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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00082
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00082
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    Supplement: Senate debates for 29th March, 1967
        Page A 67
        Page A 68
        Page A 69
        Page A 70
        Page A 71
        Page A 72
        Page A 73
        Page A 74
        Page A 75
        Page A 76
        Page A 77
        Page A 78
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        Page A 80
        Page A 81
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        Page A 86
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        Page A 101
        Page A 102
        Page A 103
        Page A 104
        Page A 105
        Page A 106
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 42; Customs duties (Alliance Francaise) order, 1967
        Page B 1
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 43; Customs duties (Barbados Arts Council) order, 1969
        Page B 2
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 44: Customs duties (Duke of Edinburg Award Scheme)
        Page B 3
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 45: Customs duties (amendment) order, 1969
        Page B 4
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 46: Land acquisition re land at Saint Thomas for erection of public bath
        Page B 5
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17; S.I. 47: Land acquisition re land at Saint Joseph for resiting of houses from Scotlant District
        Page B 6
Full Text










VOL. CIV


*JffibdI


PUBLISHED BY


vm( eZtte


AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 20TH MARCH, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Application for Liquor Licence at Dist. "A"........ 250
Appointments: N. A. Niles and K. C. Browne to be
Commissioners of Probate........................ 250
V. M. Pilgrim to be Assistant Accountant General 249
F. 0. Sealy to be Customs Guard.................. 249
Grant of leave to Senator P. G. Morgan................ 249
Income Tax Notice (Year of Income 1968)..............267, 268
Industrial Development (Export Industries) Act re
Sporting Goods etc................................ 255
Industrial Incentices Act re Textile Products........ 255
In the Supreme Court of Judicature:
Edwards vs. Walker; Gollop vs. Bartholomew 253, 254
Gollop vs. Sedgemore; Goodridge vs. Corbin 256, 253
Grant vs. Clarke; Iaynes vs. Williams.......... 250, 251
Hewitt vs. Speiler; Power vs. Alleyne and
Pilgrim.............. ................. ....... ....
Power vs. Brathwaite; Volney vs. Clark $5
Land Acquisition re land at Rock Hall, St as 270-.
Probate Advertisements dated 14th Marc 196 ..269, 270
Resignations: Jean M. Bascombe, Staf urs ...... 259
Marjorie Small, Medical Secretary. ..'........ 259
Resolutions: No. 26/1969 for $12,000; 27/1969 for p
$110,144; No. 28/1969 for $4,995.. ... ...... 257-25~9
Trade Marks: "Big Sid", "Discreet", te 2q" 260-266
Trainingin Cartography............................ 250


Senate Debates for 29th March, 1967.


Legal Supplement
S.I. 1969 No. 42: Customs Duties (Alliance Francaise)
Order, 1969.
S.I, 1969 No. 43: Customs Duties (Barbados Arts Council)
Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No, 44: Customs Duties (Duke of Edinburgh Award
Scheme) Order, 1969.
S.I. 1969 No. 45: Customs Duties (Amendment) Order, 1969.
S.I .1969 No. 46: Land Acquisition re land at Saint Thomas
for erection of Public Bath.
S.I. 1969 No. 47: Land Acquisition re land at Saint Joseph
for resting of houses from Scotland District.


NOTICE NO. 210
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Appointments
V. M. Pilgrim, Senior Accountant, Ac-
countant General's Department, has been
appointed to the post of Assistant Accountant
General, with effect from 1st March, 1969.

(M.P. 3173/S2)

F.O. Sealy, tobe Custom Guard, Custom
Department with effect from 1st February,
1969.

M.P. 2900/8 Vol. III)

Resignations
ssi Marjorie Small, Medical Secretary,
ha ig ed from the Public Service with ef-
e om 1st September, 1968.

.(MP.P. 6661)
Miss Jean M. Bascombe, Staff Nurse,
resigns form the Public Service with effect
from 21st March, 1969.

(M.P. P. 9077)
Grant of leave to Senator
Senator P.G. Morgan has been granted
leave of absence from his duty as a Senator
during the period 13th to 29th March, 1969.

(M.P. 0028)


~7Z70
522_70
Ig-s~o


__


~- '"


NO. 23


(Z^









March 20 1969


GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Appointment

N. A. Niles and K. C. Browne to be
Commissioners of Probates for the purposes
of Section 2 of the Commissioners of Probates
Act, 1903.

(M.P. 6291 Vol. II)


NOTICE NO. 211

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court


No. 79 of 1969

OLIVER SEYMOUR GRANT: Plaintiff
SIDNEY OSWALD CLARKE: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 8th day
of May 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THATcertainpiece or
parcel of land situate at Brittons Hill in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island contain-
ing by admeasurement two thousand seven
hundred square feet or thereabouts abutting
and bounding on lands formerly of one
Osbourne but now or late of J. Beckles on
lands formerly of one Moe but now or late of
Mrs. Millar on lands now or late of one White
and on the Public Road or however else the
same may abut and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,350.00

Dated this 10th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


Training in Cartography

Applicants male and female are in-
vited for training in the field of Cartography.
Training is expected to cover a period of six
months and on the completion of such training
successful trainees may be considered for
appointment to posts of Draughtsman and
Field Technician in the Civil Service.

Closing date for applications 22nd
March, 1969.

(M.P. 8581/113)


NOTICE NO. 212

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

(Act 1957- 40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


FRANK EDWARDS
Shopkeeper
Brandons, St. Michael
Board & galvanise build-


ing situate at
Brandons, St. Michael.


Dated this 12th day of March 1969.



Signed: F. EDWARDS
Applicant.


This Application for a Retail Licence
will be considered at a Licensing Court to be
held at Magistrates' Courts District "A" on
Thursday the 27th day of March 1969 at
9 o'clock a.m.


GEORGE COLLYMORE
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20 1969









Marc 2 199OFIILGAET


NOTICE NO. 213

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 568 of 1968

ORVILLE ARTHUR POWER: Plaintiff

MILDRED ALLEYNE &
ARTHUR DORIS PILGRIM: Defendants

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
llth day of April 1960 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT cer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at Lodge
Hill in the parish of Saint Michael in this Is-
land containing by admeasurement one rood
or thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands
of Alexander Crick, onlands of James Yarde
on lands of John Nelson and on the Public
Road or however else the same may abut and
bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Taitt Hill in the
parish of Saint George in this Island contain-
ing by admeasurement one acre sixteen per-
ches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of Winston Pilgrim, on lands now or
late of Ebenezer Tull deceased on lands now
or late of H. Goring on two sides on lands now
or late of a place called Rose Cottage or
however else the same may abut and bound
AND THIRDLY ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Taitt Hill in the
parish of Saint George in this Island contain-
ing by admeasurement one acre one rood six
perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding
on lands of Elizabeth Haynes, on lands of
Amelia Walker on lands of Ernestine Tull


on lands of one Alleyne, on lands of William
Atkinson and on the Public Road or however
else the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICES: $1,000.00; $2,000.00;
$2,000.00

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.

NOTICE NO. 214

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE
High Court
No. 68 of 1969

ERSKINE DENIS WINSTON HAYNES:
Plaintiff

JOSEPH WILLIAMS: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such-claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 8th day
of May 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Lighter Cottage near
Checker Hall in the parish of Saint Lucy an
Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement:
three and three-quarter perches or there-
abouts abutting and bounding on lands of
Hubert Brome on lands of V.I. Richardson
on lands of the estate of S. Skinner deceased
on lands of Mrs. I.E. Harris and on the pub-
lic road or however else the same may abut
and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $500.00

Dated this loth day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969.









252 OFFICIAL GAZETTE March 20, 1969


NOTICE NO. 215

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 588 of 1968

MITCHINSON EDWARD S. HEWITT:
Plaintiff


GOLDIE SPEILER:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1lth day of April 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THATcertainpiece or
parcel of land situate at Shop Hill in the par-
ish of Saint Thomas and Island abovesaid
containing by admeasurement three roods six
perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding
on lands of G. Simmonds on lands of Edghill
Plantation on lands of one Martindale and on
lands of one Maynard and G. Simmonds or
however else the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $2,000.00

Dated this 10th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 216

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 559 of 1969

BRYAN ALEXANDER VOLNEY: Plaintiff


ODESSA CLARKE:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
on the 11th day of April 1969 at 2 p.m. and if
not then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Waterloo Road in the
parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barbados
containing by admeasurement 1,435 square
feet or thereabouts abutting and bounding on
lands of one Hackett, on two sides on lands of
one Jones and on Waterloo Road which leads
to Wellington Street or however else the
same may abut and bound.


UPSET PRICE: $500.00

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C, A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


252'


March 20, 1969








March 20. 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 217

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE,
High C crt

No. 81 of 1969

LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS: Plaintiff

GERALD WALKER: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 8th day
of May, 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at White Hall in the
parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement eleven thousand
six hundred and fifty square feet or there-
abouts (inclusive of one thousand six hundred
and fifty four square feet in the area of the
Public Road hereinafter mentioned) abutting
and bounding on lands of Mr. A. Hope onL
Thompson Gap on lands of Clifford Holloway
and on the Public Road or however else the
same may abut and bound together with the
buildings and erections (exclusive of the
chattel building thereon) on the same erected
and built standing and being with the appur-
tenances.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $9,500..00

Dated this 10th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 218

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 567 of 1968

GRETA PALMYRA GOODRIDGE: Plaintiff

FITZ HERMAN CORBIN: Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1lth day of April 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Whitehall in the
parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barbados
aforesaid containing by admeasurement one
rood and one half perches or thereabouts
(intersected by a Roadway eight feet wide
over which there is a right of way and in
which area are included one and one half
perches in the Public Road) Abutting and
bounding as a whole on lands now or late of
Elizabeth Smith on lands now or late of
Grazettes Plantation on lands late of Hon. J.C.
Lynchand on a road eight feet wide- and on the
Public Road aforesaid or however else the
same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $3,000.00

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20. 1969








CLA Ec .


NOTICE NO. 219



IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 70 of 1969


FRED WINLYN GOLLOP:
ADINA BARTHOLEMEW:


Plaintiff
Defendant


Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 8th day
of May 1969.

PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT cer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at a place
called "Bartletts" in the parish of Christ
Church and Island aforesaid and being the lot
numbered 26 on a Plan dated 27th August 1937
by C. H. Inniss, Sworn Surveyor, formerly
said to contain by admeasurement two roods
and sixteen perches (inclusive of three roods
in a road eight feet wide adjoining the same)
but found by survey made by J. R. Peterkin,
Sworn Surveyor, on 9th January 1969 to con-
tain by admeasurement twenty-six thousand
four hundred and two square feet (inclusive of
nine hundred and twelve square feet in the
said road eight feet wide) BUTTING AND
BOUNDING formerly on lots 25, 27, and 28 on
the said plan of 27th August 1937 but now on


lands of W. L. Kinch, on lots 27 hereinafter
granted and described on the remainder of the
said road eight feet wide and on another road
twelve feet wide which leads to the Public Road
or however else the same may butt and bound
and SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece or-
parcel of land (part of the said place called
Bartletts) and being the lot numbered 27 on
the hereinbefore mentioned plan formerly
said to contain by admeasurement three roods
and thirty-one perches (inclusive of five per-
ches in a road which leads out to the public
road) but found by surveyor made by J.R.
Peterkin, Sworn Surveyor, on the said 9th
January 1969 to contain by admeasurement
forty-one thousand nine hundred and ninety

seven square feet be the same more or less
BUTTING AND BOUNDING formerly on lots
10,11,12,25,26, and 28 on the said Plan dated
27th August 1937 but now abutting and bound-
ing on lands of W. L. Kinch, Gordon
Parkinson, J. D. S. MacKenzie and on the par-
cel of land hereinbefore granted and described
and on lands of one Walcott or however else
the same may butt and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTIES: $7,250.00
each

Dated this loth day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


' March 20. 1969









OFFICIAL GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 220
THE INDUSTRIAL INCENTIVES ACT,1963

(Section 6)

NOTICE

The Honourable Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Finance pursuant to Section 6 of the
Industrial Incentives Act, 1963, hereby gives
notice that he is about to be asked to consider
whether for the purposes of the abovemen-
tioned Act, the following products should be
approved products and whether the following
companies should be approved enterprises in
respect of the relevant products.


Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of these products who objects
to their being declared approved products or
the companies bei g declared approved enter-
prises for the purposes of the Industrial In-
centives Act, 1963, should forward to the
Director, Economic Planning Unit, Office of
the Prime Minister and acopy to the Manager
Barbados Development Board, to reach them
on or before Friday, March 28th, 1969 a
statement in writing setting forth the grounds
of his objection.


Company:
Obo Limited


Relevant Product:
Textile Products


NOTICE NO. 221
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT (EXPORT

INDUSTRIES) ACT, 1963


(Section 6)

NOTICE


The Honourable Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance pursuant to Section 6 of
the Industrial Development (Export Industries)
Act, 1963 hereby gives notice that he is about
to be asked to consider whether for the pur-
poses of the abovementioned Act, Sporting
goods, Balls and protective equipment should
be approved products.


Any person interested in the manufacture
or importation of Sporting goods, Balls and
protective equipment who objects to these
products being declared approved products
for the purposes of the Industrial Develop-
ment (Export Industries) Act, 1963 should
forward to the Director (Ag.) Economic
Planning Unit, Office of the Prime Minister
and a copy to the Manager, Barbados Deve-
lopment Board to reach him on or before
Monday, March 31st 1969, a statement in
writing setting forth the grounds of his ob-
jection.


Ur 9. %


M h 20 1969








O CA A TMc01


NOTICE NO. 222

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court

No. 77 of 1969

FRED WINLYN GOLLOP: Plaintiff

MARY AUDREY SEDGEMORE: Defendant

Any person having any claim, lien or
charge against the property described here-
under shall submit such claim duly authenti-
cated on oath to me on or before the 8th day
of May 1969.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Clapham in the par-
ish of Christ Church in this Island containing
by admeasurement 12,330 square feet (in-
clusive of 670 squarefeet in twopublic roads
which run along the northern and southern
boundaries of the said land) butting and
bounding on the east on lands of one Hutchinson
and H. Hinds, on the South on a public road
called Ford's Road, on the West on lands of
Edna Breedy Skipper and on the North on a
public road known as Clapham Heights or
however else the same may butt and bound.

VALUE OF PROPERTY: $5,830.00

Dated this 10th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


NOTICE NO. 223


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE

High Court
No. 557 of 1968

ORVILLE ARTHUR POWER: Plaintiff

SEMMERSON BRATHWAITE: Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
llth day of April 1969 at 2 p.m. and if not
then sold it will be set up for sale on each
succeeding Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece
or parcel of land situate at Apple Hall, in the
parish of Saint Philip in this Island containing
by admeasurement sixty three thousand three
hundred and forty six square feet (of which
area one thousand one hundred and seventy
eight square feet is contained in the area of a
public road hereinafter mentioned) abutting
and bounding on lands of the estate of one
Kirton deceased, on lands of the estate of
Marcus Brathwaite deceased, on lands of
Mary Williams and on the public road or
however else the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $1,200.00

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20. 1969









March 20. 1969 I A G I


Resolution No. 26/1969


M.P. 5001/8/T10


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Resolved that the sum of TWELVE THOUSAND DOLLARS be granted
from the Consolidated Fund and placed at the disposal of the Government
to supplement the Estimates, 1968-69, Part II Capital as shown in the
Supplementary Estimate, 1968-69 No. 69 which forms the Schedule to this
Resolution and that the Senate be invited to concur herein, and if concurred
in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

4th March, 1969.

THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 13th day of March, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.
I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
14th March, 1969.


SCHEDULE
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 69


HEAD AND ITEM
OF


APPROVED ESTIMATES


Provision in
Approved Estimates
1968-69


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


Provision in
Supplementary Esti-
mates Nos. 1-68


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


Supplementary
Provision
Required


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


$ $ $ $ $ $
PART II CAPITAL

HEAD 104 EDUCATION
Item 5 Extensions to Secondary
Comprehensive Schools 120,000 12,000


March 20, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE









OFFICIAL GAZETTE


Resolution No. 27/1969


M.P. 322/T4


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Resolved that the sum of ONE HUNDRED AND TEN THOUSAND
ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY FOUR DOLLARS be granted from the Con-
solidated Fund and placed at the disposal of the Government tosupplement
the Estimates, '1968-69, ,Part I Current as. shown in the Supplementary
Estimated 1968-69 No. 70 which forms theSchedule to this Resolution and
that the Senate be invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

4th March, 1969.
THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 13th day of March, 1969.
E. S. ROBINSON
President.


I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
14th March, 1969.


SCHEDULE


Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 70

Provision in Provision in Supplementary
Approved Estimates Supplementary Esti- Provision
HEAD AND ITEM 1968-69 mates Nos. 1-69 Required
OF
Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
APPROVED ESTIMATES Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-
ture ture ture ture ture ture

$ $ $ $ $ $
PART I CURRENT
HEAD 38 MINISTRY OF EDU-
CATION (5) SCHOOLS
Item 3 Supernumerary
Teacher 735,670 15,597
Item 4 Acting Staff 611,400 94,187
Item 17 Compulsory Atten-
dance 13,620 360


March 20, 1969


OFFLC~AL aAZETTE









Mac 20....OFFICIAL GAZETTE


Resolution No. 28/1969


M.P. 3864 (No. 2)


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Resolved that the sum of FOUR THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND
NINETY-FIVE DOLLARS be granted from the Consolidated Fund and
placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,
1968-69 Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary Estimate,
1968-69 No. 71 which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the
Senate be invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor- General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.


4th March, 1969.


THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.


Concurred in by the Senate the 13th day of March, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.

I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
14th March, 1969.



SCHEDULE
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 71


Provision in Provision in Supplementary
HEAD AND ITEM Approved Estimates Supplementary Esti- Provision
1968-69 mates Nos. 1-70 Required

OF Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-
APPROVED ESTIMATES ture ture ture ture ture ture

$ $ $ $ $ $


PART I CURRENT

HEAD 3 PARLIAMENT

Item 21- Reporting 33,960 4,995


March 20, 1969;


OFFICIAL QAZETTE









OFFICIAL GAET ach2,16


NOTICE NO. 224

TAKE NOTICE

RCA

That Radio Corporation of America, a
corporation organized and existing under the

laws of the States of Deleware, United States of
America, whose trade or business address is 30
Rockefeller Plaza, City of New York, State of
New York 10020, United States of America trad-
ing as Manufacturers and Merchants, has ap-
plied for the registration of a trade mark
in Part "A" of Register in respect of
Machines for washing and/or drying, laundry,
machines and machine, tools for use in in-
dustry; engines and motors, not for land ve-
hicles; electricgenerators and power plants.
apparatus and instruments for recording,
storing, transmitting, relaying, receiving, re-
producing, analysing, processing and/or
selecting information, data, sound, music,
pictures and/or other signals; apparatus, in-
struments and gauges for testing, measuring,
weighing, probing, indicating and/or con-
trolling; laser apparatus; means of recording
signals, including disc, magnetic tape and
cartridges therefore; apparatus and instru-
ments for the navigation and/or control of
land, water, air and/or space vehicles and
other objects in space or aerospace; electric
batteries; apparatus and instruments for use
in communications, including radio, telephone,
television and other means of signalling;
electric utensils, apparatus and instruments
for use in laboratories and/or for scientific
purposes; apparatus for teaching, training, or
learning, installations and appliances for
heating, lighting, cooking, cooling, refrigera-
ting, air conditioning, ventilating, drying, and
for sanitary purposes, conponent parts of all


the aforesaid goods; printed matter for use in
business, education, entertainment and com-
munications; advertising, business, insurance,
financial, construction, repair, communication
transportation, storage, education, training
and entertainment services and will be en-
titled to register the same after one month
from the 20th day of March 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 225

TAKE NOTICE

TABASCO

That Mcllhenny Company, a corporation
organised and existing under the laws of the
State of Maine, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is City
of New Iberia, State of Louisiana 70560,
United States of America, trading as Manu-
facturers and Merchants, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of Condiments, sauces,
and all kinds of food preparations and sub-
stances; and beverages both alcoholic and
non-alcoholic, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 20th day
of March 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.
Dated this 6th day of March 1969.
C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969








Marc 20,196' OFICIL GAETT


NOTICE NO. 226


Merchandise Marks Act, 1949


TAKE NOTICE

That J. & J. VICKERS & CO. LIMITED,
a limited liability company registered under
the laws of Great Britain of Stratton House,
Stratton Street, London W.I.,England, have
applied for the registration of an assignment
of The Trade Mark No. 2477 COSSACK in
respect of Wines, spirits and liqueurs regis-
tered in Part "A" of the Register of Trade
Marks on 25th May, 1962, in the name of
Booths Distilleries Limited of 57/61
Clerkenwell Road, London, E.C.I.,England,
will be entitled to be entered in the Register
of Trade Marks as subsequent proprietors of
the said Trade Mark after one month from the
20th day of March 1969, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice of opposi-
tion of such registration.

The Trade Mark and Assignment can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 227

TAKE NOTICE

BIG SID

That Reliable Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,
a Company incorporated under the laws of
Jamaica, West Indies, whose trade or busi-
ness address is 131 Water Lane, Kingston,
Jamaica, has applied for the registration of a


trade mark in Part "A" of Register in re-
spect of all types of garments, outer and

underwear, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 20th day of
March 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my
Office of opposition of such registration. The
Trade mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 228

TAKE NOTICE

MAN--ON-THE-SPOT

That Bank of America National Trust
and Savings Association a corporation or-
ganised and existing under the Federal Laws
of the United States of America whose trade
or business address is 300 Montgomery
Street, City of San Francisco, State of
California, United States of America has ap-
plied for the registration of a trade mark in
Part "A" of Register in respect of Printed
matter, printed forms, informational publi-
cations, instruction pamphlets, financial and
economic reports and foreign exchange rate
books and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 20th day of
March 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


March 20, 1969'


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








OFICA GAZETTE Marc 20, 1969


NOTICE NO. 229

TAKE NOTICE

ECKSTEIN No. 5

That Reemtsma Cigarettenfabriken
G.m.b.H., a German industrial corporation
limited, whose trade or business address
is Parkstrasse 51, Hamburgh-Grossflottbek,
Germany, Industrialists, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of tobaccos, cigars and
cigarettes, snuffs and articles for smokers
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 20th day of March 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office.
"The applicants disclaim any exclusive use to
the word "No" and the numeral "5".

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar o f Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 230

TAKE NOTICE

FLOXAPEN

That BEECHAM GROUP LIMITED, trad-
ing also as BEECHAM RESEARCH LABORA-
TORIES, Manufacturers and Merchants, a
British Company, whose trade or business
is Beecham House, Great West Road,
Brentford, Middlesex, England, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in Part
"A" of Register in respect of All Pharmaceut-
ical, veterinary and sanitary substances and
willbe entitled toregister the same after one


month from the 20th day of March 1969 un-
less some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 231

TAKE NOTICE

BEFORE AND AFTER

That A. WANDER, LIMITED, Manufactur-
ing Chemists, whose trade or business ad-
dress is 42, Upper Grosvenor Street,
Grosvenor Square, London, W., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade mark
in Part "A" of Register in respect of Per-
fumes, non-medicated toilet preparations,
including sun tanning preparations (being
non-medicated toilet preparation), cosmetic
preparations, dentifrices, depilatory prepara-
tions, tiolet articles, sachets for use in
waving the hair, shampoos, soaps and essen-
tial oils, and medicated preparations for the
treatment of Sunburn and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
20th day of March 1969 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such re-
gistration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969









MardI 2 196 OFIILAET


NOTICE NO. 232

TAKE NOTICE

ERNTE 23

That Reemtsma Cigarettenfabriken
G.m.b.H., a German Industrial corporation
limited, whose trade or business address
is Parkstrasse 51, Hamburgh-Grossflottbek,
Germany, Industrialists, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of tobaccos, cigars and
cigarettes, snuffs and articles for smokers
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 20th day of March 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office.
"The applicants disclaim any exclusive use to
the numeral "23".

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 233


TAKE NOTICE


SEA & SKI


That Sea & Ski Corporation whose trade
or business address is 975 Timber Way,
Reno, Nevada, in the United States of America,
trading as Distributors, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of Body and Suntan Lotion


and lip balm and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 20th day
of March 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registra-
tion. The trade mark can be seen on applica-
tion at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.



NOTICE NO. 234

TAKE NOTICE


DISCREET


That Ralph Mahfood, a Jamaican National
whose trade or business address is 1 Carmel
Avenue, Kingston 8, Jamaica, West Indies,
has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect of
Pharmaceutical, veterinary and sanitary
substances; infants' and invalids' foods;
plasters, material for bandaging; material
for stopping teeth, dental wax, disinfectants
preparations for killing weeds and destroying
vermin, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 20th day of
March 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


March 20. 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








OFFICIALS GAET ach216


NOTICE NO. 235
TAKE NOTICE

POMAGNE

That H.P. Bulmer Limited a British
Company whose trade or business address is
The Cider Works, Ryelands Street, Hereford,
England, Manufacturers and Merchants has
applied for the registration of a trade mark
in Part "A" of Register in respect of Cider
and will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 20th day of March 1969
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office
of opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 236

TAKE NOTICE


That The Carling Breweries Limited, a
company incorporated under the laws of
Ontario, whose trade or business address is


155 King Street South, Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada, trading as Manufacturers and Mer-
chants, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in res-
spectof Alcoholic brewery beverages includ-
ing ale, lager, beer, porter and stout and will
be entitled to register the same after one
month from the2othday of March 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime.give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of op-
position of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office. "The
applicants disclaim any exclusive right to the
use of the device of a bottle."

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.

