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Title: The official gazette
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Full Text










NO. 2-9


VOL. CIV.


*JfidiaI


($aette


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS,IOTH APRIL, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Gazette Notices


Acting Appointments:
L. L. Austin as Permanent Secretary, Ministry
of Agriculture Labour and National Insurance
L. A. Bourne as Chief Town Planner............
C. H. Clarke as Financial Secretary...............
H. S. Eastmond as Comptroller of Customs.....
Dr. Yvonne Harding as Senior Registrar, Q.E.H.
A. S. Howell as Permanent Secretary, Ministry
of Health and Community Development........
R. N. Jordan as Chief Marshal and Sargeant-at-
Arms, Registration Office......................
B. Morris as Superintendent of Prisons...........
Appointments:
Mrs. Merle Arthur to be Executive Officer,
Ministry of External Affairs..................
F. A. Bishop, I.S.O. as Chairman of the Local
Government Service Commission............
T. A. D. Clarke as Member of the Local Govern-
ment Service Commission.......................
Lindsay A. Drakes as Groom, Police Department
E. D. Inniss as Member of the Local Government
Service Commission...............................
Charles G. Johnston as Electrical Engineer......
Rev. E. C. M. Mural as Member of the Local
Government Service Commission...............
Grace P. Tulle; Edna Barker; Sheila Armstrong
as Staff Nurses....................................
Appointments to the Barbados Development Bank....
Coin Continuation Board as at 28th February, 1969
Executorials: Bertha Montague Browne................
Winifred Maud MacIntyre..............................
Industrial Incentives re Lightening Fasteners etc...
Resignation:UlriciaV. Best, Clerical Officer.........
Statement of Coin Continuation Board as at 31/12/68
Statement of Coin Continuation Board for period
1st January to 31st December, 1968..............
Statement of East Caribbean Currency Authority as
at 28th February, 1969................................
Therapeutic Substance Act, 1949........................

House of Assembly Debates for 2nd July, 1968.


327
326
327
327
327

327

327
327

326

325

325
326
325
326

325

326
326
329
328
328
327
326
332

331

330
326


NOTICE NO. 269

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Appointm ents

F. A. Bishop, I.S.O. has been appointed
as Chairman of the Local GovernmentService
Commission for a further period of five
months with effect from 1st February to 30th
June, 1969.


E. D. Inniss, has been appointed as a
Member of the Local Government Service
Commission for a further period of five
months with effect from 1st February to 30th
June, 1969.

The Reveretm E. C. M. Mural, has been
appointed as a Idbfert of the Local Govern- '
ment Service Comsl-sion for a further period ,
with effect from 20th March to 30th June,
1969,

T. A. D. Clarke, has been appointed as a
Member of the Local Government Service
Commission for a further period of three
months with effect from 1st April, to 30th
June, 1969.
(M.P. 5929/17 Vol.II).


3L7d_ 9
J .7oP /


ate








OFFICIAL GAZETTE


GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Appointments

Lindsay A. Drakes has been appointed'
Groom, Police Department, with effectfrom
1st February, 1969.

(M.P. 3657/7)

The following persons have been ap-
pointed to the post of Staff Nurse, Health
Centres with effect from 1st March, 1969.

Mrs. Grace P. Tulle
Mrs. Edna Barker
Mrs. Sheila Armstrong

(M.P. 5968/5)

Charles G. Johnston, has been appointed
to the post of Electrical Engineer, Electrical
Inspection Department, with effect from 1st
April, 1969.

(M.P. 1703/S.1/4).


Mrs. Merle Arthur, Tutor, Community
College, to be Executive Officer, Ministry of
External Affairs, with effect from 1st April,
1969.

(M.P. 1515/39/22/14)


Resignation

Ulricia V. Best, Clerical Officer, Na-
tional Insurance Office resigned from the
Public Service with effect from 1st April,
1969.


Acting Appointment
L. A. Bourne, Town Planner, Town Plan-
ning Office, acted as Chief Town Planner,
with effect from 3rd April to 9th April, 1969.

(M.P. 8952/10)


Appointments to the Barbados Development
Bank

Pursuant to the provisions of paragraph
1 of the schedule to the Barbados Development
Bank Act, 1963, the Minister of Finance has
appointed the following persons to be mem-
bers of the Barbados Development Bank for a
period of three years with effect from 1st
April, 1969:-

Mr. L. Bernstein Chairman
Mr. P. Stewart Kirby Deputy
Chairman
Mr. Clifford Zepherin Member
The Financial Secretary Member
The Manager, Industrial
Development Corporation -

(M.P. 5021/4 Vol.IV).

Therapeutic Substance Act, 1949

The following firm has been added to the
list of manufactruing firms approved for the
importation of any drug or therapeutic sub-
stance into Barbados:-

M. T. C. Pharmaceuticals Ltd.,
1890 Bramston Street,
Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada.


(M.P. P. 8613)


An-l In Iln.n


(M.P. 23B2).








Apri OFFICIAL GAZETTE


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Acting Appointments

Ba Morris, Assistant Director of Music,
Royal Barbados Police Force, to act as
Superintendent of Prisions with effect from
23rd March, 1969.

(M.P. 3653/1)



R. N. Jordan, Accountant, Registration
Office, acted as Chief Marshal and Sargeant-
at-Arms, Registration, Office, with effect
from 13th March to 17th March, 1969.

(M.P. 3064/6)


H. S. Eastmond, Senior Supervisor, Cus-
toms Department, appointed to act as Comp-
troller of Customs for the periods 24th to
31st March 1969 and 8th to 13th April, 1969.

(M.P. 2900/14 Vol. II)


A.S. Howell, Senior Assistant Secretary,
acted as Permanent Secretary, Ministry of
Health and Community Development, with ef-
fect from 31st January to 15th Feburary, 1969.


C.H. Clarke, Deputy Financial Secretary,
acted as Financial Secretary, with effect from
1st to 7th February, 1969.


L. L. Austin, AssistantSecretary, acted
as Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Agric-
culture, Labour and National Insurance, with
effect from 17th to 27th February, 1969.


(M.P. C.690 Vol.IV).


Dr.YvonneHarding, has been appointed
to act as Senior Registrar, Queen Elizabeth
Hospital, with effect from 1st January, 1969,
until further notice.

(M.P. 443/63/1 T.2)


NOTICE NO. 270

THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT, 1963

(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance pursuant to Section 6 of the Industrial
Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives notice
that he is about to be asked to consider
whether for the purposes of the abovemen-
tioned Act, the following products should be
approved products and whether the following
companies should be approved enterprises in
respect of the relevant products.

Any person interested in the manufac-
ture or importation of these products who
objects to their being declared approved pro-
ducts or the companies being declared ap-
proved enterprises for the purposes of the
Industrial Incentives Act, 1963, should for-
ward to the Director, Economic Planning
Unit, Office of the Prime Minister and a copy
to the Manager, Barbados Development Board,
to reach them on or before Tuesday, April
15th, 1969, a statement in writing setting
forth the grounds of his objection.


Company:

Perma Develop-
ment Corporation


Relevant Product:

Lightening Fast-
eners (Zippers)
Special Production
Machines.


i W


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


-l 1i 6 n io








l irIprt 10l 19091


NOTICE NO. 271


NOTICE

Re the Estate Qf

WINIFRED MAUD MACINTYRE

Deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all per-
sons having any debt or claim upon or affect-
ing the Estate of Winifred Maud MacIntyre,
late of Rostrevor Apartments, St. Lawrence,
Christ Church, in this Island who died on the
10th day of October 1968, are hereby re-
quested to send particulars of their claims
duly attested to Barclays Bank D. C. 0. at
Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, Barbados on or
before- the 9th day of June 1969, after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the assets
of the estate among the parties entitled there-
to having regard to the debts and claims only
of which we shall then have had notice; and that
we shall not be liable for assets so distri-
buted to any person of whose debt or claim
we shall not have had notice at the time of
such distribution.

And all persons indebted to the said Es-
tate are requested to settle their accounts
without delay.

Dated the 28th day of March 1969.

BARCLAYS BANK D.C. 0.
Executor I of the Will of
Winifred Maud MacIntyre,
deceased.


NOTICE NO. 272

NOTICE
Re the Estate (f
BERTHA MONTAGUE BROWNE
Deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all per-
sons having any debt or claim upon or affect-
ing the Estate of Bertha Montague Browne,
late of 5 Orme Square, Bayswater, London
W.2, England, who died at St. Francis Hospi-
tal, Haywards Heath, Sussex, England, on the
2nd day of March 1966, are hereby requested
to send particulars of their Claims duly at-
tested to Barlays Bank D.C.O. at Roebuck
Street, Bridgetown, Barbados on or before the
29th day of May 1969, after which date we
shall proceed to distribute the assets of the
estate among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard to the debts and claims only of
which we shall then have had notice; and that
we shall not be liable for assets so distributed
to any person of whose debt or claim we shall
we shall not have had notice at the time of
such distribution.

And all persons indebted to the said Es-
tate are requested to settle their accounts
without delay.

Dated this 21st day of March 1969.

BARCLAYS BANK LIMITED
Administrators with the Will annexed
of the Estate of Bertha Montague
Browne, deceased, by their Con-
stituted Attorneys on record.


BARCLAYS BANK D.C.O.


328


OFF1IIIAr. r.d7PTF*


A-flin A-J









April~~I 10, 196 OFIILGZfE1


COIN CONTINUATION BOARD


BRITISH CARIBBEAN CURRENCY BOARD COIN IN CIRCULATION
AS AT 28TH FEBRUARY, 1969


(Pursuant to the British Caribbean Currency Agreement 1964, Article 10 (3))


Antigua ...

Barbados ...

Dominica ...

Grenada

Montserrat ...

St. Kitts/Nevis/Anguilla

St. Lucia ...

St. Vincent ...

Guyana ... .

Trinidad & Tobago


$ t

374,650.00

1,266,089.50

172,075.00

278,575.00

37,450.00

179,400.00

191,700.00

161,600.00

460,217.00

928,821.00


"Proof Sets"


$ t

















2,661,539.50



1,389,038.00

4,050,577.50

1,870.00

$4,052,447.50


N. L. SMITH
Acting Executive Commissioner
Coin Continuation Board.


April 10, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


I 329









EAST CARIBBEAN CURRENCY AUTHORITY

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AS AT 28TH FEBRUARY, 1969


LIABILITIES


Demand Liabilities:


EC $


EC $


Notes in Circulation 40,584.097


Bankers' Deposits 41,810,000


Bankers' Balances



General Reserve



Other Liabilities


446,450


82,840,547


... 3,009,454



1,989,281


ASSETS
ExternalAssets:
Current Accounts and
Money at Call in London


United Kingdom Treasury Bills


Other United Kingdom
Government Securities .



Commerical Banks' Balances*


Central Bank of Trinidad and
Tobago Notes* ... ...


EC $


38,788,304


26,264,160



17,371,372



1,277,203



332,800


British Caribbean Currency Board Notes

Government Local Debentures

Local Treasury Bills

Other Assets


EC $87,839,282


EC $


84,033,839

115,000

2,607,050


344,920


738,473
EC $87,839,282


(Proportion of external assets to
demand liabilities 101.4%).
* Convertible into sterling on demand.
N. L. SMITH
Acting Managing Director.


March 28, 1969











STATEMENT



INCOME


COIN CONTINUATION BOARD

OF COIN CONTINUATION BOARD INCOME ACCOUNT FOR THE PERIOD

1ST JANUARY, 1968 TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1968

EXPENDITURE


EC $


INTEREST


U.K. Government Securtities

Local (U.K.) Government
Securities

Joint Consolidated Fund

Charges on Sales of Coin


105,300.00


123,538.58

92,245.14


Miscellaneous Revenue


EC $


Commissioners' Fees

Agency Fees (E.C.C.A., Central Bank of
Trinidad & Tobago & Bank
of Guyana)


Shipping Expenses

321,083.72 Commission Charges

776.32 Other Expenses

Depreciation on 6 3/4 % Exchequer
389.72 Stock, 1971

Balance transferred to Balance Sheet


EC $

2,400.00


4,915.00


30,068.46

1,260.88

3,697.68


BC $322.249.76


EC $


42,342.02


12,703.04

267,204.70

EC $ 322.249.76









COIN CONTINUATION BOARD

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AS AT 31ST DECEMBER, 1968

LIABLILTIES ASSETS

EC $ EC $


Coin in Circulatito


Other Liabilities
Transferred from income and
Expenditure account

Balance from end-December,
1967


4,082,347.50


118,650.02


267,204.70


71,585.48 338,790.18


External Assets:
LOANS TOLOCAL (U.K.) AUTHORITIES;

Exporters Refinery Corporation
Birmingham
Bury St. Edmonds

U.K. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES:
6 3/4% Exchequer Stock, 1971
(Market Value)


792,000.00
768,000.00
240,000.00


EC $4,539,787.70


MONEY AT CALL:
Crown Agents, London



Bank of England, London


616,840.78
378,071.04


994,911.82


.88
EC $4,539,787.70


N. L. SMITH
Acting Executive Commissioner
Coin Continuation Board.


EC $


EC $


1,800,000.00


1,744,875.00


January 28, 1969











THE





House of Assembly Debates




(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Tuesday, 2nd July, 1968.

Pursuant to the adjournment, the House of As-
sembly met at 2.30 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT


His Honour J. E. T. BRANCKER, Q.C. F.Z.S., (Speaker)
Mr. L. E. SMITH, J.P.; Hon. C. E. TALMA, (Minister of Health
and Community Development); Hon. J. C. TUDOR, M.A., (Leader
of the House); Mr. R. ST.C. WEEKES, J.P.; Mr. W. R. LOWE,J.P.
Hon. N. W. BOXILL, (Minister of Communications and Works);
Mr. J. B. YEARWOOD, J.P. (Chairman of Committees); Hon.
A. DaC. EDWARDS, (Minister of Agriculture, Labour and Na-
tional Insurance); Mr. C. A. E. HOPPIN, J.P.; Mr. L. S.CRAIG;
Mr. J. B. SPRINGER and Mr. H. B. ST. JOHN, LL.B.

Prayers were read.

Mr. HINDS and Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS entered the House
and took their seats.



MINUTES

Mr. SPEAKER: I regret to have to inform hon.
members that once again there are no minutes avail-
able for confirmation.

DOCUMENT

Mr. SPEAKER: I have the honour to inform the
House that I am in receiptof the Accounts and State-
ments for the month of June, 1967, as prepared by the
Accountant General.

PAPERS LAID

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, I am com-
manded to lay the twelfth Annual Report and State-
ment of Accounts of the Transport Board for the
year ended 30th September, 1967.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the
Hon. and Learned Prime Minister, Minister of Fi-
nance and Minister of External Affairs, Ibegto give


notice of a Resolution to place the sum of $16,600 at
the disposal of the Government to supplement the
Estimates 1968-69, Part I, Current, as shown inthe
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 9 which form
the Schedule to the Resolution.

REPLIES LAID

Hon. N. W. BOXILL: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice that the Oral Replies to the following Par-
liamentary Questions are ready. I have already
given notice that the Oral Reply to Parliamentary
Question No. 42, asked by the hon. senior member for
St. Thomas is ready. I am now giving notice that the
Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 135, stand-
ing in the name of the hon. senior member for St.
James, is now ready.


