32. Returns to be furnished to the Commissioner.
33. Service of notices.
34. Address for service.
35. Substituted service.

36. Right to appear.
37. Power of Minister to extend times for doing
certain things etc.

38. Penalties.
39. False returns or statements.
40. Place where the offence is committed.
41. Evidence.
42. Certain returns admissible as evidence in val-
uation proceedings.
43. Regulations.
44. Amendment and repeal of certain enactments.
45. Removal of difficulty.
46. Commencement.
FIRST SCHEDULE
SECOND SCHEDULE
THIRD SCHEDULE.









BARBADOS


I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT,
Governor-General.
2nd May, 1969.



1969-20


An Act to makeprovision for determining the val-
uation of land for taxation, rating and other purposes
and for matters connected therewith or incidental
thereto.

(By Proclamation) commencement.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty, -by and with the advice and consent of the
Senate and House of Assembly of Barbados and by the
authority of the same as follows -
1. This Act may be cited as the Land Valuation short title.
Act 1969.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Part. I
General and Administration
Interpretation. 2. For the purposes of this Act -
"agent" includes every person who in this
Island for or on behalf of any person (here-
inafter called "the principal") has the control
or disposal of any land belonging to the prin-
cipal, or the control, ,receipt or disposal of
any rents, issues or proceeds derived from
any such land;

"Board" means the Land Valuation Board es-
tablished by section 5;

"Commissioner" means the Commissioner of
Valuations;

"fee simple" in relation to the value of land
means the estate in fee simple in possession
in the land free from any lesser estates or
interests therein or any encumbrances thereon
or any rights or immunities conferred upon a
tenant under the Security of Tenure of Small
Act 1955-39 Holdings Act, 1955 or under the Tenantries
Act 1965-34 (Control and Development) Act, 1965 and
free also from any restrictive covenants and
conditions other than restrictive covenants
and conditions created by a Crown grant or.
by law;
"improved land" means land on which improve-
ments as defined in this Act have been ef-
fected;

"improved value" means in relation to land
the capital sum which the fee simple of the







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


land might be expected to realise if offered
for sale on such reasonable terms and con-
ditions as a bona fide seller would require;

"improvements" in relation to land means those
physical additions and alterations thereto and
all works for the benefit of the land made or
done on the land by the owner or any of his
predecessors in title which, at the date on
which the improved value or site value is
required to be ascertained, have the effect
of increasing its value; but

(a) the destruction or removal of timber or
vegetable growth;
(b) the reclamation of land by draining or
filling together with any retaining walls
or other works appurtenant thereto;
(c) the excavation, -grading or levelling of
land,
shall not be deemed to be improvements;
"land" includes all tenements and heredita-
ments and also all messuages, houses, build-
ings, or other construction, .whether the pro-
perty of the Crown, 'or of any corporation,
or of any private individual, and all trees
growing or standing thereon but does not in-
clude growing crops:
Provided that -

(a) the value of trees, other than fruit trees,
that have been planted for any purpose;
or
(b) the value of trees that have been pre-
served as shelter or for ornamental
purposes,








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


shall not be included in any valuation roll prepared
under section 15;
"officer" means the Commissioner, the Deputy
Commissioner and any other officer for whom
provision is made in section 3;
"owner" means the person who, whether
jointly or severally is seised or possessed
of or entitled to any estate or interest in land
and includes any person who, whether sev-
erally or jointly, claims that there is'vested
in him, and any person in whom the Com-
missioner believes there is vested, in pos-
session, remainder or reversion, any estate
or interest at law or in equity in the parcel
of land;

"parcel of land" means land which is separ--
ately held by an owner or land which the Com-
missioner directs should be valued as a
separate parcel of land;
"person in possession of land" includes the
attorney, overseer or manager or other person
having the management of or the collection
or the receipts of the rents, issues or profits
of any land as well as the owner, ,occupier or
person actually in possession of such land;
"return" includes all returns, notices, declara-
tions, -statements and information prescribed
or required by the Commissioner to be furnished:
"sub-divided" and "sub-divide" mean and refer
to dividing lands into parts whether the divi-
ding is -







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20



(a) by sale, (conveyance, transfer or partition;
or

(b) by any agreement, dealing or instrument
inter vivos (other than a lease or any
term not exceeding five years without
right of renewal), rendering different parts
thereof immediately available for separate
disposition or separate occupation;
"site value" means -

(a) in relation to unimproved land, the capital
sum which the fee simple of the land might
be expected to realise if offered for sale
on such reasonable terms and conditions
as a bona fide seller would require;

(b) in relation to improved land, the capital
sum which the fee simple of the land might
be expected to realise if offered for sale on
such reasonable terms and conditions as a
bona fide seller would require, assuming
that at the time at which the value is re-
quired to be ascertained for the purposes of
this Act the improvements as defined in
this Act do not exist:
Provided that the site value shall in no
case be less than the sum that will be ob-
tained by deducting the value of the improve-
ments from the improved value at the time
at which the value is required to be ascer-
tained for the purpose of the Act;
"unimproved land" means land on which no im-
provements as defined in this Act have been
effected;







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Commissioner of
Valuations and
other officers.