NOTICE NO. 237


PUDDIN' HEAD

That Colgate-Palmolive Limited, a
Company duly incorporated in Canada whose
trade or business address is 64 Colgate
Avenue, Toronto, Canada, trading as Manu-
facturers and Merchants, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "B" of
Register in respect of Instant Pudding in
Powdered Form and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 20th day
of March 1969 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969









MarchI 20 99OFCA AET


NOTICE NO. 238

TAKE NOTICE





r e
marshall's Idell

That Silvester Marshall whose address
is Union Cot, Hindsbury Road in the parish of
Saint Michael in this Island, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part "A"
of Register in respect of tea, and will be en-
titled to register the same after one month.
from the 20th day of March 1969 unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office. The mark is
to be limited to the colours Red, Black and
white.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 239


TAKE NOTICE


GALAXIE

That Colgate-Palmolive Limited, a Com-
pany duly incorporated in Canada, whose
trade or business address is 64 Colgate
Avenue, Toronto,8, Canada, trading as Manu-
facturers and Merchants, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part "A' of
Register in respect of "Detergents, Deter-
gents Bars, Pre-soaking Products, Laundry
Soaps, Laundry Bars, all washing and
Cleaning Products and Pharmaceutical Pro-


ducts", and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 20th day of
March 1969 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 240


TAKE NOTICE


That Trinidad Match Factory Limited, a
Company incorporated under the laws of
Trinidad & Tobago, whose trade or business
address is 69 Independence Square, Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
Register in respect of safety matches and
willbe entitled to register the same after one
month from the 20th day of March 1969 unless
some person shall in the meantime give no-
tice in duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office. "The ap-
plicants disclaim any exclusive use of the
words "Safety matches" and "Made in
Trinidad" and "Average 40 contents."

Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969








March 20 1969


NOTICE NO. 241
Merchandise Marks Act, 1949
TAKE NOTICE

HyperpHaze
That COLGATE-PALMOLIVE LIMITED,
a company duly incorporated in Canada, of
64 Colgate Avenue, Toronto 8, Canada, Manu-
facturers and Merchants, being the Regis-
tered Proprietors of the Registered Trade
Mark No. 3655 HyperpHase registered in
Part "A" of the Register of Trade Marks on
26th.April, 1968, have applied to add to or
alter, as the case may be, the said Trade
Mark in certain particulars, to wit:
(a) That the two letters "p" and "H"
are to be underlined and the "s" is
be changed to a "z

and will be entitled to do so after one month
from the 20th day of March 1969, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice of
opposition to such addition or alteration.

The Trade Mark as it presently appears
and as it shall appear when added to or al-
tered can both be seen on application atmy
office.
Dated this 6th day of March 1869.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


NOTICE NO. 242

TAKE NOTICE

BEFORE 'N AFTER

That A. WANDER, LIMITED, Manufac-
turing Chemists, whose trade or business
address is 42, Upper Grosvenor Street,
Grosvenor Square, London, W., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade mark
in Part "A" of Register in respect of Per-
fumes, non-medicated toilet preparations,
including sun tanning preparations (being
non-medicated toilet preparations), cosmetic
preparations, dentifrices, depilatory pre-
patations, toilet articles, sachets for use in
waving the hair, shampoos, soaps and essen-
tials oils; and medicated preparations for the
treatment of Sunburn, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from the
20th day of March 1969 unless some person
shallin the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such re-
gistration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.


Dated this 6th day of March 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Marks.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20 1969











INCOME TAX NOTICE

(Year of Income 1968)

Notice is hereby given that Income Tax Returns are required from:-

(1) Every Company, and every person resident or non resident who has
carried on a business, profession, vocation, trade, manufacture or un-
dertaking of any kind, or an adventure or concern in the nature of trade
in Barbados during the income year 1968.

(2) Every person who was in the income year 1968 -
(a) an owner of land;
(b), as owner of property, other than land, from which as assess-
able income was derived:
(c) a trust or estate;
(d) an individual who
(i) was a married person who wholly supported his spouse,
or
(ii) was a married man whose wife was habitually living with
him,
and whose assessable income, including the assessable income of
his spousewas $1,400 or over in the income year; or

(e) an individual other than an individual described in paragraph
(d) whose assessable income was $800 or over in the income
year.

2. Return Forms

Returns may be obtained from the Inland Revenue Department (2nd
Floor) Treasury Building, Bridge Street, and forms duly filled in must
be delivered to me on or before 30th April, 1969.

3. Every Company and every other person required to file a return of his
assessable income shall in the return
(a) set out the deductions from assessable income that he wishes to
claim,
(b) calculate his taxable income, and
(c) estimate the amount of tax payable by him.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20 1969











4. Rayment of Tax
The tax as estimated and unpaid must be paid as indicated hereunder:-

(a) By Companies
on or before 30th April, 1969.

(b) By Individuals
One half (1/2) not later than 30th June, 1969.
The other half (1/2) not later than 30th November, 1969.

W. A. GITTENS
Commissioner of Inland Revenue.

FORMS TO BE USED BY INDIVIDUALS

1. Short Form

This return form should be used by persons in receipt of income from
the following sources only:-

(a) employment (salary, wages pension etc.) and
(b) interest arising in Barbados.

a brochure has been prepared to assist persons using the short form in
completing returns and estimating tax payable. A copy will be issued with
each form. Please ensure that you obtain a copy.

2. General Form

This return form should be used by all otherpersons. For persons filing
the General Form a Guide has been prepared; this should be of assis-
tance in completing returns and estimating tax payable. A copy will be
issued with each return form.

Penalties

(1) Failure to deliver a return of income by 30th April, 1969, to estimate
tax payable, 5% of tax assessed and unpaid.

(2) Failure to pay an account of tax estimated or that is assessed and
unpaid 5% of the tax due and unpaid or $10 which ever is the greater,

And in addition to penalties at (1) and (2) liable on Summary con-
viction to a fine of not less than $10.00 and not greater than $10,000.


(3) Interest at the rate of 1% per month.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20 1969








March 20, 1969 OFFICIAL GAZETTE 269



PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-

PROBATE of the Will dated the 27th day of March, 1965, of EVAN GARFIELD NURSE late
of Taitt Hill in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on the loth day of
January, 1969, by JULIAN GARFIELD ODLE, the sole Executor named in the Will
of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 23rd day of January, 1961, of JESTINA ELETHA FORDE,
late of Kirtons in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who died on the 17th day
of December, 1966, by ARTHUR LESLIE LUCAS and JAMES CHRISTOPHER
MOTTLEY, the Executors named in the Will of\ the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 18th day of January, 1967, of EDNA SEYMOUR PILGRIM,
late of "Radcliffe", Haggatt Hall Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island
who died on the 13th day of March, 1968, by ROYAL BANK TRUST COMPANY
(BARBADOS) LIMITED, the Executor named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 19th day of February, 1962, of ELSIE GERTRUDE BOUVIER,
late of 1lth Avenue, Belleville in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died
on the 22nd day of February, 1968, by ERIC CUMMINS and GERALD CUMMINS, the
Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 30th day of June, 1968, of DUNCAN LOWE, late of
Chimborazo in the parish of Saint Joseph in this Island who died on the 3rd day of
August, 1968, by MIRIAM HOLDIPP, the sole Executrix named in the Will of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of EVADINE LIBURNEY KNIGHT late of 20
Ripon Street, Greenheys in the County Borough of Manchester, England who died
on the 9th day of March, 1958, by MVARION AGATHA HAREWOOD, the Constituted
Attorney on record in this Island of FRANK IRVIN KNIGHT, husband of the said de-
ceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of DARCY OWEN GRANT late of Weirs Gap,
Brittons Hill in the parish of Saint Michael-in this Island who died on the 13th day of
July, 1944, by ARNOLD WILLIAM Af-LEYNE the Constituted Attorney on record in
this Island of SYBIL GRANT, brother of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of JAMES ERROL BRATHWAITE late of
Eastbourne in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who died on the 4th day of
May, 1968, by DEANIS LEOTTA BRATHWAITE, widow of the said deceased.













ii


aA I _h


---ILI11 ---Y-











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS Cont*d

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of SAMUEL ALBERT ISAACS late of 4 Gully
Field Avenue, Beckles Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on
the 11th day of June, 1968, by NEVILLE WILFRED BOXILL, the Constituted Attor-
ney on record in this Island of UNA BEATRICE VERONICA ISAACS, widow of the
said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of MARIA ALICIA WHITEHEAD late of
Martindales Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on thel4th
day of April, 1967, by SYLVIA DOROTHY WALCOTT, the Attorney on record in this
Island of MARIE BERNADETTE JUSTINE FERGUSSON, mother of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Advertisement
with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications have
been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 14th day of March, 1969.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


NOTICE NO. 243


LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949

(Notice under Section 3)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it ap-
pears to the Minister responsible for lands
that the parcel of land described in the Sche-
dule hereto and situate in the parish of Saint
Thomas is likely to be needed for purposes
which in the opinion of the Minister are pub-
lic purposes namelyfor the purpose of high-
way improvement.
Schedule
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Rock Hall in the parish of Saint


Thomas in this Island (being part of the pro-
perty of Alonza Davis) containing by estima-
tion 388 square feet or thereabouts Abutting
and Bounding on the remaining lands of Alonza
Davis and on the public road or however else
the same may abut and bound.


Dated this 20th day of February One
thousand nine hundred and sixty-nine at
Government Headquarters, Bay Street, in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island of
Barbados.

A. W. SYMMONDS
Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Home Affairs.


Government Printing Office


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


March 20, 1969










THE


SENATE DEBATE




(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966- 71


THE SENATE
Wednesday, 29th March, 1967
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 2 o' clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.
(President); His Honour Senator C. Asquith PHILLIPS,
B.A., (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable H.A
VAUGHAN, O. B.E., Q. C., (Minister of State and Leader
of the Senate); Senator the Honourable P. M.
GREAVES, B.A. (Minister of Home Affairs); Senator
the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q.C., (Attorney General);
Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE, Senator F. C. H.
CARE, Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H.
(Parliamentary Secretary); Senator H. F. ALKINS,
Senator E. Lisle WARD, Senator W.W. BLACKMAN,
M.B.E., Senator S. A. BLANCHETFE, Senator S.V.
ASHBY, Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE, B.Sc., M.B.B.S.,
Senator N. A. BARROW, B.A.; Senator C. G. JOHNSON
Senator D. A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E.;SenatorF.L.
WALCOTT, O.B.E.; Senator Erma V. ROCK; and Sen-
ator R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator P. G. MORGAN.
Prayers were read.
PAPERS
Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan, Minister of
State and Leader of the Senate, laid the following
Papers:-
(i) The National Insurance and Social Secur-
ity (Collection of Contributions)Regula-
tions, 1967.

(ii) The National Insurance and Social Secur-
ity (Contributions) Regulations, 1967.

(iii) The National Insurance and Social Secur-
ity (Classification) Regulations, 1967.

(iv) The National Insurance and Social Secur-
ity (Pensions abroad and Voluntary
Contributions) Regulations, 1967.

(v) The National Insurance and Social Secur-
ity (Benefit) Regulations, 1967.


(vi) The National Insurance and Social Security
(Claims and Payments) Regulations, 1967.

(vii) The National Insurance and Social Security
(Determination of Claims and Questions)
Regulations, 1967.

(viii) Statement showing Net Customs and Excise
Receipts for eleven mo iths ended 28th Feb-
ruary, 1967.

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ASK LEAVE
TO PROCEED WITH MATTERS
NOT ON THE ORDER PAPER

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan gave no-
tice of his intention to ask leave to proceed with the
following matters which were not on the Order Paper
for the day:-

A Resolution to approve the Civil Establish-
ment (General) (Amendment) (No. 4) Order 1967.

A Resolution to approve Supplementary Es-
timate 1966-67, Part I- Current No. 55- $2,375.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE ANNUAL
ESTIMATES OF PORT

The President called the first Order- A Reso-
lution to approve under section 10 of the Barbados
Harbours Act, 1960, the Annual Estimates of the Port
Department for the year 1967-68.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President,-- This is the usual Resolution which
the Government introduces every year dealing with
the estimates of revenue and expenditure for the
Port Department. The main heads of both are set out
in the Resolution.

I move, sir, that the Senate concur in the Resolu-
tion.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President,--Ihope
that I am in order. I hope that the Honourable Minis-
ter will be able to answer a simple question. I under-










stand that there is a talk ofawar between bunkering.
at our port here and bunkeringfacilities recently es-
tablished in Antigua. I donotknowif the Minister can
say that the operation of the bunkering facilities in
Antigua can affect our bunkering and thus our revenue.

There is also a report of major finds of oil off
the shores of Guyana expected to be of so large a
quantity that Trinidad's sales of oil to Guyana will be
affected, and that Guyana has arranged to buy oil from
Antigua which she previously bought from Trinidad.
It would be interesting to know if the Government is
aware of where these developments will lead to. As I
see it, it is an interesting situation developing between
the signatories to the Caribbean Free Trade Area
Agreement.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
I have been asked by the Senator if there has been
some modification of the attitude of the territory of
Guyana towards Trinidad where oil is concerned.
I suppose that everyone around this table has heard of
it. I cannot take that as a final assessment of the sit-
uation, or any guide as to the attitude of Guyana to-
wards the Government of Barbados.
There is, as Senator Mapp has said, a Free Trade
Agreement between Guyana, Barbados and Antigua
which is expected to come into operation soon. I sup-
pose that the matters raised by SenatorMappwill be
given consideration and gone into thoroughly before
finality on the agreement is reached. I am not in a
position to tell him of any definite decision which the
Government has reached on the matter.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE ANNEXED
ESTIMATES OF PORT

The President called the second Order -- A Res-
olution to approve of the expenditure required to sup-
plement the Annexed Estimates of the Port
Department for the year 1966-67, as shown in the
Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, -- The purpose of the Resolution is
set out in the Addendum. The salaries mentioned are
payable to the Port Department staff, and the proposed
increases are made necessary by the recent revision
of the salaries and wages of Government employees.

I move, sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Hon. P.M.Greaves seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

BILL TO DISSOLVE LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CORPORATION AND COUNCILS

The President called the third Order -- A Bill
to dissolve the Corporation and Councils established
by the Local Government Act, 1958; to provide for the
transfer of their functions,assets andliabilitiesto an


Interim Commissioner for Local Government, and for
matters incidental thereto and connected therewith.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, -- The scope of this Bill is compre-
hensively set out in the Objects and Reasons the two
first paragraphs of which say:

"The objects of this Bill are generally to provide
for the dissolution of the Local Government Councils
established by the Local Government Act, 1958 andto
provide for the transfer to, and the performance by.an
Interim Commissioner of all the functions which are
presently performed by the Councils.

This is an interim measure which is considered
necessary until such time as the detailed legislation
which is required for implementing recommendations
arising out of the Jackson Report can be prepared and
enacted."

The provision which will enable that to be done
is contained in Clause 3 of the Bill which provides
that such dissolution should take place on the ap-
pointed day, and the "appointed day" is defined in
Clause 2 as such day as the Governor -General may
appoint by proclamation published in the Official
Gazette.

The Bill also seeks to provide for the transfer to
the Interim Commissioner of all assets and liabili-
ties of the Councils and of all officers and servants of
the Councils. It is provided that the Interim Com-
missioner should be a person designated by the Cabi-
net and provision for the performance of his functions
are contained in Clauses 6 to I0.

There is a further provision in Clause 12 for
safeguarding the position of the present employees of
the Local Government Councils who will be trans-
ferred to the direction of the Interim Commissioner.

Those, sir, briefly speaking, are the main pro-
visions of the Bill. As everyone knows, there has been
some degree of discussion as to the appropriateness
of this Bill, and perhaps it would,notbe out of order
if I were to link it up with the well knownJackson Re-
port which the Bill seeks to implement in some
measure.

Sir, as far as I am aware, three main arguments
have been adduced against the principle of this Bill.
One is that it represents a too sudden break with the
past, secondly that it takes away the fundamental dem -
ocratic right of the people, and thirdly that it de-
prives people of the opportunity of performing civic
and welfare work as a training ground for welfare
services.

I hope to be able to show senators that these ar-
guments are not as forceful as those who advance
them believe that they are. In the first place, I think
that it should be known thatthis Bill only continues a
transfer which began a long time ago. Any student of
local affairs knows that with the coming of the new


_












state of affairsafterI838 andthe multiplicity of func:
tions and responsibilities both at Local Government
and Central Government level, some of the most en-
lightened minds in the House of Assembly were of the
opinion that the Vestry system, which of course has
been replaced bythe Local Government system, but
which in,its basic sense did not differ much, should be
as far aSs possible centralised.

Any person who chooses to look at:the records,
the debates and report of the Select Committee of the
House of Assembly can find what I mentionedearlier
namely that the most enlightened minds of that day
on both sides of the House of Assembly, both Gov-
errnment and private members, were of the opinion
that the functions of the Vestry should be centra-
lised.
What happened was -that there was a clash of per -
sonalities between one of the greatest advocates of
the proposal and one of the prominent members of the
House and the matter was never proceeded with. Then
again,some 40 years later,a similar proposal was put
forward by- one of the most enlightened Governors of
the island that the powers should be more centralised.
The only reason why the,-proposal was not accepted
was because it had.been put forward by a Governor
and was regarded as an interference in the manage-
ment of affairs and because it was put forward at
a time when Barbados was wrestling with the Colo-
nial Office to maintain our representative institutions.

Although the arguments for centratisation were un -
answerable, we went on and oa jogging along with our
somewhat -antiquated system until Sir John Maude-
made his report and we had a Local Government Bill
passed. Then, later we know, Professor Jackson came
and made his report, -and suggested or recommended
that certain of the functions of Local Government
should be transferred en bloc and unhesitatingly to
Central Government while others should remain with
Local Government.


The big question is whether or not those functions
which remain after the other functions have been, as,
Professor Jackson recommended, taken away are.
worth the trouble and the expense of the complete Lo-
cal.Government set up.- Whether ,it is worthwlh Le tak-
ingL-any, responsibility for these functions for the
purposes which Were set out. Great emphasis has been
placed- upon the defects of the Local Government
system -on two paragraphs of Professor Jackson's
Report, one is paragraph 3 in whichhe states that he
found instances of dishonesty Iam not saying for a
moment that there was not, but I.am saying what I
am saying now merely because it seems to me that
those who have read this paragraph have either mis -
understood-or have deliberately misinterpreted it in
order to face. up to their distaste for this Bill.

Mr. Jackson told us that "my enquiry in accord-
ance with the terms of reference was confined to the
system of Local;Government" and it was-not an in-
vestigation, therefore an enquiry. He says that the en-
quiry did; however, bring him into touch with all
aspects, but anybody can see there is a wide


-difference between his enquiry into specific allega-
tions or his seeking to discoverwhether there was or -
was not dishonesty, and his just sitting back and wait-
ing for some person to say that this or that particular
Councillor was dishonest in his financial dealings,
and I take it that they will be reminded of the scope
of the enquiry-and what the terms of reference were.
Therefore when Professor Jackson goes onto say that
he thought it right to say that whilst there were
serious weaknesses, he foundno instance of personal
dishonesty, all that that meant was that none was
disclosed to him. As a matter of fact, the matter was
just left blank, so no argument against this Bill can be
built upon the fact that Professor Jackson didn't dis -
cover that the system of Local Government was in-
adequate.

Much more important and detailed is Chapter 8
of the Report, paragraphs 161-164. Everybody within
the last few weeks who have had an opportunity of
studying the report have been reminded of the ser-
vices which in paragraph 161 Professor Jacksonsug-
gested should be left to the Local Government Council:
Scavenging, Baths, Sanitary conveniences, Civic
centres and playing fields, etc.

He goes on to say in paragraph 161 "I think there
is scope for substantial development" andthatthere
is room for expansion. The big question here, Sir,
is whether or not those services are sufficient to,in
the first place, draw the attentionofand to enlist the
services of men of the necessary calibre if this system
of Local Government obtains that is largely a mat-
ter of opinion- and I can tell this Chamber that this
Bill has not been brought forward suddenly; it is after
the most extensive discussion that it was brought
down. So there was no stampede or no one person
simply decided that Local Government, should be
wiped off the slate, that is absolutely without founda-
tion. The matter was discussed and discussed thor-
oughly in all its aspects, the main consideration being
the welfare of the island and the financial implications
which are involved.

Now,Sir, can anybody say that it is worthwhile
every few years having Local Government elections
purely for the sake of choosing a number of people to
look after Scavenging? To look after baths and
sanitary conveniences, and to look after parks, civic
centres and playing fields? Where are the parks? The
last park,was given to Central Government and that
was in St. Joseph.There is Queen's Park, King George
V Park, Barclays Park; where are the other parks?
Street lighting, Speightstown and Bridgetown areas,
baths and sanitary conveniences. Sir, it is difficult
to accept as serious some of the objections which
one has heard against this Bill based ol the ground
which I suggested.

Care for children. We have already gone into this
and we have taken steps to see that children have
been transferred from Infirmaries and have been
placed in suitable buildings :where they can get
adequate care, but as I say, Sir, if Professor' Jackson
knew more about our community he might verypossi-
bly have made a strong recommendation-I put it no


_ __ _1_











stronger than that -with respect to the future of these
Local Government Councils.. No doubt, a stranger
amqng us, he did not want to impair the value of
some of us.

In Barbados there have been some people who
have resisted change;there were those who resisted
the change in Central Government; there are those
who resisted having a written Constitution, those who
felt that Barbados should have an "'anyhow" Consti-
tution to be covered with difficulty from a multi-
ciplicity of documents, instead of having it set out
in a single document.

There is one very famous Barbadian who said
that once you touch the Vestry system, all your
representative Government is at an end. The Vestry
system was touched Local Government was intro-
duced, and I have not heard that Barbados has gone
own-the drain; we are still gettingalong very well
so that the arguments which have been put forward,
to my mind, are of no force whatever.

Now, Sir, the secondandthird of those objections
which I have mentioned must not be put aside entire-
ly because they are -I would be the last person to
deny dit but it will be necessary for some person
to get up and say that this Government was attempting
to take away the ancient privileges of the people,
to get a number of people to say the same thing with-
out understanding exactly what it is all about.

The criterion with respect to this Chamber is
not whether what is about to be changed is ancient,
but whether it is in keeping with the current times,
and whether with our increasing financial demands
and with the desire for stricter and more precise
financial accounting procedures, the present Local
Government system should be continued; and as I said
earlier,,I will not for a moment suggest that there
has been any financial dishonesty or corruption, but
there may possibly have been certain practices which,
without being liable to be regarded as in any way cor-
rupt, were not in the strictest financial methods. I am
not blaming any particular Councillor or Council as a
whole -as a matter of fact, what has happened is this,
that the Councils have taken on much of the atmos-
phere,.and the spirit of the Vestry System. This is
exactly what took place, and to attempt now to change,
to reconstruct the Local Government Councils, is it
worthwhile carrying out that procedure, going.in for
.the necessary expense and the necessary detailed
vigilance merely for the sake of keeping these few
fragmentary powers which Professor Jackson said
should be given to Local Government Councils. Is it
worthwhile in terms of pounds, shillings and pence;
is it worthwhile?

Sir, around this table I see some members who
are commercial men or whose living is made in the
business; world, who deal with financial matters.
every day of their lives, who teach me finance. I
would ask anyone whether if this was a concern of his:
and he had to decide whether he should rationalize or
whether he should allow it to remain, whether he
would not say it is better to rationalize or go in for


an entirely different setup. Let us rationalise, let us
base this organisation upon an entirely different:
footing.

As I said, the arguments against this are merely
sentimental. What I have just said appliesnot only to
the first and second arguments raised against this
Bill, but the third as well. Izdo not think that-there is
any difficulty in any person coming forward for the
House of Assembly nowadays, none whatever. People
jump straight into the House of Assembly, so those
arguments I' have heard outside mean-absolutely
nothing.

It has been argued, sir, that because of Professor
Jackson's recommendation that certain major fuhdn-
tions of the Councils should be taken away would so
denude the Councils of power and interest as to ren-
der it very unlikely that the sort of person who before
went into Local Government, or before that, into the'
Vestry, would now be keen on coming forward.

What is the situation? The main functions of the
Councils, as of the Vestries, included the assessmelit
of rates. That is done nownot by the Council, but by
the Department of Inland.Revenue. The responsibility
for roads has also been taken away from the Councils.
As a matter of fact some of the roads were taken
over long before we had Local Government Councils.

Since I have been a member of the upper Chamber
I have introduced a Resolution as the result of a re-
quest by one of the Local Government Councils-toa
take over the roads within its jurisdiction. As
Professor Jackson has: said, the important thing is
that the maintenance of the roads at the requisite
standard can be so much better done by CentralT Gov-
ernment than by the Councils.

Therefore we have assessment of rates, and we
have roads.We also have public assistance.-That too
Professor Jackson proposes should be taken over
from the Councils. When these things, the heart of
Local Governiient work, are taken away, nothing of
importance is left; and rather than wait until time
proves, as it seems very likely to prove, that we
would be, keeping up an effete system merely for, the.
sake of perpetuating some prejudice or favourfora
particular form of Government, we should, Lsug-
gest, take time by the forelock nowthat we have gone
into ,independence and take a wide view of the functions
of the Local Government system so that everything is
brought together under a better type of control.



I would conclude by saying, sir, that the argu-,
ments, in favour of the Bill are mainly two. (I) There
is not ,sufficient work for the Local Government
Councils to do, and that the work left, by its very
nature would not invite the participation of men of
the requisite calibre. (2) The financial implications'
of having Local Government Elections every three
years are not worth it compared with the paltry:fune-.
tions which Professor Jackson said should be left to
the Local Government Councils.


- ----












I move, sir, that the Bill be reada second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, -- This
Bill has received widespread condemnation, except
perhaps from members of the Government and sup-
porters of the majority party, not merely because
of what it seeks to do, but also because of the manner
in which the Government is doing it.

Having listened to the member who has just sat
down,, one is tempted to ask who brought Professor
Jackson to this island, and why did they bring him
here. It was not the previous Government that brought
him. If Professor Jackson's recommendations are
now to be wiped off the map, ,so to speak, if they are
now to be ripped in pieces by the same Government
that brought him, then all we can say is that there
was a waste of time, energy and money to bring him
down to carry out his investigation.

One is tempted to conclude that Professor
Jackson might have been brought here with an edict
and did not exactly follow that edict. The Minister in
introducing this Bill, with due apologies to Professor
Jackson, took issue with him especially on the recom-
mendations of the last chapter of his report for the
simple reason that Professor Jackson did not recom-
mend the abolition of Local Government. In order to
justify this Bill the Minister had to pick Professor
Jackson to pieces.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President,, On a point of order. I seldom inter-
rupt a member of this Chamber; but Ido think that the
senator either did not hear me properly -- which I
am inclined to believe otherwise I would have to ac-
cuse him of something unparliamentary, that is de-
liberately twisting something which I have said.

