• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Supplement: House of assembly debates...
 Statutory Instruments Supplement...














Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00098
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00098
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
    Supplement: House of assembly debates for 6th August, 1968
        Page A 1966
        Page A 1967
        Page A 1968
        Page A 1969
        Page A 1970
        Page A 1971
        Page A 1972
        Page A 1973
        Page A 1974
        Page A 1975
        Page A 1976
        Page A 1977
        Page A 1978
        Page A 1979
        Page A 1980
        Page A 1981
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 26; S.I. 73: Land acquisition re land at Pile Bay, St. Michael for the fishing industry
        Page A 1982
Full Text









VOL. CIV.


~JjidiaI


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 5TH MAY, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Applications for Liquor Licences, Districts "A"
and "E", St. Peter. ...............................
Appointment of Returning Officer, Election Clerk
and Presiding Officers............... .....
Board of Education:
Mr. Evelyn Greaves (Appointed as a member)
Executorials:
George William Iuggins..........................
Leslie Porte also known as Leslie Morris
Notice:
Anderson A. Greaves; Theodore David Gittens;
George Walton Payne successful in the Solicitors
Preliminary Examination..........................
Notice of Sitting of Licensing Authority, Dist. 'E'
Resignation:
Reuben DaC. Adams, Air Traffic Control Officer,
Department of Civil Aviation..............
Resolution: No. 1/1969 for $57,109........... **.......

House of Assembly Debates for 9th August, 1968.

Legal Supplement
S.I. 1969 No. 73: Land Acquisition re land at Pile Bay,
St. Michael for the Fishing Industry.


NOTICE NO. 299
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Resignation

Reuben DaC. Adams, Air Traffic Control
Officer, Department of Civil Aviation, re-
signed from the Public Service with effect
from 25th January, 1969.

(M.P. P. 4175) D
RIDA




fa&f d Vk I


NOTICE

The following persons have been success-
ful in the Solicitors' Preliminary Examination
held on 5th April, 1969:


Anderson A. Greaves
Theodore David Gittens
George Walton Payne


C. A. ROCHEFORD.
Registrar.



Board of Education

The Minister of Education by virtue of
the powers vested in him by section 3 of the
Education (Amendment) Act, 1965 has been
pleased to appoint the following person to be
a member of the Board of Education for the
remainder of the three year period which
commenced on 3rd January, 1969, with effect
from 3rd April, 1969:-

Mr. Evelyn Greaves.

(CB Vo.2).


) >


NO. 36


Zat


~lrzotte








OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 5, 1969


NOTICE NO. 300

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES

(Act 1957- 40)

APPLICANT: RANDOLPH FIELD
OCCUPATION: Accountant
ADDRESS: Brighton, Black Rock.
PREMISES: A Board & shingled
house situated at Good-
land Main Rd. St. Mich-
ael.

Dated this 23rd day of April 1969.

Signed: RANDOLPH FIELD
Applicant.


This Application for a General Whole-
sale Licence will be considered at a Licen-
sing Court to be held at Magistrates' Courts
Dist. 'A' on Thursday the 15th day of May
1969 at 9.00 o'clock a. m.

GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


KENNETH MASCOLL
Shopkeeper
Sand Street, St. Peter
An upstairs wall and
wooden building situated
at Sand Street, St. Peter


Dated this 21st day of April 1969.

Signed: KENNETH MASCOLL.
Applicant.


This Application for a Restaurant Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrate's Courts Dist. "E" St.
Peter on the 16th day of June 1969 at 9.00
o'clock a. m.


CARLO D.A. BYNOE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


NOTICE NO. 301

Notice of Sitting of Licensing Authority

(The Liquor Licence Act 1957 Sec. 16)

Notice is hereby given that a sitting of
the Licensing Authority for District "E" St.
Peter and St. Lucy will be held at Magistrate's
Court, District "E" St. Peter on Monday the
16th day of June, 1969 at nine o'Clock for the
purpose of Granting Licences, Transfers of
Licences and Orders for Registration of
Clubs under the above Acts.

Dated this 29th day of April, 1969 at the
Magistrates Court, District "E" St. Peter.

N. B. All Applications MUST be made not
later than Monday the 26th May, 1969.

CARLO D. A. BYNOE
Clerk to the Licensing Authority.


NOTICE NO. 302

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

(Act 1957 40)
APPLICANT: CLINTON BEST
OCCUPATION: Market Cleaner
ADDRESS: Wavell Ave., Black
Rock.
PREMISES: Board & galvanise build-
ing situated at Baxters
Road.

Dated this 25th day of April 1969.

Signed: CLINTON HOLDER

Applicant.

This Application for a Retail Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held atMagistrates' CourtDist. 'A' onThurs-
day the 15th day of May 1969 at 9 o'clock a.m.


GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 5, 1969









Ma 5C


Resolution No. 35/1969


M.P. 5001/8/T1


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY


Resolved that the sum of FIFTY-SEVEN THOUrAND ONE HUN-
DRED AND NINE DOLLARS be granted from the Con. dated Fund and
placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,
1969-70, Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary Estimate, 1969-70
No. 1 which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the Senate be
invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to as-
sent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.
22nd April, 1969

THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker


Concurred in by the Senate the 24th day of April, 1969.

C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS
Deputy Presidentr


I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
26th April, 1969.


Supplementary Estimates 1969-70 No. 1


i:.\ADn AND ITEM

P( F

APPROVED ESTIMATES


PART I CURRENT
HEAD 11 PENSIONS
Item 11 Cost of Living Al-
lowances to Pen-
sioners.

Item 18 (New) Church
Officers Pen-
sions

HEAD 20 CIVIL AVIATION
Item 35 Fixtures, Fittings
and Equipment


Provision in
\ppro\ed Estimates
1969-70


Provision in
Supplementary Esti-
mates No.


Statutory Other Statutory
Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-
ture tur I ture


476,000


9,898


Other
Expendi-
ture


Supplementary
Provision
Required


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


$ $ $






3,480



5,060



48,569

I


_~ __ ~C~_


May 5, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








402 OFFICIAL GAZETTE May 5.1969


NOTICE NO. 267 (second publication)

Re the Estate of

GEORGE WILLIAM HUGGINS

Deceased


Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any debt or claim upon or affecting the
Estate of George William Huggins of
No. 75 Cascade Road, St. Anns in the County
of St. George in the Territory of Trinidad
and Tobago who died on the 15th day of May,
1968 are hereby requested to send in parti-
culars of their Claims duly attested to the un-
dersigned in care of Messrs. Fitzwilliam,
Stone & Alcazar, Lucas Street, Bridgetownon
or before the 23rd day of May, 1969after
which date we shall proceed to distribute the
assets among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard to the debts and claims of which we

shall then have had notice, and that we shall
not be liable for the assets so distributed to
any person whose debt or claim we shall not
have had notice at the time of such distribu-
tion and all persons indebted to the said Es-
tate are requested to settle their accounts
without delay.

Dated the 20th day of March 1969.

BARCLAYS BANK D.C. O.
Trustee Department
The Executor of the Estate of
George William Huggins,
deceased.


NOTICE NO. 268 (second publication)

Re the Estate of

LESLIE PORTE

also known as

LESLIE MORRIS

Deceased

Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any debt or claim upon or affecting
the Estate of Leslie Porte also known as
Leslie Morris late of Richmond in the parish
of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the
26th day of June, 1966 are hereby requested
to send in particulars of their Claims duly at-
tested to the undersigned in care of Messrs.
Fitzwilliam, Stone & Alcazar, Lucas Street,
Bridgetown on or before the 23rd day of May,
1969 after which date I shall proceed to dis-
tribute the assets among the parties entitled
theretohaving regard to the debts and claims
of which I shall then have had notice, and that
I shall not be liable for the assets so distri-
buted to any person whose debt or claim I
shall not have had notice at the time of such
distribution and all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to settle their ac-
counts without delay.

Dated the 20th day of March 1969.

FITZGERALD DACOSTA PORTE
The Administrator of the Estate of
Leslie Porte also known as
Leslie Morris.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 5, 1969


402








May 5, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


Sugar Factory Workers Severance Payments Act, 1965


APPOINTMENTS


In accordance with the provisions of Section 4 (2) of the Sugar Factory
Workers Severance Payments Act, 1965, as amended by the Existing Laws
Amendment Order, No. 2 1967, the Minister has appointed the following per-
sons to be members of the Sugar Factory Workers Severance Payments Board
for a period of two years with effect from 21st April, 1969:-


Mr. C. L. L. Sealy
Mr. C. R. Packer
Mr. E. L. G. Hoad


Senator F. L. Walcott, O.B.E.
Mr. Aubrey Sobers
Mr. Oscar Atwell


Nominated by the Barbados Sugar
Producers' Federation

j oiae yteBrao ua


Nominated by the Barbados
Workers' Union.


(M.P. 1035/18/2)


APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS TO SUGAR WORKERS'
PROVIDENT FUND BOARD

In accordance with Section 3 of the Sugar Workers (Provident Fund) Act,
1968, (1968-54), the Minister of Labour has appointed the following persons to
be members of the Sugar Workers' Provident Fund Board under the Chairman-
ship of the Chief Labour Officer for a period of two years with effect from 1st
May, 1969:-


Mr. E. R. L. Ward
Mr. N. C. Thornton
Mr. C. O. Williams

Mr. E. Henry
Mr. O. Atwell
Senator F. L. Walcott
O.B.E.


Nominated by the Sugar Producers'
Federation of Barbados.