Act 1949-5


Power of dele-
gation.


"value of improvement" in relation to land
means the added value which the improvements
give to the land at the time at which the value
is required to be ascertained for the purpose
of this Act irrespective of the cost of the
improvements:
Provided that the added value shall in no
case exceed the amount that should reason-
ably be involved in effecting at the time as at
which the value is required to be ascertained
for the purposes of this Act, improvements of
a nature and efficiency equivalent to the
existing improvements.

3. (1) For the purposes of this Act there shall be -
(a) a Commissioner of Valuations who shall
have, subject to the Minister, 'the general
administration of this Act;

(b) a Deputy Commissioner of Valuations; and

(c) such valuers and other officers as may
from time to time be provided for by
order under section 3 of the Civil Es-
tablishment Act, 1949.

(2) The Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner,
valuers and other officers shall be public officers.

4. (1) For the purpose of carrying out the objects
and purposes of this Act, and his functions thereunder,
the Commissioner is hereby authorised to delegate to
the Deputy Commissioner, or to any other officer, .any
of his powers, duties and responsibilities under this
Act, ,except the power of delegation.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(2) A delegation may be made in respect of any
particular matter or of any class of matters or gen-
erally, .or may be limited to any part of the Island and
may be subject to or on such terms and conditions as
the Commissioner thinks fit.

(3) Every delegation under this section shall be
revocable at the will of the Commissioner but no dele-
gation shall prevent the exercise of any power, duty,
function or authority by the Commissioner himself.

5. (1) There is hereby established a Board to be
known as the Land Valuation Board whose function
shall be to hear, in accordance with the provisions
of Part III, appeals from decisions of the Commissioner.

(2) The provisions of the First Schedule shall
have effect as to the constitution and procedure of
the Land Valuation Board and otherwise in relation
thereto.


Part II

Valuations


6.(1) Except as provided in subsection (2) the
Commissioner shall make a valuation of the site and
improved value of every parcel of land in the Island.

(2) Subject to subsection (3) the Minister may,
by order, direct that it shall not be necessary to deter-
mine -

(a) the site value or improved value of such
land belonging to or occupied by the
Crown as may be prescribed in the order;


Establishment
and constitution
of Land Valua-
tion Board.


First Schedule.


Commissioner
to make valua-
tion.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(b) the site value of such land of estimated
low site value as may be prescribed in
the order; and

(c) the improved value of such lands as are
prescribed in the order (except so far
as it may be necessary in order to deter-
mine the site value of such lands).

(3) Every order made under this section shall
be subject to affirmative resolution.

(4) An order made under paragraph (a) or para-
graph (c) of subsection (2) may be limited to an area
of the Island but an order made under paragraph (b)
of subsection (2) shall not be so limited and shall
apply to the whole Island.
(5) Where an order under paragraph (a) or para-
graph (c) of subsection (2) is limited to an area of the
Island it shall define in writing the extent and
boundaries of that area.

(6) Any order under this section may be given
retrospective effect to a date not earlier than the
date on which this Act comes into operation.
Date of valua- 7. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section, the
tion. Commissioner shall in respect of every valuation of
land, fix a date as at which all parcels of land in the
Island shall be valued.

(2) If the Commissioner considers it necessary
or expedient so to do he may alter from time to time
any dates fixed by him under subsection (1), but any
date, as originally fixed or subsequently altered by
the Commissioner under this section shall be earlier







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


than the date on which the valuation in question comes
into force.

8. (1) Subject to subsection (2) the Minister shall,
by order fix a date on and after which the first valua-
tion made by the Commissioner of all parcels of land
in the Island shall, subject to objection or appeal under
this Act, be the valuation of all parcels of land re-
quired by this Act to be valued by the Commissioner.

(2) The Commissioner may alter the valuation of
any parcel of land in accordance with subsection (3)
and (4) of section 10.

9. As from the date fixed under section 8 as the
date on which the first valuation under this Act of all
parcels of land in the Island shall come into force,
every valuation made under Part II of the Local Gov-
ernment Act, 1958 shall cease to have effect and the
provisions of that Part of that Act relating to valua-
tion of land shall cease to apply to every parcel of
land included in such valuation.
10. (1) As near as may be three years after the date
fixed by the Minister under section 8 for any first val-
uation, .and as near as may be on every third anniver-
sary of that date thereafter, .a fresh valuation shall be
made of all parcels of land in the Island.

(2) Such fresh valuation shall come into opera-
tion on a date fixed by the Minister by order published
in the Official Gazette and as from that date the pre-
vious valuation shall cease to be in force.

(3) No alteration shall be made in the valuation
of any parcel of land during any period of three years
referred to in subsection (1) -


Fixing date of
first valuation.


Effect of valua-
tion.


Act 1958-55.