Senator Mapp is of the opinion that Professor
Jackson was brought to make a particular recom-
mendation. It is unworthy to suggest that anyone of the
eminence and reputation of Professor Jacksonwould
be asked to come here andbe given orders before-
hand. I do think that Senator Mapp should be asked to
withdraw his statement if only in fairness to himself
because, as an ex-minister, he should know better.

Nothing that I said bore the meaning that I felt
that Professor Jackson should have made any par-
ticular recommendation. I said that in certain cir-
cumstances he might have come to some other
conclusion, and I stressed the word "might". That
was put as clearly in the circumstances as I thought
that it could have been.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Iwill merely repeat what
I said. What the Minister said gave the impression. I
am not saying that it was so. The Minister has de-
nied it. He is sayingthat it is not so. I am very glad
to hear that it was not so; but that impression has
been given.


I am not a member of this Government and I will
never be. I was a member of the previous Govern-
ment and we brought down Sir John Maude who made
a report. We did not bring him down and then say,
as the Minister has said, "far be it from me to
criticise, but." He goes on to read about the other
services which Professor Jackson said should be
left with a revised form of Local Government and
also criticises Jackson for that. Now the Minister is
alarmed at the fact that I have said that.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: You have ac-
cepted the Minister's explanation. I would not stress
that point any further.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Thankyou,sir. My argu-
ment is that if you are sweeping away Local Govern-
ment altogether you are sweeping away the entire
report of Professor Jackson; and there was no ne-
cessity for the Government to bring him down here
at all.

Another fact is that Professor Jackson reported
two years ago. Since he reported, the party in power
drew up its manifesto for the last elections, and in
that manifesto the party specifically said they would
implement the Jackson Report. In the Speech from the
Throne as recently as the attainment of Independence
it was said that the Jackson Report would be imple-
mented. What we are doing today is not implementing
the Report. In fact there was no need for the report
in these circumstances. Government could have come
to the conclusion long ago that there was need to abol -
ish the Local Government system altogether.

We have gone through a long, intensive and really
ridiculous exercise to reach what? With a stroke of
the pen we are doing away with an institution that has
existed for all these years, and which is not unique
to us but exists in democratic countries as a whole.
And for what reason?

Certainly, sir, nothing that the Minister has said
can justify going to the extent that the Government
has gone as distinct from the extent to which Pro-
fessor Jackson has gone. What reasons has the Gov-
ernment given? You heard about savings. Has the Min-
ister shown that there will be savings? You heard that
there is not sufficient work; but Professor Jackson,
whom the Minister holds to be an authority and whom
he apologised for challenging, said that there should
be no dearth of individuals willing to take part in
Local Government. That is the essence of the whole
argument put up by Professor Jackson for the reduc-
tion of the functions of the Councils.

We heard about corruption where Public Assis-
tance is concerned. You have corruption in Govern-
ments too. Are we looking for a dictatorship like in
Africa? Or are we willing to abide by the decision of
the electors to throw out those whom they do not feel
are fit to represent them? That is democracy. You
do not sit on Mount Olympus and say that you have.
the whip, that you are here to chastise and that you
are the end all of everything.











The judges are the people themselves. If they.
feel that there is corruption let the people deal with
it. You do not abolish the House of Assembly because
you have corrupt people in it and get a Commissioner
to take over. Is that the next step contemplated?

When you hear that there will not be enough work
and you read Professor Jackson, -- and I have no
reason to challenge his experience -- he says on
Page 79: "Looking at the list of functions in para-
paragraph 16r. I think there is scope for substantial
development."





After all, the drive for the centralisation of
these services did not start with the present Govern-
ment. It started before their time, and plans were
made for centralisation and the creation of district
hospitals etc. before they came into power.

Professor Jackson went further. He said that
given a more sophisticated electorate, given an inde -
pendent nation with a proud spirit, given these things,
child care would become important. Thus you would
get people representing the local area who know their
people, who are close to them, taking an interest in
these things, and thus, at the local level, managing
and carrying on these services.

If I was in the shoe of the hon. Minister with
Shis long and vast experience I would be the first to
warn any Government that it is better to have a
safety valve along the line than to centralise every-
thing on top with no safety valve below.

I think that that is what Sir John Maude had in
mind when he said that we should not centralise and
do away with Local Government altogether. Professor
Jackson agreed with Maude and suggested a kind of
buffer at local level against what might happen when
you have too much power at the centre. Power cor-
rupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. I want
none of it.

As a member of the Barbados Labour Party
and as a member of the Other Place I fundamentally
disagreed with a Bill that came down in which the
Colonial Office had the power to appoint from England.
I disagreed with it even if that angered some of my
party colleagues. I named Civil Servants who should
be brought back here. I spoke as one who was a Bar-
badian,proud of Barbados and who takes an interest,
whether I am elected or not, in the future of Barba-
dos.



The attitude of this Government is notlimitedto
this Government alone. It is typical of the attitude of
Governments all over the world to go on concentra-
ting more and more power in their hands. When you
do that you are asking for trouble and in the end you
call it subversion. If you do not get the trouble from
inside your own ranks you will get it from outside.
Maybe you are getting it from inside already.


You should not deny people the right to be repre-
sented at all levels of Government. When the blow
comes it will come from at bottom, and there will be
no safety valve to stop it.

We have heard that there will not be sufficient
work for the Local Councils to do; but Professor
Jackson says that there is; and this Government
brought down Professor Jackson. It is a reflection on
Barbados to say that we cannot get forward looking
Councillors or to say that you will get councillors who
will be any different in calibre from those of today.

There is the question of Scavenging. Do we scoff
at its importance? We know that scavenging methods
are antiquated, and even members of this Government
have criticised the Councils for not running Scaveng-
ing better.

The problem of rats and young monkeys. If we;
had enough coconut trees, like Sierra Leon:, I do
not think they are taking this thing very seriously.
Monkeys were trained to eat coconuts, to pick
coconuts, and not enough trained monkeys pick
coconuts.

MR. PRESIDENT: May I ask the Honourable Sen-
ator what that has to do with this Bill?

SENATOR MAPP: There is a problem here, you
may not appreciate it now, Sir, but I can assure you
it is the Government who should look after rats and
other crooks of that sort. Baths and sanitary con-
veniences. Are we suggesting that there are so many


SENATOR CAREW: Did the Senator say thatthe
Government is responsible for scavenging in the
Southern District Council?

MR. PRESIDENT: No, I do not thinkhe said that.

SENATOR MAPP: I am sorry the Honourable
member may not have heard me. I was referring to
the point made by the Minister of State, and I simply
said that these are functions which Professor Jackson
said should be retained. The importance of scaveng-
ing; the fact that today it is not being done well and
that there is scope for improvement, and when you
have scope for improvement there is enough there
for them to do. We cannot just throwaway this by the
stroke of the pen or the wave of the hand and say that
these things are not important; they are becoming
more and more important and they are not being done
properly. But the point is, my point and Professor
Jackson's point, that at local level let the people elect
Councillors; if they cannot get the present ones to do
the job, then elect fresh ones in their place, but the
power lies in other hands, and in the hands of a
group of men who because they have the Government
think they have the right to order everything for
everybody.

Scavenging, baths and sanitary conveniences.
These are important services and there is vital ne-
cessity for more of these, but the reason why you











cannot get a body of men to get elected to perform
these functions, parks and playing fields the Hon-
ourable Minister said that it is not sufficient work.
It would be sufficient work if you had, say, one or two
or three parks kept in a dillapidated condition, but
Queen's Park is nothing to be proud of. What about
the St. Philip Park andanyofthose? There is scope
for improvement, there is scope for forwardlooking
people who can come in at local level and give their
help and advice in providing more parks.



The Minister said that the functions will not at-
tract personnel of the correct calibre, but we do not
agree. It is because you do not have men of
sufficient personal requisites, you do
not have better parks, but it is for the people them-
selves to put people who will provide those ameni-
ties for them or who will improve them and who
will improve on the preformance of the people who
who at present run these services. We have no
guarantee that the person who will do it has the
efficiency or that all these things that require to be
done will be done. If these functions cannot attract
men of the requisite calibre, well then I do not
know what the Government means by that. It is
either infringing on the people of Barbados or they
themselves are just fishing for arguments to justify
this sweeping change, because if these functions are
not that important as to attract people, do they mean
that they will put 38 men on these boards to run
them? Does it mean that these things do not matter?
Is that the argument? Or are we saying, Mr. Presi-
dent, that already the people who run for Local
Government are second rate and therefore, because
they do not have public assistance, even the second
rate ones would not take that interest. If we are
saying that, God help Barbados.
Sir, it is not local government that should be
swept away. This stab inthe back -that is what it is -
it was not put in the Manifesto nor in the Speech from
the Throne. It is not the system that wants throwing
away in this manner, if anything it is the present Par -
ty that is running the system should be done away
with and perhaps that is the fear behind this Bill. In
other words, we may not be able to win the next elec-
tion so therefore in order to control it we must do
away entirely with the system.

MR. PRESIDENT: I must draw the Honourable
Senator's attention to the fact that I have not heard the
'Honourable Introducer of this Bill mention that in his
argument, this is something new which the Honourable
Senator seems to be introducing in his own behalf.

SENATOR MAPP: I am very sorry, but the Bill
provides for it doing away with elected members
and ...

MR. PRESIDENT: I would like to draw the Hon-
ourable Senator's attention to the Objects and Reasons
of the Bill. The second paragraph states:

"This is an interim measure which is con-
sidered necessary until such time as the de-


tailed legislation which is required for
implementing recommendations arising out of
the Jackson Report can be prepared and enacted"
and under (c) of the third paragraph -
"the appointment by the Cabinet of an In-
terim Commissioner for Local Government and
the transfer to and performance by him of all
functions performed by the Councils immediately
before the appointed day."
the word "interim" is being stressed in both in-
stances.

SENATOR MAPP: He is bureaucratic fully. He
cannot do it himself, he has to hear other people on
it, and all of them will be Civil Servants. He is exact-
ly the little boy. The Minister failed to tell us if they
had any long-range terms as to what will be done, but
there has been no denial by the Minister to flout al-
legations made in this island; there has been an an-
swer to other arguments put up but there is
absolutely no denial of these allegations. As you say,
Sir, I cannot dwell too longonthat because the Min-
ister did not say it will be run by these Boards, but
I still know why he did not deny those allegations and
answered other arguments. Itake itas an omission on
his part a very striking point the argument by
those people who fear what will happen. I would like
the Minister in his reply to really tell us what plans
he has, how interim this will be, or how you are going
to run this in the future. The Government must have
formulated some plan, some long range plan; how are
they going to do it? Do not just leave us in the dark.
The island should know what the plans of the Govern-
ment are for running the whole affair. Will they con-
tinue to have a Civil Servant run it or will they set up
boards like the Marketing Corporation or for Housing
and so on. Let us know, it is not good enough, Sir, to
come to the Parliament or to the Senate and tell us
they are going to set up this Interim Commissioner
and still not let us know what the plans will be for the
future, who will succeed the Interim Commissioner,
how interim he will be, how much longer this state of
affairs will continue, what will happen in the near fu -
ture. Those are important things. This is an institu-
tion that you are doing away with; this is not, I repeat
a system that is wrong, it is in the people and in the
lives of people. The argument may be put up, Sir, that
very few people vote in Local Government elections,
but .......

MR. PRESIDENT: The Honourable Minister
never said that. I would draw the Honourable Senator's
attention to .....

SENATOR MAPP: I was under the impression
that he said at one time that people were not in-
terested.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
I have no recollection of making that statement at all,
but if you say they were not interested, that is very
different from saying that the people did not vote. I
do deny categorically ever having said the people
did not vote, presumably at the last elections, I do
not know to what point of time or to what event Sena-
tor Mapp referred.











SENATOR MAPP: It is a bit difficult for me. I am
not challenging what you say, Sir, but the Honourable
Minister referred to things that were said and I am
now referring to things that were said. I must only
refer to things that he said. I do not know whether
these reasons have been introduced and it is a bit

difficult not to touch on all the reasons that might
have been introduced or which might be intro-
duced later on. I am saying that if an argument like
that should be used to justify this plight, I am only
saying that it could not be accepted by any worthwhile
democrat, because it would be like saying that only
40% voted in St. Michael and you should do away with
it altogether.They are not interested; they do not want
a House of Assembly; I hope that other members of
the Government will follow the lead of the Honourable
Minister and not follow such ridiculous arguments.
We expect better of them; I just mentioned that in
passing.

Now, Sir, we will go on with what had been said
by the Honourable Minister and what was put forward
by him as Government's reasons for introducingthis
measure. He would like to ask the Senate to accept
his statements. Tell us what it will cost what I can-
not understand is that we have been pressing ever
since for the abolition of something like the West
Indian Hospital Sweepstake which has done this
island very much......

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Mr. Presi-
dent, Sir this is quite irrelevant.

MR. PRESIDENT: The Honourable Senator has
raised the question of the Hospital Sweepstake. This
is not the business before the Senate.

SENATOR MAPP: I am just dealing with their
arguments for not abolishing that at the stroke of the
pen and for abolishing the Local Government system;
mere comparison Sir.

SENATOR C. ASQUITH PHILLIPS: No
question of the Hospital Sweepstake should engage
the attention of this Chamber as far as I am a-
ware, so it is completely out of order.

SENATOR MAPP: The Honourable Senator is
very fidgety; you must have an investigation, Sir,
into other things. Where there are organizations,
or whatever you may call them, other things that
are going on, you must investigate, you cannot
abolish them just with the stroke of the pen. You
cannot abolish local Government without even put-
ting it to the people of this island in the Mani-
festo at election time or at any other time. I say
Sir, this is not good enough. I do not blame Members for
being sensitive about these points, of course they are
sensitive. We want to hear from them some facts as
to how they arrived at this conclusion, andwhat they
based this conclusion on. What are the financial
ramifications that are not worth it? Have they gone
into it at all?

The Honourable Member said it is not worth
while having elections every three years; as far as


I remember,every few years. I do not know whether
the English for few means two, three, four or five,
to my mind it means less than five. Five is not as
few as three, but Professor Jackson saidthree years
and even if he did not recommend it, there is nothing
to stop the Government or to prevent the Government
from changing the law and making it every five years
instead of three. In other words,you lessen the cost
of holding elections.



When the Honourable Member was speaking he
said that we are trying to keep up with the times
and that Local Government is ancient, but what we
are doing is in keeping with the times. Which times?
OAS times? Because every other West Indian island
and every democratic country large or small is
in this area outside the OAS country' of South America
every country is out of step. We are the only people
in step; the whole army is marching and we are told
to keep up with the times, but they are out of place
out of mark, out of step. It is great fun, but as I look
around the whole Commonwealth every country
retains some form of elected Local Government
which gives an opportunity to citizens at every level
to place some matter to Government, however small.
That is the important point; if you believe in it you
just do not take your pen in hand ani do way with
it like that.

If you do not believe in those points, if you do
not believe fundamentally in that, it is easy. You
can just say 'do way with it' it is a nuisance. It is
not worthwhile; you cannot find anybody, they are
too foolish, it would not attract bright people. It is
easy to say that, but it is not very easy to get way
from the fundamental point that every citizen is
given an opportunity at the local level to play some
part in Government. That is the point. That is where
the difference between us is fundamentally, and that
is the danger that we face, Sir, and I say you do
nbt have to belong to the Barbados Labour Party to
see it, every man who is worthhis salt in this island
should see it. I say that not simply as member of the
Opposition, but as a person. I repeat, a citizen of
Barbados should feel that this step is a wrong step
taken in the wrong way, it is not even a question of
money. Sometimes money is not all, I have seen
nothing in the way of facts or figures to tell us that
there will be any saving; I see nothing at all.

Mr. President, there was in this island a Defence
Association. At the time this Association was formed
the idea was, the Govenor at the time was causing
riots because he was taking action not in the interest
of the masses of this island. The people who had
interests to defend formed the Defence Association to
defend themselves. You will see the daywhenyou are
going to have a Defence Association in this island when
the matter against this creeping idea that I alone
can do everything and nobody else can. I must
manipulate all the springs.


After all these objections, all these reasons
stated by the Minister have been gone through with a
fine tooth comb, we find that these proposals which










have only now seen the light of day and which were not
contained in the manifesto nor in the speechfrom the
Throne are nothing but a sudden impulse. Anyone can
see that.

Two years have gone by and no indication was
given to the public not even in the Speech from the
Throne that the Government would not support
Professor Jackson and recognize a limited form of
Local Government, not sweep away everything. Sud-
denly, like a bolt from the blue, you hear that you
will sweep away Local Government.

Mr. President, when such things are done, when
these serious steps are taken without giving the com -
munity an opportunity of at least debating it at all
levels, when you get-thse leaps in the dark, it is
time that the ordinary citizen watch out. It is time
for those who have the interest of this island at
heart to beware.

We have heard no argument at all to-day to jus-
tify this bit of legislation which will wipe out of ex-
istence the entire system of Local Government and
which will put everything into the hands of the Central
Government.

I take a very serious viewofit, Sir, and Ishall
be moving amendments to the Bill in due course,
amendments which will give the Government time at
least to reconsider this matter.

SENATOR Dr. R.B. CADDLE: Mr. President,--
We are here to consider this Bill which will abolish
the Corporation and the Councils of Local Government.
One would have thought that the Opposition would have
given facts why the Councils should be retained.

Senator Mapp dwelt for a long time on the Jackson
Report. My personal opinion is that these people in
Barbados seldom come to satisfactory conclusions.
The Senator in harping upon the Jackson Report
seems to be giving the impression that we are
still a colonial country. Why can we not get together
and decide what we want to do in Barbados? Why
depend on t reports from people from outside who
cannot, in their short stay, get enough information
about Barbados?

When you consider what has been going on in
the Local Government Councils, proven, unproven
and whispered and talked openly, one has a reason
to believe that the Government is embarking on a
good step. The Government is not embarking on a
policy of removing Local Government Administration
from the island entirely. I do not believe that Local
Government and Local Government Councils are
synonymous.

The complaint has been made and it creates
an erroneous impression that you must always have
people paid to do everything. When one considers
how Local Government is being conducted, it is not
surprising that you do not have forward looking
people coming forward.


When one looks at what has gone on on the Local
Government scene we see no reason why the Councils
should not be abolished and those who do not want
to expose themselves to the abuse shower, on them
on political platforms are given the opportunity to
make their contribution to the life of-Ba--bados.


Senator Mapp has not put forward any case why
the Councils should be retained. As I have said, I
think that the Government is making a good step. We
know about the givingout of public assistance in Bar-
bados. We know that there are many who cannot get
because they are the political whims and fancies of
people.


We also know the poor state of sanitary facili-
ties in Barbados. In referring to Sanitation Senator
Mapp has made out a strong case for the abolition
of the Southern District Council.

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: On a point of order, sir,
I said that there was an opportunity for Councillors
to come forward and give good service at local level.

SENATOR Dr. R.B. CADDLE:Itwas myimpres-
sion that Senator Mapp put forward a strong case for
the Government removing Sanitation from the
Councils. One gets the impression that lie was not
satisfied with how the Sanitary Departments were
being run.
When one analyses the report of Professor
Jackson one gets the impression that we would be
retaining Local Councils to perform left overs. I
do not see why we should elect Councils every three
years when these services couldbeadequatelyper-
formed by a Commissioner.

I see no reason why this Bill should not be
passed. I must remind Senator Mapp that the
Leader of his party said that he would abolish Local
Government administration if he had the opportunity.

SENATOR MAPP: On a point of order. I must
deny that most strenuously. We have discussed this
at Government level and never has the previous Gov-
ernment recommended the abolition of Local Govern-
ment Councils. Neither has the Chairman of the party.

SENATOR Dr. R.B. CADDLE: If the senators
not aware of this I amnot responsible for his ignor-
ance. I feel strongly that the Government is moving
on the right track The Government is aware that
many of the people of Barbados are dissatisfied
with the behaviour of the Councils and is reflect-
ing the spirit of those people.Why retain something
in which the people have lost confidence?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F.G. SMITH:
Mr. President, --- I want it to be clearly under-
stood that the function of the Government is to
govern. The present Government has every intention
of governing in the manner which it thinks is right
for the people of Barbados. We are prepared to


1










take bold steps when we feel that they are necessary
in the interest of Barbados.

There are some people who try to accuse this
Government of dictatorship. The senator knows that
his own party is or used to be a virtual dictatorship..
He himself knows the heartaches which he had in
that party. I was kicked down the steps and never
had an opportunity to appeal to anyone.

There is a subtle and deliberate attempt to give
people the impression that this Government is out
to do away with their rights. I say, as Attorney
General, that the democratic rights of the people
are enshrined in the Constitution which was drafted
with the assistance and concurrence of the Bar-
bados Labour Party, the Barbados National Party
and the Democratic Labour Party.

It is one of my functions to interpret that document.
When they go around and tell people that there will
be a dictatorship, that document, the Constitution,
will have to be thrown into the sea before a dicta-
torship could be established. The Government can
only rule within the confines of that sacred document.
It makes provision for the two-party system of demo -
cratic government, and any lawpassed'in contradic-
tion of that document is null and void.

When you go around telling people about a one-
man dictatorship and all of that,how could it happen
under the Constitution? Certain important functions
are performed by the Prime Minister after consul-
tation with the Leader of the Opposition.

They go around, or get their supporters to go
around saying that the DLP has gone contrary to its
manifesto. A manifesto is drawn up in the light of cir -
cumstances then prevailing. When you get into power
you have to be conscious of present facts and circum-
stances and act in accordance with the interests of
the people whom you are governing.

I submit that there is a clear case for the aboli-
tion of the Local Government Councils. At the last
Local Government Elections only 30 per cent voted at
the polls despite the fact that the Councils were then
responsible for Public Assistance and Public Health,
and all the functions on which Professor Jackson re-
ported.

If we go through the whole electoral machinery
impartially, we find that in England for example,
where there are Urban Councils and Borough Coun-
cils, the idea is that the people at the top, the people
in Central Government, are not the people who know
the local needs of the people in the various districts.
Barbados is 21 by 14. Do you think, sir, that there is
any member of this Senate who is not aware of the
needs of the people in Boscobel? If he is not, he has
no right to be a member of this Chamber. You are a
Barbadian; and if you are you must certainly know the
needs of your people.

Does the Senator want to say that people at the
centre do not know what is happening, and what are


the needs like water, light and other local conven-
iences? Are we to go through the whole electoral pro-
cess? I do not want to repeat what the Minister of
State has said. If people were notbiassedthey would
see the logic of his arguments.

It would cost at least $40,000 to runa Local Gov-
ernment election. That would be more usefully put to
the erection of more sanitary conveniences. Refuse
collection and disposal could almost be given out on
contract. Public baths and conveniences would need
someone to look after them. Then there are other
things like parks, playing fields, cemetery' s etc. Do
you want a man to be elected to count thedead or to
tell you where to bury someone at Westbury Cemetery.

The* Government now gives money to many of
these children's organizations. We have a Social Wel -
fare Department. If we decide to take over everything
do you mean to say that we cannot find skilled public
servants to run the business properly?

As a member of this Government, I do not see
how we could sit down and after mature consideration
allow the whole electoral machinery to be gone
through so that candidates can be the target of abuse
and where self- respecting people will not come for-
ward when they see the services that are to be ad-
ministered by Local Government. Of course you will
get hungry people to whom $3.00 a day would mean
something. If no one came forward, then our oppo-
nents would laugh at us and say you did not have elec-
tions for so many years and nowthat you hold one no
one.has come forward.

We have gone into this matter. Any idea that this
was railroaded through by one man is nonsense. Every
member of this Cabinet has as much say as the Prime
Minister who is only primus inter pares. He is not a
dictator. Sometimes I wish that he was because he is
too soft.

I am not saying that these services to which I
have referred are not important. If you are to have a
healthy community scavenging must be a matter of
importance for the Central Government. Burial of the
dead is also important; but we are saying that they
do not merit having the whole electoral machinery
gone through.

No one is criticising Professor Jackson. He is an
able person. He made an able report which the Gov-
ernment is going to honour in certain respects. This
is only an interim measure. There is the question of
boards to be considered. This is not a complete abol-
ition; but we do not think that the machinery should
be employed for these-purposes.



The Senate may be interested to know, sir, that
arrears due to the Councils represent 58 per cent of
their current revenue. The Councils have to borrow
at 6 1/2 per cent. Do they want us to continue with
this state affairs? With the Government underwriting
and approving their budget?











If Senator Mapp could argue that the jobs and pen-.
sion rights of the Local Government employees are
not secured by this Bill Iwouldhave been one of the
first to suggest that the Bill shouldn't be sent down.
But the Bill gives the assurance that those rights are
safeguarded. What is the Opposition quarrelling
about? Are they quarrelling because we are getting
rid of some councillors who only look for subsistence
allowances?

So, Mr. President, the points as I see them are
that firstly, the argument about the manifesto is non-
sense. Secondly, the system of democratic govern-
ment is enshrined in the Constitution. Iamsorry that
I dwelt so long on that, but when I heard threats about
riots --

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order, Mr.
President, I hope that the hon. member is not making
any threats to me.

SENATOR THE HON. F. G. SMITH: If the threats
had come from him the Senate might be one short. I
have the right to see that peace andorder are main-
tained, and I intend to advise the Government at any
stage against anyone in order to see that this island's
reputation for law and order is maintained. I will do
that without fear, favour, affection or ill will.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, on a
point of order, the hon. member is Attorney General,
and as I have not seen or heard threats from anybody
towards this Government, I would like the hon. mem-
ber to say where there have been threats made andwho
made them. It is a serious statement.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, I will not pursue that, Iwill take my seat
I am sorry that I have spoken so loudly, but on this
issue when I find that this Government is doing the
best in the interest of this country after several dis -
cussions and coming up with a bold decision, then to
hear allegations made against this Government, it
does make me speak with a little more volume than
I normally should, and therefore I hope honourable
Senators would forgive me for my forcible manner.
We short people in order to be heard have to speak
loudly. Thank you for listening to me; Ihope that some
of the things I have said will convince people that this
has been a democratic decision arrived at.