Nominated by the Barbados
Workers' Union.


May 5, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








OFIIA AZTE-a 5,I196


Government Notice

Appointment of Returning Officer, Election Clerk and
Presiding Officers.

Pursuant to the provisions of sections 18, 19 and 20 of the Represen-
tation of the People Act, 1957, (1957-50), the following persons have been
appointed to be election officers for the bye-election to be held in the
City of Bridgetown on 29th May, 1969:-


Returning Officer Mr. Lisle A. Harrison. M.B.E.
Election Clerk Mr. Noel G. Smith.
Presiding Officers:
Polling Station V Mr. Cecil B. Marshall
BA Mr. Austin Brathwaite
BB1 Mr. Clyde Grant
BB2 Mr. W. G. Armstrong
BC Mr. Wilfred A. Deane
BDI Mr. Hugh Mapp
BD2 Mr. J. O. Morris
BE1 Mr. Hermon Yearwood
BE2 Mr. Lomer Alleyne
BFI Mr. Irving A. Kendall
BF2 Mr. Ernest B. Marshall
BF3 Mr. Hugh C. Walkes
BG Mr. George DaC. Maynard.


(M.P. 7471/1 Vol. IV).


Government Printing Office.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


May 5, 1969












THE




House of Assembly Debates




(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
Friday, 9th August, 1968.
Pursuant to the adjournment, the House of As-
sembly met at 4.45 p.m. o'clock today.

PRESENT
His Honour J. E. T. BRANCKER, Q.C., F.Z.S.,
(Speaker); Mr. L. E. SMITH, J.P.; Hon. C. E. TALMA, (Minis-
ter of Health and Community Development); Hon. J. C. TUDOR,
M.A., (Leader of the House); Mr. J. W. CORBIN, J.P.; Hon.
G. G. FERGUSSON, (Minister of Trade, Tiourism, Co-operatives
and Fisheries); Mr. R. St.C. WEEKES, J.P.; Mr. W. R. LOWE,
J.P.; Hon. N. W. BOXILL, (Minister of Communications and
Works); Mr. J. B. YEARWOOD, J.P., (Chairman of Committees);
Sir GLH. ADAMS, C.M.G., Q.C., B.A., D.C.L. (Hon.), (Leader
of the Opposition); His Honour G. E. SARGEANTI, (Deputy
Speaker); Mr. C. A. E. HOPPIN, J.P., Mr. J. B. SPRINGER;
and Mr. H. B. ST. JOHN, LL.B.

Prayers were read.

Messrs. HINDS and CRAIG entered the Chamber and took
their seats.

MINUTES

Mr. SPEAKER: There are no Minutes available
for confirmation. I express my regret to hon. mem-
bers.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of
the Hon. and Learned Prime Minister, Minister of
Finance and Minister of External Affairs, I beg to
give notice of the following:-

A Resolution to place the sum of $18,448 at the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Esti-
mates 1968-69, Part I Current, as shown in the
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 20whichform
the Schedule to the Resolution.

I also beg to give notice of my intention to move
the House into Committee of Supply at its next sitting
*to deal with this Resolution in all its stages.


Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of the following:

A Bill to amend the Medical Registration Act,
1911.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Mr. SPRINGER: Mr. Speaker, Ibegto give notice
of the following Resolution:-

WHEREAS the establishment of the Community
College is designed to provide further education for
pupils of' secondary school age, including pupils of
the approved independent secondary schools; and

WHEREAS a large section of the secondary
school population already receive tuition at these
schools; and

WHEREAS Government already awards bursa-
ries tenable at these schools;

BE IT RESOLVED that Government substantially
increase the number of these awards as from the
beginning of the school year in September, 1968.

QUESTIONS

Mr. SPEAKER: There are Questions in the name
of the Hon. and Learned member for St. Thomas. Is
any member requesting permission to proceed to
give notice of these Questions?

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Speaker, I am asking leave on
behalf of the hon. senior member for St. Thomas to
give notice of the following Questions:-
To enquire of the appropriate Minister:

1. Is the Minister aware that on the 1stJune,
1968, the VIP room at Seawell Airport was made
available to His Lordship the Bishop of Barbados, but
not to the Senior member for St. Thomas, who was
travelling on the same flight to London, while at Lon-
don Airport the welcoming facilities of the Barbados
High Commission were made available to the senior
member for St. Thomas, but not to His Lordship the
Bishop?


i







1967


2. What is the Government's policy in respect
to the use of (a) the VIP room at Seawell Airport, and
(b) the welcoming facilities afforded by the Barbados
diplomatic mission overseas.

To enquire of the appropriate Minister:

Will the Minister state what rent is paid by West
Indies Hospital Sweepstake Limited for the use of a
booth at Seawell Airport, and when last was this rent
paid?

To enquire of the Minister of Finance:

Will the Minister give figures for the last two
completed financial years of collecting of Inland
Revenue broken down into payments made by Com-
panies, by individuals subject to PAYE deductions,
and by all other individuals and sources of Inland
Revenue?

To enquire of the Minister responsible for
Development:

Will the Minister take steps to have the accounts
of expenditure incurred in respect of the Barbados
contribution to the Barbados-Guyana Pavillion at
Expo '67 published as soon as possible?

To enquire of the appropriate Minister:

1. What is the Government's policy with re-
spect to employment of non-Barbadian nationals in
the High Commission for Barbados in London?

2. Excluding the High Commissioner,how many
non-Barbadian nationals are employed in the High
Commission and in what positions?

3. Is it considered that there are no Barba-
dians resident in the United Kingdom or otherwise
suitable for employment in the positions referredto
in paragraph (ii)?

To enquire of the Minister for ExternalAffairs:

What is the number, if any, of temporary staff
employed in the London High Commission?

2. Is any difficulty being experienced by the
Government in filling the posts referred to in para-
graph (i)?

To enquire of the Minister forExternalAffairs:

1. What rent is paid by the Students' and
Nurses' Department of the High Commission for
Guyana for their use of part of the premises of the
High Commission for Barbados in London?

2. Is the students and Nurses Section of the
High Commission for Guyana using the telephone and
reception facilities of the High Commission for Barba-
dos in London, and if so is any allowance being made
to members of the staff of the Barbados High Com-
mission for any'additional duties thereby involved?


To enquire of the Minister responsible for
Development:

What residential accommodation was rented by
the Government of Barbados and Guyana in connection
with Expo '67 where, for how long; at what rent or
rents; for how long was it occupied; by whom; and
at what dates?
4.55 p.m.

To enquire of the Minister of External Affairs:

Will the Minister make arrangements for a
proper display of the flag of Barbados at the pre-
mises of the High Commission in London, so that
it may be seen from the street in front of the High
Commission?

To enquire of the Minister of Communications
and Works:

1. Is the Minister aware that during the
morning of Monday 28th July, 1968, a guard wall,
the property of the Government, near Bennetts Road,
in the parish of St. Thomas, was demolished follow-
ing a collision involving a motor car and a bicycle?

2. Will the Minister state the names of the
car driver and the bicycle rider respectively?


3.
Courts
cerned


Will the Minister take steps, through the
if necessary, to recover from those con-
the cost of replacing the said guard wall.


To enquire of the Minister of Communications
and Works:

1. Is the Minister aware that since question
No. 143, referring to parking spaces in the Court-
yard of the Law Courts, was asked in the Honourable
House, a number of "No Parking" signs have been
painted in the said courtyard?

2. Were these signs placed there bythe Min-
ister's direction, and if so, why?

To enquire of the Prime Minister:

Will the Prime Minister investigate the cir-
cumstances under which, although no complaint was
received by any memberof the staff of the Department
concerned, on the initiative of the Minister of Com-
munications and Works, the Acting Postmaster Gen-
eral invited certain members of the public to make
complaints against a St, Thomas postman relevant to
the performance of his duties, and pursued this course
of action even after the members of the public con-
cerned had refused to attend the G.P.O. to make any
such complaint?

To enquire of the Minister of Communications
and Works:

Will the Minister take steps to provide shelter
and sanitary facilities for members of the public
waiting for buses at the Princess Alice bus stand?







rl968


:To enquire of the Minister of Community Devel-
opment:

Forwhat reason are members of the public some-
times required to give their names before using
certain sanitary conveniences in Bridgetown and St.
Michael?

BILL READ A FIRST TIME

Hon, C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, I begto move
that a Bill to amend the Medical Registration Act,
1911, be now read a first time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Mr. SPEAKER: The first Orderof the Day stands
in the name of the Hon. Leader of the House:-

To move the House into Committee of Supply to
consider the grant of sums of money forthe service
of the Island.

SHon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that you do now leave the Chair and the House go into
Committee of Supply.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question wzs put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.:

Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into Com-
mittee of Supply, Mr. YEARWOODi in the Chair.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES 1967-68 No. 18

TRAINING DIVISION FURNITURE
& EQUIPMENT

A Resolution for the sum of $990 was called.


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, I think that
the Committee will recall that some little time ago,
the House gave approval to a Civil Establishment
Order, the purpose of which was to provide extra
Staff in the Training Unit. This Resolution now seeks
to provide the furniture for that additional staff,
to wit; Four desks, four swivel chairs, two typist
desks and two typist chairs, for which the sum of
$990 is estimated. I beg to move that this Resolution
do now pass.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE 1968-69 No. 19

MENTAL HOSPITAL


A Resolution for the sum of $10,660 was called.


Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Chairman, in moving
the passing of this Resolution, hon. members will
remember that in the Estimates of Expenditure this
year, 1968-69, provision was made in the sum of
$30,000, under Capital Head 103, Item 4, for the
construction of quarters for the Assistant Medical
Superintendent of the Mental Hospital. This amount
has already been voted. Since then, on the 15th March
this year, the plans in connection with this building
were again examined and the Chief Technical Direc-
tor has advised that the quarters, as designed, could
not be constructed for $30,000. Tenders were ac-
cordingly invited, and the Tenders Committee has
recommended the acceptance of thetender of a cer-
tain firm of architects in the sum of $40,660, which
is the lowest tender that was submitted. Since then,
it was agreed that that tender should be accepted by
the Cabinet. However, in order for the tender to be
accepted, we need a supplementary provision of
$10,660 to enable us to award this contract.

I may mention these facts, thatbetween1965-66
the Public Works Department constructed six quar-
ters in the form of maisonettes for Medical Staff of
the Queen Elizabeth Hospital at a cost of $192,897,
and the average cost of each of these quarters was
therefore $32,150 approximately. It therefore ap-
peared to be reasonable for a detached house with
similar accommodation to be constructed two years
after, and owing to the general increase in wages
and the devaluation of the pound, that that house
would cost at least $7,000 more. The Chief Technical
Director considers the recommended tender as being
a reasonable one, and the Quantity Surveyor attached
to the Ministry of Communications and Works esti-
mated the project at $39,148. It is therefore con-
sidered that the tender for $40,660 is a reasonable
one. All of our advisers have advised us that way,
and we are constructing this house for the Assistant
Medical Superintendent at the Mental Hospital. By
so doing, "Fernihurst", which occupied about five
acres of land could be utilised for other purposes,
whether for housing or otherwise; in fact, "Ferni-
hurst" was originally intended for a Children's Home.
5.05 p.m.

Since then we thought of having the Headquarters
of the Housing Authority removed there and a work-
shop constructed. That matter has not yet been fully
resolved. At present we are looking at "Clarendon",
Black Rock, in the hope of having the Children's
Home constructed there; so that with all of this
criticism, even from people who belong to this Party,
about the children at the Infirmary, I want to say that
since I have been a Minister for the last three
years, or thereabouts, we have actually constructed
or renovated, two homes for children within the last
1 1/2 to 2 years.

Now that, in my opinion, is some sort of achieve-
ment. I am not taking credit for what has been done;
the Government take full credit for it. But for anyone
to sit and say, orto publish, that we are doing nothing
about children and the people's children at the Alms-
house and crying out on their behalf, when two
houses have been constructed, or renovated, for








1969


placing children to live under more amenable and
comfortable conditions,lis not good enough. I referto
Farrs in St. Peter and the St. John's Children Home
at St. John. What is very alarming and disturbing is
that people belonging to your own Party will get up
and criticise the Government of which they are a
part. I have to say that.

We are dealing now with this Children's Home.
It is true that we are asking for money now to con-
struct a house opposite or, more or less, side by
side, the Medical Superintendent's home. We are
thinking of having a house constructed there for his
Assistant, and to utilise the 4 1/2 to 5 acres of land
at "Fernihurst" for housing or some other purpose,
because that land could be more beneficially utilised.
I beg to move that this Resolution do now pass.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Chairman, I understand from
the Minister that they are thinking of constructing
this building on lands presently occupied by the
Medical Superintendent, that is, at a house called
"Rosemonte". Now the Minister ought to have told
us that the Medical Superintendent has taken very
strong objection to Government attempting to, what
he calls, "trespass" (Mr. St. JOHN: Are you
making a joke?) -

Hon. C. E. TALMA: On a point of order, Sir.
Before the hon. member elaborates further, I should
like to point outthat that has been resolved..The sit-
ing of this particular house has been resolved with
the Medical Superintendent, one of the Architects
from the Ministry of Communications and Works and
the Ministry, and I was actually present when it was
resolved. I had a big hand in resolving it. If the hon.
member cares to listen to that, he could probably
save a lot of energy.

Mr. HINDS: All I am saying is that the Medical
Superintendent has objected. The Minister now tells
us that there was something to be resolved, and it
has been resolved. That is all I had to say on the
matter. Now the Minister tells us that this house
is to be constructed forthe Assistant Medical Super-
intendent. How many Assistant Medical Superinten-
dents are there at the Mental Hospital? My informa-
tion is that there are to be two in addition to the
Medical Superintendent. The Minister told us quite
rightly on a previous occasion that the Medical
Superintendent is going on leave. I think he will
leave tomorrow.

The situation at the Mental Hospital is that the
Medical Superintendent will be going away tomorrow
and will not be returning until the 1st December.
During that period Dr. Davies has been recruited as
an Assistant Medical Superintendent; but, while Dr.
Davies is a newcomer, another situation has arisen
at the Mental Hospital. The Senior Assistant Medical
Superintendent has refused to act as Medical Super-
intendent during the absence of the Superintendent
abroad, and we now find that Dr. Davies, who has
now been recruited, is coming in as a newcomer to


be in charge of the Senior Assistant Medical Super-
intendent.

Dr. Davies took up residence in the quarters
formerly occupied by the Chief Male Nurse during
the last month, and some very, very interesting
things have been revealed. It has been discovered now
that the Matron, who is occupying the other flat ad-
joining the one Dr. Davies is occupying, has been
occupying that flat from 1960 or1962. From the time
she has been occupying that flat, she has been having
the services of a domestic servant. She has been
using this flat and having the services of this servant
for merely $20.00 a month. It is stipulated that she
should have been paying $36.00 a month. The situa-
tion that we find at the Mental Hospital now is that
the Matron owes $16.00 per month for a period of
about five or six years.

While Dr. Davies is occupying this other flat,
I wonder whether the Minister would tell us if he
is going to be charged more than the matron was
charged during the 5 year period, or if he will be
allowed to occupy this flat at $20.00 instead of
$36.00 a month?
5.15 p.m.

Now I understand the Minister to say that the
situation has been resolved as regards the siting of
this new building, but has Government been charged
for the drawing of plans for this new building? Is it
not a case where the cost of plan drawing is in the
region of the $10,660 that we are being asked to vote
today? We feel that the Ministerwouldbeglad to ex-
plain to us what is going to be the situation with re-
gard to the services of another Assistant Superinten-
dent during the period as from tomorrow until 1st
December when the Medical Superintendent is due to
return. I feel that the Minister will also be glad to
tell us who is the lucky personwho tendered and how
soon he expects work on this resolved site will
commence.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Chairman, in so far as
the arrangements for carrying on of the Mental
Hospital are concerned, Dr. Davies will be acting
as Medical Superintendent because Dr. Murray-
Ainsley has recently retired I think his contract
is up and he is just holding on to assist us until such
time as the Medical Superintendent returns, It may
well be that he did not want to have the responsibility
but I could not explain that very fully. The arrange-
ment is that Dr. Davies will be acting as Medical
Superintendent in place of Dr. Dacre who is the sub-
stantive holder of the post, and Dr. Murray-Ainsley
as Assistant Medical Superintendent.

In so far as the rates for rental of the flats are
concerned, I am afraid I have very little to do with
that. The Minister of Home Affairs has a Committee
which deals with rental of flats, andIam not a mem-
ber of the Committee; so whether it is $20 or $30 or
whatever it is, I could not answer that just off-hand,
but I will have that looked into. If the wrong rent
was charged for 5 1/2 years, I do not see that the
Government could recover the arrears, difference








1970


of differential. If you have made a mistake, you
should pay for the mistake; but if the rent paid was
$20 for the last five years and they have only now
discovered that it should have been $36 so that the
ne* tenant would be paying $36, the only thing that
could be done is to adjust it so that each would pay
$36 as fronm some time this year. I could not go into
that any more thoroughly.

SThe hon. member asked who was the luckyper-
son who tendered for the contract. Tenders were put
in in the normal way and the lowest tender came from
architect Timothy Walker Construction and is for
$40,660. The question of havingto pay $10,000 for the
plan does not arise. Plans will be drawn by the various
people who tender and that is part and parcel of the
contfrat; you do not have to pay $10,000 extra for the
plan. I gave the reasons for the cost going up from
$30,000 to roughly $40,000. First of all there was
the devaluation of the pound and increase wages owing
to the cost of living. These are the only reasons I
have here.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Chairman, I wonder if the
Minister would explain to us why use has not been
made in a case such as this of the Government
Architect in the Public Works Department for the
preparation of plans and the like so as to reduce the
cost of this.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Chairman, the Minister
of Communications and Works, as far as I know,
prepares the regular sketch plan because there is a
lady there who does the drafting, and she was the
one who was at the site on the day in question and had
the plan. The plan will be prepared by the Ministry
of Communications and they will have to comply with
the specifications of the plan as prepared; so I do
not quite understand what the hon. member is asking.

On the question of giving the work out by tender,
the policy is in certain cases forwork to be given out
by tender to get the work done more quickly and more
expeditiously. If we were trying to get the Public
Works to do it, the hon. member would ask; why not
give it out by contract. Now we are giving it out, he
has asked just the reverse.
Mr. HINDS: On a point of order, Inever queried
the Government's reason forgiving it out on contract.

Mr. CHAIRMAN: The question is .......

Mr. HINDS: I am sorry, Mr. Chairman, I really
rose on a point of order as I thought the Minister had
something more to say on the matter, and that is why
I sat down. I wonder what part the Quantity Surveyor
at the Ministry of Communications and Works played
in this Estimate, because I must tell the Minister that
I know he is being shunned, so to speak, and the reason
why he is being shunned in the Ministry is because
it, has been found that he is too honest a man to be
working with Communications and Works in Barba-
dos.