New valuations.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(a) unless the land is sub-divided during
that period; or

(b) unless where two or more parcels of
unoccupied land adjoining each other
are valued as one portion of land and
one or more parcels of such land is or
are sold or occupied during the period; or
(c) unless a public work, service, or under-
-taking is provided during the period on
account of which the Commissioner Ts
of opinion that the value of the land
has altered; or
(d) unless by reason of flood, hurricane, -or
some other adverse natural cause over
which the owner had no control, the land
has been permanently damaged and the
Commissioner is ofopinion thatthe value
of the land has been altered; or

(e) unless the site value of that parcel of
land is altered by the acquisition or
loss, during that period, of a licence
or other right or privilege the value of
which is deemed to form part of the site
value of that land; or
(f) unless, being land exclusively used
for residential purposes when valued,
that land comes under use for indus-
trial or other purposes whereby the
value thereof is, in the opinion of the
Commissioner, .altered; or







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(g) unless, in the opinion of the Commis-
sioner, any improvements have been
added to or removed from the land; or

(h) unless, in the opinion of the Commis-
sioner, .circumstances affecting the val-
uation of the land are such as to render
an alteration necessary or desirable for
preserving or attaining uniformity in
values between that valuation and sub-
sisting valuations of other comparable
parcels of lands.

(4) Nothing in this section shall prevent or
be deemed to prevent the Commissioner from valuing
any land which becomes taxable or rateable or from
deducting from the value of any parcel that portion of
the value which may be applicable to any part of
that parcelwhichhas ceased to be taxable or rateable.
11. Unless the Commissioner otherwise directs, Land to be in-
there shall be included in one valuation several par- eluded in one
valuation.
eels of land which adjoin and which are owned by the
same person and where either no part is let or all of
the holdings are let to one person.

12. Unless the Commissioner otherwise directs separate val-
uation.
(a) several parcels of land which adjoin
and which are owned by the same per-
son shall be valued separately if build-
ings are erected thereon which are
obviously adapted to separate occupa-
tion and which could respectively be
held under separate ownerships;
(b) several parcels of land which are owned
by the same person but are separately








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20.


Certain returns
and information
to be furnished.


Access to lands
and buildings,
plans and docu-
ments, etc.


let to different persons shall be separa-
tely valued;

(c) if a parcel of land is severed by a public
road or by a stream or river, and in fact
occupied and used as one property it
shall, notwithstanding the severance,
be valued as one parcel.

13. (1) The Registrar of the Supreme Court and
every other officer employed in or in connection with
any department of Government other than the Depart-
ment of Inland Revenue shall, (at the prescribed time
and in the prescribed form, furnish to the Commissioner
such information in their respective offices as may be
required by the Commissioner.

(2) Notwithstanding anything contained in the
Local Government Act, 1958, the Interim Commissioner
for Local Government and every officer in his service
shall, at the prescribed time and in the prescribed
form, furnish to the Commissioner such information in
relation to valuation returns, rate books or other docu-
ments as may be required by the Commissioner.

14. (1) Subject to subsection (2) the Commissioner,
or any officer or other person authorised by the Com-
missioner in writing for that purpose, may for the pur-
pose of ascertaining the value of any land enter, at
all reasonable hours during the day, in or upon any
land without being liable to any legal proceedings
or molestation whatever on account of such entry.

(2) Neither, the Commissioner nor any officer
or other person authorised by him under subsection
(1) shall enter into any dwelling house in actual







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


occupation except with the consent of the occupier
thereof, without previously giving forty eight hours
notice in writing to the occupier.

(3) Every person in possession of land, after
being served with a notice in writing signed by the
Commissioner or by an officer authorised by the Com-
missioner, shall -

(a) show to the Commissioner or officer
authorised as aforesaid all maps, plans,
diagrams, documents of title and docu-
ments containing information as to the
rents, issues and profits of such land
in his custody or control; and

(b) permit the Commissioner or officer au-
thorised as aforesaid to make tracings
or copies of such maps, plans, diagrams
or documents; and

(c) on the date appointed in the notice
being not less than seven days after
the service thereof, meet the Commis-
sioner or the officer or other person
authorised as aforesaid on such land
and answer all such questions as may
be put to him concerning such land and
point out the boundaries of such land.

(4) Any person who fails to comply with any of
the provisions of subsection (3) is guilty of an offence
and is liable on summary conviction thereof to a fine
not exceeding one hundred dollars or to imprisonment
for a term not exceeding one month or to both such
fine and imprisonment.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Preparation of 15. (1) A valuation roll shall, .as soon as practi-
valuation roll. cable, be prepared for the Island and shall be in such
form as may be prescribed and in it shall be set forth
(so far as is practicable) in respect of each valuation
the following particulars -
(a) the name and postal address of the
owner;

(b) the situation, description and measure-
ment or area of the land;

(c) the site value of the land;
(d) the improved value of the land;
(e) such other particulars as may be pre-
scribed.

(2) The valuation roll may. be amended if the
Commissioner considers it necessary to correct any
error or omission or to record any new valuation.