Hon, A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, I beg to
give notice that the Oral Replies to Parliamentary
Questions Nos. 73, 74 and 123, asked by the hon.
junior member for St. Peter, are now ready. I also
beg to give notice that the Oral Reply to Parliamen-
tary Question No. 109, asked by the hon. junior mem-
ber for St. James is ready. This has already been
given notice of.

Hon, J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of my intention to move the House into Com-
mittee of Supply at its next meeting in order to deal
with the Money Resolution of which notice has just
been given.

PRIVATE MEMBER'S NOTICE

Mr. CRAIG: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give notice
of the following Resolution:

WHEREAS the system of garbage disposal inthis
Island leaves much to be desired;

BE IT RESOLVED that this House request Gov-
ernment to purchase an incinerator and erect same
at a suitable point so as to dispose of garbage in the
centrally-sited parishes of the Island.

QUESTION TIME

Mr. SPEAKER: It is nowQuestion Time. Iam ad-
vised that the Reply has beenlaidto Question No. 73,


_ ~~







1771


standing in the name of the hon. junior member for,
St. Peter.

DEVELOPMENT IN BUILDING AND
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the ap-
propriate Minister:-

1. Is Government aware of the development
taking place in the building and construction industry
in this Island?

2. Would Government investigate with a view
to finding out whether, or to what extent, the labour
market of carpenters and masons, attendant la-
bourers and clerks engaged in such building and con-
struction is being exploited?

3. Is Government satisfied that overseas and
other firms enjoying Government contracts in the
said building and construction industry inthis Island,
are paying adequate wages to workers employed and
making conditions of work for these people such as
to reflect the existence of human standards?

hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: The Reply to the hon.
member's Question is as follows:-

(1) Yes, Sir.

(2) The Government is not aware of any ex-
ploitation of workers engaged on construction pro-
jects. Wage rates in the construction industry are
subject to free collective and individual bargaining.

(3) The Labour Clause (Public Contracts) Act
1952, stipulates that Government contractors shall
pay wages and observe hours and conditions of labour
not less favourable than those established in the trade
or industry. In the absence of established rates and
conditions, the Chief Labour Officer shall draw up
fair and reasonable rates and conditions to be ob-
served in the execution of contracts. Powers of in-
spection are vested in the Chief Labour Officer.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I would like to enquire
of the Minister if these Contractors are paying the
wages that they should pay, which he refers to in his
Reply to No. 3. In other words, he tells us what they
should do and I am asking him if they are doing it.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: My information is that
this is being done in respect of contracts.

EMPLOYMENT OF FEMALE WORKERS AT
GRAZETTES AND OTHER SITES

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Question to which the
Reply has been laid is Question No. 74, standing in
the name of the same hon. member. That is on page
3, right column.

Mr. HINDS: To enquire of the appropriate Minis -
ter:-
1. Is Government aware that a number of in-
dustrial firms established at Grazettes Estate and


other sites with the financial assistance of the Bar-
bados Development Board, are employing large num-
bers of female workers in the manufacture of their
products both for the export market and for local
consumption?

2. Is Government aware that the bulk of these
firms employ a system of work-apportioning and
price-calculating, which could constitute-a whole-
sale robbery of the majority of these female workers?

3. Is Government satisfied to have industries
established under Barbados Development Board au-
spices which insist on paying 90% and more of their
female staff, a weekly wage of as low as $5 and hardly
more than $10 for a five-day week?

4. Would Government see to it that the Bar-
bados Development Board establish as a policy that
no industry enjoying the Board's assistance should
have a minimum basic weekly wage less than the
present weekly wage of a female Shop Attendant?

5. Is Government aware that a number of the
industries established under auspices of the Barbados
Development Board are apt to employ tactics which
would make employees fear becoming members of a
trade union?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, the Reply
to the hon. member's Question is as follows:-

(1) Yes, Sir.

(2) No, Sir. Some firms operate a system of
payment on a piece-rate basis which places emphasis
on speed but a minimum weekly wage is observed.
Wage agreements with the Barbados Workers' Union
exist in some of these undertakings and, in others,
earnings range from $15.00 per week to $30.00 per
week except in the case of probationers who are paid
a minimum of $2.00 a day.

In one case workers are paid on a piece-rate basis
with a fixed minimum of $2.00 a day. No complaints
have been made to the Ministry.


(3)
(4)
matter.
(5)


No, Sir.
Active consideration is being given to this

No, Sir."


Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, at No. 2, I would like
to enquire of the Minister what is the minimum
weekly wage which is observed. His reply is that a
weekly minimum wage is observed. What is that mini-
mum weekly wage? And when the hon. member rises,
he might also reply in the case of probationers em-
ployed at the rate of $2.00 per day. Can he tell us
whether these probationers are told in advance that
they are probationers and that they will be paid at
the rate of $2.00 a day?
2.55 p.m.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Sir, in reply to the hon.
member's first question, the minimum weekly wage
is determined by negotiations between the employers







1772


and the Barbados Workers' Union. In reply to the
second question, the information which I have on my
file is that they are told that as probationers they
are expected to receive a minimum of $2.00 per day
plus what money they raise from the piece-rate
production. I do not know if that satisfies the hon.
member.......

Mr. ST. JOHN: Mr. Speaker, Sir, is the Minister
saying that the workers at the Garment Industry in
Grazettes are unionised? If he is sayingthat,will he
tell us the date of the last agreement between the
Workers' Union and the employers?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I have had my officers
investigate this matter, and the information I have
given is information which I have received from my
officers. I am advised that there are a number of
wage agreements between the B.W.U. and the em-
ployers of workers in this industry. There are a
number of such undertakings at Grazettes, and these
are investigated by Labour Officers, and it was as-
certained that in the case of female workers there
were only nine female workers employed at the rate
which the hon. member spoke of.

It was found that there were three garment fac -
tories with agreements with the B.W.U.,and in these
agreements there was a minimum wage of $2,00per
day for probationers up to the first three months, and
thereafter the minimum was $2.40 per day.

This was information I got from the Officers. As
far as I am aware, there are three of these industries
which have agreements with the B.W.U. in Grazettes,
and the employees are paid on a piece work basis.

Mr. HINDS: Just to get one point clear from the
Minister. Am I to understand the Minister to say that
these Officers discovered that there were nine
workers who'were being paid at rates from $5.00
to $10.00 a week?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I said thatonlynine of
these concerns employed female workers, andthere
are three that have agreements with the Union,
and the rate which is fixed is the rate which I gave.
There are five other undertakings and the earnings
range between $15.00 and $35.00 per week. It is stated
that one business pays salaries of $120.00 to $200.00
a month.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I do not know if the
Minister understands me quite clearly or if it is a
case of where I do not understand the Minister. I
think that I can say that I understand the Minister to
say that there are nine firms employing female
workers. Is that right? I want to know if his Officers
have discovered at any of these firms that wages
as low as $5.00 to $10.00 are paidweekly to the wor-
kers.



Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, the rea-
son why this question took so long to be answered is
that I was sending Officers to and fro for information,
because I myself heard that this obtained in some of


the industries. The information was that the people
who received it, the people who got this $5.00 or less
received it on a piece work basis. They did not
necessarily receive it for a whole week.

Mr. HINDS: I wonder, Mr. Speaker, if the Minis -
ter made any inquiries as to the conditions under
which these workers work. I wonder if the Minister
became aware during his investigations that when
there is a cut in the electricity at a factory, which
may be for two or four hours during the day, the
workers have to remain on the premises, but they
are not paid. I wonder if the Minister is aware of
all that.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I must say, Mr. Speaker
that I tried to equip myself with the answers to the
Questions asked by the hon. member. Would say that
the question now asked by the hon. member could be
asked as a substantive question, and I will investigate
it. It is completely different from what he asked about
wages. He did not ask about general conditions of
service. If the hon. member would like to ask a sub-
stantive question, I will investigate it and give him
a reply.

Mr. HINDS: The Minister is just trying to seek
a way of escape. In answering my supplementary he
made mention of the fact that some of the workers
received $5.00 at the end of the week; but he made
out a case where they were not in such cases em-
ployed a whole week. I asked a supplementary arising
out of this question. What I want to ask the Minister
now is this: in any case is the Government satisfied
that industries being established under the auspices
of the Development Board are paying workers as
little as $5.00 a week? Is the Minister admitting that
workers have been receiving as little as $5.00 week.
Is the Government satisfied that this is fair and just
in the year 1968?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, I ex-
plained that the question of $5.00 a week was not for
a week's pay, but for piece work where workers do
not work for a week, but for a day or a day-and-a
half. Until legislation is brought in whereby a mini-
mum week's pay is guaranteed for workers in the
industry, I do not see how the position can change.

The question which the hon. member asked about
conditions of service will have to be investigated; but
the Government is not aware that any worker in the
industry, after having worked for a whole week, only
receives $5.00 a week. Iwant to make that clear. Peo -
ple who may have received $5.00 at the end of a week
received it for working part of a week, for a day or
a day-and-a-half, as the case may be.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I would like to inquire
if the Minister investigated the system of work ap-
portioning and price calculation?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: The answer to that, Mr.
Speaker, is no.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, Sir, the Minister has
given a reply to Question No. 2andl would like, Mr.







1773
.% .. : : L, .. .


Speaker, if you will permit the Minister -what I am
saying is that in respect of Question No. 2, inasmuch
as the Minister has admitted that he did not inquire-
about the subject, matter of the question, if Your Hon-
our will be willing to have this question remain on
the Order Paper until the Minister can really in-
vestigate and report factually on the matter.
3.05 p.m.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, I think
I misunderstood the question askedby the hon. mem-
ber. I really gave him the reply to Question No. 2
when I said the answer to that was no. That is, after
further investigation, we were satisfied that there
was no discrimination in the question of work pro-
portion. I completely misunderstood the penultimate
question. I think he understands now.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, I wonder whether the
Minister, in carrying out his investigation, dis-
covered that workers leave their homes on mornings,
turn out at these respective factories, wait around
the premises ,.maybe for two or three hours, and are
then told that there is no work today, or there will
be no work until a later hour during that day?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I am not aware of that,
Mr. Speaker.

Mr. SPEAKER: No. 123 standing in the name of
the same hon. member at page 5, right hand column.

INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC LIMITED

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the ap-
propriate Minister:

Is Government aware of the presence in this
Island of a business firm operating under the name
of International Scientific Limited?

2. How many Barbadian workers under 40
years of age have been employed by this firm in its
first year of operations here threading memory
cores, or doing similar work?

3. Is Government aware of the highly scien-
tific nature of the work these workers perform?

4. Are they adequately compensated for the
type of work they do?

5. Is Government aware that the long hours
these workers perform and the meticulousness and
exactness of the tasks involved, impose a consider-
able strain on the eyesight of these workers?

6. With a view to ensuring whether or not
there is impairment to the health of these workers,
.particularly the eyesight, would Government under-
take to have checks made on the eyes of a number of
these workers by the Department of Ophthalmology
of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital?

7. If tests reveal the presence of myosis re-
sulting from the nature of the said work would Gov-
ernment stipulate that -


(a) regular tests of the eyes of these Wor-
kers be carried out;
(b) all workers employed by this firm ?be
specially insured against loss of eyesight,
impairment thereof, and particularly,
contraction of the pupil of the eye?

8. How many workers employed by this firm
have been medically advised to wear spectacles since
being employed there?

9. How many workers have not been finan-
cially able to meet the requirements of the advice
given at 8 above?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, the reply
is as follows:-

1.. .Yes, Sir.

2. 203 persons were,:hired during the year
1967 for training in the stringing of memory cores.

3. The Government is aware that the work
requires training for its satisfactory performance.

4. This is a matter-for bargaining between
employers and employees.

5. The Government is not aware that con-
siderable strain ts imposed on the eyesight of the
employes but if it is, then it is a matter which em-
ployers and employees should take into account in
setting conditions of work for employees.

6. The provisions of the Labour Department
7. Act, 1943, prohibit the collection and release
8. of the information requested on these
9. points.

Mr. HINDS: If the provisions of the Labour De-
partment Act prohibit the collection and release of
the information requested on these points, then we
will proceed with other points with Your Honour's
permission. Is the Minister aware that International
Scientific Limited offered Cod Liver Oil as something
extra to some of its workers?

SHon. A. DaC; EDWARDS: The Minister is not
aware ofthat.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, am I to understand from
the Minister that it is not.possible, in Barbados, to
find out from a worker if he is financially able to
carry out his doctor's advice when he is employed
by a firm established under the Barbados Develop-
ment Board's auspices?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I do not understand the
question. If the hon. member would repeat it, I should
be glad.

Mr. HINDS: I am enquiring from the Minister if
he wants this House to understand that it is impossi-
ble for the Labour Department to find out from a
worker employed at International Scientific Limited,
or in any other industry inthis Island, if that worker







1774


has been able, during the course of his employment,
to carry out instructions received from a doctor?

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I am not trying to tell
the House so. What I am trying to tell the House is
that the provisions of the Labour Department Act,
1943, prohibit the Chief Labour Officer, or any of-
ficer in the industry of labour, from obtaining and re -
leasing any information in connection with the points
raised by the hon. member. I would invite the hon.
member to have a look at the Labour Department Act,
1943, and he would not ask those questions.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid it is after 3.15
o'clock p.m., when Question Time expires.

Mr. HINDS: May I ask that these questions re-
main on the Order Paper?

Mr. SPEAKER: It is my understanding that the
supplementaries have not been completed.

We revert now to Private Members' Business.
When this was adjourned at the previous meeting, the
hon. senior member for St. Joseph was addressing
the Chamber on Item No. 1, Private Members' Busi-
ness. That hon. member may now proceed with his
Address, if he wishes.
3.15 p.m.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, this is a business af-
ternoon and more important business has to be dis-
cussed this afternoon than ever for the year.

Now I have noticedthat there is more equipment
in here than we are accustomed to having, and before
I go any further I would like to know by whose per-
mission it is here and for what purposse...

Mr. SPEAKER: My permission was sought and
given for equipment to be installed in accordance
with precedent for the purpose of the Budget. As to
the actual amount or type of equipment, Iam not in a
position to say whether there is more or less, or
whether it is different from any previous occasions,
except in respect of this rather imposing or threaten -
ing looking apparatus in front of me which I un-
derstand is designed so that if the Chair has to
interpolate or intervene, that that intervention would
also be audible.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order,
may I remind Your Honour that the actual procedure
has not yet been agreed on. The Leader of the House
proclaimed rather emphatically, if not dogmatically
that he intended to exercise the right of reply al-
though the matter before the House would be under
Private Members' Business, while later the Prime
Minister indicated that there would be no such reply,
and that it is purely Private Members' Business. I
rise merely on a point of order to draw to Your
Honour's attention that the matter is not yet con-
cluded, if the matter is before the House with two
contrary expressions of opinion as to what the pro-
cedure is to be, I suggest to Your Honour with great
respect that the House should decide on how far the
debate is to go and how much is to be broadcast.


Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, the equipment, as I
understand, is for the purpose of the speech of the
Prime Minister relative to the Financial Statement
and Budgetary Proposals. Sir, this one with which
I am dealing now is the Budget Speech, and I am en-
titled to have the equipment switched on. It is in-
stalled for the purpose of the Budget Speech, and in
the same way that permission was sought and given
to allow it to come inhere, Ifeel that we should give
the green light and have it turned on. You have the
authority and the power to instruct the operator to
have it turned on, because this is the Budget Speech
also from an elected member, and an elected mem-
ber of this Country is speaking on the Budget with
respect to which I am in order; otherwise you would
not have called on me to speak. In the same way that
permission was sought for the purpose of the Budget
Speech, I feel that you can give instructions to have it
turned on and let us start the ball rolling from here.
If you are not going to give such instructions, I want
to know under what conditions these speeches will be
broadcast, because there is a possibility that the
Prime Minister as usual will broadcast his speech,

leave the Chamber and the apparatus followhim; but
it is my intention today to create history in this
House, and if I am not allowed to use the same equip-
ment this afternoon, nobody at all will use it P.M.
or M.P. I do not want to embarrass you or any other
member in here, but some embarrassment will take
place this evening, because I am not allowing it to
happen. I am not allowing the Prime Minister to
come here at 4.30 p.m. and broadcast his speech and
leave, and the apparatus leave also. The apparatus
will have to leave before he starts to talk and then he
can follow after.

Do not think, Mr. Speaker, that Iam threatening
you. I have come with my ammunition to work, and I
am going to work if something is not done. I intend
to do it, and after it is done anything can happen with
me. You can send me to Glendairy, to the Mental
Hospital or anywhere at all; I am representing my
people. I am not going to allow any speech to be
broadcast this afternoon in here unless Igetthe as -
surance that the Opposition will have the same pri-
vilege to use it. I am asking you to have it switched
on now, because it is here for the purpose of the
Budgetary Proposals and Financial Statement, and I
intend to carry on with this. You will recall that I
have not gone into this speech yet, and it is my pre-
rogative not the one in St. George to have this
thing switched on, and if it is not switched on, I am
going to switch it off for good.


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on a point of
order, I really think the hon. senior member for St.
Joseph is generating more anger than the circum-
stances really warrant. In the first place, the hon.
member is supposed to be addressing the House in
respect of the last Budget and not yet in respect of
the one which is to come. I do not want to tell the
House, but I just want to make two short points to
show why the hon. member, I think, is out of order.
In the first place, the other side, so far as I know,
has already made its official reply broadcast to the
last Budget. Secondly, Mr. Speaker, it is true that







1775


,in the course of his own speech he has made a re-
quest for broadcast time, and I understand, because
I was not present when the request was made, that
the Prime Minister was very favourably disposed
towards the request of the hon. member, but that it
was pointed out to him......

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order,
Your Honour must rule at some time or other. What
is the point of order? What is the hon. member doing
wrong on which a point of order can arise?

Mr. SPEAKER: I am allowing a certain amount
of latitude for the purpose of clarifying this matter
which I had thought and hoped might have been dis -
cussed and decided by the Whips on both sides before
now.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: The hon. seniormem-
ber for St. Joseph is the Chief Whip on our side, but
that is not my point. My point is that I am on a point
of order, and I am asking Your Honour to rule that
the hon. member is not allowed to make another
speech under the guise of making a point of order.
Where is the point of order? What is the point of
order? What has gone wrong? Where is the breach
of a rule? Your Honour has just attended a meeting
of the Caribbean area and that is one of the things
that was pointed out: the duty of the Chair to stop
this sort of accident disorder. The hon. member is
not entitled to make another speech, and I would be
glad to know that the Speaker of Barbados set the ex-
ample for the rest of the Caribbean.
3.25 p.m.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the Opposi-
tion has not made a point of order.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I raised the point of
order that the hon. member is making a speech,
and not a point of order. That is a point of order.
This is showing that there is disorder on the part
of the Hon. Leader of the House. He is breaking all
the Rules; he is making a speech, and he cannot
make a speech under the guise of a point of order. One
of the chief things that Your Honour has just finished
discussing was the fraudulent the word 'fraudulent'
has been used in the House of Commons, and I notice
that the West Indian speakers use it too use of the
term "point of order" in order to make a speech.
Your Honour must rule.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I
am drawing to Your Honour's attention that here is a
case where Your Honour has been allowing two hon.
members to be on their feet at the same time. One
hon. member is addressing the Chair, and the other
hon. member is on his feet, as is happening in this
case now......

Mr. SPEAKER: I observe that two hon. members
are on their feet now.

Mr. HINDS: That is right.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
rose on a point of order, and he was proceeding to


make his point of order or points of order when an-
other hon. member rose the Hon. Leader of the Op-
position and he also said: "On a point of order".
The Hon. Leader of the House should have been al-
lowed to complete his point and then the Hon. Leader
of the Opposition could make his. It is not a question
of a point of order arising out of a point of order. That
is my point. (ASIDES)) Right nowhere are three hon.
members on their feet.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes, Mr. Speaker......

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, that is what Iwas en-
quiring of Your Honour. If two hon. members are on
their feet, are we respectingyou any longer? (ASIDES)
It seems to me, Sir, that the equipment has been
turned off. (A MEMBER: That is his friend.)

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker,......

Mr. SPEAKER: Again, I see two hon. members
on their feet.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker,......

Mr. HINDS: I was speaking on a point of order
and it was observed that more than one hon. member
was on his feet. Are we going to have this kind of
racketeering (ASIDES)

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker,......

Mr, HINDS: It seems to me that the volume has
now been turned on. I am to ask Your Honour to rule
in these things. The Opposition has had to complain
time and time again and too often about the equipment
not working when the members of the Opposition are
speaking. (A MEMBER: He is the Speaker's friend.)
I do not mind whose friend this youngsterhappens to
be. He is drawing the taxpayers' money which has
got to be voted by this Honourable House. I do not
want to offend Mr. Speaker or any other friend of
whom he may happen to be. Let him do his job to the
Opposition as he is doing it to any other hon. member
in here.

Mr. SPEAKER: Again I see that two hon. mem-
bers are on their feet. The Hon, Leader of the House
was making his point of order and he may proceed and
complete his point of order, and the hon. senior mem-
ber for St. Joseph may resume his address.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I thank you, Mr. Speaker.
The point Iwas makingwas that the hon. senior mem-
ber for St. Joseph, I think, was wrongly imputing......

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, how can
that be a point of order?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I take it that Your Honour is
still in the Chair.

Mr. SPEAKER: Very much so.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I was saying that, in my
opinion, the hon. senior member for St. Joseph mis-
takenly imputed to the Prime Minister the respon-







1776


Sibility for the arrangement which Your Honour has,
just mentioned. I went on to say, Mr. Speaker, that on
the last occasion the other side replied to the Budget
through their official spokesman, but that in the
course of the hon. member's......

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I must interrupt the
hon. member now. He is speaking on the occasion of
the last Budget, but I am speaking now on the oc-
casion of this Budget. I am nothing to do with the
last Budget. I want this House to understand my in-
tention with this Budget which is to come. I ask you
to ask the operator to turn on the switch. If you do
not do it, I cannot make you do it, but you have given
permission to bring the equipment in here, and the
same permission applies to have it working. If it
does not work, I have already allowed this House to
know what is going to happen. If it does not work
now, it will never work again inhere as long as I am
an hon. member in here. If it is not going to work
now, it will never be allowed to work as long as I am
in this Chamber. It is the people of St. Joseph who
are responsible for my being in this Chamber and
they alone, nobody else. I am sure that if I create
history this afternoon with this loud-speakingequip-
ment, the people in St. Joseph will create history
with me too at the next election; that is to say, that
anyone else who ever wants to come in St. Joseph
will never be able to enter. I intend to create this
history. Do you know why, Sir? Iam on my feet, Sir.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am entitled to intervene. Iwill
say this to the hon. member. I spoke of having given
permission in respect of the apparatus being brought
here this afternoon. It was in respect of a request
for the purpose of broadcasting the Budget, which is,
I understand, to be made in the course of Government
Business this afternoon. It was in respect of that
Budget and not in respect of the Budget which is still
proceeding from last year. That is what I gave per-
mission in respect of. So far as I am concerned, I
have no authority in respect of the switching on or the
turning off.
3.35 p.m.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I do not now
rise on a point of order, because the hon. senior
member for St. Joseph has clarified what Itook to be
a misconception of his. He says that his remarks are
now in respect of the Budget which is to come. I wish
now therefore to speak in explanation of the arrange -
ment which Your Honour has announced.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid that while it is true
that the Hon. Leader of the House has not yet spoken
- so I am advised on this matter, the hon. senior
member for St. Joseph is on his feet and the Hon.
Leader of the House has not proposed that he is
rising on a point of order or point of explanation or
a point of clarification. I am afraid that he will have to
await the conclusion of the hon. member for St.
Joseph's speech and then rise, if he catches my eye
first.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: On a point of order. I really
do not think that I am being fairly treated. I am sorry.


\ have, for many years, only once in my life had to
say this to the Chair. (Aside: take up the Mace)

Your Honour knows the circumstances in which
this request was made, and Your Honour also knows
that this request did not originate with me. If it had
originated with me, I would not have to explain. I
have the ultimate responsibility of seeing that Gov-
ernment's policy in this House is carried out, and I
would not like Government's policy to go by default.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. Am
I to understand that the Leader of the House is being
badly treated in that he has not spoken on the matter
that is before the House the last Budgetary Pro-
posals? In other words, will he be allowed to speak
on this matter again?

Mr. SPEAKER: If the hon. member has not yet
spoken, he is perfectly entitled to speak on it.

Mr. HINDS: Has he not spoken today?

Mr. SPEAKER: He rose and said: "On a point
of order."

Mr. HINDS: The Leader of the House said that
he was not rising on a point of order. He said defi-
nitely that it was not on a point of order.

Mr. SPEAKER: He said that he was not speaking
on a point of order, but that he was speaking on a
point of explanation.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: On a point of order. I
am asking Your Honour to rule if it is in order for
a member to speak on a point of explanation on some-
thing that has not arisen. How do we know that he
will not rise on a point of complaint? He said that
he was treated badly. Obviously no one could treat
him badly but the Chair. I do not understand how any-
body but the Chair could treat the hon. member
badly. He could only have meant the Chair,and we
on this side sympathise with Your Honour.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I did not hear too
clearly; but it sounds to me as if he said or wants
to say that asking for permission for this apparatus
did not originate through him. Now, Sir, I will have
to agree that the Hon. Leader of the House was
treated unfairly or badly, because who else should
it come from? I feel that way too.


If it came from an outsider, and Your Honour
agreed to give the green light to an outsider to have
it brought in here, you can give the green light for it
to be switched on or off. So, you will make me feel
that you care more for an outsider than for any mem-
ber of the House. Iwas thinkingall the time that per-
mission was asked by the Leader of the House; but it
is not so. If you have openedyour hands to an outsider
that strengthens my argument for having it thrown
outside at once because it did not come through the
right channels. I am finished, Sir, because you are
listening to the Clerk.








1777


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I rose on a
point of explanation because if I had been allowed to
speak, the whole matter would have been resolved to
everybody's satisfaction.

Mr. SPEAKER: Will the Hon. Leader of the House
make his point?

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Yes,thankyou, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. HINDS: Is the Leader of the House on a
point of order or what?

Mr. SPEAKER: I have to awaithis point before I
can rule on it.

Mr. HINDS: He should first intimate to Your
Honour what is the point which he is making. Each
time he gets up he makes a speech, and before this
matter is finished he will have made five or six
speeches. Members of this side can only address
Your Honour once.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid that the hon. junior
member for St. Peter has risen as often as the
Leader of the House on points of order.

Mr. HINDS: On each occasion it was a point of
order.

Mr. SPEAKER: It was prefaced "on a point of
order".

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, Iwas saying, on
a point of explanation ......

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: I draw Your Honour's
attention to Rule 26 (15) which says that "no mem-
ber shall speak more than once on any proposition
except -


in Committee;
in explanation as provided in paragraph
16 of this Order;
to a point of order; or
in the case of the mover of a substantive
motion in the House, in reply:


Provided that any Member may second a motion
or amendment to a Bill by rising in his place and
stating that it is his intention to second the motion
or amendment, without prejudice to his right to speak
at a later period of the debate."

No. 17 says that "a member who has spoken may
speak again when a new question has been proposed
by the Speaker, such as a proposed amendment, or a
motion for the adjournment of the debate or a dila-
tory motion".

I have noticed I do not want to cause any em-
barrassment to Your Honour or to anyone else that
from time to time a member very often gets up and
says "on a point of order",and makes a point of ex-
planation on some matter that he has already spoken
on. There is by members on the other side this vio-


lation and I repeat the word, this violation of the
term "point of order". Only last month Your Hon-
our was in conference with other Speakers who came
here, and one of the objects of the discussions was to
join together and put an end to this violation of the
term "point of order", and Your Honour is allowing
it!

I draw Your Honour's attention again to the
Standing Order I have just read. The hon. member
has not spoken in substance on this matter and there -
fore, he cannot be giving an explanation of anything
that he said, and it is for Your Honour to say, ac-
cording to the Standing Order, if he can rise on a
point of order.
3.45 p.m.

I am rising to show there is disorder. An Order
has been broken, but the hon. member wants to talk
on a point of explanation, point of order, and all sorts
of things. I repeat the word "fraudulent". Very often
members deliberately do that in order that they may
get in something that they had not said before.

Mr. SPEAKER: I do not think that the Hon. Leader
of the Opposition can complain about any hon. member
making a speech after prefacing it with a point of
order, because he has certainly made a speech. If
the Hon. Leader of the House is seeking the indul-
gence of the House to make a personal explanation....

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, Your Hon-
our is seeking the indulgence of the House and not of
the Chair; we have to agree as well.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order.
Am I to understand that Your Honour is giving the
Leader of the House permission to make the speech
referred to, or the explanation referred to, in the
middle of the speech of the hon. member for St.
Joseph who is addressing the House on the substan-
tive matter?

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. junior member for St.
Peter is not to understand that I am giving him leave.
If the House agrees, and in an effort to clarify this
situation, the hon. member will be permitted to make
his personal explanation. I think it will facilitate
matters a great deal in respect of what seems to be
very highly controversial.

Mr. HINDS: So the hon. senior member for St.
Joseph will continue his speech.

Hot.. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I am asking
indulgence of the House to make a personal ex-
planation.


Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. Leader of the House
is seeking the indulgence of the House to make a
personal explanation. If there is no objection, leave
will be granted. (Mr. HINDS: "Objection".)


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Objection. On a point
of order. I notice Your Honour invites the informa-






1778


tion of the Clerk. It is not the Clerk's duty to instruct
the Chair unless he is asked for an opinion.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the Opposi-
tion did not remember, whenhe spoke a moment ago,
that in this Parliament we are not supplied with
Parliamentary Counsel; so one, on occasion, refers
to the Clerks-at-the-Table. Sir Harry Foster, a for-
mer Solicitor General and one of Her Majesty's
Counsel, has Parliamentary Counsel just as any other
Speaker has.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, am I in order?