Hon. C. E. TALMA:Mr. Chairman, I was at
pains to give as much detail as Ihad before me, and
I did actually mention that the Quantity Surveyor at-
tached to the Ministry of Communications andWorks
estimated the project at $39,148. I said all that
already. I am not sheltering. I have stated what the
view, advice and estimate of the Quantity Surveyor is,
and the services of the Quantity Surveyor are being
utilised. He is a new man; so he has to get into various
costings on the Island, and like that his services are
being as fully utilised as possible; but you cannot
bring a new man here and get him doing costings
without knowing local conditions and the cost of local
material and all that.
The question that the Resolution for the sum of $10,660
do now pass was put and resolved in the affirmative without
division.
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, Ibegto move
that Your Honour do not report the passing of three
Resolutions in Committee of Supply.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to secorid that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative,
the Committee dividing as follows:-

5.25 p.m.

AYES: Hon. J. C. TUDOR, Hon. C. E. TALMA,
Hon. N. W. BOXILL. Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, Messrs.
LOWE, SPRINGER, CORBIN, SERGEANT, WEEKS,
HOPPIN and SMITH 11.

NOES: Messrs. HINDS, J. M, 0. M. ADAMSand
CRAIG 3.
The CHAIRMAN reported and Mr. SPEAKER resumed the
Chair and reported accordingly.
Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I am taking objecton
to the Report of the Committee with respect to the
sum of $370,000. On the occasionwhenthe farce was
executed, I was standing on my feet addressing the
Chair in respect of this Resolution. Ithappened, Sir,
that the Leader of the House rose, I was still on my
feet addressing the Chair, and the next thing that I
was to witness whilst addressing the Chair on the
Resolution was that the Chairman of Committees put
the question. I was still on my feet. I did not even
pause as if to give the Chairman to feel in any re-
spect that I had concluded my address. I am to say
that what took place in Committee when the Chairman
of Committees acted in the way he did, drew from this
side of the House asternwarningto the Chair that he
is inviting violence in this Honourable Chamber. I am
repeating it now to you, Sir, that the Chairman acted
in a manner which could not in any way bring credit
to the proceedings of this Honourable House. Would
appreciate much, Mr. Speaker, if you would draw on
the records of the House........

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, on a point 6f
order.








1971


Mr. HINDS: If you would draw on the records
of the House, Sir,........

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member has risen on
a point of order.

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to
draw the attention of the hon. member who has just
sat down and the House to "May's" at page 475, the
seventeenth Edition of "May's" as to when closure
is movable.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. On
a point of order

Mr. YEARWOOD: "At the conclusion of a speech
whilst a member is addressing the House........."

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, is the hon. member
making a speech? I would like Your Honour to rule.

Mr. SMITH: Two hon. members are on their feet.

Mr. SPEAKER: Yes. I think I should get the
situation straight. I announced that the Chairman of
Committees had reported to me the passing of cer-
tain Resolutions in Committee. The situation will be
regularised if a motion were made that these Reso-
lutions be now read a first time and then any hon.
member who is opposing that motion would, in my
view, be entitled to give his reasons for opposing
that motion. The hon; junior member for St. Peter
rose, neither on a motion, nor on a point of order, if
I understood him correctly. The hon. junior member
for St. John has risen and he prefaced his remarks
by saying: "On a point of order". Iwould counsel all
hon. members that, unless and until a motion is made
in respect of these Resolutions, they defer their
reasons for supporting or opposing the passing of
these Resolutions, or the reading of these Resolutions
a first time, until such a motion is made.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that these Resolutions be now read a first time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, acting on Your Hon-
our's advice, as to what time that a motion could be
opposed or ought to be opposed, I now take this
opportunity to oppose the motion with respect to the
Resolution for $370,000.

Mr. SPEAKER: The question that these Reso-
lutions be now read a first time is a collective
motion. The hon. member is entitled to say why he
is not supporting this motion because of his views
about one or other Resolution or because of some-
thing which occurred, without, of course, making a
speech on the subject matter of that which was in
Committee.
5.35 p.m.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday when the
Resolution for $370,000 was being debated in Com-
mittee, I was on my feet addressing the Chair and,


without giving any cause whatsoever for the Chair-
man to feel that I had concluded my address, the
Chairman put the motion while Iwas still on my eet.

Mr. YEARWOOD: On a point of order, Mr.
Speaker. First, it is not true that I thought the
member had concluded his speech. Secondly -
(ASIDES).

Mr. SPEAKER: I agree it would not be a point
of order to make a statement as to fact: contradicting
or affirming. That would not be a point of order.

Mr. YEARWOOD: I have stated, Mr. Speaker, that
a Motion for closure was being made. Rule 32, the
Motion for closure, was being made, anditis backed
by the Seventeenth Edition of May's Parliamentary
practice that the Motion for closure can be made at
the end of a speech. (ASIDES).

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order.

Mr. SPEAKER: Let me hear the point of order
to which the hon. junior member for St. John has
risen.

Mr. YEARWOOD: My point of order, Mr. Speaker,
is that I am citing May's to prove that I was entitled
at page 475, Seventeenth Edition of May's, which
reads as follows:

"Closure may be moved at the conclusion of a
speech, or whilst a Member is addressing the
House".

Mr. HINDS: Can an hon. member refer toMay's
on a point of Order, Sir?

Mr. SPEAKER: Yes, he may refer to May's on
a point of order. I am endeavouringto hear the point
which he is making.

Mr. HINDS: That is a point of information, Sir.
Enquire from him, and I should be gladif you would,
whether it arises out of anything I have said today.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am endeavouring to hear the
point which he is making. As soon as he has com-
pleted his point, which I assume he willdo concisely,
I will be able to rule.

Mr. YEARWOOD: The point, Sir, thatIammak-
ing is that I am referring to the Seventeenth Edition
of May's.

Mr. HINDS: The hon. member says the point of
order he is making -

Mr. SPEAKER: I take it he is referring to a
point of order.

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, this is on page
475: "Closure may be moved at the conclusion of a
speech, orwhilst amemberis addressingthe House".

Mr. HINDS: We were addressing the Committee
and not the House, Sir. That is the trouble with him








1972


in here, Sir. We were addressing the. Committee.
The Chairman of Committees does not understand
what is "House" from what is "Committee". That is
the trouble, Sir.

Mr. SPEAKER: Now let the hon. junior member
for St. Peter continue calmly and dispassionately to
give his reasons for not supporting the Motion.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, you will no doubt
appreciate the difficulties underwhichhon. members
of this House have to labour.

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of
order. I would like to drawthe attention of the House
to Standing Order 35:

"The Speaker in the House orthe Chairman
in Committee shall be responsible for the ob-
servance of the rules of order in the House and
Committee respectively, and his decision upon
any point of order shall not be open to appeal
and shall not be reviewed by the House except
upon a substantive motion."

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, at no stage duringmy
speech did any hon. memberfrom the opposite side -
the Government benches rise on any point of or-
der. There was never a question of point of order,
and the Chairman of Committees is now reading
from May's! (ASIDES).

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order. Is
it in order for any hon. member, even if he happens
to be the Chairman of Committees, to be in effect
censuring you, Sir? That is what the hon. member
is doing. He is reading the Standing Order which, in
effect, tells you what you should do that you should
rule the hon. junior member for St. Peter out of
order. I rise on a point of order, and to suggest, Sir,
that it is not in order foranhon. member to do that.
He just does not understand the Queen's English.
(ASIDES).

Mr. SPEAKER: I see two hon. members ontheir
feet.

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: He has no manners, Mr.
Speaker.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order,
Sir. Is it in orderforamemberwho, obviously, has
no manners to be accusing another member of not
having manners? (ASIDES). He is off again. The
easiest thing in the world is to irritate the hon.
member. Is the hon. member addressing the Chair?
I thought the hon. member was sitting down.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid I may have to stand
again.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order,
Sir. Hon. members on this side of the House let
me say it bluntly I feel that too often, practically
99 times outof 100 the juniormemberfor St. Thomas


sits there and makes a lot of irrelevant and rude re-
marks seated, and the Chair does not correct him.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. junior member for St.
Peter may proceed; but mayI just point out that I am
not concerned with what took place in Committee, or
the debate on the substative matters which were in
Committee. The hon. member may now only address
giving his reason for not supporting, or for opposing,
this Resolution, but in so doing he must not seek to
go into the minutiae and details of the Motion with
which he dealt in the Committee of the whole House.
Let the hon. member continue to give his reasons for
not supporting, or for opposing the Motionthatthese
Resolutions be now read a first time.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Am Ito understandthat
Your Honour is ruling that in the House you cannot
discuss the merits of a Bill or Resolution before the
House. That is only a discussion by a Committee
which makes a Report to the House; itis not binding.
5.45 p.m.

You can discuss the first reading, the second
reading and I have seen the third reading discussed
in this House before, and I suggest to Your Honour
that you do not give a Ruling which gives the impre s-
sion that you cannot begin from the beginning again
in the House of a Committee's report, because it is
only the report of a Committee. I do not know what
the Clerk is telling you; he may be telling you that
the buses are about to leave the stand, but the Clerk
gives the impression sometimes to be givingunsoli-
cited advice to the Chair and that is none of his
function or duty. The Clerk has not got a greater
friend in this House than myself, but there is a stage
which you reach. (Hon. N. W. BOXILL: You like the
Clerk like how a butcher likes a pig.) That pig-like
interruption!