Part. III
Notice of Valuations, Objections
and Appeals.
Notice of val- 16. (1) Notice of valuation shall be given to the
nation. person in possession of land in the prescribed form
and the notice shall also state that the owner of the
land may lodge an objection to the valuation.

(2) Notice of valuation may be given at any
time after the making of the valuation but not, in the
case of a first valuation under this Act, before the
Minister has, ,pursuant to section 8, ,fixed, in relation
to the land to which. that valuation relates the date
mentioned in that section.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


17. (1) Any person who is dissatisfied with a val- Objections
nation made under this Act may, within 30 days after to valua-
service of the notice of valuation, post to or lodge on
with the Commissioner an objection in writing against
the valuation stating the grounds upon which he relies
and the reasons therefore.

(2) An objection against a valuation made under
this Act shall be limited to one or more of the following
grounds -
(a) that the values assessed are too high
or too low;
(b) that lands which should be included in
one valuation have been valued sep-
arately;
(c) that lands which should be valued sep-
arately have been included in one
valuation;
(d) that the person named in the notice is
not the owner of the land.

18. (1) Where a change in ownership of land occurs Rightof new
after the giving of a notice of valuation in respect of owner oaj-
that land, the new owner of the land may, subject to tion orappeal.
this section and to section 17 lodge an objection
against the valuation and, if he is dissatisfied with
the decision of the Commissioner upon that objection,
appeal against that decision.

(2) If an objection or appeal was made or in-
stituted by a former owner of land before the change
in ownership then the new owner of the land is entitled
to carry on in his own name that objection or appeal
but he is not entitled in that case to make or institute









LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


a fresh objection or, as the case may be, appeal but
may add to or vary the grounds of objection or appeal.

(3) A new owner of land is not entitled to be
given a fresh notice of valuation but shall be deemed
to have received the notice of valuation given to the
person in possession of the land and to have received
it when it was so given.

19. (1) The Commissioner shall with all reasonable
despatch consider every objection made under this
Part and may disallow it or allow it either wholly or
in part.

(2) Written notice of the Commissioner's de-
cision shall be served on the objector.

20.(1) Any person who is dissatisfied with the
decision of the Commissioner upon an objection may,
within 30 days of the service of notice of that decision,
in writing, request the Commissioner to refer the de-
cision to the Land Valuation Board for review of the
valuation and thereupon shall deposit with the Com-
missioner as a security for the due prosecution of the
appeal such sum as may be prescribed for the parti-
cular class of case; and if he appears in person or
by solicitor or counsel before the Board in support
of his appeal he is entitled to return of the said sum
whatever the outcome of the appeal.

(2) An appeal shall be limited to the grounds
stated in the objection; but the Board may in its dis-
cretion permit any ground of appeal to be amended.

(3) Where the Commissioner has been requested
to refer a decision to the Board he shall refer the de-
cision accordingly with all reasonable despatch.


Considers
tion of ob-
jections.


Appeal
against de-
cision of
Commissioner.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(4) Upon an appeal under this section the
Board may confirm or reduce or increase the valuation
appealed against and may make such order as it thinks
fit with respect to the payment of costs.

(5) Written notice of the Board's decision to-
gether with a written statement of the reasons therefore
shall be served on the appellant and on the Commis-
sioner.

(6) No Judge or Magistrate or member of the
Board shall solely on account of land owned by him
being subject to valuation by the Commissioner, be
deemed to be interested in or debarred from dealing
with any matter upon which he may be called upon
to adjudicate under this Act.

21. (1) Any person (hereinafter in this Part re- Right of
ferred to as the objector) -aHh court.

(a) who, pursuant to section 17, has objected
to a valuation made under this Act and
is dissatisfied with the decision of the
Commissioner upon any such objection;
or
(b) who, pursuant to section 20, has re-
quested the Commissioner to refer a
decision to the Board for review and
is dissatisfied in any respect with the
decision of the Board,
may appeal from the decision of the Commissioner or
the decision of the Board, as the case may be, to the
High Court within 30 days after the date on which no-
tice of the decision of the Commissioner or the de-
cision of the Board, as the case may be, was served
on him.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(2) The Commissioner may appeal to the High
Court from a decision of the Board within 30 days
after the date on which notice of the decision of the
Board was served on him.
(3) An appeal to the High Court shall be in-
stituted by summons' to be designated a "Land Val-
uation Summons" entitled in the matter of the Land
Valuation Act, 1969 and in the matter of the valuation
of the land the valuation of which is in dispute.
(4) Every Land Valuation Summons shall con-
tain particulars, shortly stated, of -
(a) the land which is the subject of the
valuation in dispute;
(b) the decision or part of the decision
which is the subject of the appeal; and

(c) the objector and, if the objector is not
the owner of the land, .the owner.
(5) Every Land Valuation Summons shall be
returnable within 14 days or such other period as may
be prescribed by rules of court for the purposes of this
Act, or as the High Court may allow and shall be ser-
ved on -
(a) the Commissioner or the objector, as
the case may be, or on such other per-
son as the High Court may direct; and
(b) on the Secretary to the Board in the
case of an appeal against a decision
of the Board.
(6) Where a Land Valuation Summons is served
on the Secretary to the Board pursuant to subsection(5)








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


the Secretary shall within 30 days of the date of ser-
vice of such summons forward to the Registrar of the
Supreme Court a record of the proceedings before the
Board including a statement of the reasons for the
Board's decision.
(7) Subject to the provisions of this Act, the
rules of the Supreme Court applicable in respect of
proceedings by way of originating summons shall ap-
ply with such modifications as are necessary in re-
spect of proceedings on a Land Valuation Summons.