We have taken a serious consideration of the fi-
nancial implications and all the other circumstances
and then we made the decision. We realise it may
have political implications, and any Government that
runs from political consequences does not deserve
the confidence of the people. The people may exercise
their democratic rights, and we can prepare for any
political consequence which may ensue.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I cannot
promise to generate as muchheat ornoise or motion
as the previous speakers, but I should like to start by
saying that I support wholeheartedly the principle of
this Bill. I say that purely from a sense of cold reality,
a sense of the exigencies at the moment, but I think


I must tend to agree with Senator Mapp that we have
not been given enough information as to what will
take the place of these Councils. I am a little more
confused, since the statements made by the hon. At-
torney General and Senator Caddle are slightly differ-
ent from those made by the hon. Minister of State as
to the basic reason for this Bill.

I did not intend to raise this, but I would mention
that only this morning somebody who had read the
Objects and Reasons of this Bill asked me if I under-
stood what the Government intends. I said that as I
read it the Government intends to abolish the Councils
to appoint an Interim Commissioner to carry on their
functions until such time as details may be worked
out. He said, and in the end I had to agree with him
that that was not what it said. Paragraph one says it
is proposed to abolish the Councils and replace them
by an Interim Commissioner; paragraph two says
this is an interim measure until you can implement
the recommendations of the Jackson Report. He then
went on to say that the Jackson Report never recom-
mended the abolition of the Councils, and therefore
if this is only an interim measure, what is intended
is to wipe out the Councils, have an Interim Commis -
sioner and then start fresh. In other words, introduce
some other form of local government.

I must admit that the Objects and Reasons are
rather ambiguous; they do not set out clearly that the
intention is to abolish the Councils. The Hon. Minis -
ter of State did say so, the hon. Attorney General and
Senator Caddie referred they both used the term
"temporarily!'. I think the Hon. Minister of State can
clear up this. Is it to be a final abolition in so far
as Government's intention now is concerned, or are
you arranging for a temporary abolition with the in-
tention of bringing in some form of local government
later? I think in fairness to this hon. chamber and to
the public generally, that it should be made quite
clear.

I have heard mention of the substitution of Statu-
tory Boards to carry out these functions of the
Councils, but that is not local government in my view,
this is just anextension of central government opera-
tions. Anyhow, I just mentioned that to suggest that
these points might be cleared up when the Hon. Min-
ister of State is making his final reply. From the time
the-Vestry system was changed, Iwas rather inclined
to favour the abolition of a form of local government
altogether for the simple reason that our system of
local administration the necessity for our system
of local administration arose from the circumstances
at the time. Communications were difficult:it was
difficult for people in the different parishes to get
into town, etc., etc., and so you had to have these
forms of local government for the more distantpar-
ishes. Those conditions no longer obtain and we
are a very small community, the island is 21 x
14 and there is no point in the island that cannot be
reached with half hour's driving, therefore the nec-
essity for these spread out forms of government no
longer obtains.I must admit that one is rather disap-
pointed in the fact that a greater number cannot be
brought within the scope of Government, but I think










we must look at the facts through realistic eyes,
and the moment the Government decided to remove
some of the main functions from these Councils and
left them with a few services to be performed
by them, I think they are definitely not needed.
It is about time we should clear the situation up
and do something about it; this Bill attempts to do
this and it is for that reason that I support it.



When we look at what is left for the Local
Government Councils to do, what is it really?
I am not going into detail, but broadly speaking
there are certain community services which have
to be performed, and you do not really require
Local Government Councils to carry them out,
but those community services cost money, and that
is where the rub comes. I have not heard a word
yet about what is to happen about the rates which
are now being paid to the Councils; presumably
the Central Government will take over that, but the
Interim Commissioner, after receiving his instruc-
tions from the Cabinet, will say that the rates shall
be so and so. An undesirable feature with the Local
Government Council system was the difference in
rating structure in the various parishes, and I
think that anything which removes that and gives a
uniform rate throughout the island as a whole is de-
sirable. That is why this rating structure and the
necessity of finding money to carry on the functions
performed by the Local Government Councils is an
essential part of what I would describe as a tax
structure. I understand that the Government at the
moment is engaged in carrying out a survey of this
structure.


Quite frankly I do not see why the Local
Government Councils could not have been allowed
to continue until that was completed, because
that is an essential part of the Local Government
Councils.

The two things that we hope to gain by the intro -
duction of this Bill are greater efficiency and greater
economy. In other words, ,we are either going to
have the same services that we have been getting
at a lower price, or we are going to have improved
services at no less than the present cost. If we do
not get efficiency and if we do not get economy,
we are wasting our time. It is not worthy that both
Sir John Maude and Dr. Jackson had discussed
the possibility of doing away with Local Government
altogether, but they both brought up the same reason
for not recommending it completely, andthat is, they
say that too great a load will be thrown probably on
the Central Government. Now, I am hoping, Sir, that
the Central Government is so gearing its Government
machinery to take on this increased load. There is no
doubt that it will be an increased load; the machinery
I am afraid, is creaking at the joints here and there,
and I am assuming that by taking on this additional
load they are also going to pour some oil into those
joints and keep the machinery to take care of the in-
,creased load. I would be happy if the hon. Minister
of State could tell me if that aspect of the matter


has been carefully gone into and carefully consid-
ered.

SENATOR N. BARROW: Mr. President, it was
not my intention to say anythingg this afternoon,
but I find it a bit disturbing that the Attorney Gen-
eral should find it possible to make a statement of
so serious an implication that the Prime Minister is
in fact too soft, otherwise certain criticisms such as
are made by the hon. Senator Mapp could not be made.
In a country which wants to get away from bother and
not to be worried by unimportant details this is a
very serious statement. Ithinkwehave at all times
to try and keep, our heads, because it means that
what the hon. Attorney General is in fact doing is
questioning the right of criticism in the society,
and I am afraid that that is a very serious thing to
do.



There are a few other points which I think we
ought to clarify because there has been some misrep-
resentation of Senator Mapp's presentation. I do
not really mean the comment made by Senator
Caddie, but you depend onthe Jackson Report, since
Senator: Caddle and members of the Party are still
saying that. But he went on to make another point that
the electorate has lost confidence in the Councils.
Does he know this as a result of the suspension of
Local Government Elections, or does he have a
different manner in which he goes around and sam-
ples public opinion and therefore knows how they
will, respond? If he does that, I think, Mr. Presi-
dent, I want to get this clarified. Both our Party
and the Democratic Labour Party, as far as we
were concerned in fact, if you look at the Bill
you would probably think even now that the Jackson
Report and the Bill are not quite saying the same
thing. However, all of the presentation on the Govern-
ment side this evening has been made denying crit-
icism which has been that they no longer stand up
to Dr. Jackson's Report. There is a discrepancy
between the presentations, as Senator Alkins pointed
out, of one Minister and another, and the biggest
discrepancy is that all the Government speakers have
said something different from what the Bill itself
says. There therefore seems to be undue haste alto -
gether.
I can agree quite easily with the hon. Attorney
General when he says that if you go to the elec-
torate with a promise and then having had an oppor-
tunity to study the matter more closely you have made
a different decision, you should not then just rush
through. This is common sense. I am not opposed to
the Bill; if you say you are going to implement
Jackson and you are to come back and show us,
Mr. President, that there is good reason why you
should change your mind, this is another matter alto -
gether, but there has been no adequate explanation.
all the explanation given so far is explanation which
we do not have to wait until now to get. They could
have given that at any time. There has been nothing
between the last statements of Government policy and
now that the Government has informed us of the de -
parture from the policy.










We are running a democracy, 'and the Hon. Attore-
ney General does not always agreewith the fact- that
democracy should operate with consultation and dis
cussion; this is very very important andpeople must
know why we are taking decisions. I am afifid-that if
you just set down estimates and get n' further with
anything, you are obviously tryri to-get aifeund all the
requirements of democratic Government. I saythat
this country is in serious trouble. "



The Hon. Attorney General' told us this evening
that this" country was run by a dictatorship up to
1961' I understand that even in 1961 there was', Mr.
President, a democratic Constitution,: o therefore
when he comes back and tells:'us that there is a
democratic Constitution obtaining and it is not fair for
us to saythere is not,also that if we deny there was a
dictatorship then, it is not possible to have one now.

Mr. President, among the reasons advanced,
directly orindireetly, for this Bill before us this eve-
ning is thit ionly 30percent of the people voted. Some
people d6:-not like to vote, but in 1948 under the old
Vestry system, 4,214 people voted. People were not
used to voting in Local Government elections, this was
someth Ing completely new to them. Local Government
elections have never been treated by any of the politi-
cal parties' with the seriousness that they deserve,
therefore there was not the same reception by the
public.

The thing to do is not to abolish Local Govern-
ment elections but to get people to understand there
is some merit in having an election. These things have
to be done and I believe that they are done more
effectively by people who are still answerable rothe
electorate than by any political party that is in power.
This is my view, because let us face facts, Mr. Presi-
dent an interim measure can only be an interim
measure; it would not last all the time, and if the
Government declines to say exactly what it intends
to do, 've may assume they do not, for some reason
which they cannot divulge without. any reflection on
this, want to get themselves out of the Way quick.



It is as simple as that, Mr. President. Our posi-
tion I will state very simply; Ido not want to be mis-
understood. We have never advocated that the system
should be abolished, but other parties until this Bill
came 'down, had been saying that they stand by what
Dr. Caddle suggested. Therefore when the Hon. Sen-
ator is expecting people to come inhere and put up a
defence which is just so much complete misunder-
standing we have never at anytime said we want the
present system to continue. The present system has
obviously failed, that is why we agree that the
Counc is s'hoald be reduced, their functions should be
reduced, and that the rest should be run by 'an elec-
ted body. If there are now special circumstances
which merit the appointment of an Interim Commins -
sioner, tell us; but if there are no such reasons, to
say that the work left inthe Councils is-nothing which


.any self-respecting person will do, is to say we do
not agree with Jackson.

Mr. President, Sir, we will support the measure
as it stands because we are satisfied in our minds
that there is no good and civil reason for a departure
from the recommendations made by Dr. Jackson, be-
cause Dr. Jackson was brought here at the taxpayers'
expense.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE C. ASQUITH
PHILLIPS: Mr. President, Sir, as General Secre-
tary of the party which commands the Government, I
think I can say that this party has never stayed who
was.corrupt or otherwise, even if they had been ac-
cepted by other parties.

Mr. President, there is only one aspect of this
Bill I would like to comment upon quite briefly, and
:iat is the suggestion which rose from the members
of the Opposition that there is something sudden about
this Bill; that Local Government Councils should
be dissolved is a sudden decision arrived at by the
Government. I support strongly the comments of the Hon.
Attorney General that a Government is elected
to govern, and I commend heartily the Government on
the stand which it has taken on this matter. There
are always these hints that the leader:of the par-
ty to which I belong,the Prime.Minister of this count-
ry, is a dictator. A person who moves in the com-
munity in the manner in which he moves, who
drives about by himself any hour of the day or night
who lives in a place that anybody couldwalk into any
time,'where there is no guard, is this a person who
has the making of a dictator? I can appreciate the
heat generated by the Hon. Attorney General because
we must keep answering this kind of remarks which
are not relevant to the issues in hand, which do not
advance the debate, but which of course cannot be
left unanswered.

Now, sir, during the time that I was a mem-
ber of this party, from 1960, at every annual
conference there have been resolutions condemning
the working of the Local Government Councils. If
today we are implementing that, the Government is
only following the lead given by the majority of the
members of this party. This is no sudden move.

The reasons wvhy you had the Jackson Report
was because the Government found it difficult to
resist the pressure exerted from the grass roots
of the party. At that time there was a strong move
within this party to have the Councils abolished. They
did not want anyone to come from overseas to say that
the Councils should be abolished.

What is happening today should have happened in
1961 and 1962. It shows that the Government took some
time to seriously consider all the facts and arrive at a
mature conclusion. Dr. Jackson made certain recom-
mendations. When a Government or any other organ-
isation invites a person to investigate something the
recommendations can be accepted or not accepted, or
they can be accepted in part or rejected in part. That
is what has happened to the Jackson Report.


_ -I ---










There is another point. Report which is accep-
table atone stage may not be acceptable at anoth-
er stage. One has to change one's stand to suit the
circumstances. That is a problem of Governments
and indeed of life.

What I want to get across, sir, is that with or
without Dr. Jackson, the vast majority of this party
wanted to see the system of Local Government abol-
ished. That was not because of any desire to take
away from the people their right to vote at elec-
tions or to deprive people of the right of having
elected representatives. That sort of suggestion is
cheap propaganda. As a matter of fact, Mr. Presi-
dent, I have been given to understand that the party
to which members of the Opposition claim to belong,.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: On a point of order,
Mr. President. I must object to the remarks "the
party to which Opposition members claim to belong."

Mr. PRESIDENT: I take it that the senator is a
member of the party.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: I am.

SENATOR ASQUITH PHILLIPS: I am glad to
hear the senator say so. One. is never certain to
which party he belongs. I am given to understand that
the Opposition Party had it in mind if they were re-
turned to power in 1961, to deal with the Local Gov-
ernment Councils in a serious anddrastiomanner.
That is no secret.

The Bill before us this afternoon commends itself
by the very fact that all of us are aware of the evils
that exist in the Local Government system, and the
criticisms of the remarks of Senator Mapp as to the
Government's view are relevant and well made.

Anyone who has lived in Barbados for the past
five or ten years who could suggest that this Bill is
not timely is not aware of what has been going on, or
has some other reason for wishing to oppose it.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President, --
The hon. Minister of State has toldus that from 1938
it was the consensus of opinion that the Vestry system
should be abolished. That was 1938. In spite of that the
Government then in power brought down Sir. John
Maude and he suggested that the system should con-
tinue. Professor Jackson also said that it shouldcon-
tinue.


Senator Caddie talked about bringing in people
from overseas to advise us, and that it shows a colonial
disposition. I do not want to mention any instances,
but why are we now placing such emphasis on colo-
nial status when we are dealing with the Local Gov-:
ernment Councils?

Four months ago we were give the assurance
that the Jackson Report would be implemented. To-
day we are told that they will be abolished. If the Gov-
ernment had any definite plans about a substitution for
the Local Government Councils I think that I would be


justified in voting for the Bill;but they have nothing of
that kind. Voting for this Bill is like giving the Gov-
ernment a blank cheque.

They are abolishing somethingwhichhas served
us .for .over 300 years, and we do not know what is
going to be put in its.place. The Government does not
know whether the Interim Commissioner will do the
right thing, because Clause 8 exempts him from any
liability. They expect that something will go wrong.

We have heard about corruption. As long as in-
stitutions are run by men there will be corruption.
You do not just kill the Councils because there is cor-
ruption, When you have a pear. tree and it has blight
you do not cut it.down; you spray it and get rid of the
blight. I cannot support the Bill.

SHORT ADJOURNMENT

SENATOR THE HON. H. A. VAUGHAN: Mr.
President, -- I see that several other members are
interested in contributing to this debate. We have a lot
on the Business Paper to do and I think that we
should have a brief recess. I move that the Senate do
now adjourn for 20 minutes.

Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESUMPTION
On the resumption:

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, --
I do not want to prolong this debate. I have been told
and I have read that there has been a profusion of
arguments about Democracy and what is going to hap-
pen to Democracy. if we abolish the Local Government
Councils.
Some people talk about the institutions of govern-
ment as if they were sacrosanct, something like the
laws of the Medes and Persians; and not as if they were
made to suit certain circumstances. There was a time
in Barbados when.we could understand the reason for
the Local Government system. We had donkey carts
which took you as long to get from the country to Bridge.
town as you take now to get from Barbados to Mexi-
co. Some people want to perpetuate these ancient in-
stitutions.
There are people who say that Barbados should
be in a Federation. They do not seemto realise that
if we were in a Federation the whole island would be
a Local Government for administrative purposes.
With a lot of power atthe centre what would Barbados
have been left to do?

If you analyse what the Local Government Coun-
cils will be left to do there is justification for this
Bill. The whole of Barbados can be covered from point
to point inan hour. There is no trouble about having to
sleep away from home unless you want to sleep away
from home.
People are talking about dictatorship; about
people wanting to hold down things and keep others


__ _











under their thumb. That is pointless. We should see
what is the most efficient type of administration that
we can have, and that we can evolve.

We have been through the exercise of the Local
Government system and where are we today? In an
area as small as Barbados Local Government rates
are one thing in Christ Church and another thing in
St. James. The London County Council controls more
people than there are in Barbados. In a country with
240.000 people do you want a proliferation of govern-
ments?

One of the problems that we face in the modern
world is that there is too much government for too few
people. You have Local Government. You have to look
for a chairman for this and that, something like some
voluntary organizations where you have to make all
the members officers. When a man has authority and
has nothing to do he looks for trouble because he
wants to exercise his authority.

You try to change a system like that and you hear
these outcries. When you listen to the members of the
Opposition -- I remember when there were the first
Local Government elections in 1958 when another
party won 11 out of the 12 seats in the City Council
the then Government still wanted to say who should be
Mayor. Do you want anything more bare-faced than
that? And now they are bringing in these stupid innu -
endoes. They said then that they should choose the Al-
dermen and therefore nullify the results of the
elections. They nearly caused a riot. Now you get
some person who was nearly beheaded by the Barba-
dos Labour Party -- but, sir, politics breed strange
bedfellows -

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, ona point
of order. This is an old story and it is not true. As a
member of the then Government I want to say that the
names were submitted to the then Premier. We in-
sisted that we had the right to name the Aldermen. It
is not true that we wanted to pick the Aldermen so
that we could name the Mayor ourselves.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Why did the Govern-
ment rely on the Constitution so soon after the Local
Government Elections in which they were defeated?
Now they are talking about Democracy. We have to re-,
member that Hitler and Mussolini spoke about De-
mocracy before they got power. After they got power
they showed how much democracy they believed in.

Another thing, sir. There were Federal Elections
and the then Government made the whole island into
one constituency, when all the other territories had
constituencies. Some came out of the Federal Govern-
ment with a handshake. It is the only time I have ever
seen anyone get a reward for a failure of a federation.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: I think that the
senator should stick to the subjectunderdiscussion.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Senator Mappwas a
member of the Government that turned the whole is -
land into one constituency for the Federal Elections.


Those things are forgotten by them now conveniently.
What do we want to carry these trappings of Local
Government for? So that when the Queen comes here
every chairman will get a bow? If you want to think
seriously about having an administration that can fit
in with 1967 andnot 1667youhave to analyse the situ-
ation carefully. You have to ask yourself what will you
be leaving Local Government to do unless you want to
keep a perpetual skeleton inthe cupboard as a relic of
the past.

Barbados is lucky at this stage that we have an
Assembly of 24 people representing 240,000 If you
followed the comparison of population how many peo-
ple would you have in the Parliaments of Russia and
India.

When you are dealing with Local Government you
have to deal with it in a practical manner. You have
to consider whether it has a op-heavy superstruc-
ture. If it is not really necessary there is no point at-
tacking the Government and talking about democracy.

The Barbados society is one that is extremely
critical. Everyone in Barbados feels that he has a
divine right to criticise even if it is only for the sake
of criticism. There are people who talk, about free-
dom; but I do not see anythingdone to widen the areas
of freedom. I find that there is a tendency in some
people to be extremely snobbish and narrow in their
point of view, and at the same time talk about liberty
and democracy. That is why I have no faith in these
statements that the Government in abolishing Local
Government Councils is interfering with democracy.

I will be the last, Mr. President, not to
support this Bill. I have examined the Vestries here
for many years when we had the exercise, and when
,re see the institution of Local Government for the
six or seven years it has been in operation, there
have been so many mishaps, there have been .so many
views about administration, and when Senator Mapp
spoke about corruption I am not going so far as to
speak about corruption, because the only place that
people are not corrupt is in Barbados. The Barba-
dians are the most conceited people that I have com-
across, they do not like self-examination, they are
the most upright people, even if a man cannot spell
"Ada" backwards.

They are just like the people in Oxfordwho live
near the University of Oxford, no matter how igno-
rant they are, they live near Oxford. This thing has
grown upon the Barbadians and I speak as one who
lived here all my life.

I feel thac the Local Government Councils will
never succeed in Barbados functioning the way they
are at pro eent. They are not doing anything to justi-
fy the retention of them, and the retention of the Lo-
cal Government system will be a relic of the past. -
We feel we must have Local Government because it is
in other countries.

The central administration, fortunately, have
been able to recruit more efficient public servants











than the local authorities have been able to over the.
past years, because Local Governments have an old
system of patronage and people have had jobs in local
government systems that normally would not be in
the public service.

I do not believe Senator Mapp andhis colleagues
believe in any dictatorship, but by their own loyalty
they have subscribed to a symbol of :leadership that
has demonstrated more of these attributes than I
have seen anywhere else. The leader of the party has
not hidden his strong views about things, but they have
put him up as the standard power of democracy. I do
not know that in one breath you talk about dictatorship
and in the other breath you can say how many times
they have broken faith with somebody else, and if you
do not want to do what Isay,out you go. I do not feel
it is necessary to rope into this debate about local
government that there is going to be a dictatorship.
Let us take Antigua as an example, because it is a
small place, but Antigua have not had local govern-
ment yet. Antigua is controlled by a Legislative Coun -
cil, so I do not think it is necessary, and the persons
that I hear talk, I neverheardthem say that Mr. Bird
is a dictator, and I do not knowhow they would oper-
ate if they had to live in Antigua.
I do not really follow them in their arguments
that the fact that you are not going to have local gov-
ernment is something against democracy.WhenSena-
tor Mapp was a member of the Government and his
party introduced the Maude Report, the same
type of argument was used by some of them. Dr.
Jackson made a report and if he says to take away from
the local government and you still have a local gov-
ernment you will have the most expensive public in-
stitution operating in the world, and I do not see why
we should hold on to this tripe for the sake of the re -
tention of a name.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN: Mr.
President, perhaps I can preface my reply by saying
something which I said to another Senator at our last
meeting, and it concerns the comment which the Hon.
Attorney General and Senator Walcott made on cer-
tain statements which have been put forward by the
two members of the Opposition.




Now, Sir, I want to make it perfectly clear that
what I am saying now is entirely my personal view.
I have never discussed it with any members of my
party. I find that there is an attempt made by two
members of the Opposition to make allegations about,
dictatorship, and much to my regret some of our most
effective speakers on the Government side have felt
themselves bound to reply to this constant allegation.
Frankly, I am not so sure they were right. I am not
suggesting for a moment that we should not answer
arguments of the Opposition. I am suggestingthat al -
legations which have no basis for argument shouldn't
be dealt with, but I would like to suggest that those
members of the Government who feel themselves
bound to get up to answer these allegations to consid-
er that in so doing they are adding fuel to the fire, and
allowing two members of the Opposition to set the
tone of the debate in this Chamber.


I entirely disagree with that. How does it look,
meeting after meeting, to find that when we should be
discussing what is before us we have been here
since 2 o' clock and it is now a quarter to six and
what we have been hammering on has nothing to do
with the Bill, and if certain empty vessels will con-
tinue to make noise, for my part they will always
make noise. There are other times ........

SENATOR N. BARROW: On a point of order,
Mr. President am I to take it that"empty vessels"
is in the same ......
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
May I continue, Mr. President? It seems to me ab-
surd to spend the greater part of an evening,
an evening when we have the Appropriation Bill be-
fore us, tossing purely personal andparty balls back
and forth across the table.

I agree that this Government intendstogovern.
You either govern or you do not. I would not sub-
scribe for a moment to any of this cross talk which
would let the members of the Opposition feel that they
are so important that meeting after meetingthe Gov-
ernment must take its time getting nowhere ......

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Mr. President, onapoint
of order, is the Hon. Member sayingthat members of
this Senate are unimportant?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A VAUGHAN:
May I continue, Mr. President?

MR. PRESIDENT: Yes.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
There are at least two things which should be said
One is that nobody in this Chamber is satisfied
with the existing system of local government. On
no side of the table has anybody got up and said that
the system of local government in Barbados is
absolutely alright and there is no need for rem-
edial legislation. Everybody on some ground or
,other is dissatisfied, and let me say, profoundly dis-
satisfied with the way in which this system of local
government is working.

The second thing is that there has existed for a
considerable time the feeling that there should not
only be a reforming but an abolishing of the local
government system. For along time nowpeople have
felt that the Councils were not functioning properly
and that they should be set aside.

That brings me to the question asked by Sen-
ator Mapp and by Senator Alkins and which was re-
phrased in different way by Senator Blackman. That,
is what are the plans of Government for replacing the
existing system when the term of appointment of the
Interim Commissioner comes to an end. It is only
something for some period of time. What are we
going to do? Senator Blackman has gone to the extent
of stating that he feels that the Government does
not know what it intends to do. Well, Sir, I can assure
him that the Government knows its mindwell, and I
will tell him now what the plans are.


~_ ~-~----- --










May I say, first of all, Sir, that the omission ti
mention th s in my second reading speechwas that in
dealing with the Legislative Assa mbly one has to adopt
such tactics as appear to one at the moment to be the
best suited to the particular situation. Sir, perhaps
it might be best if Iwere to re-read part of the Objects
and Reasons of the Bill. In-as-much-as SenatorAlkins,
has based certain criticism on what he thought an
ambiguity in an important paragraph of the Objects
anu Reasons, I would invite him to read this para-
graph again. It says, and I quote:

"This is an interim measure which is considered
necessary until such time as the detailed legislation
which is required for implementing recommendations
arising out of the Jackson Report can be prepared
and enacted."

Now, Sir, there are two things that that paragraph
does not say. It does not say that it is an interim
measure which is necessary until the time is ripe for
bringing in the legislation to implement the Jackson
Report. It does not even say that it is an interim
measure pending implementation of the recommenda-
tions of the Jackson Report. It simply states
"recommendations arising out of the Jackson Re-
port." Now Senator Alkins is not a lawyer and per-
haps that is the reason he has overlooked the exact
meaning of those words, and what those words can be
said reasonably to mean is this, that there are cer-
tain recommendations of the Jackson Report which
Government intends to implement and until those
recommendations are implemented it is necessary
that certain changes should be brought about in the
system of local government. By means of this Bill,
then, we will appoint an Interim Commissioner, giv-
ing him certain powers and making provision for
the security of tenure of the people who have been
turned over from local government councils.

