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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00074
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00074
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Supplement: Senate debates for 10th August, 1967
        Page A 170
        Page A 171
        Page A 172
        Page A 173
        Page A 174
        Page A 175
        Page A 176
        Page A 177
        Page A 178
        Page A 179
        Page A 180
        Page A 181
        Page A 182
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 13; S.I. 32: Barbados harbours (Amendment) (No. 2) regulations, 1969
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 13; S.I. 33: Directions by the commissioner of police re Rally Club for 1st 2nd March, 1969
        Page B 6
Full Text
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PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 27TH FEBRUARY, 1969


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Income Tax Notice re Return Forms for Companies,
Partnerships; joint ventures, etc..;;;.* ........;.. 192
Notice of Sitting of Licensing Authority, Dist. 'F' 192
Patent: "Compositions and Methods, useful for in.
creasing the sugar context of crops, etc. 192
Probate Advertisements dated 21st February, 1969. 200
Resignations:
Beresford Arthur, Printing Machine Operator;
Joyce Grant, Stenographer Grade "B";
Shirley D. Layne, Clerical Officer;
Rudolph A. Sargeant, Postman..;...........;;. 191
Resolutions: Nos. 12-17/1969 for $55,491; $8,841;
$5,222; $89,560; $417,592; $230,499-;..---.-. 193-199
Vacant Post in the Public Service:
Senior Agricultural Officer/Agricultural Officer 191

Senate Debates for 10th August, 1967.

Legal Supplement
S.. 1969 No. 32: Barbados Harbours (Amendment) (No.2)
Regulations, 1969. :
S.I. 1969 No. 33 : Directions by the Commissioner of Police
re Rally Club for 1st and 2nd March, 1969.

NOTICE NO. 183

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Resignations
Miss Shirley D. Layne, Clerical Officer,
resigns from the Public Service with effect
from 24th March, 1969.

(M.P, P. 8611)
Beresford Arthur, Printing Machine
Operator, resigns from the Public Service
with effect from 9th March, 1969.
(M,P, P. 5394)


Resignations
Rudolph A. Sargeant, Postman, General
Post Office, resigned from the Public Service
with effect from 4th February, 1969.
(M.P. P 6 LORV/
J rant, Stenog' er Grade "B",
rest rom the Pbilic &5 vi e with effect
A Y 1 i |
from IMYarch, 1969.
(M.pP. 853)

Vacan st in--- e Public Service
Senior Agricultural Officer/Agricultural
Officer/(Entomology), Ministry of Agri-
culture, Labour and National Insurance.

The Salary of the post is as follows:-

(a) Senior Agricultural Officer
$7,320 x 300 7,920 x 300 9,000
per annum.

(b) Agricultural Officer
$4,860 x 240 7,020 per antnun.

Further particulars are obtained from
Service Commissions Department,
"Flodden", Culloden Road.

Closing date for applications 3rd May,
1969.

(M.P. 3649/23 Vol. II)


2M




4''' ,


NO. 17


VOL. CIV


9,#t









192 OFCA AET eray2,16


NOTICE NO. 184

Form R Regulation 9

Notice of Sitting of Licensing Authority

(The Liquor Licence Act 1957 Section 16)
Notice is hereby given that a Sitting of
the Licensing Authority for District "F"
Belleplaine, will be held at the Magistrate's
Court, District "F" on Thursday 20th March,
1969 for the purpose of Granting Licences,
Transfers of Licences and Orders for Regis-
tration of Clubs under the above mentioned
Act.

Dated at Magistrate's Court District
"F", 24th February, 1969.

R. K. BREWSTER
Clerk to the Licensing Authority. (Ag.)

N.B. All Applications mustreach the Magis-
trate's Court District "F" not later than the
27th February, 1969.


NOTICE NO. 161 (second publication)
PUBLIC NOTICE
(Patents Act, 1903-7, Sec. 10)

NOTICE is hereby given that E.I. DU
POINT DE NEMOURS AND COMPANY, a cor-
poration orgainsed and existing under the
laws of the State of Delaware, United States
of America of Wilmington 98, United States
of America, lodged in this Office an applica-
tion and complete specification for a patent
under the Patent Act 1903 (1903-7), for an
invention for "COMPOSITIONS AND METH-
ODS, USEFUL FOR INCREASING THE SUGAR
CONTEXT OF CROPS UTILIZING ar
UREIDOOXYCARBOXYLIC ACIDS AND
THEIR DERIVATIVES"

The said Specification has been accepted
and is open topublic inspection at this Office.

W. A. DAVIS.
Registrar. (Ag.)


INCOME TAX NOTICE


RETURN FORMS YEAR OF INCOME 1968

Notice is hereby given that Income Tax Return forms for the year
of income 1968 to be filed by:-

(a) Companies,
(b) Partnerships, jointventures, trusts, and estates of deceased per-
sons

are now available at the Inland Revenue Department, Treasury Building,
Bridge Street.

2. A further notice will be placed in the daily newspaper when re-
turn forms to be filed by individuals are ready for distribution.

3. Old type return forms (with figures for Year of Assessment
amended to 1969) are not suitable for the 1968 year of income and taxpayers
are specifically requested not to use them.

4. Income tax returns must be delivered to me on or before 30th
April, 1969.


W. A. GITTENS
Commissioner of Inland Revenue


February 27, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


1 2


,jL J --








OFFICIAL GAZETTE


Resolution No. 12/1969 M.P. B.22/T1

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
Resolved that the sum of FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED
AND NINETY-ONE DOLLARS be granted from the Consolidated Fund and
placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,
1968-69 Part I-Current as shown in the Supplementary Estimate, 1968-69
No. 60 which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the Senate be
invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

11th February, 1969.
THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.
I assent,
.A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
21st February, 1969.

SCIIEDI LE
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 60


ProvisTon in Provision in Supplementary
Approved Estimates Supplementary Esti- Provision
HEAD AND ITEM 1968-69 mates Nos 1- 59 Required
OF
Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
APPROVED ESTIMATES Fxpendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-
ture ture ture ture ture ture


$ $ $ $ $ $
PART I CURRENT
HEAD 38 MINISTRY OF EDUCA-
TION
(1) General Administration
Item 32 U.W.I. Tuition Fees 38,800 -148

(3) Technical Institute
Item 12 Electricity, Water and
Gas 3,000 4,331
Item 17 Workshop Materials 15,500 5,000
Item 22 Workshop Equipment 26,758 20,000
(4) Housecraft Centre 853 495
Item 15 Furniture and
Fittings 853 495
(5) Schools
Item 10 Flectricity, Water and
Gas 40,000 23,517
Item 26 Examinations 90 170
Item 28 Visual Aids 14,400 1,830






A


February 27, 1969


OFICIAL aAZETTE









OFFICIAL GAZETTE February 27, 1969


Resolution No. 13/1969


M.P. 3002/9/T2


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY


Resolved that the sum of EIGHT THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED
AND FORTY-ONE DOLLARS be granted from the Consolidated Fund and
placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,
1968-69 PartII-Capital as shown in the Supplementary Estimate, 1968-69
No. 61 which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the Senate
be invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,.

Resolved that His Fxcellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.


11th February, 1969.
THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker


Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.


I assent,
A. 'TINSTON SCOTT,
Governor-General.
21st February, 1969.


SCIIEDULE

Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 61


HEAD AND ITEM
OF

APPROVED ESTIMATES





PART II CAPITAL

HEAD 102 COMMUNICATIONS
AND WORKS

Item 10 East Coast Road


Provision in
Approved Estimates
1968-69

Statutory Other
Expendi- Expendi-
ture ture


Provision in
Supplementary Esti-
mates Nos. 1- 60


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


Supplementary
Provision
Required


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi=
ture


1 I-2_ __ _


25,000



- 25,000


11,710



11,710


8,841



8,841


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


February 27, 1969








Febrary 7, 169 OFICIL GAETT


Resolution No. 14/1969


M.P. 5001,'8/T3


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Resolved that the sum of FIVE THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED AND
TWENTY-THO DOLLARS be granted from the Consolidated Fund and
placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,
1968-69, Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary Estimates,
1968-69 No. 62 which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the
Senate be invited to concur herein, and if concurred in,

Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

11th February, 1969.

THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.


Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.


I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General
21st February, 1969.