(8) The proceedings on a Land Valuation Sum-
mons and in all matters and things incidental and
ancillary thereto shall be had and taken in the same
manner, and the powers of the Judge and the Registrar
shall be the same as in a trial in an action in the
High Court.

(9) Notwithstanding subsection (8), in any
proceedings on a Land Valuation Summons -
(a) the hearing shall be in open Court un-
less the Judge otherwise directs;

(b) the onus of proof shall be on the objector.

22. Either the Commissioner or the objector or the night of
appeal to
owner of the land the valuation of which was in issue court of
on a Land Valuation Summons may appeal to the Court Appeal.
of Appeal from the decision of the High Court and
every such appeal shall be made within the time and
in the manner laid down by any enactment or rules
of court for the purposes of appeals from the High
Court to the Court of Appeal and shall be subject in
all respects to the law relating to such appeals.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Right of ap- 23. An appeal on a point of law only shall lie
peal toPrivy as of right to Her Majesty in Council from any de-
Council on
point oflaw. cision of the Court of Appeal under section 22.

Extension of 24. If, on application made thereto, the Board,
or appeals or the High Court, or the Court of Appeal, as the
case may be, is satisfied that there is adequate
reason why the time limits in respect of any appeal
thereto could not be complied with, the Board, or the
the High Court, or the Court of Appeal, as the case
may be, may extend those time limits for a fixed
period, ,although the application for such extension is
not made until after the expiration of the relevant
time limit.

Objection or 25. The fact that an objection has been made
appeal not or that an appeal is pending shall not in the mean-
to interfere
with collec- time interfere with or affect the making, levying or
tion ofrates recovery of any rates or taxes under any enactment
imposing rates or taxes on land or the making, levying
or recovery of any other statutoryrate, charge or assess-
ment based on the site value or improved value of
land. If the valuation is altered, due adjustment shall
be made and for this purpose amounts paid in excess
shall be refunded and amounts short paid shall be re-
coverable as arrears.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Part IV

Uses of Valuation

26. Where in any enactment whether enacted or
made before, on or after the commencement of this
Act, .reference is made to the site value or improved
value of land and there is a subsisting valuation made
under this Act of the land in question, the site or
improved value of the land for the purposes of such
other enactment shall, unless that other enactment
otherwise provides, be the site or improved value in
that valuation.
27.(1) The Commissioner shall, as soon as is
reasonably practicable after the completion of the val-
uation roll prepared pursuant to section 15, furnish a
copy of that roll to -

(a) the Commissioner of Inland Revenue; and

(b) such other persons as may be prescribed.

(2) Where any amendment of a valuation roll is
made a supplementary roll showing the amendment
shall be furnished to the persons specified in subsec-
tion (1).

(3) Fees in respect of valuation rolls supplied
pursuant to this section shall be payable by such per-
sons and in such amount as may be prescribed.

(4) All copies of the valuation roll shall be
certified by the Commissioner in the prescribed form.

28. (1) The Commissioner may make, and shall, as
and when required by any Ministry or Department of the
Government or by any statutory board, make any valua-
tion of any land for such Ministry, Department or statu-
tory board.


purposes for
which valuation
to be used.









Supply of copies
of valuation
roll by Commis-
sioner. "


Commissioner
to make valua-
tions for Gov-
ernment Depart-
ments, etc.







22 LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(2) The Commissioner may also make any valua-
tion of any land as and when requested to do so by
the owners thereof.

(3) A valuation made pursuant to this section
shall be made on such basis as is appropriate to the
purpose for which it is required.
(4) The fees payable for making any valuation
under this section shall be as prescribed.

(5) The Commissioner shall issue a certificate
of valuation in respect of any valuation made under
this section.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Part V

Miscellaneous


29. On application in writing and on payment of
the prescribed fee the Commissioner shall supply to
any person in such form as the Commissioner may de-
termine a certified copy of, .or a certified extract from
the particulars in respect of any valuation entered on
the valuation roll. Such certified copy or certified ex-
tracts shall for all purposes and in all proceedings be
evidence of the matters and things stated therein and
that any valuation mentioned therein has been duly
made in accordance with the provisions of this Act.

30. (1) The Commissioner may, in order to obtain
information required for the purposes of this Act, by
notice in writing, -require any person, whether the per-
son is in possession of land or not, to attend and give
evidence before him or before any officer authorised
by him in that behalf, -concerning any land, and to
produce all books, .documents, -and other papers.what-
soever in his custody, or under his control relating
thereto.