Mr. SPEAKER: As I said, this is a matter in
which the hon. member might make a personal ex-
planation by the indulgence of the House. Now hon.
members who are in favour of granting such indul-
gence will please indicate. I am obtaining the feeling
of the House. (Hon. Members: Aye.) Hon. Members
who are not in favour of granting this indulgence? I
think the "Ayes" have it.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, there is
the duty on every member to respect the Chair. I am
asking Your Honour what is the Order bywhich Your
Honour puts to a vote a motion of this sort? We can-
not respect the Chair if, with this matter so clear
that we on this side object, Your Honour says: "The
Ayes have it". We would call for a division, and no
division could possibly be in order where you ask for
the indulgence of House. A single dissentient voice
shows the House is not in agreement. Your Honour
knows that; Your Honour has been a Speaker for
many years. We have been tryingour best to respect
the Chair, and to make people abroad feel that the
House of Assembly can live upto the traditions of any
House of Assembly, or any House of Commons, in any
part of the world, and then Your Honour does that!

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
may make his personal explanation.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, are we to understand
that, in the face of the objection by the Opposition, he
will be allowed to speak? We oppose any such sug-
gestion. There was objection from this side of the
House. Are you not going to protect the minority?
Are you not going to protect the Opposition against
these outrages, or are you going to contribute to
them? (Hon. N. W. BOXILL:Name him.)We are will-
ing to respect the Chair, and we are begging you to
rule in a manner which compels us to respect the
Chair. We are willing to respect Your Honour, but
undoubtedly something is wrong. I am sure Your
Honour could not mean that the Hon. Leader of the
House is entitled to make his speech......

Mr. SPEAKER: There is no question of making
a speech. It is a question of making a personal ex-
planation.
Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order.
(ASIDES)
Mr. SPEAKER: In view of the grave disorder,
this sitting is suspended for 15 minutes.
3.55 p.m.


On resumption:
Mr. SPEAKER: I would like to make it quite
clear to hon. members that what I have given per-
mission for in respect of this afternoon's pro-
ceedings is and only permission for the Prime
Minister's Speech to be broadcast live. That is all
that I have given permission for, and it is that alone
which will be done, I take it, this afternoon, in ac-
cordance with custom. Then when a motion is made
in accordance with custom to deal with the Budgetary
Proposals, I would suggest that the amount of broad-
casting time available for both sides of the House
should be a matter for arrangements between them
before that discussion starts;but all that Ihave given
permission for is for the equipment to be brought in
this Chamber, and there is ample precedent for the
Chair giving such permission. It has been given
year after year, but all that I have given permission
for is for the equipment to be brought in here for
the Prime Minister's speech to be broadcast live;
that and nothing else as for now. Then in respect of
the debate initiated to discuss the Budgetary Pro-
posals which obviously could not start today, that
would be a matter between now and the next meeting
of this House for a request or arrangements to be
made for the equipment if it is wanted for the dis-
cussion of the budget. That is a matter for both sides
to arrange between themselves, how many hours
they want it for and how many speakers. (ASIDES)
There can be no question of not having control if an
agreement is arrived at between both sides. (ASIDES)
That applies only in respect of this afternoon to
broadcast the Budget Proposals live. There is no
permission for anyone else or any other afternoon.


Mr. St. JOHN: Speaking on a point of privilege,
Your Honour is the guardian of the privileges of this
House, and Your Honour has given permission to an
outside person over whom Your Honour has no con-
trol, and Your Honour has not consulted the Leader
of the House nor the Leader of the Opposition, nor
the Chief Whip on this side, so that we find ourselves
in this position that permission has been granted,
without the House knowing, in respect of the broad-
cast of a speech of a member of this House with no
power or authority in Your Honour to ensure that
equality can take place in the future. That in my sub-
mission is acting against the interest of the privi-
leges of this House.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, time is running out on
me. Now, Sir, you have the authority and the power,
I believe, to give the permission. I feel so; I may be
wrong. Would you let me knowwho asked for the per-
mission and to whom it was given before I start? I
intend firing off the gun; but before Ipull the trigger,
would you let me know who sought the permission?

Mr. SPEAKER: The Government Information
Officer.

Mr. SMITH: Thank you, Sir. It is no wonder that
the Leader of the House is not feeling too happy on
this matter. I want the Leader of the House to see
quite clearly, if he cannot, that as far as he is con-







1779


cerned, somebody does not care anymore about him
in here as Leader of the House as they care about
me. I believe this is the first time that the Informa-
tion Officer had to seek permission to bring appara-
tus in here. Why is it? Who is the Information Officer?
Is he an elected representative of this country? That
is the reason why I am not going to let it work this
afternoon promises or no promises. The Hon.
Leader of the House said he was not treated fairly,
and I am saying that I have not been treated fairly
either. The Information Officer is a servant; so
somebody instructed him to do it. He did not do it
off his own bat. Some Quartermaster shirt-tail man
asked or gave permission and by-passed the Leader
of the House, and it serves him right.

Mr. SPEAKER: For the information of hon.
members, I will say that from 1962 so far as records
before me now reveal, the request has been made by
the same official.

Mr. SMITH: If from 1962 the InformationOfficer
was seeking permission, then the request was granted
without the knowledge of the Leader of the House. If
that was so, I cannot understand why the Leader
should feel so unhappy this afternoon. If permission
was being sought, I feel that the Leader of the House
should negotiate it; but in this case the Leader did
not have any say in it, and to make matters worse,
the Minister in charge of these things or of C.B.C.
does not care anything about the Leader of the House.
He should have consulted the Leader of the House in
this matter; yet the Leader of the House comes in
here and pilots the same shirt-tail Minister's work.
If the Leader of the House is doing that, then he
should be getting half the money, because the quali-
fication to be a Minister is that you come in here and
pilot your own Bills. That is part and parcel of the
Ministry. This chap does not do that, and although
the Leader of the House is workingforhim and he is
drawing money he does not earn, he still by-passed
him and sent to the Speaker without the knowledge of
the Leader. They can do as they like; they belong to
one pen, and I belong to another.

Mr. Speaker, I am an elected member and I have
the same rights and privileges inside here as the
Prime Minister or anybody else. The Government
cannot or should not dictate to Parliament by telling
us that the Leader of the Opposition willhave half an
hour, two hours or twenty hours. This equipment be-
longs to the people and we are doing the people's
business. Why do you want to limit us? Why do you
want to muzzle us? Why don't you wantthe people of
this country to hear what we have to say? Something
is wrong. (Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, on a
point of order....) I am not agreeing to any half an
hour, two hours or anything at all. It is here for all
of us or nobody at all.
Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
has risen and said "on a point of order".

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I think the hon. member is
wrong to suggest that somebody from this side is
trying to limit or inhibit the freedom of speech of
hon. members.
4.20 p.m.


It is impossible for me at this stage to say what
I wish to say, but I give the hon. member the assur-
ance that I will consult with the other side after the
Prime Minister has spoken, when they have given
notice of the motion which they traditionally give
notice of, and when they indicate to me what time they
wish to initiate the debate, the proper arrangement
will be made. I can guarantee that it will be to the
satisfaction of the whole House.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order.
Any arrangement or negotiation should be entered
into before the apparatus is used by any member of
this House. In other words, we cannot negotiate with
the equipment on the premises. That is the first thing.
In other words, we must have uninhibited territory.
(Laughter) That is what we must have. We must have
the equipment removed and then let us begin to ne-
gotiate. You must bear in mind, Mr. Speaker, that
this House is comprised of Government members
and Opposition members, and when Your Honour pro-
ceeded to give permission for the equipment to be
brought in I appreciate the fact that Your Honour
followed the custom from 1962, but it means that we
have only discovered in 1968 that Your Honour has
not been discharging your duties in ample fairness.
You do not at all times take into consideration the
rights and privileges of the minority group, the Op-
position members, in the House of Assembly. We
find that in 1968....

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, that is not a point of
order and time is running out. (Laughter) I am not
standing for it. That is not point of order; that is a
gallon. Sir, the Hon. Leader of the House has just
said that after the Prime Minister has spoken, we can
come together and make the necessary arrangements.
Now, Sir, I am drawing this to the attention of the Hon.
Leader of the House now, and I said that this would
pass my way some time again. Last year I was pro-
mised that I would have a say over the air; in fact,
that was the year before last. The Hon. Minister at
that time had given me that assurance, but he quickly
left the Island before the day of the next meeting. At
the next meeting the apparatus was not brought in. At
that time he was a Minister; he was Quarter Master,
General, Foreman and everything then. This time he
is only a boy as far as that is concerned, because he
is not the Minister. He was the Minister at the time
and he gave me that assurance. When I raised the
point the Prime Minister said that he gave instruc-
tions not to bring back the equipment at that time
and that was the end of it. Last year I raised the
point again, and after I succeeded in convincing the
Prime Minister, he passed on the Order I would not
say to whom he gave it for it to be brought in. The
hon. junior member for St. John said: "No, it would
not be fair to Cammie" and it was not done. (ASIDES)
I am saying what the hon. member said, and the
Prime Minister dropped it like a red-hot brick. He
was in favour of it, he gave instructions to bring it
in I am calling names now but after the hon. ju-
nior member for St. John said: "No, it would not be
fair" he dropped it.

This is my time this afternoon. Iam not waiting
until the Prime Minister speaks because Iknow what







1780


is going to happen. I do not know where they put up
these things so that I can go one night and break open
the premises and bring them in here next Tuesday.
After they have left these premises, they have gone
for good and you will be laughing at me, but nobody
will be laughing at me this afternoon; it will be more
a possibility of my being locked up. I am not allow-
ing the Prime Minister to say one word through this
equipment. I am saying this now; I will wait until the
Prime Minister comes in, and as soon as he starts,
I will work. No one can prevent me from doing it; no -
body can touch me. I am sure he will not do it. I have
been tricked too many times and this is my time now.
I was promised last year that it would be done; he
would not do it. Sir,doyou think it is fair that we are
the representatives of the people and a Minister or the
Government on the whole is dictatingto us to tell us
what we should do? This is very important business.
This is the Financial Statement and Budgetary Pro-
posals. It is the people who want to hear it; it is not
so much that we want to give it out, but it is that the
people want to hear it. Youwill be muzzling the peo-
ple if it does not happen and Iam muzzling the Prime
Minister this afternoon.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
rose on a point of order.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I really think
that we are putting this thing out of proportion. I have
already given the hon. member the assurance which
he could reasonably want. I have said that when the
Hon. Leader of the Opposition gives notice of his
motion, I will consult with him to everybody's mutual
satisfaction.

At this stage, it now being 4.30 p.m. of the clock.

Mr. SPEAKER: It now being after 4.30 p.m. of
the clock, it is now time for Government Business.
4.30 p.m.

Mr. CORBIN: Mr. Speaker, Sir......

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House
caught my eye first.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, as I intimated
to the House last week, it was at this day's sitting
that the Hon. Prime Minister and Minister of Fi-
nance intended to lay before the House the Budgetary
Statement and Fiscal Proposals for this year. I now
beg to move that that be Order No. 1 under Govern-
ment Business.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Mr. SMITH: On a point of explanation, for the
benefit of the Prime Minister who was not in the
House I do not want to do anything that he may not
be au fait with but the Prime Minister will agree
with me .that last year he gave instructions to bring
in apparatus so that I would be able to speak, and the
hon. junior member for St. John practically threw a
spanner in the works.


It is my wish and the people's wish that the
Statement on the Budgetary Proposals after being
broadcast by the Prime Minister should be broad-
cast by any other member of this House. Up to now
I cannot guarantee that that will be done because it
should be settled before the Prime Minister starts.

If the Prime Minister starts without a settlement
I am going to interrupt. I am not going to let the
thing work. I have my tool, Sir, to work with, Mr.
Prime Minister, and if I do not get the assurance
before he starts, I will make sure that the people
do not hear him either.

What I am going to do you will not see in the
Standing Orders nor in the Constitution. So it will
not be breaking the rules of the Constitution or the
Standing Orders. It is what I am claiming as my
democratic rights this afternoon. If I do not get an
assurance before the Prime Minister starts, I will
throw a spanner in the works. I am claiming my
rights. Let me get them this afternoon or else the
Prime Minister will be heard through these, but not
through those down there.

It is left to the Prime Minister, and to the House
and to you, I want an assurance before the P.M.
starts.

Mr. SPEAKER: Let the hon. member not refer
to P.M.

Mr. SMITH: I was only trying to make it short.
I see P.M. in the newspaper. You cannot do wrong
in the newspaper, but you can do wrong in here. I am
claiming my democratic rights. In the same way that
Dr. Martin Luther King fought for the people and lost
his life, I am prepared to do it here this afternoon.

I will not let it work before I get the assurance
from the Prime Minister. If he starts without giving
that assurance I am going to finish it up.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, Iunderstand
that the hon. senior member for St. Joseph is pre-
pared to break up these proceedings unless I give
him some assurance.

Mr. SMITH: On a point of order. Idid not say that
I was going to break up the proceedings. I said that
you will talk here but not there. That is not breaking
up the proceedings.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: The hon. member while I
was speaking took up a pair of pliers which is now
over his head and said that he was prepared to use
them and would not let the proceedings go on. I can
only take it I -have no intention of giving way to any
such threats, If he thinks that he can do that with
impunity, I will read Section 39 of the Malicious In-
jury to Property Act, 1868-2 which says:-

"Whosoever shall unlawfully and maliciously
commit any damage, injury, or spoil, to orupon any
real or personal property whatsoever, either of a







1781
....- -- --. '-,; ,


public or private nature, for which no punishment is
hereinbefore provided, the damage, injury or spoil
being to an amount exceeding five pounds, shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, and being convicted there -
of shall be liable, at the discretion of the court, to be
imprisoned for any term not exceeding two years, with
or without hard labour and in case any such offence
shall be committed between the hours of nine of the
clock in the evening and six of the clock in the next
morning, shall be liable at the discretion of the court,
to be kept in penal servitude for any term not ex-
ceeding five years and not less than three years, or
to be imprisoned for any term not exceeding two
years, with or without hard labour."

Now, there is a popular misconception that if one
is a member of the House, he automatically becomes
above the law of the land. The hon. member is not a
lawyer, and I am giving him free and gratuitous ad-
vice. Section 39 of the Malicious Injury to Property
Act 1968-2 has not been repealed.

The hon. member may have been carried away
because he feels that he has got an audience. I have
no recollection of having made any promise, but I
would like to remind the hon. member thatunder the
previous regime he had no opportunity to speak into
the microphone or at all. The only time his voice
was heard was when he said "hon. members in fa-
will please say "Aye", and those against willplease
say 'No" when he was Chairman of Committees.

We have instituted the broadcasting of important
debates in this Chamber. We have given to the Oppo -
sition the opportunity to be heard. It is for the hon.
member to regulate with the members on his side
what period of time he should have. That is all I could
promise the hon. member. He asked me for an as-
surance that he would be given a broadcast.

If he feels that he will not have an opportunity
to broadcast, he should leave that Party and join
another Party in which he would have more demo-
cratic rights. I repeat that we will not undertake
to give them any time over and above what they give
the Government. If the hon. member still intends to
pursue his nefarious intentions to commit damage
to property he is entitled to go ahead; but I think that
the whole principle of democracy is being distorted
particularly in the minds of members on the other
side that this gives them unlimited licence to com-
mit a crime such as this.

I would like to remind the hon. member that al-
though my last Budget Speech was 12 months ago, it
is still being debated during Private Members' Busi-
ness, and the Opposition is enjoying the monopoly
of a debate which has been going on for the past 12
months.