SC'IEDULE

Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 62


Provision in Provision in Supplementary

HEAD AND ITEM Approved Estimates Supplementary Esti- Provision
1968-69 mates Nos. 1 61 Required
OF
Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
APPROVED ESTIMATES Expendi- -Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-
ture ture ture ture ture ture


$ $ $ $ $ $

PART I CURRENT
HEAD 23 MINISTRY OF
HOME AFFAIRS

Item 17 Travelling 2,000 -- 2,603

HEAD 37 ELECTRICAL
INSPECTION

Item 16 Maintenance of
Electrical Installations 9,200 2,619


February 27, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE









OFFICIAL GAET Ferur 27 1969


Resolution No. 15/1969


M.P. J.K. 33


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY


Resolvedthat the sum of EIGHTY-NINE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED
AND SIXTY DOLLARS be granted from the Consolidated Fund and placed
at the disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates, 1968-69,
Part II Capital as shown in the Supplementary Estimate, .1968-69, .No. 63
which forms the Schedule to this Resolution and that the Senate be invited
to concur herein, and if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

11th February, 1969.


THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.

I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General
21st February, 1969.


SCHEDULE

Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 63


HEAD AND ITEM

OF

APPROVED ESTI MATES


Provision in
Approved Estimates
1968-69


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


Provision in
Supplementary Esti-
mates Nos. 1-62


Statutory
Expendi-
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


4 4 + 4 4--


Head 194 EDUCATION

Item 4 (New) Secondary
Comprehensive Schools


Supplementary
Provision
Required


Statutory
Expendi-.
ture


Other
Expendi-
ture


38,517


February 27, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


89,560











Resolution No. 16,'1969 M.P. 5001 '8/T4

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Resolved that the sum of FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN
THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND NINETY TWO DOLLARS be granted
from the Consolidated Fund and placed at the disposal of the Govern-
ment to supplement the Estimates, 1968-69, Part- Current as shown in
the Supplementary Estimate, 1968-69 No. 64 which forms the Schedule
to this Resolution and that the Senate be invited to concur herein, and
if concurred in,
Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to
assent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.
11th February, 1969.


THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.
I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General.
21st February, 1969.

SCHEDULE
Supplementary estimates 1968-69 No. 6t


Provision in Provision in Supplementary
HEAD AND ITEM Approved Estimates Supplementary Esti- Provision
1968-69 mates Nos 1 63 Required

OF Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi Expendi Expendi-
APPROVED ESTIMATES ture ture ture ture ture ture

$ $ $ $

FART I CURRENT
HEAD 43 QUEEN ELIZABETI
HOSPITAL
Item 16 Substitutes and
Temporary Staff 175,760 93,500
Item 17 Overtime Pay 20,000 4,000
Item 33 Dental Outpatient
Service 3,640 304
Item 34 Services Rendered
by Specialist Officers 90,000 37,300
Item 103-Medical Supplies 732,820 -- 150,000
Item 104- Furniture and
Equipment 55,000 7,000
Item 106 Cleaning and
Laundry 50,000 15,000
Item 108 Telephone 17,000 -- 3,000
Item 109 Travelling 2,800 1,600
Item 11- Stationery 17,000 3,420
Item 112 -Passages of officers 30,000 16,000
Item 116 -Maintenance of
Buildings and Plant 65,000 -7,000


February 27, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE










OFFICIAL GAZETTE


February 27, 1969


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Ferur 27 99OFCA AET


Resolution No. 17/1969


M.P. 5009/10/T1


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY


Resolved that the sum of TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY THOUSAND
FOUR HUNDRED AND NINETY NINE DOLLARS be granted from the
Consolidated Fund and placed at the disposal of the Government to sup-
plement the Estimates, 1968-69, Part II Capital as shown in the Sup-
plementary Estimate, 1968-69 No. 65 which forms the Schedule to this
Resolution and that the Senate be invited to concur herein, and if con-
curred in,

Resolved that His Excellency the Governor-General be asked to as-
sent and take the necessary steps to give effect to this Resolution.

11th February, 1969.

THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Concurred in by the Senate the 20th day of February, 1969.

E. S. ROBINSON
President.


I assent,
A. WINSTON SCOTT
Governor-General
21st February, 1969.


SCHEDULE
Supplementary Estimates 1968-69 No. 65


Provision in Provision in Suppleme ntary
HEAD AND ITEM Approved Estimates Supplementary Provision
1968-69 Estimates Nos. 1-64 Required
OF
Statutory Other Statutory Other Statutory Other
APPROVED ESTIMATES Expendi. Expendi- Expendi- Expendi- Expendi-i Expendi-
ture ture ture ture ture ture


PART II- CAPITAL
HEAD 104 EDUCATION

Item 20 (New) University of
the West Indies


230,499


-I-~ls '


February 27, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE












PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-


PROBATE of the Will dated the 11th day of April 1963, of REGINALD ARCHIBALD
BARROW late of the parish of St. Michael in this Island who died on the 2nd day of
March, 1965 by REGINALD CLARENCE SEALE, one of the Executors named in the
Will of the said deceased

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CLARENCE CHASTELL WARD late of
Fairfield Land, Grazettes in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the
14th day of July, 1968, by MARIE MATILDA WARD widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of EGBERT MILLINGTON HARPER late of
Lucas Street in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who died on the 9th day of
January 1969, by ELOISE CARNETTA HARPER, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of THELSON WHITFIELD BEST late of
Seaview, in the parish of Saint Philip in this Island who died on the 28th day of
October, 1964 by VEEKLIN IDILLA BEST mother of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of ELSIE MAY COZIER late of Pie Corner
in the parish of Saint Lucy in this Island who died on the 15th day of January, 1969,
by ALLAN ARTHUR COZIER widower of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CLYDE RICHARDSON PATRICK late of
King Street, Bridgetown, in this Island who died on the 1st day of January 1968, by
HERBERT LISLE THOMAS the Attorney on record in this Island of LOUISE
CARLOTTA PARTICK, widow of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Advertisement
with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications have
been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 21st day of February, 1969.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar.


emo\'rnnent printing Office


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


February 27, 1969












THE


SENATE


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE

Thursday, 10th August, 1967
The Senate-met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President)plis Honour Senator C. Asquith Phillips,
B.A. (Deputy President), Senator the Honourable H.A.
VAUGHAN, O.B.E., Q.C., (Minister of State and Lead-
er of the Senate) Senator the Honourable F. G. SMITH,
Q.C., (Attorney General) Senator C.L.BRATHWAITE,
Senator H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H., (Parlia-
mentary Secretary), Senator H. F. ALKINS, Senator
D. A. WILES, C.M.G., O.B.E., Senator F. C. H.
CAREW, Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE,B.Sc.,M.B.B.S.,
Senator S. V. ASHBY, Senator F. L..WALCOTT,
O.B.E., Senator W. W. BLACKMAN, M.B.E., Senator
Erma V. ROCK, Senator S. A. BLANCHETTE, Sen-
ator N. A. BARROW, B. A., Senator R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves, B.A.,
(Minister of Home Affairs), Senator P. G. MORGAN
(On leave),Senator E. Lisle WARD.

Prayers were said.

CHANGES IN THE SENATE

Before the business of the day was enteredupon
His Honour the President read the text of the follow-
ing letter from His Excellency the Governor-Gener-
al:-

GOVERNMENT HOUSE

BARBADOS


1st August, 1967.

Sir,

I have the honour to inform you that Senator
C. G. Johnson has tendered his resignation as a
member of the Senate of Barbados and that, in ac-
cordance with the provisions of section 39 (f) of the


Constitution of Barbados,I have, acting on the advice of
Sthe Prime Minister, instructed that the necessary
instrument be prepared declaring vacant the seat of
Senator Johnson with effect from the 18th July, 1967,
the date on which I received his resignation.

To fill the vacancy created by Mr. Johnson's
resignation, I have, in accordance with the advice of
the Prime Minister, appointed Mr. Lloyd Erskine
Sandiford to be a member of the Senate under the
provisions of section 36 (2) of the Constitution with
effect from the 15th August, 1967.

I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,

A. WINSTON SCOTT
GOVERNOR-GENERAL

Senator The Honourable E. S. Robinson, C.B.E.,
President of the Senate.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan, Minister
of State and Leader of the Senate, laid the following
paper:

The Drawback of Duties on Sale of Goods to
Tourists (Pearls) Regulations, 1967.

REPORT OF SELECT COMMITTEE

Senator H. F. Alkins presented the Report of the
Joint Select Committee appointed to consider and re-
port on a Bill intituled an Act to provide for the ac-
quisition, deprivation and renunciation of citizenship
of Barbados and for purposes incidental to or con-
nected with the matters aforesaid.

His Honour the President directed that the Re-
port be circulated to members.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE( CURRENT) NO.6

H is Honour the President called the first Order -
A Resolution to place the sum of $22,062 at the dis-
posal of the Government to supplement the Estimates,


DEBATES












1-967-68 Part 1 Current as shown inthe Supplemen-
tary Estimates, 1967-68 No. 6 which forms the
Schedule to the Resolution.



SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, This Resolution is to provide for the
refund of duty paid by the Barbados Dairy Industries
Limited on supplies which were imported during the
period 1st December, 1965 to 4th May, 1966 prior to
the publication of the Customs Duties Order granting
Ithe Company duty free coniess!i).n,.

What happened was that they believed that pioneer
status automatically entitled them to import into the
island all machinery duty free. That is not so. They
have approached the Government for this refund and it
is thought desirable that they should be given some
sort of ease to the extent indicated in this resolution


The second item deals with the relief of distress -
ed Barbadians abroad.As members are no doubt aware
there is a sum of $2,240 provided annually by the
Government as a contribution towards the upkeep of
the Old People's Home in Colon, Panama.

Colon, however, is not the only place in Panama
in which there are Barbadians and so the amount
which we provide goes only towards the relief of such
Barbadians as may be admissable to the home in
Colon, In Panama City itself, however, there are a
number of distressed Barbadians and the British Aid
Society in Panama which provides help for British
subjects there,have approached this Government for
financial assistance towards their work and the Gov-
ernment willingly agreed that the sum of $850 be
granted towards the relief of ten Barbadians in Panama
City on whom the society spends about $1,428 a year.

As the vote stands at present we shall have to
supplement it by $510 in order to bring itup to the
$850 which it is thought adequate to give.

I beg to move that the Resolution be concurred
in.

Senator C.L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.


SENATOR R.G. MAPP: MR. President, unfor-
tunately I was not here when the Minister began his
introduction to this Resolution. I do not know if he had
gone into details as to the items or supplies for which
this refund to Barbados Dairies is being sought. I do
not know if it is duty paid on powdered milk or other
supplies of that nature., It would be interesting if we
could be told these facts because the public is very
worried about the standard of milk that is being pro-
duced at this plant and they have a right to be because
it is costing more than was ever envisagedwhen the
plant started, and more money has to come from
pockets that can ill afford it, because we know that
milk is a standard diet for children.


As I have said, this plant is giving us quite a
lot of worry in this island. I have been informed
powdered milk has been seen to go there in bags
and the bags come out empty. It must be assumed
that the powdered milk does not disappear outside the
plant but inside of it, and that it was used for making
this milk which is supposed to be unpowdered.

I have been told lately that powdered milk, if
you let it stay too long gets weevils and often has to
be dumped,and that may account for the poor quality
of this milk. It is a strange fact that while this plant
is manufacturing large tins of evaported milk small
tins are being manufactured in Belgium for Barbados.
In other words we are being asked to grant privileges
that amount almost to a monopoly to a manufacturing
concern in Belgium.

Everyone knows that the great demand by the pub-
lic is for the small tins and not for the large ones.
The small tins are said to be a better quality while
the large tins of poor quality are the one which come
from the local factory. Apart from that, the small
ones have always been in greater demand and because
they are cheaper. The fact is that the milk for which
you have the greater demand comes from abroad.


It seems to me that the worst quality is being
manufactured here. It is a very serious state of af-
fairs. I know that it has been said that the Government
is paying attention to it. The Government can easily
say that things should not be so and that the Govern-
ment is seeingto it that it will not be so in the future.
I am wondering if this is not a case of having got off
on the wrong foot at the wrong time.


HIS HD '!:UR THE PRESIDENT: I do not wantto
stifle the senator. You ask a specific question of the
minister who introduced the Resolution, namely, if he
could give information as regards what supplies were
being given this refund on the duty paid. So far the
Minister has not had an opportunity to give you that
information. I cannot allow a general debate to take
place on the Barbados Dairies Industry as such. I
would ask the senator to confine his remarks to the
question that he asked.



SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am willing to let him
reply if you say that you will not allow a debate -

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: On a broad
basis, but I do not think you can be allowed to discuss
broad principles. You will have ample opportunity to
do so in the near future, I have no doubt.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I am not going into de-
tails. I was talking about the quality of the milk com-
ing from the Pine Hill Dairy Plant. I have been told
that these supplies go in and also come out and they
are all part and parcel of the same thing. I quite
agree with your ruling, but we are suggesting that












because the quality is not as good as it should be,
and because it appears that something has gone wrong
we want to see that we are not wasting our money
by not getting the best service from this plant.

I feel that there should be not only protection
for the industry but protection for the consumer. This
industry plays between the devil and the deep blue
sea. On the one hand the industry wrote to producers
complaining about the quality of the milk sold to the
plant and informing them that if the quality was not
improved the plant may have to pay a smaller price.
That was before the broadcast by the Minister of
Agriculture. On the other hand there was a general
complaint by the producers that the price the plant
was paying was so unreasonable that the producers
might have to go out of business. You have a battle
between the plant and the producers, and it is the
consumer who is suffering. He is suffering in respect
of both quality and price.



It seems to me that the Government should set
up a board to regularise the position so that the pro-
ducers will get a price that is reasonable and even
produce more, while at the same time the consumer
gets the utmost protection. While the battle is going
on between the producer and the plant the consumers
are getting the worst end of the stick.



It seems to me that if you want to encourage the
production of milk you will have to see that the pro-
ducers get as favourable a price as possible consis -
tent with such things as the price of animal feed and
the expenses that they undergo.



Go into the whole position. Adjust the price or fix
the price in the interest of everyone concerned, in-
cluding the consumer. On the other hand, under the
present conditions in Barbados it is admitted that
individual producers should be encouraged to join the
Co-operative Movement. Iam sure that a Milk Board
would go into that because it is the only solution to
this problem of protecting producers on the one hand
and the public on the other. Otherwise there will be
a perpetual war and in the long run the consumer will
be paying for it.



I am sure that the majority of consumers do not
mind paying for milk if they get milk of good quality.
I am not pursuing this matter any further Sir, I am
awaiting the reply to which you referred. I am only
suggesting that the Manifesto of the Government party
set out that they were in favour of the Co-operative
Movement. We should try to get it going.




I know the difficulties in this island where Co-
operatives are concerned. We want to be individual-
istic. I am only throwing it out to the Government as
being worthy of consideration.


SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
have listened to the hon. member, and based on the
same reasonsthat the Hon. Senator Mapp spoke about,
but for different reasons mine are reasons of com-
mon sense. I do not believe there is anysubstitute
for common sense in any partoftheworld, even in
dealing with milk.

The problem of the refund to the Barbados
Dairies Industry Ltd. may be a difficult one it has
to go into the economy of the island but it has been
drawn to my attention that the plant is making milk
of a poor quality and if that is universally known, it
cannot be left for various types of criticism to be
laid against it because that will be certain death of
the very industry that you are trying to create, and
Barbadians are good at pulling down. Any unskilled
labourer can pull down the most magnificent building.
Barbados is not known for industries, we are now on
the threshold of industries. For many years they have
been talking of a milk plant and for the same problems
the producers didn't want to co-operate, and then
you find it difficult, so the milk plant must have the
co-operation of the milk producers to be able to
make it worthwhile.

That is one of the difficulties. Now this diffic-
ulty can be overcome; if the Government is aware that
there are problems, then they have got to work
quickly and expeditiously and do not wait until it is
too late. Get to the job quickly. The evaporated milk
is useless; people cannot use it and therefore if you
have a plant like this, the name is going to be a bad
advertisement for the plant, if a product coming from
the plant is being sent back to the groceries each
time someone purchases it.

Another criticism I have to make is that they
sell milk in quart quantities, and it is positively
stipid for the kind of economy we have in Barbados,
where the pint size has been universally known, that
you can go to any place in any country outside and
buy even half pint bottles in cartons. There is no
point in the dairy business here in Barbados pack-
aging the stuff in two-pints sizes when it is known
you will not be encouraging people without refrigera-
tors to buy fresh milk; there is no point in sending
out any two-pint cartons when you know you do not
have enough people withrefrigerators to say if they
are not using two pints of milk one time they can
put up the rest, therefore it is a question of wast-
age and you cannot encourage people to waste.

There must be a proper feasibility survey made
and it would give people an opportunity of buying
milk by the pint. I am satisfied, Mr. President, that
what is needed now is that there should be as quickly
as possible an investigation into this matter to find
out what the situation is because we have a problem
here before us that on one side the Manager of the
plant is making a statement, and on the other side
the Minister is making another statement. When you
have a situation like I that the Government itself
carries this under-riding responsibility, and the
criticism that can be levelled against the Government
is very great indeed, and the Minister and Govern-












ment should be aware that any person opposedto the
Government uses anything to pull the Government
down and themselves. They praise you with one half
of their mouths and pull you down with the other, so
there is no question of this being regarded as a means
of pulling down the Government in Barbados;.