(2) The Commissioner may require the evidence
to be given on oath, and either verbally or in writing,
and for such purpose he or the officer so authorised
by him may administer an oath.

(3) Any person attending in accordance with
subsection (1) before the Commissioner or an officer
authorised by him is entitled to have his expenses
paid from moneys provided for the purpose by Parlia-
ment by such person and in such manner as may be
prescribed.


Certified copies
of extracts from
valuation rolls.











Power to obtain
evidence.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Notice of change
of ownership.


Returns to be
furnished to
the Commisioner.


31. (1) Subject to subsection (2) every person who
comes into or passes out of the possession of any
parcel of land or any part of any parcel of land whether
by sub-division or otherwise shall within 3 months of
such change of possession notify the Commissioner
and furnish to him such particulars in relation to the
transaction as may be prescribed.

(2) It shall not be necessary to notify a change
of possession unless that change relates to a right to
exclusive possession that has enured or may in law
enure for a period of at least 3 years.

32. (1) Every person or class of persons on being
required to do so by notice published in the Official
Gazette and in.one newspaper in the Island, or in such
other manner, if any, as the Commissioner may think
fit, -shall, -on or before such date in every year as may
be specified by the Commissioner in any such notice
as aforesaid, furnish to the Commissioner a return in
the prescribed form setting out in relation to every
parcel of land held by him such particulars as the
Commissioner may require.

(2) Notwithstanding subsection (1) every per-
son in possession of land shall, if required by the
Commissioner, .furnish to him, .in the manner and with-
in the time required by him, wa return or an additional
return setting out in relation to every holding of land
such particulars as the Commissioner may require.

(3) If a person required by the Commissioner
to furnish a return under subsection (2) is not a person
in possession of land, he shall, nevertheless, in the
manner and within the time the Commissioner has so







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


required him to make the return, furnish a return
stating that fact and should such person fail so to
do he shall be deemed to have failed to comply with
the requirement of the Commissioner under subsection
(2).
(4) Every person, whether a person in possess-
ion of land or not, ,if required by the Commissioner,
shall in the manner and within the time required by
him, -furnish any return or any information required by
the Commissioner for the purpose of this Act.
(5) The Commissioner may require the returns
referred to in this section to be furnished to any of-
ficer duly authorised by him in that behalf, either by
delivering the same to the said officer personally,
or by forwarding the same to the said officer by regis-
tered post.

(6) Every person shall give, ,upon every return
furnished by him, his correct postal address for service of
notices and shall, ,within one month after any change
in such address, give notice in writing to the Com-
missioner of the new address.

(7) All returns, notices and information required
under this Act shall (except where otherwise specified
in or authorised by or under this Act) be delivered at
the office of the Commissioner on or before such days
as may be notified or prescribed.

33. (1) Without prejudice to section 25(2) of the service of
Interpretation Act, 1966, ,any notice or other communi- Notice. .
cation by or on behalf of the Commissioner may be
served upon any person-







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(a) by causing it to be personally served
on him; or

(b) by leaving it at his address for service;
or

(c) by sending it in a prepaid registered
letter addressed to him at his address
for service,
and, in the case of paragraph (c) of this section, ser-
vice thereof shall be deemed to have been effected at
the time when it would have been received in the or-
dinary course of the post.

(2) Any letter or communication which, under
Act 1911-8. section 16 (1) (a) of the Post Office Act, 1911, -is ex-
empt from the payment of inland postage, shall be
deemed to have been prepaid for the purposes of this
section and of section 35.
Address for 34. The address for service last given to the Com-
service, missioner, shall for all purposes under this Act, be

the address for service, ,but, where no address for ser-
vice has been given to the Commissioner or where
the departmental records disclose that such person
has subsequently changed his address, and he has
not notified the Commissioner either in a return or by
separate written advice of such change then the address
of the person as described in any record in the cus-
tody of the Commissioner shall be the address for
service.
Substituted 35. If any owner of land or other person to re-
service. ceive any notice or other document under this Act-
ceive any notice or other document under this Act-







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(a) is absent from the Island, 'and. the re-
cords in the possession of the Com-
missioner disclose that such owner or
other person has no attorney or-agent
in the Island to whom the notice or
other document may be given; or

(b) cannot after reasonable enquiry be
found,
any such notice or other document may be given or
served on him by sending the same or a copy thereof
in a prepaid registered letter addressed to him at his
address for service under this Act, -or by placing the
same on a conspicuous part of the land to which the
same relates, or by publishing a copy of a true ab-
stract of the same in the Official Gazette.

36. The Commissioner may appear either person-
ally or by counsel or solicitor or by a valuer, or by
some other public officer in any court or in any pro-
ceedings, and the statement of any such counsel, soli-
citor, valuer or officer that he so appears by authority
of the Commissioner shall be accepted as sufficient
evidence of such authority.