It is a ridiculous situation that an Opposition
which prides itself on being so replete with financial
,geniuses should only be able to table a Resolution
saying: "Be it resolved that this House note the Fi-
nancial Statement and Budgetary Proposals for the
Fiscal Year 1967-68 contained in a Statement made


in this Honourable House on 30th June, 1967, by the
Minister of Finance."
4.40 p.m.

Mr. Speaker, I rise to present my Financial
Statement and Budgetary Proposals for the financial
year 1968-69.

Mr. SMITH: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.
Now, Sir, I have asked for an assurance of the time
that will be given to us. Would like to hear how much
time will be given to us after the Hon. Prime Minister
has spoken.

The Hon. Prime Minister cannot frighten me by
talking about damage to public property and going to
gaol. If I go to gaol now, Sir, the devaluation or the
cost of living will not worry me. It will worry the
Prime Minister because he will have to find money
to keep me up there. I am willing to go along now. I
should have had a rest long ago. The only way I would
really get a rest is to go up there. They cannot make
me work if I do not want to work, and I am a sick
man at that. I am out for peace. If the Prime Minis-
ter takes 10 minutes to deliver his speech, give us
10 minutes. If he takes an hour, give us the same
hour. I will agree to that, and if that is agreed upon
now, if the Hon. Prime Minister, or the Hon. Leader
of the House, gives me that assurance now that it will
be time for time, then I will put up my tools. If I do
not get an assurance, I will work my tools and put
my hands on somebody. You can handcuff me and
carry me up. I am for peace, and if they are for
peace, too, they will give equal time. If he takes 10
minutes, we will get 10 minutes; if he takes an hour,
we will get an hour, and we will then decide among
ourselves who should speak for that one hour. If the
Leader of the House can give me that assurance, I
have nothing further to say.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, the assurance
was given last year and year before. What happened
last year, however, was that the hon. senior member
for St. Thomas had equal time with the Prime Minis-
ter. I think it was 42 minutes, or whatever it was, and
he monopolised all the time. This year if the Prime
Minister speaks for 60, 70 or whatever minutes, the
other side will have those minutes and it will be for
the hon. senior member for St. Thomas to let him
have some of the time which is at their disposal.


Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: On point of order, Mr.
Speaker. The Prime Minister made his speech which
was broadcast live, and it was then rebroadcast the
same evening 84 minutes orwhatever itwas. When
the Resolution was tabled by the hon. junior member
for St. Joseph, the Leader of the Opposition, it was
designed for a specific purpose, and since it only
took note of the Budgetary Proposals, there would
be no question of a Government Minister having the
right to reply at the end. Despite the form of words
in the Resolution, what the Hon. Leader of the House
announced was that half an hour would be given and
half an hour for a Government reply. Indeed, my
speech was cut off from Rediffusion in midstream.







1782


At the end of half hour it was cut off. The Prime
Minister's speech ran its full length.

To be truthful, Mr. Speaker, I am not so imper-
tinent as to suggest that, on the Budget the views of
the Opposition something within the province of the
Minister of Finance should be treated as though
they were of the same importance. I believe that we
must be heard, but after all the Budget is the Budget.
We were cut off in the middle and told that there
would then be a Government Reply equal in time to
my half an hour. Certainly I was cutoff precisely in
the middle of my speech.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, on a point
of order. I would like to know if the Leader of the
House has got an assurance beforehand. Apparently
he knows nothing about it. Does he know if the Prime
Minister speaks for six hours C.B.C. will give six
hours' time to the Opposition? Is C.B.C. going to
abandon its commercial broadcast for the length of
time the Prime Minister and the Opposition may
speak?

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, before Icom-
mence my Financial Statement, I would like to re-
assure, with the deepest sincerity, the hon. member
who has just sat down that we will give him 17 times
the amount of time which he gave us when we were
in the Opposition. I couldn't be more generous than
that.

Mr. Speaker, I now rise, after some delay, to
present my Financial Statement and Budgetary Pro-
posals for the financial year 1968-69.

Mr. J. M. G. M. ADAMS: On a point of order.
Mr. Speaker, I am sorry I have to raise this matter
at this stage. I refer to the Economic Survey. I en-
tered the House at a late stage, and I would like to
know whether the Economic Survey, which is nor-
mally circulated before the Budget Speech, has been
circulated to hon. members. If so, Ihave not had my
copy, and really I did not know that we received the
Budget Statement before the Survey was in circula-
tion! I thought it was a prerequisite to the Budget
Statement. I have not got my copy, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid I cannot regard that
as a point of order.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, if the hon.
member will allow me......

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker; I was about to rise on
a point of order. I have not got the assurance of the
time that will be given to us. If I am not going to get
it, I am not asking about it any more. I am going to
gaol. As soon as the Prime Minister starts I am go-
ing to start, because, if they really intended to ac-
commodate us with the time, they would do it. Now,
the Hon. Prime Minister got up and said that the same
time that was allowed to them during the regime of the
Hon. Leader of the Opposition will be given to us. Now
what can I understand that to mean? He is not giving
-any time. (Laughter)


Mr. Speaker, I am asking the Hon. Leader of the
House if he will give an assurance regarding the time.
If he does not give the assurance, I am going to work.
This is the last time I am saying this. If they do not
get up, Sir, I will be getting up.

Mr. SPEAKER: Perhaps I might be of some as-
sistance. Whilst I agree that 17 times zero is zero,
and that is what I gather the hon. senior member for
St. Joseph is saying, it is my understand from the
Government that as many minutes or hours as are
allotted to them will be allotted to the Opposition.
Whether it is X minutes that is my understanding -
there will be an equal amount of time. If I am wrong,
will Government instantly correct me?

Hon, J. C. TUDOR: Your Honour is correct.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, does that
mean that the Hon. Leader of the House has that as -
surance from the Thomson Corporation?Are they
promising that for any length of time members of
the House of Assembly choose to speak, they will be
granted that time?
4.50 p.m.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: No Sir. It is not for any time
that members of the House of Assembly choose to
speak. It is this: that if the Prime Minister and Hon.
Minister of Finance's Budgetary Proposals take him
70 minutes or whatever minutes there are to speak
then, the other side will have 70 minutes over the
air and will divide the time as they see fit.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I keep
asking and so far he has not answered. Has the Leader
of the House that assurance from C.B.C.? It is one
thing for the hon. member to say that here and then
come in here next Tuesday, and say "I am sorry I
made a promise, but I spoke without C.B.C., and
C.B.C. says: "No, they cannot give up all that time."
Is he prepared to kiss the Book? Is he prepared to go
on oath?


Mr. SPEAKER:I am afraid that our Gideon Bibles
are not now around the Table; so no hon. member has
any facility for taking an oath.



Let the Hon. and Learned Minister of Finance
proceed with his Budgetary Proposals.


Hon, E. W. BARROW: This is now Ibelieve, Mr.
Speaker, the fourth time that I have risen to try to
make my Financial Statement and Budgetary Pro-
posals. I am only going to do so, Mr. Speaker, on
the assurance that the Standing Orders, specifically
Standing Order No. 29 (6) are observed. Standing
Order No. 29 deals with the behaviour of members
who are not speaking, and Rule 6 states "While a
member is speaking all other members shall be
silent or shall confer...." (even with the Clerk) only
in undertones and shall not make any unseemly in-
terruptions."







1783


FINANCIAL STATEMENT AND BUDGET PROPOSALS



Mr. Speaker,, I rise now for the fourth time-to present my Finan-
cial Statement and Budgetary Proposals for the financial year 1968-69.

On previous occasions from as early as 1962 I have managed
to publish an annual Economic Survey either shortly before or simulta-
neously with the presentation of the Budget. I regret that this has not
been possible this year on account of difficulties experienced in securing
the sector statistics upon which we base our analysis of the behaviour
of the Barbados economy during the past year. A special team of ex-
perts from the Inter-American Committee of the Alliance for Progress
which visited Barbados earlier this year expressed some concern over
the lack of up-to-date statistical material; and although to some degree
we must blame an inadequacy of staff, to a larger extent this defect is
compounded by the lack of co-operation on the part of the private sec-
tor, and even by a modicum of delinquency on the part of some depart-
ments of Government. There will be, I hope, considerable improvement
in our statistical services by this time next year, even if I have to invoke
the authority vested by the law to wrench the necessary information from
those in default.

As far as this year's exercise is concerned, I have every expecta-
tion that the Economic Survey will be laid on the Table of the House
within the next three to four weeks. The need for a Financial Statement
and Budget of the kind, nature and quality to which the Legislature has
been treated for the past six years arises out of the presentation and
passage through Parliament before the 31st March each year of the Annual
Estimates of revenue and expenditure both on Current and on Capital
Accounts. This has been so from time immemorial, and is now enshrined
in the Constitution of a sovereign and independent Barbados.

Whereas a Minister of Finance has considerable latitude in fixing
a date for the presentation of a Financial Statement and Budget such as
I am now presenting and indeed need not present a Budget at all if
the Government's revenue and expenditure pattern and the economy
generally are in that delicately balanced state of equilibrium which it
would be inadvisable to disturb, there is no such discretion in respect
of the Annual Estimates which with monotonous regularity have always
negotiated both Houses of the Legislature before the 31st day of March
in each and every year. Behind this, however, lie months of examination
on the part of the Estimates Committee of every proposal for expenditure
which is not fixed by law put forward by the Government departments.
This examiii;tion usually begins some time in October and continues
five or six daynvs a week until late February under the chairmanship of
the Minister of Home Affairs, who has relieved me of this burden for the
past two years. Before this I was indebted to the former Attorney General
and Leader of the Senate for performing a similar duty on my behalf.
Both of these Ministers have been extremely vigilant in their examination
of the requests put forward by Ministries and Government departments.
My own Ministry has frequently felt the keenness of the axe which they
have applied so ruthlessly when necessary. Long before members of
this House see the Draft Estimates, the proposals may have been pruned
by some two or three million dollars. The time has come, if it is not
long overdue, when some formal recognition should be given to the role
played by a Minister who is a member of the Other Place in the manage-
ment of the finances of the country. I have long been advised by my
colleague, the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, that it is imprac-
tical for the person who is head of the Government and also in charge
of its foreign affairs to carry sole responsibility for the exchequer of








1784


the country. My personal experience both as regards the chairmanship
of the Estimates Committee and attendance at Conferences, more so now
that membership of the Inter-American Development Bank and the Regional
Development Bank is not far off, fortifies me in the decision that the
Honourable Minister of Home Affairs should also assume special respon-
sibility for Finance alongside the portfolio which I shall continue to
hold.

In Trinidad and Tobago a Minister of State was created with spe-
cial responsibility for this subject alongside the Prime Minister who
retains the portfolio of Finance. We strenuously avoid proliferation of
Ministers in this country which has a much smaller economy than our
independent neighbours in the Commonwealth Caribbean.

The year through which we have just passed has been for our coun-
try a most eventful one. W.e in Barbados have not been innocent by-
standers in these events, but we have played a leading role in the march
forward of our people in the Caribbean, and in the process we have
managed to retain and secure the good will and respect of all.

The Free Trade area which my Government initiated in 1965 came
into operation on the 1st day of May this year with the additional par-
ticipation of Trinidad and Tobago. Last week in Guyana the applications
of the Windward and Leeward Islands and of Jamaica were unanimously
accepted by the four original signatories. By the first of August this
year the provisions of the Carifta Agreement will have universal appli-
cation to more countries and territories than formerly comprised the now
defunct West Indies Federation. The Associated States of the Eastern
Caribbean have under the impetus of Carifta constituted themselves a
Common Market. All this has been accomplished without any assistance
from the metropolitan country that formerly strangled and controlled the
genius of the West Indian people to devise institutions for themselves;
it has been accomplished only because they no longer can confuse and
confound. Great Britain herself after scorning the overtures of the Inner
Six ten years ago when the Treaty of Rome was drawn up now finds her-
self a dejected suppliant at the gate of Europe. As early as 1962 I set
up a Committee under my chairmanship composed of representatives of
commerce, industry, agriculture and Trade Unions together with Govern-
ment nominees at both Ministerial and official level to examine the im-
plications of Associated Overseas status under Part IV of the Treaty
of Rome, should Britain's application to join the European Common Mar-
ket prove successful.



I also initiated a debate in this Chamber, and reported to Parliament
on ty attendance at the Prime Ministers' Conference held in London in
September, 1962 at which the implications to the Commonwealth of Bri-
tain's application were exhaustively discussed. Nothing new has taken
place since that time which would have persuaded either the Government
or the Advisory Committee to alter its view that in the absence of posi-
tive assurances from the Inner Six rather than from Britain that our special
commodity agreements would be protected, this country would have to
be most concerned over the future of its exports if the application were
successful. Whilst Britain stands at the gate with patient expectation,
we in the Caribbean cannot afford to stand idly by slavishly reliant upon
vague expressions of pious intentions, the fulfillment of which in any
event lie outside the control of our major trading partners. We have to
pursue new associations which will cushion the shock of final abandon-
ment of Imperial ties, as final abandonment there undoubtedly will be.







1785


It is with this sobering conviction always in mind that we must
welcome our acceptance into the Organisation of American States during
the past year; out impending membership of the two hemispheric banks
to which I have referred; the realisation of Carifta and the greater ex-
pectations of the New World Common Market projected for 1985 by the
President of the United States at Punte del Este in April last year..

Other significant events which have taken place since my last
Budget was delivered have been the United Nations Conference on
Trade and Development which was held in New Delhi, and from which
the countries like ours who are primary producers were expecting some
liberalisation in the attitude of the industrial economies. Our Deputy
High Commissioner in London attended this Conference which ended in
an atmosphere of disenchantment Barbados was also represented at
the World Sugar Conference held in Geneva under the chairmanship of
the Minister of Trade of Jamaica. The achievements of this particular
Conference are a matter of close concern to us. Whilst no agreement
was actually reached, the Conference will be reconvened later this year
so that hope still remains alive for the conclusion of a sensible agree-
ment to govern the production and disposal of the commodity which bulks
so largely in our national economy.

Barbados was also represented at Ministerial level at a United
Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation Conference held in Rome,
at the International Labour Office Conference in Geneva which is just-
concluded, and has sent observers to meetings of Inter-American Deve-
lopment Bank at Bogota, Columbia; the Economic Commission for Latin
America in Caracas in the Republic of Venezuela; the Inter-American
Committee for Tax Administration in Buenos Aires; and the World Health
Organisation in Geneva.

On the general question of Conferences, Cabinet has laid down a
very firm policy that this country will take part only in such meetings and
Conferences as can be demonstrated to be likely to bring about some
economic benefits to the community as a whole. We have with regret,
therefore, declined participation in such amorphous though laudable ex-
ercises as the Human Rights Conference in Teheran, and the recent
meeting of the Economic and Social Council held in Washington. We
will certainly have to reconsider our attitude to such gatherings as GATT
and UNCTAD unless the richer countries abandon their current attitude of
cynicism towards the problems of the less developed economies such as
ours.

It is also high time that the doctrine that all roads should lead to
Rome and Geneva be discarded, and that consideration be given to venues
in the Caribbean Countries which now enjoy the facilities which were not
apparent during the Colonialist period and the days of the League of
Nations. We cannot afford to pay dues to clubs whose administrative
arrangements tend always to benefit the richer members at the expense
of the poorer ones,

Since the Economic Survey has not yet been printed, I shall give
some details as to the performance of the economy during the year through
which we have just passed.