Now, Sir, if Senator Alkins would turn to page
7 of the Report he will see there the recommen-
dations dealing with the transfer of services to the
central government, and these are some of the sub-
headings involved: baths and sanitary conveniences,
parks, civic centres, playing fields, district hospit-
als,highway licences and so forth and so on. Until all
the legislation which is necessary to implement the
transfer of these services is enacted, it has been
found expedient to go ahead with this Bill. That is
the position as it now stands.

Now, let me give some details of what is at this
moment understood to be the programme for the
purpose of implementation of the Jackson proposals
and for certain other changes. I may say this, that
the volume of legislation necessary to bring about
those changes is pretty heavy. There are something
like some 90 Acts which have to be gone into and 27
items of Subsidiary Legislation. Everything is being
done to get that legislation in draft as soon as possible,
yet one must understand that legislation of that nature
has to be very carefully drafted, and it also means a
little revision of the law, and Iwould not like Hon.
Members later onto believe that a promise has been
made and Government is taking ever so long before


they implement the full proposals. There is the
creation of a National Assistance Board which mem-
bers already know of, the administration of infirm-
aries, dispensaries and other forms of medical
assistance; there is with respect to taxation and
rating, the functions of the Councils to be trans-
ferred to the Central Government.

These Councils should be responsible for the
making of grants and the administration of a sub-
Treasury for the collection of revenue and the pay-
ment of expenditure. With respect to the effective con-
trol of the system of local government, it is pro-
posed that the Councils should be abolishedandthree
Statutory Boards should be created tolookafterthe
collection and disposal of refuse, scavenging, etc. In
other words, to look after cemeteries and burial
grounds, look after parks, playing fields and civic
centres, children's homes and day nurseries, public
baths; in other words to look after just those resi-
dual functions and services which ProfessorJackson
said should be left to them. As I said earlier, the ra-
ting and taxation power of the Councils will be trans-
ferred to Central Government.

Any difference will disappear since it will be
manifestly nonsensical for Government to take over
those functions and then have reasonable distinctions
in rates of the various Councils. This exercise will
necessitate, besides a revision and amendment of the
Acts dealing with those functions which I have just
specified, also an amendment to the Trade Tax Act,
the Property Rate Act, and several otherActs. That
is the position. I do not want Hon. Members to be in
doubt as to what Government intends. I do not want
Hon. Members to feel that Government is itself in any
doubt. Government has taken its decision; Govern-
ment has not jumped to a decision without adequate
consideration of all that is necessary. In the same way
that the question as to whetherornot this Bill should
be brought in was carefully considered, so all other
matters have been carefully considered. I hope that
what I have just saidwill adequately answer the ques-
tions which have been asked by Senators with respect
to the plans of Government for the future of Local
Government Councils.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Onapointof order, is it
in order to move that this Bill, instead of being read a
second time, be deferred for consideration let
us say in six months' time?
Mr. PRESIDENT: You willhave togive that no-
tice in writing to the Clerk.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and resolvedinthe affirmative
following a division as follows:

AYES: Senators VAUGHAN, PHILLIPS, SMITH,
GREAVES, BRATHWAITE, CAREW, ASHBY,
CADDLE, WALCOTT, GITTENS, JOHNSON, WILES,
ALKINS, ROCK and BLANCHETTE. -15.


NOES: Senators BARROW, BLACKMAN, and
MAPP. -3.










Mr. PRESIDENT: 15 Hon. Senators have voted
for the second reading of the Bill and 3 against it.
The Bill is now read a second time.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. H. A. Vaughan
seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the Senate
went into Committee on the Bill, Senator Asquith
Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 7 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

Clause 8 was called.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. Chairman, Clause 8
says;

"The Interim Commissioner shall, subject to the
provisions of this Act or of any other enactment
whereby functions are conferred on him, perform his
functions in accordance with such directions, if any,
as the Cabinet may from time to time see fit to give
him; but the question whether he has in any matter
complied with such directions shall not be enquired
into in any court."

I find it hard to find out if there is a definition
of"interim" in this Bill. How long will "interim"
be? I am not making a second reading speech, but it
seems to me that the Government shouldhave some
idea of how interim this Imterim Commissioner will
be.
THE CHAIRMAN: You should stick to the Clause.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I have just read the
clause. The Interim Commissioner will obviously be
very powerful. In view of the fact that the Hon. Min-
ister who is in charge of the Billhas told us that the
Government has made up its mind exactly how they
will reform the Local Government system, our argu-
ment is that there should be some limitation of the
time that the Interim Commissioner willbe in being.
I do not like this indefinite time.

SENATOR THE HON. HILTON VAUGHAN: Mr.
President, -- Frankly, I find it difficult to under-
stand how a man who has been acquainted with the
conduct of public business in a parliamentary insti-
tution could, in the face of the circumstances which I
explained when I gave my reply, ask the Government
to state what period is "interim."

It just depends on how soon one can get through
the necessary legislation -- both substantive Acts and
subsidiary legislation in order to put the new arrange -
ment into being. It is as simple as that. I said that the
necessary drafting would be carried through as ex-
peditiously as possible. To suggest that one could put
inthe Billthat the proposed state of affairs will exist
for six months, or two weeks or three days is ludi-
crous.

I do not think the Senator is serious in asking this
question. It strikes me as the sort of thing you would
have expected an unexperienced parliamentarian to
ask. I suppose that at the back of Senator Mapp' s mind


there is fear and distrust of the Government that the
Government, instead of bringing down the necessary
legislation as soon as possible will let the situation
go on and go on.

The Government, sir, could not be so stupid.
After all, it has to face the electoratesome time or
the other. If it does what Senator Mapp seems to feel
that it will do the electorate will record its disapproval
of the acts of the Government. I cannot pledge myself
to any time that the interim period will last.

I remember that not so longago ".erewasdis-
cussion about the payment of the Interim Commis-
sioner, Sir Stephen Luke, when the West Indies Fed-
eration was being wound up. No one in the House of
Commons was so naive as to ask how long Sir Stephen
Luke would remain Interim Commissioner.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I do not know how wise
members of the House of Commons maybe, and I do
not care. I am concerned with this Senate.
THE CHAIRMAN: Will the Senator confine his re-
marks to Clause 87

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: The Ministerwas speak-
ing on Clause 8 and I am speaking on Clause 8 also,
I must thank the Minister for giving-me such a full
explanation. I could not expect afullerone even from
the hon. Attorney General. I do not think, however,
that it is correct to saythat I am naive. There is one
thing that he has assured us, and that is that it will
be done as quickly as possible. Do not think that I am
so naive when he referred to tactics. He said that
there was certain information which he hadwithheld.
I know certain tactics to employ also.

SENATOR THE HON. P. M. GREAVBS: Mr.
Chairman, -- I draw attention to Standing Order 31
(4) which says that a Senator who has spoken on a
question may again be heard to offer explanation of
some material part of his speechwhichhe claims has
been misrepresented; but he shall not introduce new
matter.

THE CHAIRMAN: I am quite familiar with the
Standing Orders of the Senate. Would refer to Stand-
ing Order 31 (3) (a) --"No Senator shall speak more
than once on any question except in Committee."

All that Senator Mapp has to do is to confine his
remarks to Clause 8.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Thankyou, sir. The Min-
ister in charge of the Bill has assured us that the
Government will be as expeditious as possible, and
that they know in their minds what theywill do. It has
taken this Government three years to make up its
mind as to what it will do. From what the Minister
said in his second reading speechwe had no idea that
they themselves knewwhat theywere going to do. Now
the Minister is filling in.

THE CHAIRMAN: Your question has been asked
and answered. Can we move on?










SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Yes, sir. I am anxious
like you to get out; but if the honourable mover of
the second reading had given this information at the
right stage I do not think that we would be here now.

THE CHAIRMAN: The senator has already
made that point.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: The Minister may rise
again and say that I did not make myself clear.

THE CHAIRMAN: Would the senator take my
assurance that his point has been made?

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I hope that the Govern-
ment will in the near future bring down a measure
to settle this arrangement and tell us exactly what
they have in mind.

The question that Clause 8 stand part of the
Bill was put and agreed to.

Clause 9 was called and agreed to without de-
bate.

Clause 10 was called.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: In this clause I notice
that the Interim Commissioner will "(a) take over and
continue to administer any service which immedi-
ately before the appointed day a Council was au-
thorised or empowered to administer by or under
any local government enactment or otherwise;

"(b) be responsible for the payment of pensions
gratuities andlike benefits granted before the ap-
pointed day in respect of local government service
or for which liability was vested in a Council pur-
suant to section 249 of the Local Government Act,
1958;" etc.

I would draw to the attention of the Government
that nurses and other people employed by Local
Government are complaining that they have not yet
got their back pay. It is creating a sense of griev-
ance. I take it that what I am saying is appropriate
under this clause, and I am not going to be deterred
by any frowns cast towards me.

THE CHAIRMAN: I have not frowned.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I thank you. Your face
looks very pleasant. In 1961 these people were to
get their back pay like Civil Servants. What has
happened? I hope that the Interim Commissioner
when he takes over will, under this clause be more
expeditious than other people have been. If this
state of affairs continues I do not know what will
happen. As a nurse told me yesterday, no one
seems to know who was responsible. We know now
who has the responsibility because the Infirmaries
are being integrated. I can only express the hope
that the Government will get behind the Interim
Commissioner and see that these people get their
arrears like other Civil Servants.


The question that Clause 10 stand part was put
and agreed to.

Clauses 11 to 15 of the Bill were called and
agreed to without debate.

Clause 16 was called.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: This clause says that
the Act shall come into operation in 1st April, 1967.
I feel that the Government would be giving a better
break to the Councils if the clause read from 1st
April, 1968. This is like a sledge hammer on the
Councils now that they are in the midst of making
their rates I do not think that the administrative
machinery is geared to take over the whole system
now, and it would give the Councils a chance to ease
their difficulties. I therefore move that the figures
"1967" be deleted and the figures "1968" substi-
tuted therefore.

THE CHAIRMAN: Has Senator Mapp complied
with Standing Order 50 (2)7 Has written notice of
that amendment been handed to the Clerk?
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Would that preclude me
from making an amendment?

THE CHAIRMAN: Does the senator have Stand-
ing Order 50 (2) before him? It is on Page 29.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am going to hand it
in to the Clerk right now. The rule does not say
that you should do it before-hand.

THE CHAIRMAN: I will allow it on this occa-
sion but I will not be allowing it on any future occa-
sion. I now ask the Clerk to read the amendment.

The amendment was read.


THE CHAIRMAN: My ruling is that
order. It should read that the words
"april 1967" be deleted etc.


it is not in
and figures


The question that Clause 16 stand part of the
Bill was put and agreed to.

The Schedule was called and passed.

The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: resumed the Chair.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, I beg to report the passing of this
Bill in Committee and I now move that it be read a
third time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: I
beg to second that.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed


VY











Mr. PRESIDENT: The next Order of the Day is
a Bill to grant a sum of money out of the Consoli-
dated Fund and to appropriate the same for the Ser-
vice of the Island for the year ending on the 31st
March, 1968.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, it is usual every year after the passing
of the Estimates by the Other Place for the appro-
priation of a certain sum from the revenue public
funds of the island for carrying on the services of
Government. There are two changes in this Bill, two
departures from custom. One is that we now have a
Consolidated Fund, and the other is that any amount
taken out of Consolidated Fund must be issuedby the
Accountant General, on the warrant of the Minister
of Finance or any person authorised by him. Both are
recognized in clause 2 of this Bill.

Now, Sir, I do not intend to make a long speech
on this Bill. The draft memorandum on the estimates
which is always referred to in any second reading
speech on the Appropriation Bill sets out the estimates
of current and capital expenditure and of current re-
venue very clearly. We see that current expenditure
is estimated at $50.6 million and capital expenditure
at $11.591 million. Current revenue Is estimated at
$44.91 million which means that there willbe a defi-
cit of some $5.7 million; and capital revenue is esti-
mated at $2.7 million which leaves the sum of $8.85
million to be made up by way of loans.

What is the background of these estimates? How
is the economy favoured? What are our prospects?
How is the island developing? It is usual in such cases
to give a brief resume of the situation and I shall do
so. At the end of December, 1966 the population was
249,190 persons, an increase of 4,228 over the figure
for 1965. One must take note of the extent ot which
emigration has been going on; during 1966 some
4,200 persons, through the Labour Department, emi-
grated to the United Kingdom; in 1965 1,350 emigrated
under the sponsored scheme and temporary employ-
ment which was found in the United States of America
under the Farm Labour Programme in 1965 catered
to 1,287 persons. In 1966 the number declinedto 879.
On the other hand, taking into account the emi-
gration to Ascension Island, in 1965 there were 170
persons and 208 in 1966. Those people who are out
of the island for some time have as usual been send-
ing back remittances. In 1966 the amount which was
sent back amounted to $7.2 million which was a de-
crease of $.6 million as compared with 1965. Our two
great standbys from the point of view of our economy
are sugar and tourism one knows what the situation
is with regard to sugar, so uncertain. In 1966 we pro -
duced 162,508 tons of sugar as compared with 1965
when we produced 171,909 tons.
This year we expect to have a bumper crop, as
a matter of fact, the planters say they expect the
crop to be no less than 200,000 tons.The negotiated
price for sugar for this year is $228 a ton. Rum may
be regarded as subsidiary industry, and in 1966
we produced 367,789 wine gallons which is an increase
of 39,901 gallons over the figure for 1965. In the same


period our exports of rum increased from over
900,000 to 1,058,247 wine gallons.

Another revenue producing activity is the manu-
facture of Beer. In 1966 consumption was 623,922
wine gallons which was 7,561 liquid wine gallons more
than the figure for 1965. On the other hand, we have
imported more and more food in 1966 than we import -
ed in 1965; we imported $2.3 million more worth of
food than we imported in 1965. Imports of manufac-
tured goods and articles also rose from $23.2 million
in 1965 to 26.8 million in 1966 which is an increase
of $3.6 million. Imports of machinery aiu transport
equipment amounted to $21 million, an increase of
$2.1 million over the figures for 1965.

Tourism. In 1965 68,218 tourists visitedthe is-
land; in 1966 the number has increased to 77,713.
The figures have been going up year after year. In
1965 tourism was estimated to have brought in some
$26.1 million, in 1966 the estimate was $29.1 million.

That very brief outline of the development of the
island during the period 1965 1966 sets the stage for
this Bill during our first year of Independence. I
have already given figures of both Capital and Re-
current estimates, and so I now move thatthis
Bill be read a second time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE P.M.GREAVES:
I beg to second that.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: Mr. President, Sir, I
would like to comment on some of the principles
of the Bill, and around this table are Senators who
have got the windows of their hearts open. If I might
make some reference to income tax which is esti-
mated to earn $13.5 million of the island's revenue
in the coming year, and it is on a few aspects of
this particular tax on which I would like to make
some remarks.

I think that the present Act dates from 1928,
almost two generations ago, and our present Act,
as you know, provides that a wife's income should
be added to that of her husband and therefore sets
the bracket which bears no relationship whatsoever
to her actual income.

In 1921, two generations ago, when this Act was
framed, I think the then thinking was that the wife's
place was only in her home, andundoubtedly this had
its merits, but in the two generations which have
passed, times have changed, and I am very happy to
say that thinking has changed, and we have come to
recognize that a married woman can make and is
making a very substantial contribution to the life of
this community, in the professions, in the commer-
cial world and in the educational field to mention only
three. In this way the married woman is making a
substantial contribution.

The typical married woman who works does not
do it because she wishes, she works because present
day circumstances force her to, or she is no longer
contented for her children to receive a secondary











education up to A level, she wishes to see her chil-
dren go on to a University, or a technical college of
higher learning, so that they can take their place in
any community in which they live. But our present
Act frequently forces the married woman, though she
knows that she is losing 35 or 40 percent of her earn-
ings,forcesher to return to her household chores, and
frequently this leads to the displacement of domestic
help who is in desperate need of a job.

I think it is true to say that in a progressive
community such as that which we find in the United
States of America, a wife is permitted to file her
return either with her husband's or separately if she
so desires, and I cannot see how a thinking commun-
ity such as ours is, I am sure, can find the moral
grounds for penalising the married woman who works
in our community, who is making contributions in our
community, to force her to pay a tax which bears no
relation whatsoever toher real earnings. Think this
is agreed on many sides.

There may be two people contemplating marriage
and whose combined salaries can run a home, but
they cannot go into this because when the wife's
salary is taxed at the top of her husband's bracket,
not very much is left and they have to be contented
with running a place or living with in-laws. We have
a number of allowances or exemptions which may be
made, for example, medical expenses which I think
came about shortly after 1951 to which it is fixed, as
you know, at $100 for a married man and a single per-
son $50. This fixed figure means that persons making
a return are only moved to submit their medical bills
up to that limit, whereas if we could think of some
means wherby medical expenses could be left on. a
sliding scale which would induce people making
returns to submit all their medical bills, Iam sure the
Commissioner would find these bills very illumina-
ting.

I happen to know the history of these allowances
and thus the performance; in short, could we not think
of a day in Barbados when there was a percentage on
a man's income which was allowed for his medical es -
penses and therefore he may submit all his medical
bills and not just those which would come to $100 or
$125. Under our laws there is an allowance of $360
per year for a child attending a secondary school,
but no difference appears to be made in the case of a
child who is attending a Government aided secondary
school where education is free, as compared with the
child who has not been able to get into a secondary
school, who has to be sent to another school and
probably pay as much as $200 a year in fees. I am not
suggesting for a moment there should be any revision,
but the parent whose child has not been able to get
into the free secondary school is not only required to
pay for the education of his own child, but through his
income tax now, is-contributing to the education of the
other child, and it has appeared to me that with the
coming of free secondary education we have a some -
what unfair position where we are doubly penalising
some people.

I think that attention has already been publicly
drawn to the somewhat illuminating figures, for out


of a population of 249,000 only about 12,000 or less
than 5% contribute to income tax, whereas there
are 16,000 registered motor vehicles in the island. It
would suggest that there are some thousands who are
enjoying an income of less than $800 per annum, which
is the minimum income tax payable by a single man.
We propose to spend about $11.7 million on education
and that is more than 25% of our estimated revenue.

I am glad to see that we are getting free educa-
tion, but there is a very casual attitude both among
some students and among their parents. These
parents would go to a great deal of trouble, and in-
deed expense, to get their children up to the neces-
sary entrance examination, and I am sorry to say
this freeness gave me the impression that the parents
no longer cared very much, and we have all been
children before and naturally this casual attitude will
affect them inthe long run. Iwill suggest that we must
make it clear to parents and children, students alike,
that if the student no longer is taking advantage of the
opportunity of free secondary education he should be
made to give the place up and make way for some
other student who is outside the door. I think that it
seems very hard that at the public expense people
should be allowed to sit around, do very little about
their work, because it is not costing them nothing as
they think, of course it is costing them their precious
time, and so I was very heartened only about two
weeks, in attending a Speech Day at Harrison College,
to hear a recent Headmaster say that there is no room
for idle boys in the College.

I think, Sir, that those days are behind us when
a boy could sit around for two years in a class, and I
am very glad they are behind us. Today each place
in Harrison College is costing the public $40 a month
and that figure is quite comparable with the other se-
condary schools. I hope that we will look at this end
quite seriously and try to ensure that none of this pre-
cious money is wasted. I can assure you there are
quite a lot of children outside these ten schools who
could make a lot of use of their education if they could
only get in.

The hon. Minister has referred to Tourism, which
is one of our industries likely to have the greatest
potential. We will all wish to pay tribute to those who
have worked in Tourism from the early 30's.
The Minister said that some 77,000 tourists are
being attracted to our island home. I think that we have
a great opportunity here. If we adopt such measures
that even half of the visitors return home fully satis -
fied with their sojourn in Barbados, it will do all the
advertisement we need.
Every grain of sand is a potential dollar bill is
how the Tourist Industry is regarded inthe U.S. Vir-
gin Islands where it is not unusual to have eight
million a year.

I think that the time has come when, if we have
77,000 visitors coming to our island, we must keep
our amenities up to date. We must also realise that
we are up against severe competition in the West
Indies and we cannot aford to have dirty beaches of
which we are ashamed at times.
In the Estimates that accompany the Appro-
priation Bill there is a contribution of $877,000 to the











Tourist Board. I know that it is as much as we can
afford; but it is a small amount compared with what
Nassau, Bermuda and such islands are spending.
I think that some of this money might be spent here
in Barbados so that we can be assured that 50 per
cent of our visitors go back pleased with the island.

It is gratifying to note that in the Capital Esti-
mates $93,000 is allocated for beach control devel-
opment. I know that this money will prove to be a
very sound investment.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, -- I
would like to begin with Head 22, Ministry of Exter-
nal Affairs. It is a bit late, and what I have to say
I am going to say at some length; but I am afraid
that the job has to be done.

This is, to my mind, the most interesting sec-
tion of the Estimates. The table shows that the
Ministry of External Affairs which represents a
completely new section, and which is essentially a
section of independent and not colonial estimates,
is now $1,912,612 and not, as we would have ex-
pected, $500,000.

In short, without any explanation we are now
being asked to foot a bill which is four times the
size of the Bill that we were told we would have to
foot. Under this head you will find Item 21 which
deals with contributions to International Organisa-
tions, and for which we are asked to vote $400,000.
The note says: "Commitments of full membership
consequent on attainment of nationhood."

Full membership of what? The people who drew
up these Estimates must be aware, as you are, sir,
that there are myriad international organizations.
Do we know whether it includes full membership of
GATT7 I think that there would have to be a lot of
serious thought before joining GATT. I know that
for a long time Jamaica was not a member because
it was considered by the people running the country
at the time that they would derive more advantage
by not going in.

Is it full membership of UNESCO? I would be
inclined to support that. Is it full membership of
FAO? I could go on and on. There is nothing to in-
dicate full membership ofwhat. This is a serious
point because there are some organizations which
we would not advise that this country should join.
We do not know if any of these organizations are in-
cluded in this note to the Estimates, nor if any of
them would be prohibitive because of the cost. The
people who have the information refuse to tell us.
What are these organizations in which we are seek-
ing full membership?

Then we come to Item 22, Contribution to Re-
gional Organisations, $100,000, and the note says
that this includes provision for contribution to Re-
gional Shipping Service, UNTAB Regional Office,
Seismographic Research and such other regional
contributions as may become necessary.


There is no declaration about anything although
we have been told that it is the intention of the Gov-
ernment to seek membership of the OAS. The Esti-
mates do not tell us whether there is the intention
to give force to that decision.

We know that there are negotiations to join a
Caribbean Free Trade Area. The Estimates do not
tell us whether there are any financial commit-
ments involved, and where the Secretariat will be
set up.

I would like to ask, sir, if it is necessary for
us to join the OAS. Evidently it is necessary in the
view of the Government. But the Government does
not think that it has any responsibility to spell
it out in the Estimates and say why it is necessary.

Obviously, Mr. President, we are supposed to
listen to those people who tell us on public plat-
forms what the Government is doing; but Parlia-
ment is not supposed to be given any sort of infor-
mation.

As far as the Opposition is concerned, we will
not vote in favour of Government at this point join-
ing the OAS. The reason is a very simple one. We
of the Barbados Labour Party say that whether we
join the OAS at this point or not is completely ir-
relevant to the interests of this country. Our busi-
ness lies in analysing and finding solutions to the
problems of the West Indies.

If anyone could show us the benefits to be de-
rived from any form of West Indian organisation
we would consider it; but the OAS is an organisation
which is successor to the Pan American Union
formed in 1909 against a background of open Ameri-
can aggression.

Those were the days when American Senators
were saying that. Cuba should be colonialised, In
1967 the OAS operates as an umbrella for the Amer-
ican Navy. There is absolutely no doubt that we
have no business with the OAS.

There has been American intervention in the
Dominican Republic which even the American pub-
lic found it difficult to support. People who know
the history of the U. S. A. in this area know what
I am talking about. They did not.have to wait until
two weeks ago to get the full story of American in-
tervention in Guyana. There are books available
written by eminent American scholars which an-
alyse quite fairly the part that American Interven-
tion has played in this area.


If anyone can show what benefits being a mem-
ber of the OAS has brought to any of the member
countries they will be doing us a service. Instead,
you will find that when the USA says that Cuba must
go, even though Mexico and Chile may
put up resistance for a certain time, in the end Cuba
must go.










What happened in Cuba, in the Dominican Re*
public, in Nicaragua or Guatemala must make us
consider carefully whether we want to enter into
any form of association with the OAS.

It is significant that the Dominion of Canada
has always refused to enter this organisation. It is
significant that Canada, whose interests, we as-
sume, would be more intimately bound up with
those countries, decided not to enter. Theotherday
when Jamaica sent people to talk with the Prime
Minister of Canada, Mr. Paul Martin said that it did
not represent any change in Canada's policy. All
the time that pressure was being put on the Ameri-
can States, Canada was always there to resist.

I think, sir, that we should be more inclined to
follow the example of Canada than that of Jamaica
and Trinidad in which latter country Dr. Williams
is feverishly looking for oil markets. I know that
people will argue that everyone is running in and so
why not us? We are talking about going in because
other Caribbean territories are going in. At the
same time Guyana cannot go in because there is a
dispute between her and Venezuela which was fo-
mented when America wanted to get Jagan out.
Guyana and Venezuela have a territorial dis-
pute and therefore Guyana cannot join the OAS. So
even if there was any merit in arguing that because
other people are rushing in we should rush in too,
you will still have countries in the area outside.
But we must ask rushing into what? What are we
seeking to achieve? As has been pointed out, sup-
pose the Government became unpopularandwe
wanted to get rid of it, are we to be in favour of the
bringing in of foreign troops to keep the Govern-
ment in power? It has been said that an advantage
will be to get into a Latin America free trade area.
There are no visible economic benefits in that.The
only thing that we could possibly hold on to is aid
from the Inter-American Development Bank which
is administered by Washington, and even who gets
aid from that bank is a political decision.