37. (1) If any act, matter or thing (other than an
appeal to the Land Valuation Board or to the High
Court or to the Court of Appeal) prescribed to be made
or done at or within a fixed time under this Act can-
not be made or done, or is not so made or done the
Minister may, by order, from time to time appoint a
further or other time for making or doing the same,
whether the time or any such further or other time with-
in which the same ought to have been done has or has
not elapsed or expired.


Right to appear.








power of Minister
to extend times
for doing cer-
tain things etc.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(2) Any act, matter or thing made or done within
the time or other time appointed by such order shall be
as valid as if it had been made or done within the time
prescribed.

penalties. 38. Any person who

(a) in any way obstructs or hinders the Com-
missioner, or any other officer in the
exercise of his functions under this Act,
or refuses to answer any relevant ques-
tion when duly required to do so; or

(b) fails to furnish any returns, notice or
information or comply with any require-
ment of the Commissioner as and when
required by this Act or by the Commis-
sioner; or

(c) refuses or neglects duly to attend and
give evidence when required by the
Board or the Commissioner or any officer
duly authorised by him in that behalf,
or fails, refuses or neglects truly and
fully to answer any questions put to him,
or to produce any book, document or
other paper required of him by the Com-
missioner or any such officer, unless
just cause or excuse for the refusal or
neglect is shown by him,

is guilty of an offence and, on summary conviction
thereof, is liable to a fine not exceeding two hundred
and fifty dollars or to imprisonment for a term not ex-
ceeding three months or to both such fine and imprison-
ment.






LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


39. Any person who alste returns
or statements.
(a) makes or delivers a return or notice
which to his knowledge is false in any
particular; or
(b) makes an answer, whether orally or in
writing, which to his knowledge is
false in any particular,to any question
put to him by the Commissioner or any
officer duly authorised by the Com-
missioner;
is guilty of an offence and, :on summary conviction
thereof, ,is liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred
dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six
months or to both such fine and imprisonment.

40. (1) Any of the following offences Offences.

(a) failure to furnish any return or informa-
tion;
(b) making or delivering a return which, to
the knowledge of the person making or
delivering the return, is false in any
particular or making an answer which,
to the knowledge of the person making
it, is a false answer;
(c) failure to comply with any requirement
shall be deemed to have been committed -
(i) at the place where the return or in-
formation was furnished or should
in accordance with this Act or a re-
quirement of the Commissioner or an
officer authorised by him, ,have been







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


furnished, or where the answer was
made, or where the requirement should
have been complied with; or
(ii) at the usual or last known place
of residence of the defendant,

and may be charged as having been committed at either
of those places.
(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of any other
enactment an information in respect of an offence under
this Act may be laid on or before a day three years
after the offence was committed or within one year
from the day on which evidence, sufficient in the opin-
ion of the Commissioner to justify a prosecution for
the offence, came to his knowledge, whichever is later,
and the Commissioner's certificate as to the day on
which such evidence came to his knowledge is con-
clusive evidence thereof.

Evidence. 41. (1) Any valuation roll and all entries made
therein or a copy of or entry from any such roll or
entries certified by the Commissioner to be a true
copy thereof shall be received as prima facie evidence
of the facts therein mentioned in any proceedings under
this or any other Act.
(2) Any certificate, notice or other document
bearing the written stamp or printed signature or the
stamped or printed name of the Commissioner shall,
until the contrary is proved, be deemed to have been
duly signed by the Commissioner.
(3) Judicial notice shall be taken of every such
signature orname and of the fact that the person whose
signature or name it purports to be holds or has held
the office of Commissioner.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


(4) The production of a copy of the Official
Gazette or of any Supplement thereto containing any
notice purporting to be published by the Commissioner
in pursuance of this Act or any notice of the appoint-
ment of the Commissioner or any officer or person
under this Act shall be conclusive evidence of such
notice, publication or appointment.

42. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section,
any return to which this section applies shall in any
valuation proceedings be admissible as evidence of
the facts stated in the return; and any document pur-
porting to be a return to which this section applies,
shall, in any valuation proceedings, be presumed, un-
less the contrary is shown-

(a) to be such a return;

(b) to have been made by the person by
whom it purports to have been made;
and

(c) if it purports to have been made by that
person as occupier or owner of a parcel
of land, or in any other capacity speci-
fied in the document, to have been
made by him as such occupier or owner
or in that other capacity, -as the case
may be.

(2) Returns to which this section applies shall
not be used by or on behalf of the Commissioner as
evidence in any valuation proceedings unless-

(a) not less than 7 days before the com-
mencement of the proceedings the Com-
missioner by notice in writing informs


Certain returns
admissible as
evidence in
valuation pro-
ceedings.







LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


the person who is party to the proceed-
ingsof thereturns to be so used and the
parcels of land to which they relate; and
(b) the Commissioner has permitted any
such person, who has given not less
than 24 hours notice of his desire to do
so, to inspect at any reasonable time,
and to take extracts from, any of the re-
turns specified in the notice under
paragraph (a).