The year 1967 was one of continued economic expansion and growth.
Indeed, for some sectors it was one of record expansion in activity.

Receipts from the sale and production of sugar were the highest
since the year 1957. The contribution to Gross Domestic Product by this
,ector stood at $35.1 million; the rate of increase over the year 1966 was







1786


9.7%. Receipts from the sale of sugar abroad amounted to $37.3 million in
1967. Except for the year 1963, this figure represents the highest earnings
from this sector ever.

Earnings from the tourist sector showed similar signs of growth on
an unprecedented scale. It is estimated that receipts from tourist expendi-
ture rose from $29.1 million in 1966 to $34.8 million in 1967 a rate of
increase of 19%. This is the highest rate of growth in tourist expenditure
so far recorded.

Perhaps a more accurate index of the true benefits to Barbados of
growing tourist receipts is the growth in the contribution to Gross Domes-
tic Product by the Services sector, The contribution of this sector to
Gross Domestic Product stood at $19.5 million in 1967, compared with
$17.5 million in 1966 an increase of $2 million or 11.40. The rate of
increase in tourist expenditures is indeed heartening.

The Government sector continued to expand, and the contribution
of this sector to Gross Domestic Product in 1967 stood at $25.8 million -
a rate of increase over the previous year's contribution to Gross Domestic
Product of 21.1%.

In 1967 therefore a year of marked expansion in activity in the
main sectors of the economy the Government sector has expanded at an
even faster rate than those sectors referred to above.

Mr. Speaker, this development of expanding Government activity is
of particular relevance to our purpose here today. Both revenue and ex-
penditure of the Government are high and rising in relation to Gross Domes-
tic Product. Between 1960/61 and 1967:/68 Central Government Current
revenues rose from $26.0 million to $50.3 million, an overall increase of
$24.3 million or 93%. Current expenditures have risen even faster, Between
1960/61 and 1967:/68 Current expenditure rose from $22.7 million to $48.7
million an increase of 114.51. As previously observed, this growth in
Current expenditure is due mainly to the expansion of Government activity
in the economy.

At 31st March, 1968, it is estimated that the Public Debt amounted
to $52.9 million an increase of $4.2 million on the figure for the corres-
ponding period in the previous year. Debt charges (i.e., interest and amorti-
zation) on previous loans amounted during the financial year 1967/68 to
about $3.4 million.

Of the total public debt of $52.9 million outstanding at 31st March,
1968, $18 million was raised to finance the construction of the Deep Water
Harbour (which is a self-financing project), and the remaining amount was
used to meet expenditures on agricultural diversification, tourist promotion
(excluding the building of the Hilton Hotel) and industrial development,
extending educational and health services and, also, to improve external
and internal communications.

In 1967/68 debt service charges (interest and amortization) absorbed
6.7% of Current revenue as against 7.8% for the year 1966!/67. The absolute
amount of debt service charges for 1967/68 was the same as that for 1966/
67, but the percentage of debt charges to Current revenue declineddue to
the increase in revenue for 1967/68 over that for 1966/67 by 14.8%.

At 31st March, 1968, the value of Treasury Bills outstanding amounted
to $2.5 million as against $.8 million outstanding at 31st March, 1967.

In 1967 the value of total imports and exports rose by $5.3 million
over the 1966 level to $206.6 million. Percentagewise, this represents an







1787


increase of 2.6% and is indeed low when compared with a rate of increase
for 1966 of 10%.

The value of total imports amounted to $134.3 million in 1967 and
rose by $3.2 million (or 2.4%) over the 1966 level. Again, this rate of in-
crease in imports might be compared with a rate of increase of 11.2% in
1966.

The value of domestic exports during the year however, stood at
$54.8 million and increased by $16.8 million (9.6%) over the 1966 level and
compares with the rate of increase for that year of 6.8%.

Indeed, the deficit in the Balance of Trade position (goods and ser-
vices) for the year shows an absolute decrease from $71.3 million in 1966
to $71.1 million in 1967. This decrease is admittedly small. It represents,
however, for the first time in many years, a reverse in thetrend of a widen-
ing negative balance in the visible trade position. An analysis of total
imports under this item reveals that while imports of machinery and equip-
ment increased from $22.3 million in 1966 to $25.6 million in 1967, imports
of manufactured goods did not rise at all and imports of food fell by $1.7
million all indicative of some progress with our programme of import-
substitution and the predictable development that expansion in productive
capacity must go hand-in-hand with increased imports of capital goods.

DEVALUATION
The British pound was devalued on 18th November 1967 and forced
upon us the devaluation of the E.C. $ which is freely convertible into
sterling at the rate of 4/2 to E.C. $1. The E.C. $ ,P'fully backed by ster -
ling investments, and at present the external--reerves are 101% of circula-
tir, In. addition, there are-~oct assets consisting of participating Govern-
ment securities amounting to nearly 6% of circulation.

Following devaluation, certain price controls have been instituted
on a wider range of consumer goods than formerly. There have been in-
creases in the prices of some goods and services, which increases have
tended to cancel out the net advantage increases in wages and salaries
achieved within the past two years.

With devaluation the United Kingdom Bank rate was raised to 8%,
and interest rates reached a high level. Bank rate has since been reduced
to 7%Y%, but high interest rates in the World's capital markets continue to
prevail. In present circumstances the cost of raising external loans for
the financing of the Development Programme is very high, ifnot prohibitive.

SOCIAL SECURITY SCHEME
The Social Security Scheme commenced on the first Monday of June,
1967. There have been initial problems and teething troubles, but the scheme
is working satisfactorily. Sickness and funeral benefits were paid as from
the first week of September, 1967, while maternity benefits became payable
as from the first week of January 1968. Old Age contributory benefit, in-
validity and survivors' benefits became payable from the third week of
May, 1968. Pensions do not become payable for another two years. The
scheme will generate funds for local investment, and at the end of the
first year of operations the insurance fund stood at approximately $4.5
million.

1967/68 REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE
I shall deal more closely with the out turn figures for revenue and
expenditure for 1967!/68. The original estimate of Current expenditure was
$52.09 million, whereas actual expenditure for the year is $48.6 million,







1788


or a saving of $3.45 million. This was achieved by careful management
and the exercise of rigid financial controls. The revenue for the year
amounted to $50.3 million as compared with an original estimate of $45.5
million. The final accounts on the year's operations show a surplus of
$1.6 million. The revenue yields were as follows -
$ million
Customs duties and Internal
consumption duties .. 22.85
Taxation.... .. 17.83
Licences .. .... .28
Interest and Redemption .. 1.41
Net Revenue Government commercial
undertakings .... .57
Receipts of Government Departments .. 5.63
Other Receipts .... 1.73

$50.30


1967/68 CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Capital expenditure in 1967/68 amounted to $8.6 million, including
a loan of $2.1 million to the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation as fol -
lows -


Agriculture
Communications and Wor&s
Health, Housing and Community
Development
Education
Home Affairs
Development and Industry
Trade, Tourism, Cooperatives and
Fisheries


$ million
.59
1.95


.63
2.75
.51
2.12


.03

$8.58


Capital expenditure was financed as follows -


Loans raised
Short Term borrowing
(Treasury Bills)
Special Bank Loan
(C.B.C. Loan) ..
Current Surplus for year
Cash reserves


.. '2:07


2.49

2.10
1.64
.28
$8.58


PUBLIC DEBT

At the 1st April, 1967 the funded Public Debt stood at $48.7mil -
lion and Treasury Bills outstanding at $813,548. During the year loans
to the extent of $2.07 million were raised locally and at the 1st April,
1968 the Public Debt stood at $52.9 million while Treasury Bills out-
standing amounted to $2.496 million.








1789


1968-69 REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The Approved Estimates for 1968-69 called for expenditure on the
current and capital services of Government to the extent of $65.4 million
as follows:-
Current Expenditure .. $56.1 million
Capital Expenditure .. 9.3 ,,
65.4


Current revenue is estimated at $50.9 million and capital revenue at
$1.026 million, excluding receipts from loans to be raised. The deficit on
Current Account is of the order of $5.1 million, and it will be necessary to
raise some $8.3 million from loans if the Capital programme is to be carried
out in full.

In considering the fiscal action necessary to meet the present situa-
tion the following factors have been taken into account:-

(a) the effects of devaluation on local costs and prices;

(b) the coming into effect of the Caribbean Free Trade Association;

(c) the difficulties in raising external loans;

(d) the need to promote the development of the economy and to in-
crease opportunities for employment;

(e) the discouragement of tax evasion.




MEASURES TO IMPROVE REVENUE YIELDS

Income Tax

In February 1967 this Government was able to secure under the Cana-
dian External Aid the services of a draughtsman to revise the Income Tax
Act and to write a new Act. The draughtsman has completed his assign-
ment, the draft of the new Act has been submitted, and it is hoped to in-
troduce it into Parliament at an early date.

With a view to ensuring that all persons who should pay tax do in
fact pay their taxes, the Government has also, under Canadian External
Aid, obtained assistance for the training of staff in tax investigation
methods and procedures.

The Government hopes that with increased powers under the new
Act to deal with tax avoidance, tax evasion and the problem of arrears,
and with a trained staff and reorganised department, the increased yields
from income tax may justify a review of the rate structure.

Land Valuation and Taxation

With the assistance of the United Nations Development Programme,
the services of two experts in land valuation have been provided to advise
on new legislation and to train local staff to make competent and profes-
sional valuations of property. A new Land Valuation Act has been drafted,
and in January last I opened a course for training of staff in Land Valua-
tion. The programme of training and revaluation will together take nearly
two years so that any increased revenue from the improved system of land
taxation would not accrue before 1970. This is the stage of planning and
preparation.







1790


BUDGET PROPOSALS

I now come to the fiscal measures which the Government needs
to take to meet its commitments. The new tax proposals have been framed
having regard to the effects of devaluation and to the creating of a dis-
incentive to luxury and substitutable consumer imports.

Devaluation has brought with it certain advantages as well as cer-
tain problems. It has caused increases in the cost of public services as
well as public debt charges. It has also caused price increases in a wide
variety of goods.

On the other hand, certain increases will accrue to Customs revenue,
and taxpayers will also benefit from sales and other income receivedin
U.S. and Canadian dollars. I need hardly state that the increases which
accrue to Government revenue only serve to reduce the amount which
would otherwise have had to be imposed to finance Government's opera-
tions during the financial year.

This country is producing an increasing range of manufactured
products, and it is the Government's aim to promote this development
to the fullest extent.

I think that this is the juncture at which I usually advise honourable
members to fasten their seat belts and prepare for take-off. If we don't
get off the ground, it will be due to the overweight of the honourable
senior member for St. Joseph, who will appreciate the low taxation.

I therefore propose to introduce the following measures:-

INCOME TAX

As I stated earlier, a new Income Tax Act and Regulations have
been drafted and will be introduced into Parliament in the near future.
I therefore do not propose any changes at this stage. Such changes as
I have decided should be made will be incorporated in the draft, I regret
that I have to disappoint those who were looking forward to a reduction
in the rates of personal income tax. A re-appraisal of the rate structure
will be made, and the rates will be included in the Act.

The income tax collections for 1967-68 amounted to $15.7 million
as compared with a revised estimate of $14.6 million and an original
estimate of $13.5 million. The estimate for the current year is $15.25
million and is $.536 million less than the actual collections for the
previous year. From the much larger sugar crop in 1967 than in 1966, re-
ceipts over and above the 1967-68 collections should accrue from this
source, Further, this department is being reorganised with a view to
spreading the taxation net and modernising the system of tax collection
generally. For these reasons an additional yield of $750,000 is expected
from this source.

CUSTOMS AND EXCISE

Import Duties
The proposed increases in import duties are concentrated on certain
luxury items, and on some items which at present are either free or where
it is felt that there is room for increases. In 1963 duties on certain equip-
ment were removed as a concession to industry. It is felt that the five








1791



year period was sufficient to enable businesses to equip their premises,
and some of these duties have been restored. The increases are as
follows I think, Mr. Speaker, that because this is a Revenue Act, I
shall have to give the Standard International Trade Classification and
all of the old and new duties in detail and in extenso. The first figure
which I quote will be the S.I.T.C., and the second column will be the class
or description of goods; the present duties will be given next in the
fourth column, and the new duties or proposed revised duties in the last
column. This, I repeat, is necessary because the duties take effect as
from today, that is, after 4.30 p.m., and certainly will be operative by
tomorrow morning.

The increases are as follows:-


Unit Present Proposed
Item No. CLASS OR DESCRIP- for
TION OF GOODS Duty Prefer- Gen- Prefer- Gen-
ential eral ential eral



055.513 Vegetables preserved
or prepared by vine-
gar etc. in airtight
containers .. .. Value* 50 $1.00 10% 20%

112.21 Cider and perry in
bottle .. .. Gal. 140 180 40o 440

112.22 Cider and perry in
wood .. .. Gal. 10p 14o 400 440

112.491 Unenumerated spirits
and other prepara-
tions containing
spirits not exceeding
the strength of Proof Gal. $12.40 $13.00 $16.00 $16.60

112.492 Unenumerated spirits
and other prepara-
tions containing
spirits exceeding
the strength of
Proof .. .. Proof
Gal. $12.40 $13.00 $16.00 $16.60

541.92 Medicinal Wines .. Gal. 84, $ 1.06 $ 3.00 3 3.22

553.04 Perfumed spirits (in-
cluding Eau de
Cologne, Lavender
water and Florida
water) .. .. Value 20% 30% 25% 35%

553.05 Other perfumed spirits Value 20% 30% 25% 35%

553.09 Cosmetics and toilet
preparations other
than soaps n.e.s.
(including rouge,
lipstick, hair dyes,
bath salts and
deodorants) .. Value 20% 30% 25% 35%


*Unit for duty formerly 100 lbs.