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid all I can hear is
laughter on both sides.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: There is always apig-
like grunt coming from the hon. junior member for
St. Thomas, and he does not seem to realise that we
look upon it just as a pig-like grunt, the sort of thing
you would expect of a pig. No manners.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, are you afraid to call
on the hon. junior member for St. Thomas to shut up
in here?
Mr. SPEAKER: I think the hon. junior member
for St. Peter has interrupted the Hon. and Learned
Leader of the Opposition.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I am always willing to
give way to any hon. member on this side of the
House, but those of us on this side of the House
strongly object, not to an occasional remark across
the House, because that happens in every Parliament,
but to the constant, unmannerly pig-like interruptions
by the hon. junior member for St. Thomas. What would
be all right in the gully in St. Thomas is not all right
in the House of Assembly.








1973


Mr. SPEAKER: Will the Hon. Leader of the
Opposition conclude his point of order?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Iwill conclude my point
of order by saying this: I am hoping that the Chair
will call on the hon. member forSt. Thomas when he
makes these crude interruptions.(Hon. N. W. BOXILL:
Is that a point of order?) It is a point of order that
members who are sitting while somebody else is
speaking must behave in an orderly way. The Chair-
man of Committees can tell you what Standing Order
that is, because he seems to have learnt all these
things by number.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, before I continue to
state my reasons for objecting, I would like to be
guided by Your Honour since I understood Your Hon-
our to say that I could not go into the details of this
Report although we are now before the House and not
before the Committee as such.

Mr. SPEAKER: What I have advised the hon.
member is that this is not the occasion or the oppor-
tunity for making the speech on the substantive matter
which was in Committee. On that occasion the motion
which presumably would have been put was that a
particular Resolution in Committee of Supply pass.
That would have been debated and a resultwould have
been arrived at. We are now in the House to decide
whether these Resolutions which were passed in
Committee should be agreed to by this House, and
therefore it is my view and it is my Ruling that
discussion may take place on the reason for support-
ing or opposing the passing of the motion that these
Resolutions be now read a first time.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order, the
only restraint or anything that comes before the House
of Assembly, House of Commons or any House in this
World is the House itself. Work is so numerous that
you have to appoint Select Committees for this, that
or the other thing or even a Committee of the whole
House. The matter is sent to a Committee of the
whole House for discussion; they discuss it andthey
pass the Resolution and report to the House: "These
are our feelings", but it is only a Committee report-
ing. It is for the House to debate. We accept the
Report or we say' "We do not accept it for this
reason" or "We accept it for this reason". It is for
the House to begin from the beginning and debate the
merits of why they accept or why they do not accept
the report of the Committee. I therefore suggest in
all humility even, Mr. Speaker, that your Ruling
should not give the impression that hon. members
cannot say the Committee was wrong. That is done
over and over again. It happens very seldom because
in a Committee of the whole House itis threshed out
and members express their points of view, and there
is no necessity for them to express it over and over
again; but on a particular occasion like this where
the hon. member is explaining why he is raising it
again in the House, then I suggest with the greatest
humility and the greatest respect to the Chair that
no impression should be given to the House that they
are not entitled to debate it as if it never went to the
Committee at all. That is the only parliamentary


procedure. Apparently the Clerk of the House will
advise Your Honour that that is correct.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am always opento advice from
any source which I respect, but I was merely en-
quiring as to the latest note which appeared on the
official record. I am afraid I cannot see so far. I
note the point which the Hon. Leader of the Opposi-
tion has made and I appreciate the manner in which
he made it. I am afraid that I beg to differ. I would
not have to remind the hon. member that we are
trying in our Committee to revise the Standing
Orders to bring them up to date having regard to
present conditions, but that Committee is moving
in very heavy waters.

I will ask all hon. members other than the hon.
member addressing the Chair to observe the appro-
priate Standing Order in respect of members not
speaking. I remind hon. members on both sides of
that. Let us proceed with the business of this meet-
ing.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on that memorable
occasion, a very significant point had been reached,
in that debate in that I had not been repeating myself
at any time throughout the debate, because had I been
doing that, I am sure the Chairman would have been
more anxious to draw it to my attention that I was
doing so; by his attitude, expressed and implied,
towards me, I am confident that he would have invoked
Standing Orders that did not exist.
5.55 p.m.

Mr. SPEAKER: I must ask the hon. membernot
to say of another hon. member of this House and a
member who holds the office of Chairman of Com-
mittees, that he would invoke Standing Orders that
did not exist. That would appear to question either
the efficiency or even perhaps the integrity of the
hon. member. I will ask the hon. member to with-
draw that and to proceed.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, if I am called upon to
withdraw that, I will withdraw it; but, Mr. Speaker,
the Chairman of Committees has sat in that Chair
and made reference to Standing Orders which never
existed in the Rules of this Honourable House. The
debates ought to be there to prove that. He has called
upon hon. members to obey Standing Orders which
did not form any part of the Standing Orders. If you
ask me to withdraw that now, I will do it again, Sir.
There is he, Mr. Speaker; he refers to Rule 29 this
and Rule 29 that, which do not exist; he refers to Rule
26 this and Rule 26 that which do not exist. If, in the
face of that, when I can bring all hon. members from
this side of the House to prove what I have said and I
am still to withdraw it, I will withdraw it again. Sir,
you just do not know the Chairman, the instrument
you have there as Chairman of Committees.

In my debate, I had reached a very significant
point in that I had broken completely new ground. I
went on to say further that the mover of the Resolu-
tion was completely shaken when I made the point.
It was this, that a new Technical Institute was the








1974


plan which the Government had inmind and, Sir, that
an application for a capital grant had been made to
the Ministry of Overseas Development to assistwith
the project. That is what caused all the confusion in
here.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member has made that
point and I allowed him the latitude so to do. He has
now made it, but I am asking him to bear in mind my
Ruling, which, of course, may be questioned substan-
tively otherwise on another occasion, that in opposing
the motion that these Resolutions,be now read a first
time, he cannot go back, so to speak, into the subject
matter of the detailed discussion in Committee.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, on point
of order. The hon. member, the Chairman of Com-
mittees, purported to read from "May's".
Mr. SPEAKER: I ask the hon. member not to
refer .......
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I do not rememberwhat
he represents.
Mr. SPEAKER: I understand, any member may
forget at times.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I do not rememberwhat
parish he represents, if he represents any parish.
Mr. SPEAKER: If he does not represent a parish,
he can only represent the City of Bridgetown.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I do not rememberwhat
parish, he can only represent the City of Bridgetown.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The hon. member, the
Chairman of Committees this is not pretence; I
just do not remember. It is not of sufficient impor-
tance for me to remember, but I understand that he
represents some parish. (A MEMBER: St. John) He
is the junior member for St. John. However, Sir, he
has referred to "May's". Nothing could be more em-
phatic than what "May's" set out. I am sorry, Sir,
I have not got my glasses, and I am afraid that in
this light .... (Laughter). I said that hoping that the
Hon. Leader of the House wouldmake one of his stu-
pid cachinnations, that is the sort of word which
he would use, laughing at nothing. "The various
Stages through which a Bill progresses (normally,
but not necessarily, on separate days) are intended
by the practice of Parliament to provide so many
opportunities not only for consideration but also for
re-consideration." This is the chapter dealing with
when a Bill comes back from the Committee to the
House. "Such stages may be taken to include the
stages of any necessary financial Resolution. Thus,
an entire Bill may be regarded as one question which
is not settled until it is passed. Andhence no objec-
tion can be taken to an amendment on any particular
stage on the ground that it raises again a question
decided on at an earlier stage. Upon this principle it
is laid down by Hatsell and is constantly exemplified
that in every stage of a Bill every part of the Bill,
is open to amendment, either for insertion or omis-
sion, whether the same amendment has been in a
former stage, accepted or objected." And it goes on
to exemplify that by saying: "What has been rejected
in Committee can be accepted in the House.


Do you tell me, Mr. Speaker, with that facing
you, that the hon. member is to be stopped from doing
what he is doing? I have seen Committee mentioned
lower down in what I have been reading. Even at the
third stage I have seen it in this House on the
third reading, members speak and move that a Bill
be rejected or that there be an amendment in it. As
Your Honour has ruled, I have somewhere here the
ruling which you gave, when the Standing Orders are
silent, you go by the Parliamentary Procedure as
laid down in "May's". "Upon this principle it is laid
down", and so on, as I have just said. "Similarly
an amendment may be proposed to a Bill although it
has been rejected when moved to a Resolution of a
Committee of the whole House necessary for the
progress of the Bill. The same Clauses or Amend-
ments may be decided inone mannerbythe Commit-
tee,in a second by the House on the Report", and so
on. In short, the Committee only reports to the House
and it is for the House to discuss the report of the
Committee, agree to it or make an amendment or
reject it.

They are only suggestions by the Committee of
the House. Faced with that, I suggest, withgreat re-
spect, that Your Honour does not stop the hon. mem-
ber from moving the rejection of anything that has
been passed by the Committee. If we want to main-
tain I' use Your Honour's words, as reported in the
Press at any rate the dignity of the Assembly, we
must not depart from the practice which should
operate in the Assembly.

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Speaker ........

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. junior member for St.
Peter was addressing the Chair.