The Hon. Senator just said that they started too
soon. You can make criticisms about other things; you
could make criticisms about the bus service, but that
is something the Government started and it is with us
now. But this is an industry that is connected with
Barbados, and there is no doubt about it, you cannot
see the worth just like that. The production of milk
is a very important thing and there are problems which
we have got to face. These problems the Government
should investigate quickly and do not wait until so
much is said.

I feel that the production of milk in Barbados
at this present time requires an investigation. Iwould
not say a milk Board; there is no point in setting up
a Board until you get down to the problem. What
price can you sell improper milk? There is no eco-
nomiciprice. You cannot sell it at all if the milk
is not fit for human consumption. What is the milk
board going to do? Before you set up a milk board
it is essential to find out how the plant is operating
so that the community would get the benefit of per-
sons, intelligent and knowledgeable, going into this
matter and let the public know that these are the
problems; either by a public: investigation or a de-
partmental investigation. You have an agricultural
department, you should have experts and economists;
you should be able to get people with knowledge to go
into this matter to determine if the product is in the
best interest of the community. When that is done
then you can have any sort of price regulation. First
things first, and I think the first thing is to see how
this thing is done.,

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, I think
that what Senator Walcott said towards the end of his
speech about going into how the plant is operated, I
thinkthis is more or less the crux of the problem
because as you look at this business of supplies
you cannot help thinking that it is obvious that two
types of supplies are being used by the plant. One is
the fresh milk and one is imported milk powder;
whatever supplies are imported I am naturally not
in position to say, but I used to think since like
everybody else here I was more concerned over the
quality of the evaporated milk which is the kind that
most Barbadians use all the time- and Government
has made a step towards getting a bureau establish-
ed to secure the services of an adviser, but I have
been doing some more thinking ali i: has become
clear to me that a bureau is most desirable in the
peculiar circumstances of the milk plant. Ithi*kthat
the bureau of standards would not be enough ,I say
this for two reasons; when it became very clear in
the exchange between the Minister and the Manager
of the milk plant that there was a grievance, perhaps
justifiable, on both sides, and you find now that where -
as one used to get the milk delivered at 170, now the
people who purchase that kind of milk, without having


to go into any big costs- transportation and all the
rest- should have paid 150. If, as, I understand it, it
takes two pints of fresh milk to make a tin of eva-
porated milk which is normally sold at about 280, if
that is the case then the basic commodity itself, with-
out any additional cost, would be costing already 150;
by the time other costs are added, plus the overhead,
it is very clear to me that this plant could not pro-
duce evaporated milk from local supply, and there-
fore that it is perhaps in the first place intended to
produce evaporated milk from imported milk powder.
This is where I became rather concerned, because I
am not without information that the process of pro-
ducing evaporated milk from powdered milk is still
one on which a great deal of experiment is being done,
and most of this experimenting is going on at the Pine
Hill Dairy. Whereas the consumer, the general pub-
lic and the Goverment at the time thought that a milk
plant was being established which would bring to the
public milk produced from locally fresh milk at a
reasonable rate, of course what they have got is a
plant.set up to produce milk by a process that is yet
being tried and of course has not yet been effective.

This seems to me to be avery serious situation,
because it means even if the Government has now
found out what happened, thousands of people in this
country have been taken for a ride. I do not want
to go any further on this point because one can go on
and be quite candid and this can be construed by
somebody else in a very different way. But it does
seem we have a peculiar circumstance here where
one is in a position to do very well if this process,
which is still experimental, should succeed, and Ithink
Government would have to do some more thinkingon
this, because it has to be said to what extent they
would allow the local consumer to be more or less a
King pin in this operation.

Most of this background, if you look at the basic
price, it is all wrong. Obviously they do not plan to
produce evaporated milk from fresh milk, otherwise
this would not be the price, and if the milk plant is
using powdered milk- and I am sure this is not what
the Government wanted- we have all been taken for a
ride. Get the kind of project which we can accept
as my colleague mentioned. Unless you get holdof the
little tin which sells for 150 you really cannot get good
evaporated milk.


SENATOR W. W. BLACKMAN: I think two Sena-
tors have said that people are saying thatthe evapo-
rated milk is bad. I am in the fortunate position to
know that it is bad, andthe Hon. Senator Walcott said
that people have to return the milk to the source. It
is disgusting every time one has to go back with a tin
of milk, therefore it seems to me that this milk is
only being made to increase the cost of living to the
people. Senator Barrow has said exactly what I was
thinking; we never thought that the milk plant would
produce milk from the powered milk. We thought that
we were getting evaporated milk from fresh cow's
milk, and I understand that recently the dairy has cur -
tailed the fresh milk from the producers. They could
take our milk and make the evaporated milk that we


~L_











want instead of taking powered milk from New Zea-
land to increase the cost to us.

Another thing too, after the dairy found out that
they could not produce evaporated milk in the small
tins at a reasonable price I do not see the purpose
in importing this tinned milkwhen we have been im-
porting this milk at a cheaper price. Senator Mapp
said that the people buy these small tins because they
were cheaper. We were getting small tins at a cheaper
price before, but we have to take the small tins be-
cause the large ones are no good. Ithink that I agree
with what Senator Walcott has said, that the Govern-
ment should go into this matter as quickly as possible
because it is protecting people and people should get
the kind of milk that they expect and the kind of milk
that they are paying for.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, I am sorry that the Senator who asked
the question on this is not in his seat. I am doubly
sorry because I am not inpossession of the informa-
tion he wishes; that would take certainly some time
but I can say this, that had the Barbados Dairies
Ltd. soon after acquiring enterprise status got enact-
ed in their favour and an order made last year, it
would have covered precisely the same matters
covered as in these supplies for which we are seek-
ing the money to pay the refund on.
These are the things that have been imported
free of duty so this amount which this Chamber is
being asked to vote to cover the refund to the com-
pany would include all these supplies which are
needed. However, things have been said on both sides
of this table with respect to the way in which the af-
fairs of the milk plant are carried on; I do not have
that intimate information which a certain Senator
professes to have I am not saying that the Govern-
ment does not but I do not profess to have that
kind of intimate information with respect to the
work of the milk plant. At the same time, I can say
that there have frequently been complaints about
the quality of the milk which has been produced;
there is no use denying that. I myself have no com-
plaints whatever, I use the pasteurized milk, and
never in all the time I have been using it have I got
a bad tin.

On the other hand, this plant has been undergo-
ing certain difficulties. There are, perhaps more
than usual. There have been clashing of personalities,
and all these have been the subject of enquiries by
Government, matters of very grave concern indeed,
not only to the Ministry which was referred to by a
Senator on that side of the table, but to the Cabinet
itself and I can assure members that there is some
solicitude for the welfare of the people of this country
and the good name of the Government, that-Govern-
ment itself is not unaware of the problem and is not
sitting down with its hands folded and is not concerned
about the necessity for taking steps in order to re-
medy the situation.

What lines we should proceed along is a matter
which is not readily known. One member suggests a
milk board, another says no milk board. One mem-


ber says co-operation. Senator Walcott says he
thought that the concern would run better if the
milk is sent out in pint cartons I do not know
whether this aspect: would seem to be a reasonable
solution, although so far as I can see from the super-
market at which I shop there is no dearth of people
who are willing to buy the two-pint cartons although
that does not mean that a lot more people would not
buy the pint cartons if they could get them.

This matter has been gone into by the company
itself, and the question of economics is involved. How
many of these pint cartons it is expected to be put
on the market during the next two months? Without
denying that there is probably a demand for milk
in one pint cartons I would not like members to
rush to the conclusion that the company did not con-
sider the feasibliity of sending out one-pint cartons
and did not decide which was better in the circum-
stances. The decision was to start off on two-pint
cartons.I am not saying that they did not consider it,
and they must be given the credit of trying to do the
best for everyone concerned.

I do not want to bore Hon. members with the
detailed analysis which they have attempted on some
of the operations of the company. This after all should
not be inthe absence of fuller knowledge on both sides
of the table; this should not be termed as a full-
fledged debate on the processing and the manage-
ment of the milk plant; that may come at a later
date. It may be necessary to do that if some enquiry
at some time is set up by Government of which I
can say nothing bu. I do want to assure members
that I appreciate the spirit in which their analysis
was made, and that without in any way rejecting any-
thing that they have said, I would like to assure,
them too that Government is aware of the problem
and that Government is seeking means to deal with
it. After all, we have a responsibility to the public;
and that responsibility must consequently be dis-
charged.

I do not think that sufficient emphasis was placed
by those who criticised the plant on the fact that it is
a private limited liability company. The Government
does not own it. Do not get the idea that the Govern-
ment has a controlling share interest in the plant. It
is just like any other private company with company
directors and the Government holding a certain num-
ber of shares.
The Barbados Dairies Industry is not a Govern-
ment company and it is not controlled or owned by
the Government, and the sooner this is known the
better. It will be appreciated therefore that as in the
case of all pioneer industries the Government's role
is rather limited. In certain circumstances what
can the Government do except take drastic action?