Mr. President, we have nothing like the housing
conditions which exist in Ecuador. We have a higher
per capital income than any of these American coun-
tries except the U.S.A. and Trinidad. What are the
criteria for getting money from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank? What are these benefits
that we are trying to get from joining the OAS?

I know that one memberof the Government Par-
ty has been very active trying to convince people
that we would be getting funds from the Alliance for
Progress, and that unless we join the OAS we will
not get them. You only have to keep in touch with
U.S. politics to know that the U.S. Congress has
always, and still expresses the feeling that aid
should be given not on a country basis, but to those
whom you consider to be your friends. Going into
the OAS is not likely to enchance our chances.

All the study that I have put into the OAS, and
I know the history of Latin America relationships
with the U.S.A., shows that we have no business


going into that organisation. I am not wasting any
time sir, I am thinking of the interests of this coun-
try, not of what America wants. She may want this
whole area: but when we are making these decisions
we have to ask ourselves what are we going to get.

We have no promises of aid, Mr. President,
and even when we get such promises we have to
look and see if they will do you any good. The hard facts
of the case convince us that the islands in this area
had better keep together and try among themselves
to solve their own problems. I do not enjoy what
seems to be happening to the people who jump up
and shout "freedom" and "Independence" and are
still wearing the saddle patch of colonialism. That
is what is happening. You walk away from Britain
and go straight into the arms of the U.S.A.
At one time it did appear in this area that after
hopes for political association between the terri-
tories were dashed there should be efforts for econ-
omic association. While any sort of association in
this area will be desirable, one will see from the
example of the European Economic Community and
the Central African Group that having economic as-
sociation without political arrangements is asking
for a lot of trouble. But even if we cannot get politi-
cal association let us try to get some other form of
association.

We have rushed out of federation. There is a lot
of talk about a Free Trade Area: and the new talk is
about joining the OAS which is merely a background
for the American military defence plan. We cannot
go to the U.N. and tell the nations that we will be
friends of all and satellites of none and then gowalk-
ing into a satellite organisation. What we would mean
is that we wouldbe satellites of none except the U.S.A.

I also want to know how we are going to con-
tinue to put before the enlightened public of this is-
land this idea that we are going to share represen-
tation in order to cut down the cost.
We are being asked to share our foreign ser-
vice representation with the new country of Guyana,
and at the same time join an organisation that
Guyana cannot get in. Does this mean that
wb are going to be sharing overseas representation
although we will not be able to share our foreign
policy aims? I wonder if anybody has realized how
difficult that would be? It should be very clearto all
those who understand how foreign policy is made
that we have to fight our own cause and not just fol-
low blindly what others have done. The making of
foreign policy is something which if you examine
the performance of Italians over 100 years apart,
you will always find that these people have interpre-
ted the policies of their country out of their require-
ments not just rushing in blindly. It is very impor-
tant that we understand what we are doing. We
could be taken into the OAS, we could be taken any-
where, and unless we are prepared as a country to
express our opinions and this Government does
nothing to assist public opinion -to take decisions,
we are telling the people in the country to join the
OAS. We could not agree to Government rushing
blindly into OAS because if we look the way that











this thing has been done; we decided we are going
into the OAS and we went off to discussions: we
came back to the Legislature because we need mon-
ey: we rush off to one or two West Indian Govern-
ments: we then go up to Jamaica, to the Latin-Amer-
ican Conference, to learn something ........

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F.G.SMITH: On
a point of order, Mr. President. My learned Sen-
ator must be very careful. The Prime Minister was
invited to preside, not to learn.

SENATOR N. BARROW: Mr. President, Sir, one
can be asked to preside but that does not necessar-
ily mean that he knows something. The point is that
the whole confused manner in which this thing has
been done, and the refusal to explain anything at all
to people is what in my opinion amounted to mem-
bers of their own party taking public stands
against the party on this issue and in fact making
wholesale speeches referring to it as a one-man
party. These matters have to be greatly threshed
out.

I think I have made it fairly clear what my atti-
and what the attitude of this party is. To some it will
never be clear but I am sure that in this hon. chamber
what I am saying is perfectly clear. I want for a mo-
ment to go back a bit to Head 18.

Head 18 is the Economic Planning Unit, andl
hope that long before the next Estimates Govern-
ment will see fit to make provision for an Agricul-
tural Economist to be appointed in that office, be-
cause as far as I am aware the only Agricultural
Economist whose services are technically available
is the Manager of the Marketing Corporation who in
fact has his hands so full down there I am sure he
is not much use to Government as a professional
Agricultural Economist. I think we need to do
something pretty quickly so that the Planning Unit
will be able to do its planning with a greater degree
of competence. I am sure they will appreciate that.
Head 29. There is nothing to indicate that Gov-
ernment intends to establish a marketing insurance
service and we should not make the necessary ar-
rangements for establishing such a service for the
agricultural economy unless we are going to be
properly equipped to do the job. I think we started
thinking in terms of having a manto do this.

Head 30. For a long time inmy opinion the short
period I spent in Government, the contact I had with
the Labour Department convinced me of the need
for this and if you are going to have a proper
Labour Exchange you will need to have some degree
of decentralisation so that in some parts of the
country there should be available to the people a La-
bour Exchange. I think provision for this should
shortly be made.
The other aspect of the Labour Department is
that there is no Manpower Research Unit because
we have not only we need to have the equipment
whereby we can assess at all times what are the
manpower needs of the country and therefore we
need some sort of programmes for training in or-


derthat we can make the best possible use of whatever
schools are available.

I wish to take this opportunity to note that
under Head 37, I think it would be better that some
provision should be included for a survey of the
Government Printery to be carried out to ensure
that it not only continues its excellent work, but that
it will be equipped to do the increased volume of
work which it will have. The last time a Resolution
came for money for equipment for the Printery you
may remember the suggestion was madethatit
would be a proper time for the Government to have
a proper survey carried out and I am sure that the
!Printery can'cope with our needs.

I notice under Head 41, Ministry of Education
and also Head 102, Capital Estimates, that there is
no provision for this junior college we heard so
much about. I thought that would be under Head 102.
There is no such provision here, and while I am
happy to see there is no such provision, I think the
fact that the Estimates tend to reflect no change in
what has been for some time the educational think-
ing, it may not be inappropriate for me to ask a few
things.

As you are probably aware, some time in the
month of October the Minister of Education inform-
ed the people that he had intended to open this col-
lege. I must say this; I do not believe him and since
then he and other colleagues of his have been promo-
ting the idea of a junior college, sixth form;college.
I wish to make it clear that while I have no objec-
tion to steps which may be usefully taken to ration-
alise the educational system, I do not consider at
this time that the junior college is ripe because the pro-
blems are more. In the first instance, while we can
make provision in the primary schools for children
of primary school age, we are asking them to sit an
examination, a common entrance examination which
is passed rather more easily by children who do not
go to the Government primary schools. The fact that
the Ministry of Education has refused to publish the
statistics of how many children sit this examination
how many children pass it, and whether they can,
every year when you look at the results per capital
the private school child gets the place.

As I have just said the Ministry of Education
has refused to make available that information and
therefore it is very difficult for us to give accurate
figures but we do know, Sir, that I think on the 29th
June, 1965 a photograph was published in a news-
paper from which we got a lot of information. The
point is that if you talk to people in the teaching bus-
iness although I am not at a public school or pri-
vate school I am still in the teaching business it
is very easy to establishthatwhatI am saying is ab-
solutely true, and also I can tell you from where I
am that the private schools are gettingnearlyevery
child in the secondary schools. The private school
child is getting all the breaks where that common en-
trance examination is concerned. It means that the
children who are from better homes have an unfair
advantage over children from the other homes. I











think educationists tend to argue that if you are from
a home of higher income it is not an additional ad-
vantage, but what the results have been showing, I
suppose we have to go to the Ministry for the statis-
tics. In addition to the additional advantage the 11 +
gives the child from the better home a far greater
advantage, because it is an examination for which
children are easily coached, and the child in the Gov-
ernment school is not coachedwith the result that that
child does so much better all the time. I think it is
fairly easy to see at the intake in Lodge or Harrison
College in any year and then the Modern High School
you will appreciate what I am saying. Look at the
children who have been sent to these schools and you
will see what homes they come from. I do not believe
that we can continue a system in which education is
being made a privilege even more than itwas. I think
we should move away from this and give every cit-
izen the full right which he reasonably should get.

Having looked at the intake, it seems to me that
the thing first of all to do is to scrapthe 1]+anidto
devise a system where children can move merely
from the primary school into the secondary school.
When we have done this we will be able then to cut
out this vicious distinction where a child from the
higher income home is moved to Lodge or Harrison
College and the child from the poor home is moved
to the Modern High School. Having looked at that as-
pect of the problem I am sure you will agree that
just by establishing a college to look after sixth form
pupils is not going to help.
There is more dissatisfaction where the compre-
hensive schools are concerned; they have beenoper-
ating not as satisfactorily as they should and it is
felt that something has to be done. It is against
this background that I insist that the best way for
us to approach the problem is I believe- that the
University and any other people that you consider
have some particular expertise, these people ought
to come together and by examination and consultation
make recommendations on a system, because what
we really want, for the amount of problems we have,
is a new system. When a school has a sixth form,
it can attract by far better staff usually than a school
that does not have a sixth form, and therefore the
sixth form is contributing to this embarrassing ed-
ucational system. In fact, some schools have and
some schools do not, but the problem begins from
the intake. As soon as you allow people to choose,
you get the better set going to one school and then
the rest going to other schools. The sixth form pro-
blem cannot be tackled by setting up a junior college
which would take care of those schools that do not
have sixth forms.
He was talking about having a junior college which
would perform the functions of a sixth form college
for all schools; now the latest comments thatyou can
here indicate that the junior college is supposed
to function only for the schools which at present do
not have sixth forms, soyouwill still have this em-
barrassing situation which would allow the child who
does a little better to go. We have to decide whether
we want to continue a system inwhich there is such
an advantage of privilege; were stillverymuchin


peed of a system. The point is that if you should
strip all the schools of sixth forms you are running
into another problem, because some people like to
teach in schools where there are sixth forms. There
is a certain amount of status involved, and some of
them would not like to be told to stand by to work
in the junior college. Soif you talk about stripping
the schools of the sixth forms, which was the origi-
nal idea, then you will get certain other problems.

We have to face the fact that the man out there
in the street who works for a very small wage, has
the same right to get his child into the best schools
in the island as the man who is doing a white collar
job. If we are going to have something called free
secondary education, we must make it free for all;
we have to realise that this is a problem which has
to be handledwith the greatest degree of profession-
alism and leave out just having a narrow point of view.
We should be able to devise a system which suits the
whole country.

Mr. President, I notice that members are a bit
tired, but as long as they are not too tired, I am
quite happy to continue. I have had the privilege to
have gone to Lodge School; this is avery interesting
experience because, Mr. President, that,school is a
mirror of this society. In a very interesting way it
is a shining example of the colour problem, because
of a white boarding establishment and if you go into
that school, say at lunch time, you will see some of
the pupils lunching here and some lunching there, and
it is really interesting to notice the difference in
colour of the two groups. Anotherinterestingfeature
is the fact that that school has been allowed to have
a roll of 400 forthe last 10 years. Very little has been
done, and we are sitting down here planning to spend
$ 43,000 this year on the Lodge School; $ 43,000 on
400 students, when we should use our money much
better by expanding the school population.

Harrison College has nearly 700 pupils anditis
doubtful whether it is more economically run. Lodge
School has been allowed to set their numbers at 400
for the past tenyears, no'change orvery little change
during that time.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Is the hon. Senator talking about
the teaching staff of the Lodge School?

SENATOR N. BARROW: No, Sir, I am talking
about the fact that we are spending$43,000 on Lodge
School this year for 400 students. What I am saying
Sir, is thatif you lookcomparatively at thegrant that
is given, say, to the private secondary schools,
this in fact shows the unfortunate system that we have.
While we are spending $ 43,000 on 400 at Lodge
School, we are spending something of the order of
$ 21,000 on these private schools where the bulk of
the secondary school age population is going to school.

I think that it is very clear to everyone that
if the Government is going to give a bigger subven-
tion they will have to be able to control the status of
these schools. But the point is that the people of
this country have to be given the fullest consideration.











We cannot in this day and age justify spending
this amount without devising a system that will re-
move these inequalities. I think that the Minister
of Home Affairs would be the first to agree with
this. You should have a completely integrated system.
What are we doing about it? We have heard about the
proposed new Education Act, but nothing has been
produced in the first few months of 1967.

Under Item 44, Head 41, on page 102, there are
funds for the payment of money to the Caribbean
Broadcasting Corporation equivalent to duties col-
lected on T.V. sets and component parts. I wish to
say, even though Iamnothappy to say so,that after
hearing the announcement this morning about the
Church not being a milestone around the necks etc.
one would have to reflect very seriously on the
quality of service provided by that medium.

CBC, I am afraid sir, has not done what I per-
sonally felt that it would do, that is to make some
sort of contribution to intelligent public opinion,
and of course bring us programmes of a certain
quality.

The quality of the service provided by CBC is
very poor indeed. That is something which a number
of people are forcedto admit, and number of people
are not satisfied with the fact that although the
Government owns the station someone else gets the
profits, the Thompson Organisation.

I have always worried about the unwisdom of
Government accepting the Thompson Group rather
than NBC. In my opinion we would have got a much
better service, and it would have cost us less. They
would not be getting as much money as Thompson
is getting. I would like to impress upon the Govern-
ment that we deserve a better service forour money
than we are getting.

I now turn to Head 46, Queen ElizabethHospital,
Items 21 to 30. There is a large and intelligent body
of public opinion that rather than have this situation
in which specialists are part time officers and are
allowed to do a great deal of private practice, it
would be better if we paid them rates which would
allow to have their services on a full time basis.
This is what is done at the hospital of the UWI.

One of the problems which crops up in the
Queen Elizabeth Hospital is that public patients do
not nearly get the quality of attention that private
patients get. It is felt that it would be a far better
arrangement, even if on the surface it would appear
to be costing a little more money, to employ these
specialists on a full time basis so that attention to
the public would be improved.

One of the biggest sources of complaint in the
hospital today-you hear some people whispering about
it and others talking loudly -- is about a surgeon
specialist whose record is apparently not so good.
I want to take this opportunity to draw to the attention
of the Government. .,


SENATOR ASQUITH PHILLIPS: The senatorhas
said that one of the surgeon specialists does not have
a very good record. I am not here to defend anyone,
but it seems to me that the senator should be very
careful. I do not know how many surgeon specialists
the m. are. I understand that there are twvo, so it has
to be one of the two. I do not think that the Senator
should take advantage of the privilege of this Cham-
ber.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: I would ask
Senator Barrow to be very guarded in his remarks.

SENATOR N.A. BARROW: I was trying to get
across to the Government that there is public dissat-
isfaction. If I appeared to be going too near the line
I thank the senator for drawing it to my attention.
As I have said already, it would seem that the
quality of service to the public could be improved
by eliminatingthe visiting surgeon idea.

Under Head 3, Parliament, Item 26, there is
provision there for refreshment for senators. I
believe that this must be a new provision for the
coming financial year, or apparently the whole vote
has already been spent.

As regards the Consolidated Fund, that would not
be in existence unless you had a new Constitution.
I would like to know, sir, if you have received a
copy of the new Constitution.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: I have received
a personal copy. I hope that the senator has done
likewise.

SENATOR N.A. BARROW: Not yet, sir. I will
turn to Capital Estimates, Head 103. Item 6. I see
that the vote for the Housing Authority which is to
build houses for the lower income groups has been
decreased from $ 400,000 to $ 350,000. Formerly the
Government built 300 houses a year. The present
Government has not been able to achieve more than
100 a year. I would have thought that they would have
tried to secure some more money so that the house
building programme could once more proceed apace.

Is there some special reason forthis decrease?
Is it expected that money will come in from some-
where else sothatwe canbe assured that the Govern-
ment will take steps to see that there are more houses
built?
A final point that I would like to make is about
this question of $ 560,000 for roads. Now that the
Government has taken over all the roads I fail to
see why more than $ 383,000 will be spent. I am
wondering what the other $ 77,000 is to be used for.
When you look at some of these roads and see how
badly served they are I do not see how you could
think of decreasing the amount to be spent on them.

I have tried Mr. President, not to give too much
time to any one head. I have triedin dealing with these
estimates not to look at them from one side of the pic-
ture, but to try to draw to the attention of the Chamber










where I consider that there are omissions or where
there are.provisions of which we shouldtake special
note.

I need only before I sit point out that part of the
exercise of Government is consultation with the
people and making information easily available. I wish
that this will be done tonight andthat the Government
will set a newtrend andwe will know what they intend
to do in the future, and why.
SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Mr. President, -- I am
willing to move 'an adjournment at this stage because
you, knore than anyone else, have been sitting there
for a long time.
HIS H4ONOUR THE PRESIDENT: Only a Min-
ister or a Parliamentary Secretary can move the
adjournment of the Senate'

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: I would be willing to let
the Minister move the adjournment. We could carry
on to the break of dawn.I think that to do justice to the
Estimates we should be able to come back tomorrow.

There was a time when, on the presentation of
the Estimates to the Legislature, there would be pre-
sented a total picture of the financial position of the
island. The: Estimates were simply a part of the
Budget, with the speech on the Estimates outlining
the financial position, The Legislature did not have
to do a piecemeal jobbutwas only asked to agree to
expenditure in the light of their knowledge of how the
money to meet the expenditure would be raised and
what the taxation measures would be.

The present strange and new technique has
developed since 1962 and to my mind is totally
unsatisfactory. We are presented with Estimates of
Expenditure in March, and it comes before the legis-
lature at the latest possible time. They are rushed
through the Other Place at high speed. We are then
later on presented with a Budget telling us how and
if the demands of the island would be met.

To my mind it is a most unscientific way of do-
ing things, and presenting the most important legis-
lative business in any country, presenting it to an
Assembly of responsible people. We find that last
year, as -was noted in the memorandum, last year
Government showed a deficit of $ 6,332,384. At the
time of the 1966-67 Budget current expenditure was
$ 48 million and current revenue $41 million showing
a deficit of $6 million, and now we have an astonishing
picture that whereas it was estimated that there
would be a current expenditure of $48 million, actual
expenditure was $43,921,625 which was over$5mil-
lion less. The whole things lopsided.

!, Those of us who have a slight knowledge of
Economics you donothdretobe an expert on Econ-
omics to know everything about it Sir Winston
Churchill was Chancellor of the Exchequer and he
never invested so blindly, he was an expert econ-
omist, aad no economist should attempt to stuff this
kind of thingdown the throats of people. This is the
only territory I know where this is done. You do not


know how to come down and paywell, we want to spend
$100 million, the Heads of Departments and us, we
have agreed to ask the House to pass this money. But
you want to do this without telling us at the same time
how much it is going to be; nor can you ask us to
approve loans without telling is in what way or by
what taxation measures you are going to raise the
revenue. It is not good enough. The Government is
asking too much of the elected representatives of the
people andthe members of the Senate.who are respon-
sible for the good government of the island. Not only
the Government is responsible for the Government
of this island; we are also part of the Government.
Some members decry us and telluswe are indulging
in more propaganda ...

MR. PRESIDENT: What Head is the Hon. mem-
ber talking on now?

SENATOR R.G.MAPP: The whole estimates. It
is the way that these things are handled that these
fears are expressed on this side. The estimates
show that for this year there has been a deficit of
over $500 million. We do not know how the deficit will
be made. Infact, judging bypast records, we do not
know that there has been a deficit at all; the estimated
deficit they say was more than $500 million, or it may
be that we have just been assuming. In other words,
it may be that many people are expecting that this
being Independence year that there will be higher tax-
ation, but it may be that judging bywhat happened in
the last financial year, it may be that this year will be
no extreme taxation because, the estimated deficit is
even less than the actual deficit. We do not know be-
cause of this unscientific method of submitting estim-
ates to Parliament, but this deficit has come at a very
serious time in the history of this island.

The hon. member, inpres'enting th6se estimates
tonight, gave us a little breakdowninwhichhe touch-
ed on a few little points. He toldus how many persons
have migrated, and how many tons of sugarwe expor-
ted. He did not tell us it is difficult to anticipate
what the picture abroad will be, but I presume that
he knows it is getting blacker andblacker. Well,we
can only say that the economy of this island is in
serious straights indeed, because in spite of every-
thing that we hear about a good sugar price, tourism
is growing. It is very interesting to know that the hon.
Minister stated that we imported $2.3 million of food
in 1966, more than in 1965, while atthe same time
he noted the increase of tourists. He also noted that
we imported $2.3 million more of food; this was done
at the time when the Government was encouraging
local food production, they were encouraging birth
control, andthere is nothing to indicate that the pop-
ulation was that much higherorthatthe standardof
living had gone up so tremendously, or the habits
of the people had changed so considerably, that they
were eating more imported food at more expense to
the island. I am saying that imported food is necess-
arily more expensive or that more expensive food
has been imported from abroad than before;nothing
like that has been told to me, and I repeat it is a
striking fact that the same time the numberof tourists











has gone up- another words, the tourists receipts
are coming in one way and are going out the other
way, because you have to feed the tourists.

We hear a lot about growing local food, and a lot
of the food is going abroad at the time when the local
people need it. I cannot see howwe can talk in terms
of exporting foodwhenwe are being told that $2.3 mil-
lion more is being spent on imported food. We have
to take a serious view of the balance of payments
position and cut down on our imports and use local
subsidies.

Let us take the milk plant. When the housewife
goes to the market as happened one day at home -
and you buy sixtins of Green Pastures milk, and the
first tin you open water flies out and it hits yournose
so stink, the smell of it is so hot that the housewife
has to throw it very very far away. It happened right
at my home and out of those six tins, about four of
them were bad. If that is happening, something is
wrong, you cannot import milk, you are told you
have to use the local substitute, you have got to
buy a dozen tins to get one good tin, and they call it
Green Pastures. It is a great name but that partic-
ular night those green pastures were notveryfresh,
they were stale.

I have heard on the political platform of the rul-
ing Party some suggestions that the day will soon
come when tourism will pay, but I say that if this
Government puts too many eggs in that one basket
one day the crash will come, because many a tour-
ist has expressed alarm at the rising prices in Bar-
bados as against what they have to pay in other is-
lands. In fact, many of them say they are going to
substitute those islands for here. I believe they are
estimated to spend $26.1 million. I do not know if I
am correct, but in.1966 $21.9 million was spent -
a drop of $5 million. I hope that is correct.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A.VAUGHAN:
$29.1 million in 1966.

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Oh, I am sorry, but Sir
as I say a lot of that increase I do not know what
the figures of tourists coming in are like, but
because of the increase they have to spend more; in
other words, we cannot always look at tourism
figures only. One of the most serious things of the
financial position of this island is that a time when
we are facing a deficit of over$5 million we are told
here that the Hilton Hotel commenced operations
toward the end of November 1966, and its first full
trading year is from the 1st January to the 31st
December, 1967. It is estimatedin1967 -68 that the
current revenue from rights and royalties will be
in the vicinity of $482,000. Now Sir, that is the position.
Those of us who foresaw itwarnedthis Government,
and we were told that we were prejudiced; thatwe
were hostile to this project, and that we were pro-
nouncing doom on this project.

If you are entering a proposition of this sort,
you are entering it as a business proposition, and
if this Government feels itwants to take part in some


economic enterprise, and that the best way or the
surest way of accruing some of the profits itwil
make out of these economic enterprises is to take a
particular course of action, well then let us knox
what that action 'is going to be.

They do not listen to warnings that they are
going for a white elephant, a millstone around' the
neck of the taxpayers of this island, at atifne whe
your public debt is going up from $43 million t<
over $75 million. One project is losing to the exten
of $179,335. Sir, that project will never-.nay, it cos
too much in the first instance. The same Hiltoi
people are building hotels in all parts of the work
and they were laughing up their sleeves because s
far as they are concerned "Heads, they win; taih
you lose".

Now, Sir, the British Government built a hote
with almost double the rooms at the Hilton, and fo
almost half the cost ......

SENATOR S.V.ASHBY: On a point of order. Thit
is not a fact. I have heard it before; it is not a fact

SENA'UR R.G.MAPP: The hon. Senator gets u
here without any figures, he said he has heard it be-
fore, but it is not so. He does not even indicate tha
he knows what I am talking about. I am 'saying thai
they built a hotel with almost double the rooms al
half the cost of this hotel.
Now, sir, everybody forewarned the Governmen
of what would happen with the Hilton Hotel. We have
called for the contract from the time the building
started. In Trinidad we know that certain things wen
on that were not in the contract, and the Government
had to take a strong line.

We have watched these big boys, these big op-
erators. In Trinidad they had a trading corporation
which was not named Hilton, but which was operated
by Hilton, and the Government had to step on its
carrying on a lot of boball. I am only saying that
the same thing can happen here.

When we called for the contract we were not
making sport. It was in the public interest, You have
to check and recheck on figures when it comes to
these enterprises so that you can be aware of what
is going on. We find it very strange that while we are
subsidizing the hotel to the tune of$179,335we can-
not get the contract. It is within our province to en-
quire This is not good enough.

Mr. President, we are called on to find various
amounts to subsidise foreign interests at time when
inflation is threatening tle welfare of this island
to an extent that it has never done before. This
Government has given an increase in salary, but
at the rate at which the cost of living is going up
they will get more demands before three years are
up. The country cannot stand it.

There are thousands of people in private en-
terprise that are being paid wages that mean for
them subsistence level or even below subsistence











level or living at present day prices. Their only-
alternative is to leave the island. Many skilled
workers are doing that and those are the people
whom we want at this particular moment when we
are trying to raise our standards. It is these skilled
or semi-skilled workers that wewant here.

Meanwhile the Government is going into a trance
seeking to join the OAS in the hope of getting some-
thing for nothing, and telling the people that because
Britain will go into the ECM we will have to go into
the OAS where we will get some aid. This is hap-
pening because the Government knows that a threat-
ening situation is developing. That is why they are
now taking these measures which we will show are
not in the best interest of this island.

I will not say more about the I-ilton now, because
every time that that structure looms on the horizon,
everytime that that subject comes up I will refer
to the contract and allthe othernecessary informa-
tion that should be given and which we cannot get.