1792


S Present Proposed
Unit
CLASS OR DESCRIP- U
Item No. TION OF GOODS for Prefer- Gen- Prefer- Gen-

ential eral ential eral



571.11 Propellent powders Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

571.121 Blasting Powder
(dynamite) .. .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

571.122 Other prepared explo-
sives .. .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

571.21 Mining, blasting and
safety fuses .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

571.22 Percussion and detona-
ting caps, igniters,
detonators .. .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

571.3 Pyrotechnical articles Value 20% 30% 25% 35%

571.41 Loaded cartridges .. Value 20% 30% 25% 35%

571.42 Lead shot, buck shot
and bullets .. .. Value 20% 30% 25% 35%

696.01 Knives .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

696.02 Knife blades .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

696.06 Spoons, forks (table
and the like) .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

698.2 Safes, strong boxes,
cash and deed boxes
and the like .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

698.86 Name plates, sign
plates and the like Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

714.11 Typewriters, electri-
cally operated
(complete) .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.12 Typewriters, other
(complete) .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.13 Parts for items 714.11
and 714.12 .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.14 Cheque-writing ma-
chines .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.21 Calculating machines
etc. (electrically
operated) .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.22 Calculating machines
etc. not electrically
operated .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.23 Parts for items 714.21
and 714.22 .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.31 Statistical machines
(complete) .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.32 Parts for Statistical
machines .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

714.91 Duplicating, address-
ing, etc. .. .. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%








1793


Present Proposed
Unit
CLASS OR DESCRIP--
Item No. for
Item TION OF GOODS Prefer- Gen- Prefer- Gen-
ential eral ential eral


714.92 Parts of office
machinery other than
dictating machine Value 10% 20% 15% 25%

719.121 Air conditioning units
1 hp. or less
(complete) .. .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.122 Non-electric parts for
item 719.121 .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.123 Air conditioning units
of more than 1 hp.
(complete) .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.124 Non-electric parts
for item 719.123 .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.31 Lifting and loading
machinery and parts Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.221 Air conditioning
blowers etc. .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.231 Air cleaners etc. .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

719.81 Humidifier Machines
for air .. .. Value Free 10% 10% 20%

897.121 Spoons and forks of
precious metal .. Value 10% 20% 25% 35%

899.95 Wigs, false beards,
switches and the
like .. .. Value 10% 20% 20% 30%

895.11 Filing Cabinets, racks,
sorting boxes etc. Value 10% 20% 15% 25%
____________________________ t I I ___


CONSUMPTION TAXES AND RESTRUCTURING OF TARIFFS

With the coming into operation of CARIFTA, duties on a wide range
of goods will be removed. The revenue effects of the removal of such
duties would be obvious and it is necessary, to find ways and means of
recovering the revenue loss. I propose to employ the consumption tax
device for the purpose of recovering revenue losses. In order that the
imposition of a consumption tax in certain cases may not raise the price
of commodities unduly where the whole market cannot be supplied from
the area, it will be necessary to restructure the tariff in the case of a
number of items.

Under Annex D of the Caribbean Free Trade Agreement the protec-
tive element in the revenue duties applied to the following goods is phased
out over a period of five years -

Rum
Beer, stout and ale
Gin, vodka and whisky
Petroleum products

Excise duties are charged on rum, beer and petroleum products, and
in the case of beer and petroleum products a consumption tax is also







1794


charged. In order that such goods locally manufactured on which excise
duties are charged may be at no disadvantage, vis-a-vis similar goods
of area origin when the duties have been completely eliminated, it will be
necessary to make certain fiscal adjustments.


It is my intention to replace the excise duty on rum by a consump-
tion tax, and to consolidate the present excise duty and consumption tax
payable on locally manufactured beer and petroleum products into a single
consumption tax. These adjustments will be made shortly.




In imposing consumption taxes, as in the case of import duties, I
propose to pursue a policy of higher duties on luxury items.




I propose the following consumption duties:
Items of Goods Rate
Still Wines, Sparkling wines and Vermouths $2.00 per gallon
Whisky not exceeding strength of proof $5.00 per gallon
Whisky exceeding strength of proof $5.00 per proof gallon

Brandy not exceeding strength of proof $5.00 per gallon

Brandy exceeding strength of proof $5.00 per proof gallon

Gin not exceeding strength of proof $4.00 per gallon

Gin exceeding strength of proof $4.00 per proof gallon

Cordials and liqueurs not exceeding
strength of proof $5.00 per gallon

Cordials and liqueurs exceeding
strength of proof $5.00 per proof gallon

Vodka not exceeding strength of proof $4.00 per gallon

Vodka exceeding strength of proof $4.00 per proof gallon

Cigars and Cheroots $2.00 per lb.

Hand made writing paper, envelopes,
letter pads and similar stationery
used in correspondence (excluding
exercise books), copying paper,
calculating machine paper, letter
paper, foolscap and similar writing
paper 12v per lb.

Refrigerators and refrigerating equipment 20% of value

Stoves, cookers and furnaces 10% of value

Accumulators (storage batteries) 10% of value

Phonograph records 10% of value

Poles, piling and posts 12% of value


Manufactured Gas


- 12% of value







1795


The following adjustments will be made in the tariff structure:-


CLASS OR DESCRIPTION Present Proposed
Item No. OF GOODS
Pref. Gen. Pref. Gen.


719.42 Domestic Refrigerators
non-electric (complete) 20% 30% 10% 20%
725.01 Electric Refrigerators
(Domestic) (complete) .. 20% 30% 10% 20%

081.9 Food wastes and prepared
animal feed n.e.s.

081.91 ,Food wastes and pre-
pared animal feed for
farm animals (horses,
goats, cows, poultry
etc0) (100 lb.) .. Free 12 Free 12v

081.92 Other Food wastes and
prepared animal feed
ne.s. (value) .. 10% 20%

512.751 Saccharine and other artificial
sweetening substances to be
used for medicinal purposes
only, (value) *. 10% 20%

512.752 Saccharine and other artificial
sweetening substances for
other purposes (oz.) .. $2.00 $4.00



MOTOR VEHICLES TAX

I propose to widen the scope of the Motor Vehicles Tax which at
present is chargeable on Motor Cars, motor cabs, hiring cabs and goods
vehicles (excluding vehicles of a maximum gross weight of or exceeding
4480 lbs.) as defined in the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act. By
virtue of the definition in this Act a vehicle carrying more than 6 passen-
gers is excluded from the tax. I propose that the charge should extend to
station wagons and other road motor vehicles constructed for the purpose
of conveying not more than 15 passengers.


RACING SERVICES

I propose to increase the present registration fee of $12,000 to
$20,000. From my observation of the amount of business that is done by
these shops, the increase is justified. It is also proposed to delete the
proviso which reduces the fee by $1,000 for every month of operation after
the month of January in each year. The reason for that, Sir, is that certain
operators come in and pay a limited fee for two or three months, and then
clear out with their spoils. If they want to operate for two or three months
they must pay $20,000.


MISCELLANEOUS CUSTOMS REVENUE

Certain licences and rents are collected by the Customs Department.
These have not been revised for a long time and it is proposed to increase
them and make them meaningful.








1796


Present


Still licences ..


. $4.80 p.a.


Proposed

$100.00 p.a.


Licence to brew beer .

Petroleum Warehouse Rent


$5.00


$100.00


12 per barrel up
to 6 months

After 6 months
44 per month
per 10 gals.


50 per barrel up
to 6 months

After 6 months
254 per month
per 10 gals.


Powder Magazine Rent ..


Certain consequential
tions will also be made.


4 per lb
for 4 years


10 per lb
per annum.


amendments to the relevant Acts and Regula-


Liquor Licences

The fees payable under the Liquor Licences Act have not been
changed for over 11 years. The Act under which we are operating is the
Act of 1957. I now propose to make the following increases in the Sched-
ule to the Liquor Licences Act of 1957:

SCHEDULE


Duty payable in respect of


A general Wholesale Licence
A Wholesale Licence
Retail Licences

Hotel Licence in respect of
an hotel containing -


Licences
Old


$300 p.a.
$100 p.a.

$ 50 p.a.


(a) up to ten bedrooms .. $ 50 p.a.
(b) eleven to twenty-five bedrooms $100 p.a.
(c) 26 to 50 bedrooms

(d) 51 to 100 bedrooms
(e) Over 100 bedrooms .. -

Restaurant Licence .. .. $ 50 p.a.
Occasional Licence .. $ 5 a day
Members Club Licence .. .. $ 5 p.a.
Proprietary Club Licence .. $100 p.a.
Druggist Licence .. .. $ 10 p.a.


N e w
$1,500 p.a.
$ 500 p.a.
$ 100 p.a.



$ 100 p.a.
$ 250 p.a.
$ 500 p.a.
$1,000 p.a.
$1,500 p.a.

$ 100 p.a.
$ 10 a day
$ 10 p.a.
$ 500 p.a.

$ 25 p.a.


The increase from $50 to $100 for a retailer's licence represents
less than $1 per week. But since it will be regarded as a deductio-n


against personal and company tax, the real net increase will
than 70< per week. However, I propose to permit the retailer's
fees to be payable in four equal quarterly instalments, if the
so wishes.


be less
licence
retailer


COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS
I also propose to change the fee chargeable to Commercial Travel-
lers and Transient Traders from $24 to $500. The necessary amendment







1797


will be made to the Commercial Travellers and Transient Traders Act
of 1935-1. I also intend to include a provision in that statute to
make it impossible for an action to be brought against a customer of a
commercial traveller or transient trader unless at the time the goods
were delivered or the contract made the trader or traveller was in pos-
session of a valid licence.
Only ten traders registered last year whilst it is common knowledge
that there are hundreds who descend upon this country in the words of
well known poem "like the wolf from the fold", pick the countryside
clean and vanish back into the haze of the Caribbean sea when the crop
is over. They offer inordinately high prices and unfair competition to
the businesses in Bridgetown and elsewhere who not only pay trade tax
and other taxes but employ local labour as well. I don't think anyone
in this House will shed a tear over that.




FEES OF OFFICE
In the 1967 budget certain fees payable to the Registrar were re-
vised. These were patents, trade marks, company registrations, certi-
ficates of births, baptisms, marriages etc. The yield from these taxes
in 1967-68 was $100,000 as compared with $37,000 in 1966-67. In other
words, Mr. Speaker, the increased fees from trade marks which are mostly
from countries resident overseas yielded an increase of $62,000 or
$63,000. I will continue the process of revising the fees payable to the
Registrar and I propose the following increases "If you have tears,
prepare to shed them now."

My statement or quotation from "Julius Caesar" was in relation to
members of the same profession which we have the honour to belong to
on the opposite side; but I will deal first with the medical and dental
practitioners:-

Medical and Dental Registration
At present practitioners pay a fee of $10.00 for lifetime registra-
tion. I propose a first registration fee of $50.00 and an annual renewal
fee of $120.00.

\ eterinary Surgeons
At present Veterinary surgeons pay a fee of $5.04 for life-time
registration. I also propose a first registration fee of $50.00 and an
annual renewal fee of $120.00.


Engineers, Architects

At present engineers and architects are not required to be regis-
tered. A first registration fee of $50.00 with a renewal fee of $120.00
is also proposed.
Land Surveyors
At present surveyors pay a first registration fee of $2.40 if paid in
January, otherwise $4.80. I propose a first registration fee of $50.00
and an annual renewal fee of $120.00.

Barristers and Solicitors
At present Barristers pay nothing. I also propose a first registra-
tion fee of $50.00 with an annual fee of $120.00. Fees in the same scale
will be payable by Solicitors.








1798


Druggists
Druggists at present also pay nothing. I propose a first registra-
tion fee of $10.00 and an annual renewal fee of $10.00. The reason for
that, Sir, is that there are a lot of young druggists who are just wage
earners and who cannot go into business for themselves in the same way
that a barrister can hang out his shingle.

I propose that all annual registration fees shall be payable in the
month of January, and if not paid within the prescribed time, a penalty
equal to the amount of the fee shall be payable in addition. Full time
Government Officials will be exempt from payment of professional fees.
Legitimacy Act
On the re-registration of one or two children a fee of $1.20 is pay-
able, for three children $1.80 and for four or more children $2.40. I pro-
pose a re-registration fee of $2.00 per child. This is not really a revenue
matter, Mr. Speaker, but in view of the fact that I am making certain
changes in the fees payable to the Registrar, I am taking the opportunity
to regularise certain anomalies which are there, not necessarily in the
upward direction.
Registration of Business Names

A fee of $1.20 is payable on registration, 60 cents on registration
of an alteration and 60 cents on registration of cessation. I propose a
fee of $20.00 on registration and $10.00 for registration of an alteration
or cessation.

Registration of Newspapers
At present no fee is payable. I propose a fee of $100.00.
Bills of Sale

A fee of 96 cents is payable on filing a Bill of Sale and 60 cents
on entering satisfaction. I propose fees of $2.00 and $1.00 respectively.

Late Registration of Births

At present a fee of $2.00 is payable to the Accountant General.
I propose that this be amended to $10.00 payable to the Registrar.

Notarial Executions
Under the Registration Office Act the Registrar is entitled to charge
certain fees. The following increases are proposed:
Present Proposed
For drawing a protest on a bill, and
recording same ...... $ 3.00 $ 7.50
For affixing seal of office only to any
certificate and administering
oath, if required ...... $ 1.50 $ 5.00
For marking each paper as an exhibit .. $ .50 $ 1.00
For noting a protest on a vessel .. $ 6.00 $15.00
For drawing a protest for a vessel,
administering oath to seamen if
required, and recording same .. $20.00 $50.00
For noting a protest on a bill .. .. $ 1.50 $ 5.00
For drawing a certificate or deposition
and affixing seal of office and
administering oath, if required .. $ 5.00 $10.00
I think you can now unfasten your seat-belts.








1799


SUMMARY
I shall now summarise the main features of this Budget.

It is proposed -

(1) To increase the import duties on -

(a) Preserved vegetables in airtight containers;

(b) Cider, perry and unenumerated spirits;

(c) Medicinal wines;

(d) Perfumed spirits and certain cosmetics and toilet prepara-
tions;

(e) Explosives;

(f) Certain items of cutlery;

(g) Safes, strong boxes, cash and deed boxes;

(h) Name and sign plates;

(i) Office machines and equipment;

(j) Air conditioning units, air blowers and cleaners;

(k) Wigs, false beards, switches.


(2) To impose consumption duties on -

(a) Wines, Whisky, Gin, Brandy, Cordials and Vodka;

(b) Cigars and cheroots;

(c) Writing, copying, calculating machines, foolscap and letter
paper (excluding exercise books);

(d) Refrigerators and refrigerating equipment;

(e) Stoves, cookers and furnaces;

(f) Accumulators, phonograph records, poles and posts;

(g) Manufactured gas.


(3) To consolidate the excise and consumption duties on beer and
petroleum products into a single consumption tax;

(4) To replace the excise duty on rum by a consumption tax.

(5) To extend the Motor Vehicles tax to station wagons and other
passenger vehicles carrying not more than 15 passengers;

(6) To increase the registration fee payable by racing service shops;

(7) To increase still licences, licence to brew beer, petroleum
warehouse and powder magazine rents;

(8) To increase the registration fees and annual renewal fees pay-
able by medical and dental practitioners, Veterinary surgeons, Land
Surveyors, barristers, solicitors, druggists, architects and engineers and
to impose such fees where none are payable at present;

(9) To increase the fees for late registration of births and re-regis-
tration under the Legitimacy Act;








1800


(10) To' increase the fees payable for registration, alteration and
cessation under the Registration of Business Names Act;

(11) To impose a fee for the registration of Newspapers;

(12) To increase the fees payable for Notarial executions;

(13) To increase Liquor Licence Fees;

(14) To increase Commercial Travellers and Transient Licence Fees.

The measures which I have outlined are expected to produce $1.27
million made up as follows:-


Import duties
Consumption Taxes
Motor Vehicles tax
Racing Service Shops
Licences ..
Registration Fees and
Notarial executions
Liquor Licences ..
Commercial Travellers


$ 360,000
625,000
50,000
64,000
8,800

53,000
100,000
10,000

$1,270,800


CONCLUSION

The Budget for 1968-69 calls for expenditure of $65.4 million -
$56.1 Current expenditure and $9.3 Capital expenditure. The Current ex-
penditure is $7.5 million more than the actual expenditure for 1967-68
and the Capital expenditure $2.8 million more than the 1967-68 expendi-
ture (excluding the C.B.C. loan of $2.1 million included under this head).