The Government is seriously concerned, but it is
in the context of Government's policy on diversifica-
tion; and the Government has got to take steps to see'
that people who are encouraged and persuaded to,
keep cows are not left holding the milk. That is the
Government's responsibility and the Government is
going to see eventually that something is done.












Do not let it be thought as some people seem to
walk around fooling people that this is the Govern-
ment's milk plant. I repeat, Government has got to
consider the question in the broad light of divers -
fication. Where farmers and planters have already
invested thousand of dollars in producing milk the
Government has got to consider it in the light of see-
ing that these farmers are not left holding the bag.
Government has to approach it in a broad, states-
manlike manner. The whole policy of the Government
on agriculture is involved.
The question that the Resolution be concurred.
was put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No. 7

The President called the second Order-AReso-
lution to place the sum of $3,000 at the disposal of the
Government to supplement the Estimates, 1967-68
Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary Es-
timates, 1967-68 No. 7 which forms the Schedule to
the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGH..N:
Mr. President, This Resolution is for what I think
every member would consider a reputable object. It is
to vote $3,000 to the Barbados Olympic Association
to help meet the expenses of sending a contingent to
the Pan American Games to be held in Canada be-
tween July 23rd and August 7th in Winnipeg.

Now, Sir, four years ago at the Pan American
Games held in Brazil, the Barbados Association sent
a team of eight men six competitors and two
officials. This time it is proposed to send a team of
16 persons 12 competitors and four officials. At
the last games they won fhr ee bro'-re medals in
athletics. On this occasion they wonthree of a lighter
but more precious metal.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. ,President, In seconding the motion Iwould
like to say that even .though the Government is
prepared to support these things, the Government
will not go on indefinitely taking up money at the last
minute to send these teams abroad.

The Government is concerned with the good
name of Barbados, but it is also true that God helps
those who help themselves. I want to warn these
associations that when they have overseas tours it
is their duty to see at an early stage that they begin
raising funds by whatever means they consider reas -
onable. It must be only in the last resort when they
can satisfy the Government that their efforts have
been the maximum and they have not reached the
amount they anticipated it would cost that they should
approach the Government for aid.

Whatever criticism the Government may even-
tually run into fromany organisation, the Government
will not give them the taxpayers' money if they do
not hold dances, drives and other forms of fund
raising for the purpose of sending their teams abroad.


That does not mean that the Government is not
concerned about projecting the image of Barbados
abroad. I want to take the opportunity of telling the
commercial people in Barbados that they have an
important part to play in underwriting these things.
In other countries business communities underwrite
boxing tournaments, football matches and other forms
of sport.

I think that in this nation it is a good field in
which the mercantile community, the sugar pro-
ducers and the other wealthy organizations could show
their love for the country by promoting sport and
underwriting such tournaments as are likely to bring
out the best in the youth of Barbados.

SENATOR F.L.WALCOTT: Mr. President,--
I have extremely strong views on these matters.
I was going to ask on what basis does that Government
provide assistance for these organisations.I say that
because many of these organizations are amorphous'
in character,but use names like the Barbados
Olympic Association.

When games like the PanAmericam Games come
up they whip up public enthusiasm showing how some -
one may get a silver medal or a bronze medal and
they try to get public support. The people who run
these organizations do not attempt to put them on a
sound and viable footing. They do not utilise the
methods used in bigger countries.

I feel that in Barbados, the Government for ex-
ample does not make the same contribution to these
things as do the Governments of Jamaica and Trin-
idad, not even where serious matters are concerned.
There was a conference to which the Government
made no contribution but someone happened to be
there. In things like sport it is felt that you cannot
entertain in these requests because you will be pre-
venting someone from coming back to the shores of
Barbados as a hero.

I feel that it is time that the oragnisations them-
selves put themselves in a position to assist in these
things, so that it does not appear' that at the last
moment they are coming and asking for money. I have
been a sportsman all my life and I will make my own
analysis. Many of these organizations do not even
want to tax their members at the local level to make
them realise that if you are indulging: in a game you
must make some contributions. Many of these organ-
isations are not run on a business-like basis. I join
with the Attorney-General and I am gladto see some-
one inside the Cabinet saying what he did.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A. VAUGHAN:
As far as the point made by Senator Smith is concern- -
ed, for my part I do not think it was necessary be-
cause as far as I am concerned the managers of these
associations are not unaware of the fact that the view
expressed this afternoon is not that of a single'mem-
ber of the Government, but of the whole Cabinet. The
point has been well taken, but it has been already
communicated to them as I understand.












The problem, however, seems to stem from the
evasion of responsibility by the management of these
organizations and from not having some sort of organ -
ised control of all aspects of sport inthe Island. It
may be that the suggestions made outside this Cham-
ber that there should be a central sports organisation
which will have overall control of these organizations
and organise various activities is a good suggestion.

There in one other point. The Senator spoke about
or rather implied that there is a principle on which
these grants are made.There is no fixed principle
that will apply to every organisation any time it
makes an application. Every application is taken on
its merits.

In this particular case this particular organisa-
tion wanted much more than the Government agree
to give. It has been cut down by at least one third.
The Government did not just accede to their request. It
was scrutinised and cut down.

The question that the Resolution be concurred
in was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SHORT ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F.G.
Smith, the Senate adjourned at 4.20 p.m. for 20
minutes.

RESUMPTION

On the resumption;

The President called the third Order A Res-
oluion to place the sum of $3,500 at the disposal of
the Government to supplement the Estimates, 1967-
68 Part 1 Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimates, 1967-68 No. 8 which forms the Schedule
to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, The sum asked for in this Resolu-
tion, as members will see, is to provide $3,500 to
complete payments in connection with the acquisition
of the Richard B. Moore Library. During the last
session the sum of $4,420 was provided to meet the
incidental expenses and the cost of bringing this
Library to the island; but of that amount only $920 was
spent by the end of the financial year. It is now nec-
essary to have this sum of $ 3,500.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C.L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT (GENERAL)
(AMENDMENT) NO.9 ORDER, 1967

The President called the fourth Order A Re-
solution to give effect to the Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) (No. 9) Order, 1967.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A.VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, This Resolution seeks the approval
of this Order which would provide for adjustments
and the increases in the Government establishment.
If members will turn to the Order they will see the
proposed changes in the staff complement of the Ser-
vice Commissions' Department. On page 2 of the
Addendum they will see that there is a proposed
increase in staff in the Establishments Division,
Prime Ministers' Office, in the Ministry of Home
Affairs and in the Department of Inland Revenue. The
total estimated cost is $36,630.

It has been necessary to have certain changes of
staff in the Establishments Division of the Service
Commissions' Department. I must say that the note
dealing with that is admirably worded and is very
comprehensive.

-One of the important additions is to be found in the
Department of Inland Revenue where two additional
posts one of Deputy Commissioner at a salary of
$9,600 a year and the other one Senior Accountant at
a salary of $6,120 rising to $7,320 are provided
for. There again there is no need to add to what the
note says.

Anyone who has gone into that department and
seen the files which the Commissioner has to deal
with will appreciate his need of assistance. The De-
pu-y Commissioner is expected to relieve him of
personnel and training matters and much of the
major administrative functions.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.


RESOLUTION TO APPROVE SUPPLEMENTARY
ESTIMATES OF THE PORT DEPARTMENT

The President called the fifth Order A Reso -
lution to approve under Section 10 of the Barbados
Harbours Act, 1960, the expenditure of $22,000 re-
quired to supplement the Estimates of the Port De-
partment for the year 1967-68 as shown inthe Sche-
dule to the Resolution.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President This Resolution has become nec-
essary because no provision was made in the Current
Estimates to cover contributions under the National
Insurance Scheme in respect of the Port Department.,
As everyone knows, this is a self accounting depart-
ment, and it is necessary to make separate provision
to cover these contributions. Of this sum 50 per cent
represent the employers' contribution and is re-
coverable.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion,













The Government is confident that the matter will
be investigated with care, patience andthoroughness
and with an absolute lack of bias which are the ne-
cessaryprerequisites for a man's being appointed to
the Bench of the High Court of Barbados.

That, Sir, lis the pivotof the whole Bill. Of course
there is nothinglin the lawto prevent people who pre-
viously had been assessors from comingto court and
giving of their expert knowledge. They can go before
the court as expert witnesses, and as my friend and
colleague will tell this Chamber, when an expert is
called to give that sort of evidence the interests of
both sides are adequately protected.The interest of the
owner of the land will be put before the court if he
chooses to call them.iThere is the derogation of the
rights of the owner of the land as a result of the pro -
cedure proposed to be adopted by this Bill.