When the last Government was building the deep
water harbour there was one long debate about the
contract. If the then Opposition which is now the
Government felt that it was right thatwe should have
produced a copy of the contract they should also feel
now that they should produce a copy of the contract
for a project like the Hilton. Iftheydo not produce it
we must ask what is wrong;.

Now, sir, in 1961 whenthe Barbados Labour Party
left the Government the public debt was $24 million.
We had to show for it adeepwater harbour which has
done this island tremendous good. So the assets are
there. The harbour pays for itself. It is nothing on
which you have to raise a subsidyto pay interest de-
mands.

Look at the Annexed Estimates and. see howwell
the harbour is doing. Apart from that it has brought
in increased trade. In a Federation, of course, it
would have done very much better, because we would
not be faced with a threat from Antigua such as we
are facing now.

The turnover in the harbour has been good be-
cause the time of handling goods has been so cut that
it has helped to stabilise prices to a-tar greater ex-
tent thanwould have been otherwise the case. Had it
not been for the harbour, the handling charges would
have put a greater burden on the people. So, as I
have said, the harbour is an asset.

We have an airport, We have heard a lot about
tourism. We know that if it were not for the airport
being able to accommodate jets an increase intourism
would be impossible. We also started the Queen
Elizabeth Hospital.

The public debt is there. There is afallacy that
future generations will pay. It has to be paid by the
present generation too. As one examines the question
one has to askif itis right that some future generation
should pay for mistakes that they did not commit. Why


should future generations De asked to pay for the
Hilton which they did not put there? This idea that
future generations will pay is fallacious and under
certain circumstances it is wicked.

Here we are making this mistake and future
generations must pay the interest on an ever increasing
debt of $72.5 million. Allthese things are matters of
commonsense. If the Government comes down tomor-
row for increased indirect taxation you will never
get out of it. They are asking for trouble. When I
say"trouble" I do not want anyone to seize on the
word as if I am trying to foment something. That
is very popular nowadays. I am avery peaceful man.
I want this island to be stable and to progress in an
aura of stability and peace. I am merelywarning the
Government that when you bite off more thanyou can
chew you are asking for trouble.

I am also warning senators besides me, some of
whom may be experts butinotherfields. Your na-
tional debt should be only so many times your nation-
al income. If you go over that it is a principle con-
trary to the runningof Government, andyou are head-
ing for trouble.

Ask any Financial Secretary who knows his job
if a national debt of $72 million inview of our nation-
al income, and in view of the fact that our economy,
except in the eyes of this Government is in a
perilous state, and see if he will on an unbiassed
judgement not tellyou that you are over the safety line.
The three economists who were in the area
sometime ago warned that our economies were in
a precarious position. There is a young man with
ideas who warned the Government that just jumping
into the OAS would not help. The situation calls for a
point of view to which the Government will not face
up because it means giving some degree of power to
their own people rather than to the people of South
America.
What is needed is an integration of the West
Indian economy. A voice is asking who broke it up.
Let the voice ask who is breaking it up now. Let the
voice ask Mr. Burnham. Fsee from a Reuters report
on March 22, 1967 that Prime Minister of Guyana,
Mr. Forbes Burnham said ....

SENATOR ASQUITH PHILLIPS: On a point of
order, sir, can the Senator use newspaper report
It is against Rule 1 (c), Standing Order 16.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: That deals with
the asking of questions.

SENATOR ASQUITH PHILLIPS: I cannotfindthe
rule dealing with the use of anewspaperreportinde-
bate; but where you find the rule dealing with
questions the rationale is the same. No one can
be certain of the accuracy of a newspaper report.
One cannot take up a newspaper report and use it ii
this fashion.

SENATOR R.G.MAPP: I am not asking questions.
I am making statements. If Senator Phillips can pro-
duce a Standing Order saying that I cannot quote











from a newspaper or any other document I am quite
willing to stop.


HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: If Senator Mapp
will allow me, Standing Order No. 31 (6) on Page
20 says that a senator shall not read his' speech;
but he may read extracts from books or papers in
respect of his arguments etc. I take it that the Sen-
ator is reading an extract from a paper to support
his argument. If he is willing that the paper be made
a document of the House he can proceed.

SENATOR R.G.MAPP: I thank you, sir. The re-
port reads:

Mr Burnham is saying that he is striving for
Caribbean unity. That the only answer to our pro-
blem is the integration of economies. We are running
away form our own problems, sir. We go behindthe-
back of Guyana andtry to jump into the OAS with-
out even considering the implications to our friend
and ally, Guyana, with whom we plan to enter a Free
Trade Area, and the implications to international
relations.


We are pushing to rush shelter skelter into the
OAS rather than facing up to the problems with which
we are confronted. It is obvious that the Government
is opening up a tremendous problem for themselves
and that they had better take note.

We are not facing up to our problem. Some people
feel that one man in this island has all the economic
wisdom, and that whatever he says goes. He lays
down a policy and we must follow it even if we are
jumping into a well. And that is justwhat we are do-
ing.
A young economist from the UWI whowas sent
around these islands warned us to look out, and not
to think that our economies are all that sound and
going up by leaps and bounds. He said that we might
find ourselves in a mess if we go on like this.


Let it be noted that apparently last year we were
finding difficulty in raising the loan that was
placed in the local market. I understand, I do not
know how true it is, Iunderstandthatthrough peo-
ple who would underwrite the loan you are placing,
through some Canadian broker and paying them even
more than the underwriters. These Canadianbrokers
are getting more than underwriters usually get and
yet still half the money cannot be raised. If the
Government is in trouble, the Government has to
put to the people of Barbados put its affairs in or-
der instead of trying to hide things.

It is at a time like this that we find everything
being done to conceal in these estimates exactly
what we have to pay to certain international orga-
nisations, exactly whom we are paying and what,
under Head 22, Ministry of External Affairs, an
amount of $1,912,612, and we see here 21 Contri-


butions to international organizations $400,000 and
we do not know exactly what this amount is for. It
is the people's right to know how much of the
$400,000 is going say to the United Nations. Does
that amount include a contribution to the O.A.S.?
How much? We are supposed to have estimates be-
fore us as a responsible party. What are we hiding?
Is it because we face a financial dilemma? Must we
put censorship on some of these transactions and
think we are going to get away with it ? Is that an-
swering the problem? Why is there all this hush-
hush and lack of information?

Mr. President, if "international organisation"
means United Nations alone, they would put it in,
and if that was so, that would be printed. Why not
say "Admission to full membership of the United
Nations consequent on the attainment of nationhood"?
We see Appendix '0' for details, but these details do
not look very good. As you can see, there is a
breakdown over here of $800,000, recurrent sum-
mary of expenditure. United Kingdom $178,000;
Canada $172,000; United Nations Mission $215,000,
Consulate, New York $ 133,000 and Washington $ 62,500,
Other items not included above, $62,000 for rent,
rates and taxes for High Commission in London; in
Ottawa $83,000; rental of housing for staff $100,000;
purchase of motor cars (Ottawa and New York)
$20,000 and provision for passages of officers and
families, conferences, special missions, visits to
overseas missions and other expenditure in con-
nection with external affairs $235,000.

Sir, the people of this island do not want at this
particular stage to be told that they will be bur-
dened with this cost, and we have got to look for
somebody else, and the only thing we can do is to
join up, say, the OAS. We are spending a lot of
money here joining, I do not know which organisa-
tion. $400,000 can be taken any part of the world.
People want to know what they are getting for it;
what it means to them; the facts of life. Does it
make any difference to their standard of living? We
have not been told yet how muchwe have to pay OAS,
and we have not been told what benefits will accrue.
We are simply told that Barbados must jointhe OAS,
we had it in our Manifesto. One time you put some-
thing in the Manifesto and it must be done, and
another time do not mind we put it in, it is not sup-
posed to be done. There are other things in our
Manifesto, let us change our minds about them. Just
go ahead and do it.

Sir, my colleague has dealt at length with the
question of joining the Organisation of American
States. We have adopted a stand in this matter, and
one of our principal claims is that this matter has
not been put to the people. The joining of an organi-
sation, attaching ourselves to an organisation that
is administered by a big power which interfereswith
the affairs of a small state, and they interfere for
reasons, let us say because these states have had
the security of the United States. We would like to
know what we are going into in this respect. These
things are not idly thrown out, they can happen in











Barbados. We are now independent, and when you
are independent every big power is watching you.


Many people were surprised to learn how the
United States interfered with the affairs of Guyana;
these have no relationships with our Party. We sent,
observers, and we heard the views of Mr. Burnham's
Party, but we are all opposed to the idea of simply
using you because you are a small country. The
same thing that happened in Guyana canhappenhere.
There is a very friendly man Mr. Walkes I think
is his name and he has been known to go and tell
one party that the situation is a good one, and then
to tell another party that the situation, the same situ-
ation, is fine for that party.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, the Senate was adjourned for 20 minutes..

ON RESUMPTION

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Sir, I was speaking on
Head 22 when the adjournment was taken, but as I
hinted before, we thought a lot of ground had been
covered so far as OAS was concerned, and I there-
fore would shorten my remarks under that. Head
There are just one or two other things I want to:
mention, and then I will sit dowva.

Capital Estimates, Item 6, Housing Authority,
page 181 Part II Capital. In the notes under capi-
tal estimates for this item it is stated "To assist
the Housing Authority in continuing its programme
of housing development," but you will notice that
this year, in spite of an increase inwages and emo-
luments, in spite of an increase in material, an
amount of $350,000 appears when they estimated an
amount of $400,000 last year. Are we to assume
that the rate at which houses are being built, even
with a small budget last year, has further come
down? In 1965-66 the actual expenditure was
$525,000; now this is almost $200,000 less, but the
whole fact of the matter is that the Housing Authori-
ty is a bit of a headache to the Government. We have
heard all kinds of things, and one thing we have
heard is that the Authority has had it a bit rough.
Because of the fact that so much money is outstanding,
the result of that is that other people are being pe-
nalised, and I feel that the Authority must adopt
measures such as those I notice being adopted in
Trinidad, andthat is, that the Authority should train
people to be Managers, especially Managers, so that
their job will be to promote a sense of humility with-
in the Authority that people will be encouraged by
each other to take a pride in their surroundings,
and realise that they are happy to be working with
the Authority. We know that there are a lot of peo-
ple who can do it, but what I feel and I have no
doubt that the Authority has the same problem is that
the position is worse in areas where you get people
thinking that the other people in other areas are bet-
ter off than they. People do not yet have that sense
of social well-being of a society of people living
close to each other, neighbourliness; to feel that


they are part of a whole housing area, part of a
whole community, who should take a responsible
attitude, and not always fighting against authority
and if you try to discipline them in any way.

Sir, it is going to take a constructive approach
to get over this problem, and I hope that senators
will realise that I am not approaching it in any par-
tisan manner. It is not a problem that is confined
to any one party. It is one that would give a head-
ache to any party.

Of course, I must say that the problemwas more
or less aggravated by rather stupid statements made
on the platform of the then Opposition and has got
worse. However, the problem is there, and I be-
lieve that if we had more training, if we had estate
managers working in liaison withthe Social Wel-
fare Department we could achieve some result. I
do not know if that liaison has yet been achieved.
We tried it in our day.

I feel that the whole Housing Programme has
suffered and is suffering at a time when more and
more of the financial resources of the Government
should be pushed into Housing even at the expense
of projects which, although in themselves they may
look very good, are not first priority: Housing is
becoming the Cinderella of the projects of this Gov-
ernment. When I see the amount by which the vote
is being cut, I feel that something is wrong.

I do not think that the Government has appre-
ciated the seriousness of the problem in St. Michael.
I appreciate that they would have to buy land but
land should have been boughtwhen itwas on the mar-
ket. Now you get this cutting down on Housing all
the time, and at a time when the demand for houses
is building up to serious proportions.

I do not know what has happened to the Cave
Hill Scheme. When we put in our Five Year Plan in
1961 the proposal to develop a housing area there,
CDC was so interested that they asked us to dis-
cuss a change in the Usury Act because they would
have to borrow money in London at a rate which
would make the local rate of 6 per cent uneconom-
ical for them. We were working on the Mortgage
Insurance Actwhen the elections came along. We
left it in draft form; but we have heard nothing
more about it.

CDC were prepared to put $2 million in the
Cave Hill Scheme. I do not know if the Minister in
charge knows anything about it. If we could have
got that scheme going we would be well on our way
to helping with this problem of the demand for
housing at all levels both at the working class
level and at other levels; but especially in the lower
and middle income groups. That scheme fell through
and today the Government is working on a Cave Hill
project.

To my mind it is too little over too long a pe-
riod of time. If it is to make a greater impact on
the problem the Government will have to push more


T











money iut.. it instead of spreading it over the length
of time that they propose. It is a wonderful scheme.
I know that enquiries have been made recently from
financial corporations and building interests in New
York and I know that one such was told that the
scheme would be advertised and that the applica-
tons would be called for in January this year. I
have seen nothing. I wonder what could be the de-
lay.

Since last year it was said that applications
would be advertised for. The longer we take to get
ahead with the groundwork and let these people
abroad know what we are doing, the more we are
destroying our chances.


Mr. President, we have debated the Estimates at
length, touching on certain heads. I have tried to look
at the financial background and examine it as pre-
sented to us in the Memorandum and by the Minister,
and also to criticise or to put forward certain views
on some of the heads.

Apart from Head 22, all are the usual heads and
items you get. Head 22 is the biggest departure this
year. I hope that the Minister will give us a break-
down of the $400,000. May be itwaspart of his tact-
ics that after he had spoken everything would fall
apart and we would allpackupourtents and go home
and sleep.

I feel that the object of the Minister should not
be to leave us in the air.We should be told what this
vote for $400,000. is for, and which international
organizations we are seeking to join.

SENATOR H.F. ALKINS: Mr. President, -- I
usually find the Memoradum on the Estimates most
helpful; but this year in some respects there are
one or two puzzling things. Itwould seem to me that
we could have been given a more complete back-
ground.

In introducing the Estimates, the Ministergave
us some background and some statistical information;
but I find it extremely difficult to digest a string
of figures that someone else is reading out. I would sug-
gest that in the future it wouldbe helpful if these fig-
ures could be incorporated in the Memorandum
itself.


To turn to one or two of the things that puzzled
me. In Paragraph 1 we see that there was an estim-
ated deficit of $1.2 million arrived at by taking into
consideration the more recently revised Estimates
for the year 1966-67. But when we turn to Page 5
that estimated deficit is turned into a current sur-
plus of $.5 of a million. It is difficult to see
how there could be this complete change around if
the people who prepared Paragraph 1 and Paragraph
16 used the same figures.

Another slightly puzzling thing is why should you
add the annexed estimates of the Post Office and the


Harbour to the total expenditure and not add the re-
venue from these two heads when you are summar-
ising the revenue?

I also think that it would have been helpful to
put down contingent liabilities under current expen-
diture; because you have $3.7 million in contingent
liabilities in the form of guarantees by the Govern-
ment for loans by statutory boards from Commercial
banks. I think that a complete picture of contingent
liabilities might have been putin] at this stage too.

The two largest guarantees are to the Housing
Authority and the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation.
They are contingent liabilities in the sense that at
any time -- one hopes that it will never happen --
Government might be called upon to make good these
guarantees.

Our attention is drawnin Paragraph 5 to the
fact that the estimates of current revenue show an
increase of approximately 5 per cent. One would
have expected that the increase in expenditure would
also have been put in percentage form, inasmuch as
they have gone up by 15 per cent.

It is somewhat disturbing to see our revenue
going up by 5 ) per cent and our expenditure by 15
per cent. The deficit is no light figure, and will call
for a lot of adjustment in our direct and indirect
taxation measures.

Another thing to which I must call attention is
the fact that of these current estimates of expen-
diture, personal emoluments take up no less than.
approximately $22 million. One hopes that the oper-
ation of the machinery of Government will reflect
this high cost in personal emoluments. I mentioned
earlier this evening that it was showing signs of
creaking at some joints, and one hopes that attention
is being paid to this aspect, and that in return for
this expenditure the public will have an efficiently and
smoothly run machinery in Government.

To turn to the Estimates themselves, I can only
say that they show signs of careful drafting and care-
ful attention to reduction in expenditure where ever
possible. As previous speakers have already exhaus-
tively pointed out, Head 22, Ministry of External
Affairs is a new head and it has come under fire in
respect of some items. I must support the comments
of previous speakers about the paucity of informa-
tion regarding Item 21 of that head.

I think, sir, that to ask this Senate to vote $400,000
without giving any information onwhat it is to be spent
on is not good enough. Withall due respect I will say
that the note to the item is meaningless when it says
"commitments of full membership consequent on
attainment of nationhood."

I will not go into the merits or demerits of
Barbados' entering the OAS, my main reason being
that I know little about it. But I would not think that
the Government would have thought of making such a
drastic step as joining the O.A.S. without giving:the











public full information as to the pros and cons of entry
andwhat it is hoped to receive: although I must say
that to go into an organisation merely in order to
receive something is again not good enough.

Like other speakers, sir, I am assuming that the
Hon. Ministerofl State will give a breakdown of this
$400,000 so that we can more intelligently vote for it.
I do not think that contributionto the O.A.S. would be
hidden away in this vote.

Under Head 14, Inland Revenue, a previous
speaker has mentioned the need to have a look at
our income tax structure. I think that we all realise
this need, and it is understood that the Government
is at present employing anexpert to go into the whole
question of direct and indirecttaxation. One can as-
sume that full attention will be paid to the various
aspects of our tax structure.

The comment that I would make is that this is
a department that brings in a lot of money. Direct
taxation alone is something like $14 million and any
money spent to increase the efficiency of the depart-
ment would, in my oponion, be money well spent.

There are a lot of criticisms of the department,
and most of them seem to be the result of the lack
of adequate staff to deal with the volume of work that
is demanded. I think that if we spent a little more
on this department, especially on the collecting side,
we would get good value for the money spent.

Under Head 29, Ministry of Agriculture, what
strikes me is that we seem to have abandoned poor
old sugar. Research seems to be concentrated on an-
imal nutrition, milk etc. while ordinary routine work
is being carried out on sugar. I do not see much on
crop diversification. I believe that a lot of work is
being done by the Sugar Producers Association and
I think that their work should be supplemented by the
Government. I think that we will continue for a long
time to be an agricultural community and this is
one of the things that requires careful attention.

Under Head 43, Item 130, Family Planning Asso-
ciation, we are to give a subvention of $42,500. We
are continually faced with this spectre of a growing
population and the need to find jobs for more and
more people Our traditional answer to this was
emigration but as we know, most of the avenues for
emigration are stopped. Industrialisation cannot pro-
vide the full answer and therefore we must think
very seriously and much more intensively about the
subject of family limitation.

That is a direction inwhichwe might concentrate
a little more money and a little more effort.



Under National Insurance I would like to comment
briefly that it was thought earlier in this session that
there would be Regulations covering the national
insurance plan. This plan is supposed to go into
op-ration on Saturday morning.


Some weeks ago various organizations inthe is-
land were circularised and asked to give their com-
ments on the outline of the scheme which had been
drafted and circulated for this purpose.

I think very few organizations could offer any
useful comments on a broad scheme, since no one
could possibly argue against the question of national
insurance. You could not argue against the princi-
ple of it but one would certainly like to see what ma-
chinery was being set up, and the details of it. It
seems to me a pity that the regulations are being put
through before the implementation date, and not
three months after; I do not think even the staff know
exactly what they have to do. This is going to take a
lot of time to do, and every commercial house has
to understand clearly what is required, and to be
able to brief their staff as to what is to be done. It
is going to take along time before these regulations
can be read, digested and understood. I repeat it
seems to me rather unfortunate that there was so
much delay in the bringing forward of these regula-
tions.

I can understand that we might have avery over-
worked legal department, but the simple solution
would have been to put your implementation date a
little later. I can quite see that one would desire to
start,with the financial year, but if it could not be
done satisfactorily a little delay would not have made
much difference. I think that those are the main
things on which I would comment at this stage; I do
not want to keep members any longer, but there is
just one final item I would mention, and that is that
it is very difficult for one to gather information as
to what is happening with a lot of these Government
projects: The Marketing Corporation, The Transport
Board, The Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation, the
Cave Hill project I do not remember seeing any
reports of those, even an interim report will be
helpful. One sees far too often reports of Government
departments being printed two years after the year to
which they apply; they are too late by then. One
wants to be kept advised astowhatis happening, and
I think every effort should be made to bring these
reports up to date.

That is about all I propose to say at the moment.
I will repeat again that these estimates do indicate
that a great deal of pare and attention have been
paid to reduction in expenditure, and I think
anything in this direction is welcome.

SENATOR C. G. JOHNSON: Mr. President, I
only want to arrest a moment or two of your time,
but an accusation was made towards the Barbados
Marketing Corporation somewhat earlier in the
evening by members on tie opposite side to the ex-
tent that the Barbados Marketing Corporation was
subsidising in some way the Hilton Hotel. I would
not like to use any strong language, but this is not
true. It is a fact that the Corporation does supply
the Manager with part of the day-to-day needs of
the Barbados Hilton, but it is done on a fixed basis,
and far from subsidising, the Corporation actually











makes a small profit on this transaction. I could not
quite understand from the remarks coming from the
other side first of all, its claim that we are having a
dictatorship that if we enter OAS we come under im-
perialistic patterns of the United States of America,
and then we go on even further by saying that the ra-
dio should have come under the -NBC operation.
Surely all of this is very conflicting.



SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, Iam
sorry that you have been sitting there so patiently all
day. There is only one thing Iwould like to say. Ear-
lier today the Minister of State, Senator Vaughan,
made one of the most brilliant statements about the
subject in hand I am a little younger than Senator
Vaughan and I believe I may have to live in this place
with these people a little longer, so they must pay at-
tention to what is being done here. The two hon. mem -
bers on the other side are even different from Senator
Alkins or Senator Blackman because I have great
respect for teachers, especially great teachers for
many years, and the Government service has got an
opportunity to flap their wings. They have never had
this sort of freedom before, but Senator Barrow and
Senator Mapp are members of a political party and
.they are only talking for the purposes of having some-
thing to say. They are trying to use this Chamber as
a springboard.


Mr. President, those of us who were in Barbados
heard this same rubbish about Independence, and what
they told the people about Independence made them
lose the elections but they are still talking about In-
dependence, they are still telling the people that they
have done wrong, or they want another Federation
broken up, let us go on breaking them up to satisfy
them. I would not go into the arguments about the
OAS, but he is talking about per capital income. Every-
body knows that per capital income is involved. What
is the per capital in the whole of the 21 republics in
Latin America? What is the invested capital in the 21
republic system? I am convinced that he does not know
what is taking place as far as these investments are
concerned.



Senator Barrow spoke about the private schools.
He thought he had a privilege going to Lodge School,
and then he was worried about going to Lodge School
with white boys. Let us close Lodge School and spend
the money at the Modern High School or the Federal
High School, because it seems to him that this Gov-
ernment is spending more money than any Govern-
ment has spent on secondary schools. The Govern-
ment is now spending $233,000 on these schools and
no money was spent by the former Government in
power. Some of these people you hear talking about
these private schools, before the children were born,
went to register them in some of these private
schools. Are you sending your children to the ele-
mentary schools?


They are only talking to make the public think
that they are good samaritans and they are not sub-
scribing to what they are saying. The talk about more
children going from private schools to secondary
schools is not substantiated by any facts: he is saying
that there are more of those children from these pri-
vate schools getting an opportunity to go into the Gov-
ernment secondary schools, and when in fact I can
state categorically that is not true. You do not have
to get any facts to show. Go in Harrison College,
Queen's College and ask where the children went to
school at the first instance and you would see they
went to primary schools. Some of them have to go to
school at Mr. Rudder because you have to send them
somewhere for some period, but there is no privilege
being given all these children getting into schools.




Even on that basis, if you have a public examine -
tion and every child who can go and sit that public ex-
amination came from a private school suppose you
kept your child at home and taught it, it is eligible to
take the public examination, so I do not know what he

is talking about.





If I may refer to this nonsense about joining the
OAS, Mr. President, if Trinidad and Tobago has refused
to join the OAS they would be ready to talk. Dr.
Williams is a scholar; his country has joined the OAS
and has been seeking to join any other organisation
now. They are tellingus that man like Dr. Williams
had a row with the Americans about Chaguaramas.
Someone is going to suggest to us that Dr. Williams
is an American satellite; when you hear this nonsense
it does not hold water. To suggest that the Leader of
this Government is a satellite to the United States of
America is the sort of cheap argument that we have
heard. Antigua said they want to join if it is possible.
Is Mr. Bird going to be a satellite? As I said before,
it seems to me that this Senate is being used as a
springboard for other purposes, and the members of the
Opposition should know that time is limitednowwith
these things, and we have to be careful about them.




These are the things that we have to look into.
In this island what we have to be aware of is the set
up of Government departments, and there are some
people who try to tell what to do and they do not do it.



The Prime Minister should never have got a man
with the same name as himself to be his Personal As -
sistant. It causes too much confusion. Ido not think,
Mr. President, that it is necessary for me to inflict
you any more. Another time will come to deal with
this question of the OAS and any of these international
agencies.











What I will say before I sit is that there is a
concerted and subtle attempt to take a vague point
and use it as a springboard. You can see what some
people are about as soon as you hear what they say.
There are going to be single member constituencies
and everybody is going to come into St.Michael now.

Senator Mapp is asking about houses in the Pine
and in Grazettes. Everything now hinges around St.
Michael. Everybody wants to see St. Michael treated
nicely. That will be the constituency in which there
will be eight or ten seats. Ithinkthat St. George will
have two seats, and St. Michael something like eight.


I would only like to tell the Minister of State
not to allow these members to get up and use this
Senate as a springboard. Some years ago these two
senators would not have kept back the Senate for so
long. They are not dissatisfied with their own party
and they are projecting themselves so that the
people can read in the newspapers that they are
saying something in this Senate.

I woull 'i.ke to point out that personal emolu-
ments always represent a high percentage of the
Government's expenditure. The greater part of the
Government's expenditure is on human beings. The
Government employs people and pays people. The
Government runs services and services mean deal -
ing with human beings, and you have to spend more
on human beings than on other things.

When you hear senators talking about CBC it
makes you think thatthe Barbados Governmentwould
have some control over the National Broadcasting
Corporation. These big organisationsdo not have to
wait on places like Barbados to ask them to come
and run a service for them.

The note to the item for $400,000 is not as unenligh -
tening as some senators are trying to make out with
their cheap arguments. You do not join organizations
like these to see what you cangetout of them. There
are people who are members of the International
Chamber of Commerce becuase they are dealingwith
commerce. They do not get something out of it as
such but their membership means something to their
general outlook.

When you join these international organizations
you do not start off on the basis that you will get
something out of them. You cannot ask the Govern-
ment what they expect to get out of the OAS as if they
were running a sweepstake syndicate or a meeting
turn. You do not tell people that if you join the OAS
everybody will be able to go to Brazil or Panama or
Nicaragua. It is depressing to hear the kind of argu-
ment that is being used.

A Government in power has the right within its own
judgement to decide what organizations it is goingto
join. This idea that you must have approval'before
you join an organisation is nonsense. Will you have
to ask approval to join the United Nations? No one
is asking what we will get out of the U. N..


I believe that the people who are talking so much
about American intervention are afraid. I am getting
suspicious. It seems to me that we will have to set
up a real security organisation. I do not believe that
human beings are not subject to some of these move-
ments. Only recently we heard of a spy ring in Italy
that was very wide stretched.

In this area, Sir, we take things for granted. I know
that we have picked people in this island who, in or-
der to say I told you so, would not mind seeing the
island destroyed. When youhearthese little remarks
and suggestions dropped here and there you have to
pay some attention to what they are saying. They are
always talking about military intervention.

There is the OAS with member countries of 200
million people and countries wanting to invest in
other countries. Senators talk about the per capital in-
come of some of those countries being lower than
ours as if that of St. Lucia is higher than ours.

I feel that I have a duty to perform in saying
what I have said, and in telling the Minister of State
that we have to keep a very igilant eye.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: Mr, President, -
I would like to st i:)oi what was said about Income
Tax. I will go further and say that the cry of the
country is for the pensioners who have given their
lives to the service of this country. I am referring
to those who have toiled hard and got nothing.

Even if you do not give the pensioners freedom
from Income Tax, I hope that the rates for them
will be a little lower than those of the people who are
working.

This is the first time that I am looking at the
Estimates with a critical eye. My onlyregret is that I
do not have enough time to do so. I do not think that
we have been given time enough to study the Esti-
mates as we should have. I hope that next time it will
be seen to that we get the Estimates much earlier.
We appreciate the fact that the Independnce celebra-
tions and other circumstances caused a delay.


As regards Head 41, Education, there are a
number of Assistant Teachers, Deputy Head Teach-
ers etc. You will remember how long we have been
told that the school population is increasing; yet
we find the number of teachers remaining the same
all the time.


That, sir, is having a deleterious effect on our
schools. Then we see under Item 3, 430 Supernumerary
Teachers, the sum of $663,780, and for Acting Staff
under Item 4, $611,400. Youwill appreciate that there
are too many of these supernumeraries in the Teach-
ing service. Nearly half or even three quarters of
them should be on the Established Staff.

I turn to Item 5, Funiture, $67,600. I often say
that in our nation there are certain pockets of work-
ers who are too small to get together, and they are


L ~











therefore pushed to the wall. So we have contrac-
tors supplying furniture to the schools. The amount
for furniture has been reduced by $800. Everyone got
an increase last year, but the vote for furniture
which is produced by small workmen has been re-
duced.

I do not see why the vote should be reduced be-
cause the note refers to additional furniture and th<
increased school population. I do not think that the
Government would want to effect a saving at the ex-
pense of the workers.

Under Item 7, Apparatus and Material, the note
refers to books. Our children are suffering today
from a lack of textbooks. You cannot afford to lend
them books to take home at night to study. All the
studying has to be done in school.

I am sorry to see that $25,000 in the last Es-
timates has been cut out. I am sorry to see too that
the Government has reduced the amount for station-
ery. About two years ago not one stickof chalk came
to the Primary Schools. Parents of children in Prim-
ary schools have never been accustomed to buy text-
books for their children. They feel that the Govern -
ment is buying everything.

Mr. President, I would like to see the Minister
of Education bring out the new EducationAct. Every-
one wants to see it, and I know that teachers in
Comprehensive Schools would like to know what is
th:! policy as regards those schools if they are
still glorified Elementary Schools or part of the
Secondary School set-up.

Two of these schools have over 1,000 children
and St. Leonards has over 2,000. The academic
streams are just as large as in any of the Grammar
Schools except Harrison College and Combermere,
but the teachers are not treated accordingly. You
will be surprised to know how they compared with
even small schools like the Alexandra and the
Alleyne Schools.


The Comprehensive Schools are doing just as
well although they get children of third rate ability
while the Grammar Schools get Children of a better
quality. I was glad when some time ago mention was
made of the proposed Junior College and our fears
were allayed about the kind of college it is going to be.

It would be a pity if the Sixth Formers were re-
moved from our Grammar Schools. The assistance
that the Independent Schools need at present is not a
Sixth Form Junior College. These schools have been
falling shom in results in the Oxford and Cambridge
examinations in the last few years. Today I doubt
whether the average of these schools is more than
two passes.

In this connection I would ask the Minister of
State to tell us in his reply why we have not published
the results of the Oxford and Cambridge examinations
yet. People are beginning to feel that they are so poor
that they cannot be published.


I repeat that a Sixth Form for Independent
Schools at this time would be a waste of money be-
cause they do not have the material. I would prefer
to see that money spent onthe Technical Institute or
a Trade School.


I had the privilege three years ago of sitting
on a Committee on a Trade School. A report was
handed in but up to now we have heard nothing about
it. Everyone knows that tradesmen are lacking. If
the Government wants to help in that direction I
think that money would be better spent on a Trade
School than on a Sixth Form College.

Our supernumerary teachers are not staying.
You get them staying for six months or as long as a
year and then you get fresh ones coming in all the
time. The headteachers, as a result, are very
frustrated. A headteacher is not prepared to stay
in one of these schools a day longer thanisnecess-
ary. I hope that the Government will take a look at
the question of recruitment.

Teachers have not received a cent of their
retroactive pay yet. People in other departments
have got theirs. Senators who are Ministers have
got theirs. Not only that, but many of these teachers
owe the Government income tax and the Government
is charging them 6 per cent on aieir arrears while
their retroactive pay is still in the Treasury. That
is one of the reasons why we have this sense of dis-
satisfaction among teachers.

Another reason why the teachers are dissatisfied
is the treatment which is displayed in the Ministry
in dealing with their business. There is a teacher at
a certain school now who has been acting for five
terms from October 1965 as a Head Teacher, and she
has not yet got one cent as acting allowance or any-
thing. Nobody has told her anything. That is the treat-
ment which is handed out to teachers, which makes
teachers feel that the Government Service is not what
it should be.

Let us take a look at the comprehensive schools.
I sympathise with the parents of the children at the
St. Leonard's Schools; the girls have three shifts and
you can just imagine how difficult it is for those
teachers and those children, and therefore we hope
that something will be done to stop this shift system,
because it is unfair to the children when we are
boasting that we are getting secondary education for
all, and it is hard that some children are not getting
a primary school education. Therefore, Mr. Presi-
dent, I hope that something willbe done forprimary
schools, and that the Minister will see to it that just
as how the Government invites tenders for such things
as stone and the like, they askthe Labour Officer to
invite tenders, or to see about the price which was
given for this furniture, which is needed in the prim-
ary schools.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: Mr. President, in re-
spect of the operation of the Hilton Hotel as mentioned
by Senator Mapp, I have been a member of the Bar-
bados Development Board for approximately 10 years


__












and I am very accustomed to this kindof thinking, this
low rate of thinking by people like Senator Mapp
and the people of his party.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: I said Iam accustomed
to. this lowrate of thinking. I say it again. It was these
very people who are responsible for the Development
Board, and it was during their regime thatthey were
only building projects one factory here andpossibly
another building somewhere else, but at a total of
about $.1,000. It is now very clear tous that if Sena-
tor Mapp's party was still in power there would be
no Hilton Hotel, and there would be 300 people out of jobs
tonight, and .this has nothing to do with the indirect
jobs provided by the operation of the Hilton Hotel. It
is still within memory how the first time we have a
good resort hotel in Barbados that people were dis -
couraged about it, by these same people. Everything
was done Ito discourage the building of this hotel and
the use of it. It was these people who were responsi-
ble for Barbados being left so far behind in the de-
velopment of tourism as an industry.

The Government of Puerto Rico took the lead in
developing tourism in the Caribbean. They built the
first Hilton Hotel in 1949 at a cost of $15 million,
and in about, six-years the Government of Puerto
Rico were the recipients of approximately $10 mil-
lion in profit from the Hotel. In 1947 the number of
tourists visiting Puerto Rico was about 40,000 and by
1956, through the building of a hotel, the number of
tourists increased to 160,000. Trinidad built a Hilton
Hotel which is now being operated successfully. Yet
you have got an. element in this country that in every
turn you tryto develop the country they find some ar-
gument to tell you that you are wastingyour time and
you are going to run this country into bankruptcy.

The Government of Barbados and the Develop-
ment Board have approached this contract with Hil-
ton in a very practical manner, so that when any-
body tries to say that we were misled as a matter
of fact, according to our projection, we have as-
sessed Hilton's first problems based on the mini-
mum: first class hotel, and profits will be from 60%
upwards. Already indications are that we are not
wrong in this because I am perfectly sure that if
things go the way they are going, there will be no
deficit this year.

After six years we do not expect just to make
any profit, we expect to make a very handsome pro-
fit and will be able to pay off the cost of the hotel in
25 years, so that the hotel will have paid for itself
and will have given you at least 19 years of substan-
tial benefit. On the other hand, the tourists spend over
$3/4 million; approximately 68,000 tourists come to
Barbados; the Hilton Hotel expects to attract no less
than 20,000 new visitors to Barbados in one year, and
common .Arithmetic i will show you that even if we had
to lose $179,000, now, it will be much better later on.
What distresses me particularly, Sir, is this cam-
paign by people like Senator Mapp every time he talks
about investments; this is an investment by the people
in Barbados.


Every time you attempt to,make these invest-
ments you are going to run the island into bankruptcy.
It seems to me to be an effort to discourage the man
in the Street from investing. One would expect that in
an investment like the Hilton Hotel that people in re-
sponsible positions would try to encourage this type
of investment and would try to encourage people to
have faith in this type of investment. But without
any sound reason we get these arguments about bank-
ruptcy. It would seem to me that the same type of
mentality that would discourage the Workers' Union
from investing the windfall money and tell the people
to draw the money and drink it out in rum would try
to discourage the tourist industry.
As a result of this sort of discouraging by people
who should know better, you find today that $96 million
has been left idle in the Savings Bank of this island,
which is about four times the capital of the biggest
business house in Bridgetown. If you invest your
money you will lose it, therefore it lies idle in the
bank and the country needs development, needs cap-
ital. When this type of mentality exists, trying to
hold back progress, discouraging your every turn,
I can only hope that these peoplewill realise that in-
vestment is the only hope for our country.
Senator H. ODESSA GITTENS: Mr. President,
I am sorry to have to keep you so long, but I would
like to clear a few points for Senator Blackman on the
matter of education. I would like him to know that if
the number of teachers remained"static andthenum-
ber,of children was increasing, it is probably because
some of the teachers have not had their full quota of
responsibility, and we are looking-intothis and doing
something about it. We have emerged, andhe knows
this. Some of the schools and the possibility of the
increase in any new schools will be taken care of at
a subsequent time. I appreciate Senator Blackman's
concern because he himself has been under this yoke;
it is a pity that he has come out now the time is a
little better. I thought that he made an issue of sta-
tionery. I think Senator Blackman, like myself, prac-
tised writing on his legs, and the issue of stationery
will be overcome from the new textbooks issued
which we intend putting in most of the primary
schools.

The furniture vote he mentioned. I would like
him to look on page 182 and see that furniture and
equipment is well accounted for in that column, so
if you have any doubts that we are not looking after
the island's children and that they are going to sit
on the customary grass that we had them on once
upon a time, it will not now be so.

SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: On a pointof ex-
planation. I looked at the item aid I see that there are
in respect of what new schools are to be built. I am
talking about furniture for the new schools.



SENATOR H. ODESSA GITTENS: I am explain-
ing, Sir, that this is the furniture and equipment. Un-
less there is going to be a wholesale breakdown I think
this is adequate. We are going to do exactly
what you asked us to do, look carefully into the con-


1











tracts before giving them out. On the other hand,
those in the" Opposition ate not 'qualified to defend
education. All my life I have been victifilsed in this
field; Senatbo Blackman would know very weli that:
there is nW government who has looked after 'he
children like the present Government.

:There Was in the press some time ago a letter
und&lke heading "Teachers are discoiteinted." I
made that same remark exactly 18 years ago when
I was frustated beyond hope. He mentioned that
teachers have been going without their acting allow-
ance; this is regrettable and I apologise. I think he
was'veiry wise to bring it up. But when he made refer-
ence to Richmond school I had to think back a few
years when. the then Government tried to inflict in-
justice onhanelementary Headmasterwho hadgained
-adegree; because those two schools had to be opened,
and they were not blessed, so you cannotexpect very
much from those schools. I think we should bury
them together, put them to rest beautifully.

As. a matter of the sixth forms, if we could go
back-a bit and find oiat how it is that people who
have had the advantage of going to a recognized
school in this island do not think of it as their alma
mater. I sat :here .this evening and heard Lodge
School 'dragged down figuratively and I wondered if
any time any child should pull to pieces a parent as
was done here. I remember verywell the effort that
was made by the former Government to integrate
the GCodrington High School and the Lodge School,
but instead of pulling down a school we have caused
it to -function properly. We do notwant in this island
a system of education whereby we get the sort of
thing we have had to be subject to for the past nine
hours. I am very sorry that I have kept you into the
wee hours of the morning, but these are things I
could-not have allowed to pass.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, I would just like to refer very brief-
ly to something which I said earlier, and I should
like to assure Senator Walcott-thathe andl are one,
but here we have still .one bill and two resolutions
to get through, and it is nearly a quarter past Thurs-
day morning. What I would say is, seeing that we had
such a great volume of business and important busi-
ness to do, it would have been preferable to have
given those members who wanted to delay the esti-
m ates by fillbuste rng an opportunity to finish what
their were doing and let us concentrate on this, but
Senator Walcott was quite right when he said what
he said.

.I was just wondering, with respect to what has
been said on the estimates, -first:of all, let me say
how grateful I, am,to allthe members who have made
certain points by way of comment and criticism, arid
quite frankly, at this hour, I do not know if they ex-
pect me to reply to everything that has been said. I
have here a list of over twenty matters, but there
are just three or four matters on which informa-
tion has been had, and I willfurnish that information
at this early hour.


First and foremost is the information that has
been asked with respect to this sum of $400,009 for
the International organizations. I do not deny that the
note in the estimates is not to the fullest. I would
not even try to make a defence, but I think little
too much has been inserted. From the information
which I have, all the details of which.I have not got
with me, since I have not got the files there -ar:c er-
tain international organizations which-upon.obtain-
ing independence we would have to join, if we must
keep abreast of:the times. Amongthose organizations
there is of course the United Nations, for which the
sum of $60,000 has been allocated; the World Health
Organisation; the International LabourOrganisation;
the General Agreement on Tariffs -and, Trade;
UNESCO; the ICAO, WHO and thevery:cofitrovereial
OAS.


I have also been askedby SenatorAlkinswhether
he could be assured that the finance department
particularly the department of Inland Revenue, has
been geared to bear this great strain that it will have
to bear as a result of the organizations we intend to
join.

There are two other questions, one raised by
Senator Blackman who I understand wanted to know
why some examination results had not been published.
Frankly, I do not know.

The other question was raised by Senator Mapp
about what has become of the.plan involving CDC in
the Cave Hill Scheme. The most I can say is that at
one time CDC did conceive becoming involved in the
scheme and then withdrew. I can get the information
for him in so far as it is available and give it to him
on another occasion.

So far as the other comments and criticisms are
concerned, whenever they are helpful I can assure
members that I will pass them on to the Government
and they will be received with the respect and-atten-
tion which they deserve.

Senator Alkins asked about the National Insur-
ance Scheme. The orders have only been laid today.
That'does not mean that contributions will be made
from today. I can assure the senator that everything
has been done to prevent any bottleneck at the begin-'
ing.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable P.M.
Greaves,. the. Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.


Clauses 1 6 of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.

The Schedule was called and passed without
debate.











The question that the passing of the Billin Com-
mittee be reported to the Senate was put and agreed
to.

His Honour the President resumedthe Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable P. M.
Greaves, the Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO CONTINUE VARIOUS EXPIRING LAWS

The President called the fifth Order -- A Bill
to continue various expiring laws.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A.VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, --- This again is the usual Bill that
comes up every year to keep in force certain laws
for which provision is made for annual expiration.
There is not much that I can say about it. It is iden-
tical to last year' s Bill, and I move that it be read
a second time.

Senator the Honourable F.G. Smith seconded
the motion.

SENATOR W.W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President,
-- I am referring to the Anglican Church Partial
Suspension Act. It is regrettable to find this year
after year among the expiring laws. It gives people
scope to throw bricks, at the Church. The Church
has been of much service to this community and
it still has an important role to play.

The Government owes the Church a moral
obligation and something more than moral. The Gov-
ernment, because of the Church has about 4,000
school places, and the Church is not asking one cent
for those buildings.

The Government has a moral obligation to the
Priests. The Church wants everyone to realise that
it will continue to perform its role in the community.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F.G.
Smith, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 of the Bill were called and
passed without debate.


The Schedule was called and passed without
debate.


The question that the passing of the Billin Com-
mittee be reported to the Senate was put and agreed


His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill was reported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F.G.
Smith, the Bill was read a third time and passed.

LEAVE TO PROCEED WITH RESOLUTIONS
NOT ON THE ORDER PAPER

Senator the Honourable H.A.Vaughan, having
given notice earlier in the meeting of his intention
to ask leave to proceed with two Resolutions which
were not on the Order Paper, sought andwas granted
leave accordingly.

His Honour the President accordingly called as
the next Order -- A Resolution to approve the Civil
Establishment (General) (Amendment) (No. 4) Order,
1967.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A.VAUGHAN:
Approval of this Order is imperativeifwe are to have
integration in the Works Departments, and the Reso-
lution following this one is also imperative if we are
to have certain services continue.

Where the Resolution now before us is concerned,
it deals, as I said, with the integration of the Works
Departments. There is no point in my going through
all of it, and I move that the Resolution be concur-
red in.

Senatorthe Honourable P.M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

SENATOR H.F. ALKINS: Mr. President, -- I
notice that you are providing 14 new posts and
abolishing 14 and then there will be 15 new people
with the takeover of the roads. Are they former em-
ployees of the Southern District Council?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A.VAUGHAN:
Not necessarily. But wherever employees of the
Council were engaged in road work they will be pro-
vided for. No one is being pushed out of a job.

SENATOR W.W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President.
-- I know that this question of integration was put
up when the salaries Commissioner was here. The
Civil Service was told that this matter was before
the Ministry. I had hoped that whatever was being
done would go back to April, 1966.

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Mr. President, -- I see
here provision for three Deputy Directors. Am I to
understand that the Chief Technical Director will be
in overall charge?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
(in an aside) Yes.
SENATOR R.G.MAPP: Can the hon. Minister tell
us whether there will be a director one for Public
Works and one for Highways and Transport and where
will everyone be?


~~











SENATOR THE HON. H.A. VAUGHAN: There
-Will be three divisions in the integrated department,
one for construction, one for planning and the other
in the maintenance division.

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Does that involve more
expediture by Way of salaries? At present you have
a Director in charge of Highways and Transport and
one in charge of the Public Works Department. This
may be necessary from the point of view of efficiency
but the cost will be more.

SENATOR THE HON, H.A. VAUGHAN: The sen-
ator is quite correct in saying that the great aim is
efficiency. If as a result of aiming at greater effi-
ciency we have to pay something more we will have
to do so. The expense is not substantially more. The
total cost under the existing system is $511,812, and
the total cost of the new posts will be $512,022.

The question that the Resolution be concurredin
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) NO.55

SENATOR THE HON.H.A. VAUGHAN: Mr. Pres-
ident, -- This Resolution for $2,375 is to supple-.
ment the votes under certain items under Head 21,
'Prisons. Under Item 20 --

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: Is the Minister aware
that we do not have copies of this Resolution?

SENATOR THE HON. H.A. VAUGHAN: Iunder-
stand that, and I ask the indulgence of the Senate. As
I was saying, sir, the request under Item 21, main-
tenance of hospital, is to meet commitments partic-


ularly with respect to dental treatment. The largest
item is for $1,800.

I move, sir, that the Resolution be concurred
in.

Senator the hon. P.M. Greaves seconded the mo-
tion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to

ADJOURNMENT

SENATOR THE HON. H. A. VAUGHAN: Mr.
President, -- I move that the Senate do now adjourn.

SENATOR THE HON. F.G. SMITH : Mr. Pres-
ident. I beg to second that. I would like on behalf of
the Government, and I think onbehalfof all senators,
to express our appreciation for the calm and effi-
cient manner in which you presided overthis meet-
ing I think that your calm and efficient manner
enabled us to go on for long hours without undue
heat and in a pleasant atmosphere.


I wish to thank members on the other side for
the way they sat out and contributed to the debates,
and the interest they took in theirwork. I thank them
very much.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: I thank the
Senator for his kind remarks.

The question that the Senate do now adjournwas
put and agreed to, and the President adjourned the
Senate accordingly at 12.45 a.m. on the 30th March,
1968.







Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 17
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 23 dated 20th March, 1969.



S.I. 1969 No. 42

The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF THE
CUSTOMS ACT, 1962
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962, here-
by makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(Alliance Francaise) Order, 1969.

2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962, is hereby amended by the addition thereto
of the following new item:-


--Alliance Fran-
caise 220


All articles imported by or on behalf
of the Alliance Francaise to be used
exclusively for the purposes and the
objects of that organisation and not
for sale on the certificate to that ef-
fect of the Secretary/Treasurer of the
Alliance Francaise."


Made by the Minister this 10th day of March, 1969.


ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.







2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 43
The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF
THE CUSTOMS ACT, 1962
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962, hereby
makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(Barbados Arts Council) Order, 1969.

2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962, is hereby amended by the addition thereto
of the following new item:-

"Barbados 221 All articles imported by or on
Arts Council
behalf of the Barbados Arts
Council to be used exclusively for
the purposes and objects of the
said Council and not for sale, on
the certificate to that effect of
the President or the Secretary of
the said Council."
Made by the Minister this 10th day of March, 1969.

(Sgd.) ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.








STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


S.I. 1969 No. 44

The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF
THE CUSTOMS ACT, 1962

The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962, hereby
makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme) Order, 1969.

2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962, is hereby amended by the addition thereto
of the following new item:-


222 All badges and equipment imported
for the exclusive use of the Duke
of Edinburgh Award Scheme or
any member thereof on the certifi-
cate to that effect of the Secretary
or other responsible officer of the
Scheme."


Made by the Minister this 10th day of March, 1969.

(Sgd.) ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.


"Duke of
Edinburgh
Award Scheme.







4 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 45
The Customs Act, 1962 (1962-18)

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF
THE CUSTOMS ACT, 1962

The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962 hereby
makes the following Order:-

1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(Amendment) Order, 1969.

2. Part I of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962 is hereby amended by deleting therefrom
Item No. 512.21 and all the words appearing opposite
thereto in the columns respectively headed -
"Class or Description of Goods", "Unit" and
"Rate of Duty",
and by substituting therefore the following:-


UNIT RATE OF DUTY
Class or Description of Goods
For Classi- For
Pref. Gen.
fiction Duty


512.21 Methyl alcohol (Methanol)
including Wood Naptha gal. value 10% 20%


Made by the Minister this 10th day of March, 1969.

(Sgd.) ERROL W. BARROW
Minister of Finance.
(M.P. 5007/31/1/T.1)







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 5



S.I. 1969 No. 46

THE LAND ACQUISITION ACT 1949

(Notice under Section 5)
The acquisition for public purposes of the follow-
ing parcel of land containing by admeasurement 2,440
square feet or thereabouts situate in the parish of
Saint Thomas in this Island described in the Schedule
hereto with the appurtenances having been decided
on by the Minister responsible for lands with the
approval of both Houses of Parliament, it is hereby
declared in pursuance of Section 5 of the Land Ac-
quisition Act, 1949, that the said land has been
acquired for the erection of a Public Bath.

SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part
of a larger area the property of Lavinia Caddle)
situate in the parish of Saint Thomas containing by
admeasurement 2,440 square feet or thereabouts
Abutting and Bounding on other lands of the said
Lavinia Caddle and on a public road or however else
the same may abut and bound.

The Notice given by the Governor-General under
Section 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, 1949, dated
the 16th September, 1968, and published as Notice
No. 77 in the Official Gazette dated 23rd September,
1968, is hereby cancelled.

Dated this 11th day of March, 1968 at Government
House in the Island of Barbados.

A. W. SCOTT
Governor-General







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 47

THE LAND ACQUISITION ACT, 1949
(Notice under Section 5)

The acquisition for public purposes of the following
parcel of land containing by admeasurement 12 Acres
3 Roods 38 Perches or thereabouts situate in the
parish of Saint Joseph in this Island described in the
Schedule hereto with the appurtenances having been
decided on by the Minister responsible for Lands with
the approval of both Houses of Parliament, it is hereby
declared in pursuance of Section 5 of the Land Ac-
quisition Act, 1949, that the said land has been
acquired for the resting of houses from the Scotland
District.

SCHEDULE
ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate-
in the parish of Saint Joseph containing by admeasure-
ment 12 Acres 3 Roods 38 Perches Abutting and
Bounding on Clement Rock Plantation, on other lands
of Lammings Plantation, on a private Road, on the
public Road, or however else the same may abut and
bound.
Dated this 11th day of March, One thousand nine
hundred and sixty-nine at Government House in the
Island of Barbados.

A. W. SCOTT
Governor-General




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