(3) This section applies to all returns as de-
fined in section 2.

(4) For the purposes of this section, ,"valuation
proceedings" means any proceedings on or in conse-
quence of a reference to the Land Valuation Board or
any proceedings on or in consequence of an appeal to
the High Court or to the Court of Appeal.
Regulations. 43. The Minister may make regulations with re-
spect to -
(a) any matters required by this Act to be
prescribed; and

(b) the powers and duties of persons em-
ployed for the purposes of this Act;

(c) the conduct of proceedings before the
Board; and
(d) any other matter or thing, whether sim-
ilar to the above or not, in respect of
which it may be expedient to make regu-
lations for the purpose of carrying this
Act into effect.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


44. (1) The enactments specified in the first column
of the Second Schedule shall, from and after such day
or days as the Governor-General may by order appoint,
have effect, -subject to the amendments set out in re-
lation thereto in the second column of that Schedule
and subject to such other modifications and adapta-
tions, if any, las may be specified in the said order.

(2) The enactments specified in the first column
of the Third Schedule shall, with effect from such day
or days as the Governor-General may by order appoint,
be repealed to the extent specified in the second column
of that Schedule.

(3) In an order under subsection (1) or subsec-
tion (2) different days may be appointed for different
enactments and for different provisions in such enact-
ments.

45. (1) Subject to subsection (2) if any difficulty
arises in bringing into operation the provisions of this
Act or in giving effect to the purpose thereof the Min-
ister may by order make such provision as seems to him
necessary or expedient for the purpose of removing the
difficulty and may by such order amend or add to any
provision of this Act.

(2) Every order under this section shall be sub-
ject to affirmative resolution.

(3) An order under this section shall not be
made later than one year after the date on which this
Act comes into operation.

(4) Any order under this section may be amend-
ed, added to or revoked by a further order, and may
be given retrospective effect to a date not earlier
than the date on which this Act comes into operation.


Amendment and
repeal of cer-
tain enactments.
Second Schedule.







Third Schedule.


Removal of
difficulties.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


Commencement.


46. This Act shall come into operation on such
day as the Governor-General may appoint by proclama-
tion.


Read three times and passed the House of Assem-
bly this twenty-second day of April, one thousand nine
hundred and sixty-nines


THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.


Read three times and passed the Senate this
thirteenth day of April, one thousand nine hundred and
sixty-nine.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


FIRST SCHEDULE

Section 5(2)

CONSTITUTION AND PROCEDURE OF LAND

VALUATION BOARD

1. The Land Valuation Board shall consist of not less than three and
not more than five members who shall be appointed by the Minister by instru-
ment in writing.

2. The Minister shall appoint as chairman of the Board a member of the
Bhard who is a barrister or solicitor of not less than 5 years' standing.

3. Every member of the Board shall hold office for a term of 3 years un-
less he dies, resigns or is removed from office by the Minister for cause be-
fore the end of that term, but -

(a) a member who is appointed to fill a vacancy created by the death,
resignation or removal from office for cause of a former member
shall hold office only for the unexpired portion of the term of that
former member; and

(b) every member is eligible for re-appointment for a further term.

4. The Minister may grant leave of absence to a member of the Board
and may appoint a person to act in the place of that member.

5. Any member of the Board may at any time resign his office by instru-
ment in writing addressed to the Minister and in the case of a member other
than the chairman, transmitted through the chairman. From the date of the re-
ceipt of such instrument by the Minister, such member shall cease to be a
member of the Board.

6. The members of the Board shall be paid such remuneration and other
allowances (if any) as is fixed by the Minister.

7. The Minister shall from time to time assign a public officer to per-
form the functions of secretary to the Board.








LAND VALUATION ACT, 1969-20


FIRST SCHEDULE Continued

8.(1) Before entering upon the duties of their office the members of,
and the secretary to, the Board shall take and subscribe an oath in the form
set out in paragraph (2) Such oath shall be administered, in the case of the
chairman of the Board, by a Justice of the Peace, and in the case of any
other member or the secretary, by the chairman or a Justice of thePeace.

(2) The form of the oath shall be as follows -

"I ............................................................................... having
been appointed/assigned as Chairman of the Land Valuation Board
Member/Secretary to
do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will freely and without
fear or favour, affection or ill-will perform my duties as Chairman/Member/
Secretary of/to the Board.

Sworn before me this day of 196
Declared




Justice of the Peace/Chairman of
Land Valuation Board.

9. Any three members of the Board may hear and determine an appeal.
In no case shall the number be four or less than three.

10. Only a member of the Board who is present throughoutthe hearing
of an appeal is entitled to take part in the decision on that appeal. A mem-
ber may write or otherwise announce his decision, or all of the members so
present may appoint one of their number to write or otherwise announce their
joint decision.

11. A decision of the Board shall be the decision of the majority of
the members of the Board entitled to take part in that decision.

12. The validity of any proceedings of the Board shall not be affected
by reason only of their being a vacancy in the membership thereof or of any
defect in the appointment of a member thereof.




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