Mr. HINDS: Yes, Sir. I understand Your Honour
to rule that I cannot go into detail on this Resolution
and that, apparently, I did so when I made mention of
this $100,000 for the new Technical Institute; but I
could hardly have tried in any better way to bring Your
Honour to the point at which this tragedy occurred. I
say that because, as I said, it was completely new
ground that I had broken in the debate.
6.05 p.m.

That is my reasonfornot supporting this Resolu-
tion.
The question that the Resolution be now read a first
time was put and resolved in the affirmative without division.
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that these Resolutions be now read a second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I object
to these Resolutions being read a second time. The
points that have been made when the Resolutions were
in Committee, as the hon. junior member for St.
Peter has pointed out points have been made by
him, some of which I am afraid, like most of what I







1975
. ,.


saidwere not listened to let alone considered by the
members of the Government. But we on this side have
to object to certain things as regards the passing of
this particular Resolution whenwe find, forinstance,
the point made by the hon. member and only by the
hon. member about the institution of a Technical In-
stitute and the making of a Technical Institute at the
same time as you are voting this money for a Com-
munity Collegewith purports, to judge from the words
of the Leader of the House, to do exactly what a
Technical Institute is supposed to do.

I'want to make this point above all things. I want
to issue a warning to the public towatch out and see
how almost impossible it is to believe that this is not
a device to get rid of Sixth Forms.I am told and I
wish the Hon. Leader of the House would contradict
it in view of what he has said before about abolishing
Sixth Forms that already the Minister of Education
has issued an edict that pupils of schools that do not
have provision for Sixth Form cannot get into a School
with a Sixth Form. In short, pupils in a private school,
let us say, that has no provision for Sikth Form teach-
ing, who make application to get into Harrison College
or Lodge School and the Lodge School has room
even if Harrison College has not got are not to be
accepted. Now that is a lat contradiction. I hope the
Leader of the House would not get annoyed if I got
on a public platform and said bluntly and plainly that
what he said about the Minister of Education having
no intention to abolish Sixth Form is utterly untrue.
(Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Why do you not sit down?)

Mr. SPEAKER: I will remind hon. members on
both sides because it happens on both sides from
time to time of the behaviour of hon. members
when not speaking.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The Hon. Leader of
the House ought to thank me for not going to the
extreme that I have occasionally been forced to go
as regards his veracity. I will merely -

Mr. SPEAKER: That does not -

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, let the hon.
member got to any extreme he likes. Who the devil
he thinks he is?

Mr. SPEAKER: No, no, no.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: That is an offensive
remark, and I ask Your Honour to cause the hon.
member to withdraw it.

Mr. SPEAKER: I will ask neither hon. member
to withdraw what either has said either about "the
veracity", or "who the devil someone thinks he is?"
I will ask neither hon. member to withdraw.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: When Your Honour does
that, Your Honour gives the impression an im-
pression that I have endeavoured not to show on the
floor of the House though I will show it outside. Why
has Your Honour got to tell me all I have said is


"question the veracity". I have said here up to last
Tuesday that I would not believe the Hon. Leader of
the House. In a witness-box I would not believe him.
I have never been asked to withdraw that. I have said
it at least sixtimes onthe floor of this House. I would
not believe him on oath. I have never been asked to
withdraw that, and merely because I say "question
the veracity" maybe Ihave done wrong to use the
language he would use. He does not use simple Eng-
lish when he could use a big word, and maybe my
saying "veracity" I should withdraw the word
"veracity" and say "truth".

Mr. SPEAKER: I make the distinction between
the case of an hon. member saying he would not
believe another hon. member, because it is matter
for the first hon. member whether that hon. member
regards himself as a doubting Thomas; but when an
hon. member speaks of the veracity of another hon.
member, then he is going very close to the border-
line. I say I am not calling on either hon. member
to withdraw, at this stage, either remark which has
been made, but I trust the debate will continue.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I am sorry I misunder-
stood Your Honour. I thought Your Honourwas call-
ing on me to withdraw.

Mr. SPEAKER: No, no, no. (ASIDES) Hon. mem-
bers who are not speaking, please do not speak, or be
inaudible.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: If Your Honour would
come down solidly on members on the Government
side who break the Standing Orders, then no Standing
Ordes would ever be broken. I mean that, and I am
going to emphasise it.

Mr. SPEAKER: Will the Hon. Leaderof the Oppo-
sition continue to give his reasons for opposing the
Motion that these Resolutions be now read a second
time?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Iwas sayingiMr. Speak-
er, that it was pointed out by the junior member
for St. Peter that the statements made and reasons
given for having a Community College conflicted
with the actions of the Government when they let it
be known that they are starting an Evening Institute
to do the same thing that the Community College
should be doing. I also added Technical Institute -
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Onapointoforder. The hon.
member does not know what he is saying. Who is
starting an Evening Institute anywhere?
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I corrected by saying
"Technical Institute". It is soeasytogetthe Leader
of. the House irritated, and one understands his posi-
tion. As Minister of Edcuation it never occurred to
him, and now he has the unpleasant duty of pushing up
somebody else's baby. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Youdo not
know what you are saying.) I do not know what I am
saying when I say "pushing up somebody else's
baby". As I understand it, the hon. member could
never produce a baby.







1976


Mr. SPEAKER: I will ask hon. members andthe
hon. member who has just spoken to avoid any un-
becoming, even if not strictly, unparliamentary lan-
guage in the interest of equanimity of the meeting.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I will be
only too glad to oblige you, but I am not aware, so
far, that I have used anyunbecoming language. I said
the Hon. ex-Minister of Education has to take charge
of the baby of the present MinisterofEducation, and
present it to the House as something to be accepted.
I did not imagine that the Hon. Ex-Ministerof Educa-
tion could produce a baby himself That is all I said.
(ASIDES.) Is the hon. member telling us that a male
person can produce a baby?

Mr. SPEAKER: Well, I am afraid that we are
not even now, as in myview,revertingto the subject
matter of what, presumably, was in Committee of the
whole House, because we are now dealing withother
matters.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: If I may say so with
great respect, Your Honour seems to be falling into
the same error that the Chairman of Committees falls
into so often:interruptinghon. members. Your Honour
has been to the House of Commons.
6.15 p.m.

Mr. SPEAKER: I will make this observation.
The Chair does not, in fact, it cannot interrupt. It
may interpose or it may intervene, and maybe, Mr.
Speaker of the House of Commons does not have
situations such as the Speaker of this House has to
cope with. Let the hon. member proceed.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Ihave seennear"come
to blows" in the House of Commons; but that is by the
way.

Mr. SPEAKER: Near "come to blows" might
be indications of violence.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Well, last Tuesday
there would have been if the House had not been
adjourned.

Mr. SPEAKER: Let us proceed now in the at-
mosphere in which we concluded last Tuesday.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The Hon. Leader of
the House ought to be glad that I have been, since I
returned to the House, in a mood of wanting to see
co-operation rather than the reverse. (Hon. J. C.
TUDOR: It is a pity you do.)

Mr. SPEAKER: Hon. members who are not
speaking, please be inaudible; and what I have just
said applies to both sides.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: It is the easiest thing in
the world to get the Leader of the House irritated.
His colleague on his left cannot be irritated because
he is sub-human, is that an offensive werd? too
stupid to understand what he is doing or what Ruling
he gives.


Mr. SPEAKER: Let the hon. member proceed
instead of referring to personalities.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I am proceeding, Sir.
When the hon. member for St. John gets there and
laughs, presumably at something I am saying, which
is ridiculous, I have to comment on the fact that he
just does not know the ordinary English language and
just does not understand the Standing Orders he reads.
That is the sort of thing that goes on all the time.

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of
order, the hon. junior member for St. Joseph has
referred to me, but all I want to say is that I am not
yet doting; I am not yet bewitched.

Mr. SPEAKER: That is not a point of order. Let
the hon. member proceed.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The hon. members says
he is not yet bewitched. He has not got cause to be-
come bewitched. He was born bewitched.
Mr. SPEAKER: That does not arise. Willthe hon.
Leader of the Opposition proceed withhis speech and
give his reasons for not supporting this motion?

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of
order, I understand the hon. junior member for St.
Joseph to say that I was born bewitched. I object to
that and I am asking him to withdraw it.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, Iwith-
draw it because it is not that I intended it; it is a
reflection on his parents.

Mr. SPEAKER: Has the Hon. Leader of the
Opposition withdrawn the words to which exception
has been taken?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Whevever any hon.
member objects to any word I have used, I will with-
draw it as long as the Chair asks me to withdraw
it.

Mr. SPEAKER: In this particular case the hon.
member has withdrawn that and I would ask ......

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, I am also taking
objection to the statement that it was a reflection on
my parents, and I am also asking him to withdraw that.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, some of
us are born wise, some of us acquire wisdom and
some of us remain fools all our lives. The hon.
member may choose.

Mr. SPEAKER: Behaviour of hon, members on
both sides of the House when not speaking. I do not
regard the last remark to which exception has been
taken as unparliamentary, but I regard it as in bad
taste and I trust that no similar remarks will be
made, and that we will proceed with the people's
business.

Sir GRANTLEY -ADAMS: All I said was that I
withdrew it out of respect for his parents, because it











would look as if his parents had produced a bewitched
child.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member having with-
drawn it, will the hon. member proceed? The beha-
viour of members not speaking.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I do not know if the hon.
member objects to my last remark because it is ob-
vious that that is of general application. Some of us
are born wise, some of us achieve wisdom, and some
of us never get wise but remain fools all our lives.
That is a general application but I do not want to
pursue it. It shows what the House has degenerated
to have a Chairman of Committees like the hon.
junior member for St. John who does not understand
simple English. Charge me with immodesty if you
like, but don't you think it is insulting to me with my
Parliamentary experience to be corrected by the hon.
junior member for St. John? It is an insult every
time the hon. member tells me I am doing something
wrong. It is like the average Barbadian who has
never gone abroad or learnt anything correcting a
Professor of French in a University of Paris, telling
him his French is wrong.