There are some other provisions which are large -
ly consequential. There is,however,one other matter
which is not consequential and with which I will deal.
That is with respect to the provision by which if the
Government acquires land compulsorily but no long-
er requires it for the purpose for which it was re-
quired shall pass it back to the person from whom it
was acquired.

That provision was put in the law in the days
when the idea or principle of property rights were
not exclusive of consideration. If the Government
acquires land, it is the Government's land.

There are certain matters referred to in the
second Schedule which are of interest to lawyers. I
do not thinkthat I need worry members of this Cham-
ber with any exposition on those provisions.

I hope Sir, that Ihave pointed out with sufficient
clarity the real object of this Bill. I hope that I have
also indicated well enough the ancillary provisions
which it seeks to have translated into the law.


I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator F.C. CAREW seconded the motion.
SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, The
processes of arriving at a fair price for land com-
pulsorily acquiredhave always been complicated, and
in a small community are rendered more difficult by
the fact that everybody knows everybody else and the
idea that once it is Government, Government can be
taken for a ride. I know that from experience.


We agree that the Government should find means
of rationalising and simplifying the procedure and
seeing that members of the community are paid just
and equitable prices for land acquired; but apart
from simplifying the procedure, the fact is how
far does this Bill go to acheive those objectives.

I hope that my interpretation is correct. There
are three procedures; by arbitrators,by a judge sit-
ting with assessers,or a judge sitting alone.


At the present moment it seems that one of the
procedures that will be adopted is that of a judge
sitting alone. We are narrowing it down, according to
this Bill to a judge sitting alone. Whether that will
achieve the objective sought for is left to be seen.

We know from experience that these matters
are always very difficult. Under the Town and Coun-
try Planning Act in Britain there are complications.
Of course the simplest thing to do would be to nationa-
lise land. That would be the simplest way of getting
away from the complex question of arbitration. That,
however, is another question with which we are not
now dealing.

Take one judge sitting alone. Let us admit that
in our present circumstances it is still an onerous
task to put on a single individual whether he is a
judge or not. You are not dealing with a case of a
judge assessing a particular case on the evidence
put before him, whether he should convict or acquit
or whether a $50 fine would be adequate.

Anyone who reads the Sunday Times will seel
where a distinguished lawyer has been questioning
the decisions of magistrates in traffic offences in Eng-
land. You do not get that kind of thing in Barbados
because people are afraid. Even in these less com-
plicated cases you cannot possibly arrive at a ver-
dict that everyone thinks fit.

I am not saying that the judge will not be fair;
but he will have to adjudicate between two sides. If
he is fair he will not necessarily saythat the Govern-
ment is right or that the owner is right. It is on the
question of judging what is right that he will be given
a headache.

I do not see why any surprised reaction should
come from the legal gentlemen on the other side. I
have so much respect for judges that I hope never
to have to go before them. However, I am hoping that
the proposed procedure works out well.

I know the complications.When we were in the
Government we appointed assessors some of whom
even went higher than the price which the owner of the
land was asking. I do not believe that this amend-
ment is necessary. I believe that there will still be
difficulties. I do not believe that a judge having to
give a decision based on what he has heard from
witnesses is good enough. I do not believe that the
Judge having the onums on him would necessarily
be assisted in the way that he would like to be.

I do not know if the present Chief Justice has
been consulted, although I suppose that out of courtesy
the Government would have consulted him.

I do not want to touch at this stage on the next
Bill before the Senate, but the Bill now before us
and the. Town and Country Planning Act have a close
relationship, although they are not bound up one with
the other. I would like to see a comprehensive bit of
legislation come down so that we can have a broad
view of this matter. As I have said, the relationship
of one Act to the other is very close and it would
be interesting to see what would happen.












generally, I do not oppose the Bill. I was just
throwing out the suggestion that this is a difficult
procedure.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, could
I be infomed whether this Bill has passed the Other
Place? It would not appear so from the copy in my
possession which: is not signed by the Speaker.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Mr. Clerk, Senator Alkins
wants assurance from you that this Bill has passed
the Other Place and has received the signature of the
Speaker, It is not so printed.

CLERK: This is perhaps a printer's error; I
have the original copy signed by the Speaker.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Perhaps the fault is
mine for not! having read the original Act, but like
the speaker who has just spoken, I find it a little
difficult to understand why it is necessary to bring
down a special Act. There are three different methods
available[ The Hon. Minister said that the first two
were unsatisfactory. I was sorry that he had not
elaborated a bit on that, but as I see it the third is
still available. Why is it necessary to bring a special
Act to introduce a procedure which is already and
still available? Could I be advised on that point by
the hon. Minister; why is it necessary to make a
special Act to institute one method which is already
available under the existing Act?
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Under the existing law, Sir, there are three methods,
any one of which may be adopted. The parties may
either agree on method (a), (b) or (c), or one may
favour one of these methods and the otherparty may
favour another, and that would mean a rather pro-
longed exercise; this does away with that, it simply
limits it to the -method we are bringing now. We
,are not bringing something new to the law, we are
simply so amending the law as to include the pos-
sibility of using the other method because it has so
far proven unsatisfactory.

Senator Mapp, who is an ex-Minister himself,
saidthathe knows thatwhen people's landis acquired
compulsorily, they think that because the Govern-nent
wants the land they can get it, and that is so. We
cannot allow people to send up the value of land at a
fictitious level, or as so often happens where you
have two assessors or two arbitrators when one
values the land at $x and the other puts the value at
$1,000 and then the poor judge has to scratch his
head to find some sort of figure which is not as low
as $x or as absurd as $1,000. In other words, you
will ensure by the restricted method that the whole
problem of the valuation of any portion of land ac-
quired compulsorily by Government would be
approached in a different manner, a calm state, sound
and impartial. There is no question oftrying this or
that alternative.,He mu., be simply concernedwith the
evidence that is bef i ce him to give a clear and balan-
ced decision.
I think that answers the point that Senator Mapp
appeared to be making, but I do not quite appreciate
one half of what he said. I do not mean that it was not


properly said perhaps I did not grasp it thoroughly,
but I understood him to say that to put the burden upon
the most experienced and learned judge he could not
possibly do justice to it.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order. I
never said he could not possibly do justice; he could
not reasonably do justice to Government alone, and he
also has to be just to all sides, and that is very dif-
ficult.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
I accept the Senator's explanation but all that means
is that in this case the judge has to apply his mind
forcibly and as fairly and as fully as he knows how.
It is no more difficult than trying a murder case, no
more difficult than a damage suit, the principles are
well known, and over and above that is this, that the
learned Chief Justice himself has no hesitationwhat-
ever in accepting the principle,and accepting the pro -
cedure of this Bill, and he has no fear that his bro-
the :s on the bench would be able to deal as fairly and
as fully as he himself. We are protected all round;
Government is protected, the public is protected.
They are protected from people who want to make a
profit on the Government, they are protected on all
sides.
SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: That clears up the point
I made I understand that this is necessary, but I
would like to be sure about one thing. I take it the'
principle of assessing the value of land is highly
technical and a very complex subject and it calls for
a little m-re than a judge summing up the pros and
cons, and I want to be assuredthat any person whose
land is being acquiredhas the right to produce the as-
sessors of his land as expert witnesses and give evi-
dence on his behalf.



SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Yes.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH: Mr.
President, I think you will appreciate that land valu-
ation is not just a question for any fly-by-night man
who can buy a piece of land and sell it. So it has
reached the stage where we have to try to get away
from the situation where some person- some land
shark- asks a price beyond all reason because he is
dealing with Government; and Government would call
in a qualified land surveyor, a qualified valuer,who
can be questioned by the either side, and each side
will have the right to test the ability of the expertise
of the person who is called, and the judge sitting there
to hear all these things to help him. But I want it to
be understood that when he sits down and listens to the
evidence, from that he will be able to assess what is
a reasonable price for the land, bearing in mind that
the Constitution guarantees to every citizen that his
land cannot be taken away without a fair transaction.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, I am
glad the Hon. Attorney General has spoken, because
in fact the initial problem which probably led to some
misunderstanding would have been made if the Attor-










ney General had not spoken. Because on this side we
do feel that to have a judge make a decision is not the
best possible arrangement. What on our side we are
concerned about is why the original system was found
to be unsatisfactory. We have a right to know and I
think that what the Attorney General has just said,
has put the matter in very good light.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. A. Phillips in the Chair.

The Clauses of the Bill were called and passed.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, it was agreed that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair, and
the passing of the Bill was reported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Bill was read a third time and passed.

A BILL TO AMEND THE TOWN AND COUNTRY
DEVELOPMENT PLANNING (INTERIM
CONTROL) ACT, 1959

His Honour the President called the twelfth
Order.

A Bill to amend the Town and Country Develop-
ment Planning (Interim Control) Act, 1959 to extend
its duration for a further period of one year from the
9th July, 1967.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, this is the sort of Bill which is done
annually -- year after year to continue in force,
the Town and Country Planning Act. At the same time,
there is on the Statute book another Act which has
verygreat importance on the 1959 Act but which has
not yet been proclaimed. This is the Act Senator
Mapp asked about when he was speaking on the last
Bill.

The reason why that Act was not proclaimed is
because the last Town and Country Planning Officer
undertook, and indeed volunteered since it is a tech-
nical matter, to do because he had expert experience
to make certain regulations under the 1965 Act. That
exercise has not yet been carried out and the neces -
sity has also arisen for certain amendments to that
1965 Act.

I t is hoped soon to finalise those two exercises
and inasmuch as we have very experienced and
outstanding lawyers, until the amendment has been
completed and brought before Parliament and is
agreed to by the two Chambers, and until the regula-
tions under that Act have been passed, and we have


the Act Proclaimed, the only thing to do is to ask.
hon. Members to agree to this Bill. I move that this
Bill be read a second time.

SENATOR C.L. BRATHWAITE: I beg to second
that.
SENATOR D.A. WILES: Iam sure we are all very
pleased to hear that steps are being taken to stop this
annual passing of one Bill to continue with something
that could be done at one time and in one Act. This
afternoon we have heard of projecting the image of
Barbados very far away in this Act and there appears
to be provisions which would assist us inpreserving
the image of Barbados on time, and time is not on
our side.
SENATOR N.A. BARROW: Mr. President ,there
are one or two points which I just want to mention.
I am not referring to the change in office of the Head
of the Department, but there is one practice which I
think we ought to change because ithas caused quite
a lot of discontent since the office has been establish-
ed, and that is the practice of employees in the office
drawing plans.

This has been the problem which people have
been complaining about on the ground that if they
get somebody else to do the plan for them at a
reasonable price,unless they have the right line they
were not sure that their plans would get anywhere.
I think this springs, unfortunately, from a little bit
of over-indulgence on the part of Government where
employees are coanerned. You may have to try and
see that Civil Servants do during working hours the
work for which they are paid as Civil Servants. If a
Permanent Secretary gets away with it, then the chap
in the Town and Country Planning Office gets away
with it in the same maumer.

I just want to draw this to the Government's at-
tention.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, I must
thank the Hon. Minister for explaining the delay in pro-
claiming the Act which was passed as far back as 1965.
I have had a lot to do with this particular Department
when it first came into force, and from my experience
I would like to tell the Government that they are going
to meet with very much difficulty unless they fix a
proper salary you cannot get skilled officers unless
you offer the right type of salary.
We were very fortunate in getting a qualified
person of the calibre we got Mr. Stevens, who was
the first Town and Country Planning Officer. It so
happened that Mr. Stevens was a very highly placed
officer in the Colonial Office,and there are certain
Senators who would bear me out and tell the Senate
that we tried all round the West Indies and a highly
qualified officer from Guyana hinted that he would
come to Barbados and whenwe advertised the post, at
the same time Guyana Government jumpedthe salary
above ours and kept him there. In other words, the
demand for these officers is high, and therefore you
have to pay an attractive salary to get the right type
of person.

I am not astonished at the delay that has occurred,
I think the hon. Minister hinted that there was some












delay in drafting the regulations and so on. I take it,
Sir, that the point is that those regulations are still
to be drafted before the Act can be proclaimed. My
point is that you will find very poor regulations un-
less you have a really top class person to put in the
job; Barbados was fortunate and it may not be so
fortunate in the future.

I knowwhat my colleague has said, the difficulties
and rumors going around are perfectly true. You can
make enquiries on your own and accept what the Head
of Department tells you; unless you carry on your own
private spy staff you will not get the truth. I do not
know if the Government has had applications for more
staff. In my opinion for a long time the Department
has been understaffed and I understand that represent -
tations have been made to Government for more staff
and those representations were not always favoured.
I am not saying that it is only now that the Head of
Department wanted staff that he thought necessary and
could not get it, but lam sayingthat a reason for a lot
of the delay in matters in this island comes from the
fact that that Department is understaffed at the bot-
tom, and Ifeel it is very very important for the Gov-
ernment to realise that there are a lot of delays on
the part of that Department, because it certainly
holds up a lot of building.

I have heard some complaints myself, and on the
surface I really could not understand why it should
happen, but I think that unless the Government pays
some attention to this matter of gettingthe right per-
son at the top we are still at the teething stage; we
have to get the main Act in force. It gave us a lot of
work since 1960. The fact that it is not proclaimed
means that something is wrong and until you get it
proclaimed you are going to get every delay because
the machinery for staff adjustment is simply not there.
It is not adequate until you proclaim that Act, and
I feel that they have to be prepared to pay the requis -
ite salary to attract qualified personnel for that De-
partment and then you will get something done and
you will be able to go forward much quicker.

SENATOR W.W. BLACKMAN: Mr. President,--
It seems to mp that certain allegations are being made
about the Town and Country Planning Office. I do not
thinkthat such remarks should be made by Senator
,Mapp if we are not sure that they are true. I feel that
if any member of the public feels that there is mis -
conduct on the part of the Town and Country Planning
Department or any other part of the Government I
think that it should be reported to the appropriate au-
thority, rather than make allegations against hard
working people.

SENATOR R.G. MAPP: On a point of order. I
hope that Senator Blackman is not accusing me of
making allegations aganist anyone.

SENATOR R.B.CADDLE: Mr. President, -- I
feel that a lot of trouble stems from the fact the many
people in Barbados are not aware of what Town and
Country Planning means and what it sets out to
achieve.


At last year's convention of the party a Reso-
lution was passed calling on the Government'to start
an inquiry into the operations of the Town and Coun-
try Planning Office. I feel that in Barbados there
should be more education about this matter so that
people should know when their rights are being in-
terferredwith. The people should be taught what are
their rights and responsibilities.

We have to have some sort of planning in this
country. When we look at Bridgetown we must realise
that people built as they saw fit. As I have said, there
is need for Town and Country Planning and.for educa-
ing the people as to what is involved.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 3, of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.
The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumedthe Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A
Vaughan, seconded by Senator C.L.Brathwaite, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO PROVIDE FOR PREPARATION AND
PUBLICATION OF NEW EDITION OF
THE LAWS
The President called the thirteenth Order A
Bill to make provision for the preparation and publi-
cation of a new edition of the Laws of Barbados and
for the maintenance of the Laws of Barbados on a
cumulative basis.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, The object of this Bill is to authorise
the publication of the revised edition of the laws in the
form of a loose-leaf edition and to make provision
for certain other matters connected therewith.

I refer members particularly to Clause 3 (1).
As I have said it will be a loose-leaf edition so that
you can take out particular Acts when they become
obsolete and insert new Acts and so keep your edition
up to date.

The provision for having this loose-leaf edition
is in Clause 3 (5). Clause 8 sets out clearly and de-
finitely the functions and powers of the Commission-
ers whose appointment is provided for in Clause 6.
Then there is Clause 11 (3) (c) which provides that the
Commissioners shall cause one such copy to be de-
livered to the Governor-General,to the Clerk of the
Senate, etc.












Clause 13 deals with the appointment of a Law
Revision Commissioner by the Governor-General.


Part IV leals with one of the most difficult parts,
that is the revision of subsidiary laws. For that exer-
cise the same functions and powers of the Commis -
sioners as provided for by Clause 8 apply to the revi-
sion of subsidiary laws.

Those, Sir, are the main provisions of the Bill.
It is one of those things which is long overdue.
Every lawyer knows the difficulty one encounters
putting his finger on some particular Act or Acts or
bit of subsidiary legislation.

It is a long time since we have had a revision
of the laws. In some instances where amendments
are available they make a terrible patchwork of the
Parent Act. You have to go over them minutely to
see that you have not left out anything. All the
amendments may not have been done by the same
draftsman, and the result is that there may seem
to be inconsistencies in the law. That is said, not to
run down any draftsman. I have the greatest respect
for them. I am only saying what sometimes occurs.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be reada second time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE F. G. SMITH:
Mr. President, In seconding the motion I would
like to pay tribute tomypredecessor, because this
exercise started away back in 1959. I am glad to see
that in my tenure of office something has been done,
not because I have done anything myself, but becuase
of the work of my predecessor.

We have had the assistance of Professor Roy
Marshall, a Barbados scholar, and one who has al-
ways retainedhis interest inthe area. We have also
had the service of Professor Paget and I think that
Barbados in the years to come will owe a debt of
gratitude to them for the sterling hard work they
putlin.

We will have in due course to tackle the sub-
sidiary, laws. I must tell the Senate that they can-
not expect to see these laws before another fifteen
to eighteen months. You have got to appoint the
Commissioners and every single law will have to be
gone through. Next week we hope to send before
the Other Place a Bill to repeal 338 laws which
will not be included in the revision. The Commission-
ers will have to read every proof of every law.

That, Sir, will give some idea of the magnitude
of the task and the reasons for the long delay.
It is very important I that we in Barbados should
have an up to date system of law. I think that this
exercise is the only one of its kind in the Caribbean
at the present time. We will have a good argument
to put forward when the question of the Law Facul-
ty comes up. There will be a copy of revised laws
in the Chambers so that members will have an up
to date copy of the laws.


The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 10 of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.

Clause 11 was called.

SENATOR D. A. WILES: Mr. President, I
think that there are two other institutions that should
receive copies of the revised laws. One is the Pub-
lic Library and the other is the Library of the Un-
iversity of the West Indies. It would not be a good
thing if the Law Faculty of UWI comes to Barbados
and there is no bound copy of the revised laws in the
library of the UWI.


I therefore
follows:


move that Clause 11 be amended as


(I) by deleting the word "seven" in
line 1 of subsection (3) (a) and sub-
stituting therefore the word "nine"
(II) by inserting the words"to the Pub-
lic Librarian, to the Librarian of
the University of the West Indies,"
immediately after the word "Com-
mission" appearing in subsection
(3) (c).

Senator H. F. Alkins seconded the motion.

The question that Clause 11 be amended as prop
posed was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that Clause 11 as amended stand
part of the Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

Clauses 12 to 26 were called and passedwithout
debate.

The Schedule was called.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.

Senator F. C. H. Carew seconded the motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of the
Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Bill was read a third time and passed.











PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS




BILL TO INCORPORATE FAMILY PLANNING
ASSOCIATION


The President called the fourteenth Order A
Bill to incorporate the Barbados Family Planning
Association.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, -Acopy
of the Bill has only just reached me and I am asking
leave to postpone further consideration of the Bill.

There being no objection leave was granted.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F. G.
Smith, the Senate adjourned at 6.55 p.m.





Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 13
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 17 dated 27th February, 1969.


S.I. 1969 No. 32
The Barbados Harbours Act, 1960 (1960-29)

THE BARBADOS I1ARBOURS (AMENDMENT) (No. 2)
REGULATIONS, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 53 of the Barbados Harbours Act,
1960 hereby makes the following regulations:-
1. These Regulations may be cited as the Bar-
bados Harbours (Amendment) (No. 2) Re
1969. o/J
2. Regulation 122 of the Bar'as Harbours
Regulations, 1961 (in these regulations referred to
as the principal Regulations) is hereby a nde1b cylS`9 m
inserting immediately after the pro *so thereto the
following proviso -\
"Provided also that nothing in th gu ion
shall be held to apply to cargo stages o
gangways when exclusively used for the processes."

3. The principal Regulations are hereby amended
by inserting immediately after regulation 125 the
following regulation as regulation 125A -


125A. When a ladder is to be used in the hold
of a ship which is not decked it shall be the
duty of the contractor undertaking the pro-
cesses to provide a ladder equipped at the
top with hooks or with other means for firmly
securing it."
4. The principal Regulations are hereby amended
by inserting immediately after regulation 137 the
/ following regulation as regulation 137A -

3zg 2Zi

^;22S


"Ladders for
use in hold to
be equipped
with hooks etc.







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


"Motors, cog-
wheels and
other dangerous
apparatus to be
fenced.


137A. All motors, cog-wheels, chain and
friction gearing, shafting, live electric con-
ductors and steam pipes shall (unless it can
be shown that by their position and construc-
tion they are equally safe to every person
employed as they would be if securely fenced)
be securely fenced so far as is practicable
without impeding the safe working of the
ship."


5. The principal Regulations
by inserting immediately after
following as regulations 145A,


are hereby amended
regulation 145 the
145B and 145C -


145A. (1) Every regular approach over a dock
wharf or quay which persons employed have to
use for going to or from a working place at
which the processes are carried on and every
such working place on shore shall be main-
tained with due regard to the safety of the
persons employed.

(2) Every such working place on shore
and any dangerous parts- of any approach to
any such place from the nearest highway shall
be safely and sufficiently lighted.

(3) In particular, so far as is practicable
having regard to the traffic and working -

(a) all dangerous parts of such ap-
proaches and working places in-
cluding dangerous breaks,
corners and edges shall be
securely fenced so that the
height of the fence shall not be
less than two feet six inches;


"Safety mea-
sures relating
to approaches
over docks,
wharves and
quays.








STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


(b) dangerous footways over
bridges, caissons, and dock
gates shall be securely fenced
so that the height of the fence
shall not be less than two feet
six inches on each side and the
fencing shall be continued at
each end of such footway for a
sufficient distance not exceeding
five yards.

145B. Provision for the rescue from drowning
of persons employed shall be made and main-
tained, and shall include:-

(a) A supply of life-saving appliances,
kept in readiness on the wharf
or quay, which shall be rea-
sonably adequate having regard
to all the circumstances.


Provision for
rescue from
drowning and
life saving
appliances, etc.


(b) Means at or near the surface of
the water at reasonable inter-
vals, for enabling a person
immersed to support himself or
escape from the water, which
shall be reasonably adequate
having regard to all the cir-
cumstances.


145C. (1) A sufficient number of first-aid
boxes or cupboards shall be provided at every
working place and, if more than one is pro-
vided, at reasonable distances from each
other.

(2) A first-aid box or cupboard shall be
marked plainly with a white cross on a red
ground.


Provision of
first-aid boxes
or cupboards.







4 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


"Safety appara-
tus not to be
removed except
under authority
or in case of
necessity.


(3) Nothing except appliances or requi-
sites for first-aid shall be kept in a first-aid
box or cupboard.

(4) A first-aid box or cupboard shall be
kept stocked and in good order and shall be
placed under the charge of a responsible per-
son who shall always be readily available
during working hours. Such person shall be a
person trained in first-aid."

6. Regulation 148 of the principal Regulations is
hereby amended by adding immediately after paragraph
(3) thereof the following as paragraph (4) -

"(4) All other openings in a deck accessi-
ble to any person employed and not in use
shall either be fenced to a height of three feet
or be securely covered."

7. The principal Regulations are hereby amended
by inserting after regulation 159 the following regula-
tion as regulation 159A:-

159A. No person shall, unless duly authorised
or in case of necessity, remove or interfere
with any fencing, gangway, gear, ladder,
hatch-covering, life-saving means or appli-
ances, lights, stages or other things what-
soever required to be provided under these
regulations. If removed, such things shall be
restored at the end of the period for which
their removal was necessary by the person
last engaged in the work that necessitated
such removal."

8. The Principal Regulations are hereby amended
by inserting after regulation 220 the following regula-
tion as regulation 220A -







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 5


"220A. Copies or summaries of Part VII of
these Regulations and of other regulations
relating to the protection of workers against
accidents shall be posted up in prominent
positions at every dock, wharf, quay or similar
place which is in frequent use for the pro-
cesses."

Made by the Minister this 13th day of February,
1969.

(Sgd.) NEVILLE W. BOXILL
Minister of Communications and Works.







6 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 33
DIRECTIONS GIVEN BY THE COMMISSIONER OF
POLICE WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE MINIS-
TER OF HOME AFFAIRS UNDER REGULATION
58A OF THE MOTOR VEHICLES AND ROAD
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS, 1952

In these directions "traffic" means the passage of
vehicles of every description, pedestrians and all
animals being ridden, driven or led.
1. On Saturday, the 1st day of March, 1969,
between the hours of 9.00 p.m. and 12.00 midnight
and on Sunday, 2nd day of March, 1969 between the
hours of 12.00 midnight and 1.00 a.m. Carrington
Private Road in the parish of St. Philip, from its
junction with Carrington's Factory Yard Road in the
said parish to its junction with Valley Field House
Road and Woodbourne Plantation Yard in the parish
of Christ Church shall be closed to all traffic except
vehicles bearing the appropriate identification mark
issued by the Barbados Rally Club.
2. All drivers and riders of vehicles, pedestrians
and drivers or riders of animals shall comply with
these directions and with any order given by a mem-
ber of the Royal Barbados Police Force in uniform

Dated this 14th day of February, 1969.

W. A. FARMER
Commissioner of Police.
Approved by the Minister of Home Affairs this
20th day of February, 1969.

P. M. GREAVES


Minister of Home Affairs.




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