The estimates of revenue for the current year have been reviewed
and it appears that additional revenue may be expected from certain
sources. For reasons which I have already stated an additional $750,000
is expected from income tax. Additional revenue from the airport may also
be expected. The receipts from landing fees for the first two months of
the current financial year are 43% of the total for 1967-68 and 40% of
the estimate for the current year. Airport service charges for the first
ten (10) months of operation also exceed the current year's estimate by
28%. In view of this performance and of the expanding number of sched-


uled flights, additional airport reve
The total revenue in sight for finan,
million made up as follows:-

Approved Estimates

Budgetary measures

Additional receipts -
Income tax

Airport


fnue of $1 million may be expected.
cing of Current expenditure is $53.98


$50.96 million

1.27


.75

1.00

$53.98 million


This leaves a deficit of $2.1 million on Current Account.

Mr. Speaker, we were faced with similar situations during the past
two years. In 1966-67, despite the heavy increase following the salaries
revision, the net out-turn on Current Account was a modest surplus of
$400,000. In 1967-68 the deficit on the Approved Estimates was $6.5
million. The out-turn for that year is a surplus of $1.6 million. These







1801
,, ---1 -- - -- IT ,'


results, Mr. Speaker, as I have said on a former occasion, reinforce my
faith in the ability of this country to pay its way. By this time next year
I will have presented to the House a Bill to completely revise the income
tax laws of Barbados. Immediately after the conclusion of this Statement
I shall ask permission to deal with a Bill in all its stages to confirm the
existing rates of Income Tax. The House may also look forward within
a matter of weeks to a Bill to regulate Insurance Companies carrying on
business in this Island. I intend also within the next twelve months to
modernise our accounting and paying systems by the establishment of a
computer and data.processing centre.

I have good reason to believe that after sorting out one or two
mechanical difficulties, and legal points with the local banks, pensioners
can receive their pensions by post either in August or at the latest in
September.

The Economic Survey, as I explained at the beginning of my State-
ment, should be available before the end of this month. After honourable
members shall have read and digested the Survey, they will no doubt
arrive at much the same conclusion as I. We continue to make progress
at a rate which is remarkable for a developing country which has not re-
ceived a great deal of help from abroad.

Mr. Speaker, I have never in the course of my Budgetary Proposals
attempted to produce by taxation the precise mathematical sum which
will close the gap between estimated expenditure and estimated revenue.
I have always relied upon the principal of deficit budgeting to avoid a
deflationary situation and to encourage consumer demand.

This year I have planned to raise additional revenue of $1.27 mil-
lion by the taxation measures I have outlined. Another $1.7 million will
accrue as a result of improved collection of inland revenue and accel-
erated growth in air traffic. The deficit therefore has been reduced by
$3 million (only $1/ million of which represents new taxation) to a much
more manageable figure of $2.1 million. I look forward on my next Budget
day in 1969 to a situation in which we shall have surpassed by more than
that amount of $2.1 million the revenues anticipated at this time. Having
eased the pressure on the middle and low income consumer, firstly by
price controls and secondly by avoiding any increase in the incidence of
direct or indirect taxation which might even remotely affect these groups,
I hope that the business community and public officers will exercise the
degree of restraint in this year of transition which is only the precursor
to our next era of sweeping reform.







1802


Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, Iam about
to give notice of a Resolution on which will be pegged
the Budget debate. It is hardly necessary to remind
Your Honour......

Mr. SPEAKER: There is precedent for it.

Sir GRANTLEY ADAMS: Yes, but it depends on
the method of procedure, I am minded to say, because
I have in my hand a Statement by Your Honour. I think
the date it was laid was 18th February, 1964. I draw
Your Honour's attention especially to paragraph 6.
"It is accepted as established convention that in mat-
ters on which Standing Orders of this House are silent
the procedure of the United Kingdom Parliament
should prevail." And Your Honour goes on to draw
attention to the Sixteenth Edition of May's Parlia-
mentary Practice on a particular point dealing with
the functions of the Clerk. I say that in order to re -
mind hon. members that at this stage it is customary
- it is convention procedure, I should rather say, in
the English Parliament to have a Resolution on which
you could peg a debate in which the Opposition cri-
ticises the Government, and for that reason I am
giving notice at this stage of a Resolution on the part
of the Opposition which reads as follows:-

"That this House strongly condemns the Gov-
ernment's Financial Proposals as contained in the
Ministerial Statement just made, and deplores its
failure to introduce measures to reduce the high rates
of interest now prevailing in this country, its failure
to introduce measures to stimulate the building in-
dustry, its failure to introduce measures to reduce
the high cost of living, and its failure to introduce
measures to relieve the high rates of unemployment
in this country."

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, I amasking
leave of the House to give notice of certain Bills.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. and Learned Minister
of Finance is seeking leave of the House to give no-
tice of certain Bills at this stage, and if there is no
objection, leave will be granted.

There being no objection, let the Hon. and
Learned member proceed.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, Ibegto give
notice of the following: -

A Bill intituled the Rate of Income Tax, 1968.

A Bill to amend the Motor Vehicles Tax Act,
1960,

A Bill to amend the Racing Service (Registra-
tion of Premises) Act, 1964.

Mr. Speaker, it is my intention to ask leave to
deal with the first Bill in all its stages at today's
sitting.


PAPERS LAID

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, I am com-
manded to lay the following:-

The Customs Duties (No. 2) Order, 1968.

The Consumption Tax (No. 2) Order, 1968.

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME

On motion of Hon. E. W. BARROW, seconded by Hon. C.E.
TALMA, a Bill to settle the Rates of Income Tax for the year
1968 and to make provision for certain other matters in connection
with the levying of the said tax, was read a first time.


On motion of Hon. E. W. BARROW, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, a Bill to amend the Motor Vehicles Tax Act, 1960, was
read a first time.


On motion of Hon. E. W. BARROW, seconded by Hon. J. C.
TUDOR, a Bill to amend the Racing Services (Fegistration of
Premises) Act, 1964, was read a first time.
6.20 p.m.

RATES OF INCOME TAX (AMENDMENT) BILL

Hon. E. W. BARROW: I intimated earlier Mr.
Soeaker, that I should like, as it is customary, to
deal with the Bill to fix the rates of Income Tax in all
of its stages today. I apologise to hon. members that
through some mishap over which I have had no con-
trol, the Bill which is the same as that of last year,
the year before and the year before that, has not been
circulated to hon. members. But in view of the fact
that there is no new provision and Section 2 of the
Bill states that subject to the provisions of Sections
9, 10, and 11 of the Income Tax Act, 1921, and any
other enactment with respect to the rates of tax on
companies and on persons who subscribe anypolicy
of insurance, other than life, the graduated rates of
tax set forth in the Schedule shall be the rates at
which Income Tax shall be charged, levied and col-
lected and paid in and for the year 1968, and these
rates are exactly the same as those for last year, I
am asking leave to proceed with the Bill.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. and Learned Prime
Minister and Minister of Finance is asking leave
to proceed with this Bill, after having duly made an
explanation as to the shortage of copies of it. If there
is no objection, leave will be granted. (AFTER
A PAUSE) There being no objection, leave is granted.
Let the Hon. Minister of Finance proceed.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, as I dis-
closed earlier today, the rates of income tax for
the year 1968 are precisely the rates which were
prevailing in the year 1967 and for some years be-
fore that. There is no alteration whatsoever in the
rates which the taxpayers will be calleduponto pay,
and since the Bill is a very short one with only two
Clauses and a Schedule, I beg to move that this Bill
be now read a second time.







1803


Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.,

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.


On motion of Hon. E. W. BARROW, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into
Committee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.


The two Clauses of the Bill were called and passed.

The Schedule was called and agreed to.


On motion of Hon. E. W. BARROW,seconded by Hon. C.E.
TALMA, the CHAIRMAN reported the passing of the Bill in Com-
mittee.

Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill was read a third time and passed.



COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day stands
in the name of the Hon. Leader of the House:- To
move the House into Committee of Supply to consider
the grant of sums of money for the service of the
Island.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that you do now leave the Chair and the House go into
Committee of Supply.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair, and the House went into Com-
mittee of Supply, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.

6.30 p.m.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE CURRENT No.8

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, in respect of
Head 16, Item 26, Commonwealth War Graves Com-
mission, hon. members already knowthat $500.00 was
provided in this year's Estimates. We have received
advice that the contribution should be somewhat in ex-
cess and this Resolution seeks to supplement the pro -
vision by $104.00

I beg to move that Head 16 Item 26 stand part of
the Schedule.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.


Annexed Estimates Post Office was called.


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Chairman, I beg to move
Item 41 stand part.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon. C. E.
TALMA, the Resolution was passed.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I beg to move that Your Hon-
our do now report the passing of one Resolution in
Committee of Supply.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put andresolved in the affirmative with-
put division, and Mr.. CHAIRMAN reported to Mr. SPEAKER who
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.
On separate motions of Hon. J. C-. TUDOR seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Resolution was read a first and second
time and was agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND THE TOWN AND
COUNTRY PLANNING ACT
Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 2 be taken as the next Order of the Day.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, Sir, I think that
hon. members are well aware of the purpose of this
Bill which is to enact certain amendments to the Town
and Country Planning Act as a result of the abolition
of the Local Government Councils. In addition to this,
opportunity has been taken to do a certain amount of
revision in order to make the Act more effective.

Hon. members may perhaps wish to ask some
questions. I cannot anticipate them and I beg to move
that this Bill be read a second time. If there are any
points raised I will do my best to answer them.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Mr. HINDS: Mr. Speaker, this Bill coming before
us at this time gives me an opportunity to call
the attention of the House to one or two points re-
garding Town and Country Planning as a whole.

Are people really taking Town and Country Plan-
ning very seriously? At the present moment the Town
and Country Planning Department is badly in need of
direction for its proper functioning. Mr. Speaker, Sir,
time and again offences are committed by private
owners, developers and the like, and the attention of the
Town and Country Planning Officer might be drawn
thereto; but he finds himself in the position that with
the Act as it stands at present there is so much red
tape that he finds himself with no effective means of
dealing with them.

There is a long process in havingnotices and en-
forcements served and executed or whatever they







1804


might call it. Throughout this island there is quite a
bit of unauthorised development taking place in every
parish and the Town and Country Planning Office is
not properly staffed to undertake the work.
6.40 p.m.

Quite recently, I understand, they have recruited
two temporary Inspectors to their staff, but even then
that does not begin to touch the hem or the border of
the work that is there to be done. It is so much that it
is not being attended to. One officer, for instance, as
I said before, has to supervise the work, that is, to
carry out inspections; he has to travel; to listen to
complaints and investigate them; when applications
are made he has to visit the sites throughout six
parishes. This is really making the Town and Country
Planning Department look like a real joke.

Some people, on the other hand, make applications
to carry out development, but the time that is spent
waiting for permission to be granted, or your appli-
cation to be refused, is creating hardships in very
many respects. The point is that the Department is
badly understaffed, and the few officers who are there
have much more work than they can really do, and the
machinery for enforcing notices is now lacking in the
Town and Country Planning Officer. It seems to me
that he needs some guidance, or legal assistance. The
Legal Department should be at his service but, on the
other hand, one might say that the advice from the Le -
gal Department is there and it has to be sought.

I am just mentioning these things to the Leader of
the House to let him understand that it is hard on the
Department at the moment to bring certain irregular -
ties under control and to have them corrected. The
people who commit these offences, such as carrying out
development and so on without the Department's per-
mission, just laugh at the Department when enforce-
ment notices are served on them.

Of course, I know how lawyers feel about these
things, because they stand to benefit in the long run.
The Department needs more staff; it needs more ef-
fective machinery, and it should be better equipped to
serve the number of applications that are made and to
expidite matters generally. I wonder if the Leader of
the House would tell us what plans they have for bring-
ing about any of these things.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move that
Your Honour do now leave the Chair and the House go
into Committee on this Bill.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative with-
out division, and Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House into
Committee on the Bill, Mr. YEARWOOD in the Chair.



Clauses 1 t o 24 inclusive were called and passed.
6.50 p.m.


The Schedule was called and passed.

On motion of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by Hon, C, E.
TALM'A, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the passing of one Bill in Com-
mittee amd Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported accor-
dingly.
On separate motions of Hon. J. C. TUDOR, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill was read a third time and passed.
Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I see that Government
Business is about to come to a close, and there is a
Resolution in my name relative to National Insurance,
and I understood from the Hon. Minister that he is
ready to deal with it. It is non-controversial; so I am
asking......

Mr. SPEAKER: I am afraid the Standing Orders
have not been suspended. I wonder if the hon. member
would seek to put that, if it is not controversial, as the
first item under Private Members' Business next
time.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I was asking leave of
the House that we revert to Private Members' Business
It is non-controversial and the Minister is ready to deal
with it.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, I do not
think that we can dispose of it in the time at our dis -
posal. There is only five minutes left before dinner,
and we would have to suspend and come back. The po-
sition is that it is goingto take more than five minutes
to deal with it because I want to explain the provisions
of the Act to the hon. member.

Mr. SPEAKER: May I venture the suggestion that
it be accorded high priority in Private Members' Busi-
ness in fixing the Order Paper for next meeting.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I was thinking that next
Tuesday would be used for the reply to the Budgetary
Proposals. This is non-controversial, and I am ask-
ing leave of the House to revert to Private Members'
Business, and we can dispose of this matter in five
minutes' time.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. senior member for St.
Andrew has given a clear intimation that he is going
to speak he has not said at length.

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, let us dispose of it now.
It would not take longer than five or ten minutes.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, the hon.
member says it is not controversial. The position is
that the hon. member is asking for an amendment to
legislation. I cannot agree to the amendment, but I have
an explanation for the hon. member on it; so it may
be controversial in the end if he does not accept my
explanation. I think we shouldleave ituntilwe can dis-
cuss it and thresh it out. I would see no reason why it
ought to be after I explain to the hon. member what the
position is, but it will take some time, and I have a
draft reply to the hon. member prepared. I think the
hon. member could let us deal with it next Tuesday
and get rid of it under Private Members' time.







1805


Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, this concludes
Government Business.



Mr. SPEAKER: Will the Opposition indicate their
preferences in respect of their business?



Mr. SMITH: Believe me, sir, we started at 2.30
p.m. If-it-is a question that we have to suspend the
sitting-for dinner, let us do so and come back and
finish this, because I am quite willing to work. I ac-
commodated the Government, and the Government can
accommodate me. Last Tuesday we were here from 12
noon until nearly midnight.



Mr. SPEAKER: And we have not forgotten what
happened.



Mr. SMITH: The Minister has already informed
me that he is ready to deal with it, and now he is ask-
ing me to put it off until another time. What I will do
is to do it my way even if I am out-voted.


SUSPENSION OF SITTING

Mr. SPEAKER: The net result is that Standing
Orders not having been suspended, this sitting now
stands suspended until 7.45 p.m.
7.00 p.m.

On re-assembling,

NO QUORUM ADJOURNMENT

Mr. CORBIN: Mr. Speaker, I should like to draw
to your attention that there is no quorum present, and I
ask that the Bell be tung.

Mr. SPEAKER: I thank the hon. member for draw-
ing that to my attention.

On the Bell being rung for two minutes, and there beingno
quorum present,

Mr. SPEAKER: It now being more than two minutes
after the hour for which this Sitting was suspended, and
there being no quorum present, I declare that this
House stand adjourned until Tuesday of next week at
12 o'clock (Noon).
7.48 p.m.




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