Mr. Speaker, I think the University of Paris is
rather far from the Resolution about the Community
College.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I was saying, Mr.
Speaker, that the hon. Leader of the House did not
hear correctly what I said about the Evening Insti-
tute. I said "Technical Institute". After all practi-
cally every school boy in this Island who has been
thinking is talking about this Community College and
of the implications of it. I merely make the point that
we have got to remember what is saidon the floor of
this House and look out to see whether in effect pro-
mises made here are going to be really carried out,
or whether it is not as the junior member for St.
Peter said in Committee, a child of the present Min-
ister of Education which he has forced on his col-
leagues in Cabinet and which for one reason or
another the Prime Minister has accepted, and which
has not the ghost of a chance of eventual success. Of
course everybody realises that it is only the use of the
majority vote by the Government that this has got
through.

If the hon. member would interrupt with louder
voice, I might be able to reply to him, but I did not
hear what he said. I do not know whether I should
really warn him not to lose his temper, so easily.
Some times we cause him to lose his temper just to
see him lose it. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Not to see me
lose it because I did not curse my mother when she
was dying).

I have already reminded hon. members that I
have made notes both on the first Tuesday and the
last Tuesday which I shall not repeat again. The Hon.
Leader of the House is very ingenious in making
statements which are not a specific "yes" or"no" so
that he can defend himself if things go this way or
that way; but what he did say was that at no time has


1977
-i-i--


the Minister of Education said he is going to abolish
Sixth Forms. When the bon. member says that, he
means no time in public, but that is not the same thing
as saying that he has no intention of abolishing Sixth
Forms, because he has. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: He has
.never said that he would). Exactly He has never said
that he would because he does not want to be pinned
down to a statement he made by beingtold afterwards
that he said on such-and-such a day inJanuary, 1968
such-and-such a thing, and now look what he is
doing
6.25 p.m.

He has already begun by refusing to allow a
private school to send pupils to a Sixth Form which
exists now the Lodge School. What is that but be-
ginning to abolish Sixth Forms? There is room for
Sixth Form pupils. What has happened with the girls
even at St. Michael's Girls' School well, they have
started at Queen's College. The girls there are going
to Harrison College because it has a Sixth Form, but
he is stopping that already, forprivate schoolpupils.
If that is not the beginning of the abolition of Sixth
Forms, I would like to know what is. I remind hon.
members that they can throw bricks at whichever
colleague they choose to pick out, but I am reminding
hon. members that Barbados is a small place and
there is no such thing as a Cabinet secret. (Hon. J. C.
TUDOR: You ought to be ashamed to say that because
you were the Head of a Cabinet).

Mr. SPEAKER: The behaviour of hon. members
when not speaking. Hon. members when not speaking
please speak inaudibly.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I have never, in all my
Parliamentary life in this House, heard it said that
when the Labour Government was in power, any of
the secrets of what you could call the Cabinet, although
it did not have the formal position of a Cabinet, ever
leaked out. I have never heard it said: "Watch out
for Mr. So-and-so, Mr. "A", Mr. "B" orMr. "C";
he tells secrets out". I have never heard that; so
when the hon. member said that I should be ashamed
.......... (ASIDES).

Mr. SPEAKER: The behaviour of hon. members...

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS:The behaviour of the Hon.
Leader of the House is past forgiveness,although Mr.
Speaker seems to be willing to forgive him. It is dif-
ficult, Sir. I am not criticising Your Honour.
Mr. SPEAKER: There is not one of the 21 mem-
bers of this House whom I have not forgiven. I do not
include Mr. Deputy Speaker or the Chairman of
Committees
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I am not
criticising Your Honour. It is most difficult to keep
the hon. member in order. You only have to irritate
him a little bit, and off he goes.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that the question be now put.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.







1978


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Ohl We will see. Ihave
not got to that stage yet, but doubtless his colleagues
on his left will remind him of the Standing Order
which says that if it is an abuse of the Rules of the
House or an infringement of the rights of the minority;
because he gets annoyed and he is angry just now
he almost began to pull off his jacket because he
gets angry you must not let the Opposition talk. What
is he? Hitler? (Mr. St. JOHN: I want to speak).
How long have we been discussing this in the House?
It is not as if points have been repeated and repeated.
This is nothing but a dictatorial method of trying to
shut the mouths of the Opposition. And he is the
Leader of the House, the Leader of a democratic
Assembly!

Mr. SPEAKER: I will say this in respect of
Rule 32 Closure of Debate. It is in order for an
hon. member when another hon. member is on
his feet, to move that the question be now put.
It is for the Chair to decide whether the putting
of the motion, that is, at the particular time,
is an abuse of the Rules of the House or an infringe-
ment of the rights of the minority. I do not rule that
the motion as now put is an abuse of the Rules of the
House, but in view of the fact that I had an intimation
that the hon. senior member for Christ Church is
seeking to speak on this motionthat these Resolutions
be now read a second time, I do not want there to be
even any apparent infringement of the rights of the
minority. That is in view of the intimation which I
have received.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, we thank
you for that intimation, but I will also add that it is
not because one member of the Opposition has said
that he would like to speak, that you have ruled. It is
either an attempt to shut the mouths of the Opposition,
and other members beside the hon. senior member
for Christ Church might want to speak. If this is not
a blatant case where anger has caused the Hon.
Leader of the House to try to keep the mouths of the
Opposition shut when the hon. member realises that
we have been doing our best in spite of the laughter
which may arise, to co-operate with the Government
- but the hon. member after all of these years does
not know me (Hon.J. C. TUDOR: Know you?) (ASIDES.)
If the hon. member knew me, he would know that the
alternative to my attitude in the House of Assembly
would be to get at every street corner and tell the
public of Barbados who the Leader of the House is,
and what his activities are, his disposition and his
outlook on life. Do you want me to say more?

Mr. SPEAKER: Will the hon. member proceed
to give his reasons for not supporting the motion?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Here am I doing my
utmost. I have seen the hon. member treated in the
same way as if he were not the Leader of the House.
and then he talks about non-cooperation! It is not
true of some other hon. member that, I almost said
"bird", but that would be uncomplimentary. He is
more four-footed thantwo-footed. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR:
Why does he say that?) (ASIDES) Why does the hon.
member interrupt? I am not even referring to him


now. I am not interfering with him now. Just now I
could have mentioned his proclivities if I wanted to
interfere with him.

Mr. SPEAKER:ILet the Hon. Leader of the House
observe Standing Order in relation to members not
speaking, and let the Hon4 Leader of the Opposition.
proceed with his substantive speech irrespective of
personalities.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I thank you very much,
Sir. (ASIDES) I wish that the Hon. Leader of the
House would not interrupt me, because he maytempt
me to do what Heaven knows I might regret doing.
(Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Do it.)

Mr. SPEAKER: Will the Hon. Leader of the
Opposition proceed? (ASIDES.)

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I believe that that ex-
pression is often used by the hon. member in other
circumstances: "Do, let's do". I wish that the hon.
member would not interrupt me any more.

Mr. SPEAKER: May I remind hon. members
now on that side of the House of the behaviour of hon.
members not speaking? It makes it difficult forme to
hear the Hon. Leader of the Opposition.
Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, this is
the last point andlwilldealwith it shortly because
I dealt with it at great length in Committee, but I
must make it in the House; it is to deplore the fact
that a public advertisement was made of the proposed
staff and their emoluments before coming to the House.
I make it again because nothing in this world, abso-
lutely nothing in this world connected with a Parlia-
ment, connected with a democratic Parliament,
could be worse than that, that in gifts of money the
House of Assembly should be the last persons to hear
of what the Government proposes to spend. It is doubt-
ful, I have not given enough considerationofthe mat-
ter, although off-hand I would say that the act does
not go so far as being unconstitutional, but is certain-
ly a complete denial, a completely contemptuous
treatment of the House of Assembly, that the Govern-
ment is issuing a statement to the public of sums
of money which they will pay out before the House
of Assembly has a chance of sayingwhetherthey will
agree to those sums or not.
6.35 p.m.
The House wvas never given an opportunity of
saying: "You are paying, say $1,500 to a cleaner or
a gardener; why not make it $1,450?" The House
was not given an opportunity to say: "We do not agree
ito that particular sum, and we want to reduce it by
$50 or 54". There was absolute contempt of the
House, and that comes as near as possible to being
unconstitutional inasmuch as I modify those last
'words, because something against the Constitution
has to be against the Constitution. It means it is
utterly contemptuous of the House to say: "You
have to.grant money, Ibut we will tell the public be-
forehand what we, having the majority vote, are going
ito pay, no matter what the Opposition say".








1979


If we go down the slippery path of neglecting the
rights of the Opposition, or the rights of the House
as a whole some back bencher on the other side
may not agree; he is not boundbya Cabinet decision.
Back Benchers in all Parliaments sometimes vote
with the Opposition because they conscientiously do
not agree with something sent down by the Govern-
ment. But the House as a whole are to be ignored;
"it is immaterial what views you have; this is what
we are paying people, whatever you may say".
'Let us have an end of this. Let us put an end to this
slippery drift down to totalitarianism. There is
plenty of it already existing plenty of a pig-like
opposition to anything that other people may feel or
do which is not liked by a particular member.

Mr. Speaker, I have said enough, and I only re-
mind hon. members of what was said by the junior
member for St. Peter when this matter was in Com-
mittee, and what others of us on this side of the House
have said. This side of the House is opposed to the
passing of this particular Resolution as it is.

Mr. St. JOHN: Mr. Speaker, I am now in a posi-
tion where, unless I hear certain explanations from the
other side, I cannot give support to this Resolution
since it contains provisions for the establishment of
and the provision of money for the Community
College, which has now turned out to be an Institute
of a totally different conception from the impression
given to us by the Hon. Leader of the House.

Mr. Speaker, the hon. junior member for St.
Peter has asked in Committee stage, and we have
had no explanations, whether it is not afact that it is
proposed by the Government to build anew Technical
Institute, or whether they have applied to the Ministry
of Overseas Development for a sum of $100,000, and
what would be the relationship between that body and
the Community College. What is more, we have in-
formation at our disposal that a Report on Technical
Education and Technology, a subject which, it is pro-
posed, will be taught at Community College there
has been a Report by a man calledMr. J. Gailer, and
neither the previous Minister of Education, nor this
Minister of Education has seen fit to publish his
recommendations. I.go further and state that none
of his recommendations has been implemented; so
it is not surprising to us on this side of the House
that the Hon. Leader of the House, since this disclo-
sure by the junior member for St. Peter, has shown
as much nervousness as a temperamental racehorse.

We go further, Sir. It is obvious that the Com-
munity College, the money for which we are dealing
with, is intended to replace, at nearly date, Depart-
ments which are now carried on by other schools in
this country for whom this Legislature votes money.
Whatever the hon. Chairman of Committees may say,
he, although legally speaking, in his capacity as a
member of the Governing Body of the Lodge School,
and Your Honour, too, in your capacity as a member
of the Governing Body of the Lodge School, will now
be subject to directives from the Minister of
Education.


Now, that is legal nonsense. The constitution of
a Governing Body of a Secondary Aided School in
Barbados is not the same thing as aStatutory Board.
The Minister cannot give them directives. All the
Ministers can do is to say: "If you do not comply
with our policy, we will revoke the grant". The
money will already be voted by this House, and the
Ministers cannot divert it to other purposes.

This is an important point, andIwishthe Leader
of the House will say something on it. You come
here and say these are the aims and objects of this
Institution. It is a new Institution. We ask for you
$365,000. Surely, in seeking to enlist the support of
members on this side, we are entitled to the honest,
upright presentation as to what are the true aims
and objectives of the Government in relation to it.
Surely, in our duty to the taxpayers, we would want
to know that we are not voting $370,000 for an Insti-
tution which, although it has Technology, is going to
replace the Technical Institute. Is is going to do that?
What about the Trade Schools that you were talking
about? At the same time they are going to beg the
British Ministry of Overseas Development for
$100,000 to build a new Technical Institutel

This year, Sir, 500 boys sat an examination to
get 100 places at the Technical Institute, in this
country where there is a great need for people in
Technical Fields of education. Why do not they tell
us what happened to the Gailer Report? Why do not
they come here and tell us what is the relationship
between the Technology Division and (ASIDES).

Sir, this is a very serious matter. The people
in this country have been accustomed to exercising
a certain freedom of choice within the Regulations
that have been made to ensure equality and opportu-
nity, and to ensure that people get places according
to their merit, They have a certain freedom of
choice as to which school they should go to.

If the Minister wants to assume directional
powers, we have to see in here that, before he can
carry out these directional powers, he comes here
and gets the necessary legislative power.
6.45 p.m.

He has no authority at all to tell any Governing
Body not to take a pupil from any school, and I
challenge any member on the other side to get up
here and say what is the legislative authority for any
Minister of Education to say that the Governing
Body of Foundation School, Harrison College or any
of the schools must not take a pupil from another
school, He is trying to fool people and masquerade
as having all these powers, and Parliament has
voted money for these schools and the Accountant
General has got to pay it out on a requisition. The
Minister cannot stop it; so do not let him go around
here saying that he is directing people that they must
not take them.

The other point, Sir, is that when one looks at
this money, another serious problem has arisen. It








1980


is cutting across all concepts of planning in this
country. Do you know, Mr. Speaker, that if I am a
pupil of Foundation School and I finishmyG.C.E. and
want to go to Lodge School because I live in St.
Philip, the Minister wants to say I cannot go to Lodge
School although it may be next doorto me, but I must
come down to the Community College? I know that the
Chairman of Committees does not agree with that.
We have had nothing here but an attempt to present
this Resolution, and aims and objects before the
House in one manner, and the Government is speak-
ing in two or three voices on this. The Leader of
the House is telling us one thing here, and the Minis-
ter of Education is telling us something different
outside through the Press. Of course, Sir, wehad an
instance earlier today when we had one Minister
having to complain about being stabbed in the back by
another Party member of another Place. It seems to
me a characteristic of people inthe Other Place who
did not face the electorate like me or you to stab
other people in the back. That is the Government we
have. I cannot vote for this because I know we have
not been told the truth in this matter. Only time will
show us the truth, and when we find out the truth and
see whether it accords with our concept, thenwe will
vote for it.


The question that the Resolution be now read a second
time was put and resolved in the affirmative, the House divid-
ing as follows:-

AYES: Mr. YEARWOOD, Hon. J. C. TUDOR, Hon.
G. G. FERGUSSON, Hon. N. W. BOXILL, Mr. LOWE,
Mr. CORBIN, Mr. SPRINGER, Mr. SERGEANT, Mr.
WEEKS and Mr. HOPPIN 10.

NOES: Mr. LYNCH, Mr. ST. JOHN, Mr. HINDS,
Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS, Mr. CRAIG and Sir
GRANTLEY ADAMS 6.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this Resolution be now agreed to.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative,
the House dividing as follows:-

AYES: Mr. YEARWOOD, Hon. J. C. TUDOR,
Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, Hon. N. W. BOXILL, Mr.
LOWE, Mr. CORBIN, Mr. SPRINGER,Mr. WEEKS,
Mr. SERGEANT and Mr. HOPPIN 10.

NOES. Mr. LYNCH, Mr. ST. JOHN, Mr. HINDS,
Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS, Mr. CRAIG and Sir
GRANTLEY ADAMS 6.

ADJOURNMENT

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, this concludes
Government Business for today's sitting.


I beg to move that this House do now adjourn
until Tuesday next ........


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On point of order, the
Order Paper is there.

Mr. SPEAKER: In what Order does the Leader
of the House want Government Business?

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I am say-
ing that the Order Pap.r is there, and we can go on
with Private Members' Business.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Oh nonsense


Mr. SPEAKER: Please.The Standing Orders have
not been suspended, andwe approach not the bewitch-
ing, but the witching hour of 7 O'clock.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this House do now adjourn until Tuesday, 13th
August, 1968, at 12 noon.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: I beg to second-hat.


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On the motion for the
adjournment, I am pointing out that this attitude of
the Government of treating the Opposition as if they
do not exist is completely and utterly wrong. I hope
no hon. member on the other side gets up and says
I am out of order in speaking on the motion for the
adjournment. They will learn in time if the way, the
truth and the right path is pointed out to some of
them. If we have an opportunity of getting rid of some
of the business of the House at a comparatively
early hour, what is to prevent the Leader of the
House from moving the suspension of such-and-such
an Order to go on with Private Members' Business?
None of us on this side could possibly object to that
because it is in our favour to go on with Private
Members' Business; but if you use the weight of
numbers, the weight of numbers is going to kill you
eventually. I do not mind these things happening. I am
writing them down and totalling them up. When the
public of Barbados realises the sort of Government
that takes place in this Island, our task in the next
election will be an easy one.


Mr. Speaker, apparently neitherthe Speakernor
the Chairman of Committees can control the hon.
junior member for St. Thomas.

Mr. SPEAKER: He is not the only memberwho....


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: If a beginning is made
with him, the others will behave. If the hon. junior
member for St. Thomas is told that if he continues
his obstreperous, pig-like behaviour in this House,
he will be asked to leave the House ........object to
that if you like.


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Of course I must object.


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS:The Leader of the House
sets himself up to be a dictator to the Chair as to








1981


what the Chair should do nor not do. If the hon. mem-
ber does not object and the Chair does not object, who
is the Leader of the House to be making objections
and talking from his seat?

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker .........


The question that this House do now adjourn until
Tuesday, 13th August, 1968, at 12 o'clock noon, was put and
resolved in the affirmative without division,and Mr. SPEAKER
adjourned the House accordingly.

6.55 p.m.






Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 26
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 36 dated 5th May, 1969.


S.I. 1969 No. 73

THE LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949
(Notice Under Section 5)

The acquisition for public purposes of the following
parcel of land containing by estimation 6,000 square
feet situate in the parish of Saint Michael in this
Island described in the Schedule hereto with the ap-
purtenances having been decided on by the Minister
responsible for Lands with the approval of both Houses
of Parliament, it is hereby declared in pursuance of
Section 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, 1949, that the
said land has been acquired for the Fishing Industry.

SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate
at Pile Bay in the parish of Saint Michael and con-
taining by estimation 6,000 square feet Abutting and
Bounding on the East and West on land of the Crown,
on the South on the Sea and on the North on the Public
Road or however else the same may abut and bound.
Dated this 28th day of April, one thousand nine
hundred and sixty-nine at Government House in the
Island of Barbados.




A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs